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December 18, 1895. 




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Gardeners' Chronicle, J 



[December 23, 1695. 



INDEX 



OF 



CONTENTS. 



JULY TO DECEMBER, 1895. 



A 



Abekdeen University, agricultural de- 
partment in, 553 ; agricultural 
teaching in, 334 
Aberia caflra, fruitg of, 737 
Abies hybrid, 685 
Abney House, Bourne End, 240 
Abnormal .Cattley a flower*, 495 
Abraxas groasulariata, 553 
Acer Lorbergi, 586 
Achimenes lanata, 456 
Adhatoda cydonisefolia, 578 
Advertisements, old-time, 488 
iEcidium nymphseoide*, DC, 1)6,135; 

M. chenopodi?, 135 
JE rides Sanderianum, 206 
ifchchynanthus Hiidebrand ; , 324 
Africa, Aristolochia elegans in, 369 
Agave americana, flowering at Wood- 
stock House, 244 
Agaveatrovirens,544; A. Kewensis,330 

Agricultural Gazette, 332 
Agricultural returns, 524 ; teaching 

in Aberdeen University, 334 
Agriculture, railway companies and, 

493; the British Association and, 332 
Ailanthus bark, 619 

Alberta magna, 484 
Allotments, the Manchester Eiyal 
Botanic Society in regard to, 364 

Alsticemerias, 91, 687 

Amasonia erecta, 132 

Amber, English, 429 

America, fruit-growing in, 395; flora 

of North, 740; cultivation of the 

Liquorice-root in, 737 
American Apple- crop of 1895, the, 

641 ; notes, 152 
American nursery, quantity of worked 

trees te, 770 
Amphitecna nigripes, 642 
Anemone japonica, monstrous, 526 
Angora, Tragacanth and Persian berries 

in, 365 
Angrsecum pellucidum, 158 

Annuals, 608 

Anona Cherimolia, 577, 619; in Con- 
stantinople, 734, 7b7 

Anthracite coal as a manure, 73 

Anthuriums, bracteate forms of, 73 ; 
hybrid, from Ghent, 73 

Aphides on Lettuces, 526 

Apiary, the, 212 

Apios tuberosa, 501 

Apogamic Ferns, 211, 271, 305 

Aponogeton dutachyon var. Lagrangei, 

215 



Arnold, Matthew, as a lover of flower*, 

738 
Artichokes, 9, 648 

Arundina bambuscefolia, 388 
Aah,the orange-berried Mountain, 361 

Aiparagus culture, lecture on, 655 
Assimilation and respiration in vege- 
tables, 132 
Assimilation in plants, 329 

Aster corymbosus, 372 

Aster field, an English, 481; A. 

Maackii, 3^1 ; plants, failure of, 216 
Asters, China, 152; hybrid, 620; 

supposed natural hybrid, 526 
Astilbe Lamoinei, 358 
Attar of Roses, the adulteration of, 333 
Auricula, the, 643 
Australia, frozen flowers from, 682 ; 

horticulture in Western, 678 
Australian flowers, 301 ; timber, 335 
Azalea indica alba at Penrice Castle, 

129 
Azaleas at Walton Lea, Warrington, 65 



Apple, a black diseased, 685 

Apple, Ben Davis, 582 ; Blenheim 
Orange, history of, 749 ; Cox's Orange 
Pippin, 684 

Apple crop of 1895, the, 641 ; culture, 
519; fruit, second crop of, 5i6 ; 
grafts on Pear stocks, 131 ; Newton 
Wonder, 710, 746; the Spitzenberg, 
268 ; trees trained on a roof, 270 ; in 
shrubberies, 719 ; with skin black, 
620 ; with flower at side, 430 

Apples, best varieties of, 555 ; colour 
in, 556; Nova Siotian, 334 ; popular 

varieties of, 587 ; prices of, 499; in 
Normandy, glut of, 716 

Apricots from standard trees, 247 

Aquatics, cultivation of, 69 

Araucaria imbricata, 74; at Bourne- 
mouth, 217 

Arauja albens, and moth- catching, 

246; A. sericifera, 211 
Arboriculture Society, the Royal 

Scottish, 387 
Aristolochia clypeata, 484 ; A, elpgans, 

452 ; A. elegans, in Africa, 369; A. 

gigas var. Sturtevanti, 518 ; A. 

longifolia, in Hong Kong, 306; A. 
ungulifoiia, 44 
Arnold arboretum, the, 461 



B 



Bamboos and the past winter, 17; 
hardy, 186 
— Bamtros* Metake jffi 

Bananas at Hampton, 7Ufrpthe 
vation of, 240 

Bankfield, Odontoglossums at, 90 

Barbarea vulgaris, 217 

Bard, lines to a minor, 79 

Bark from Ailanthus, 619 

Baroda State Gardens, retirement of 
Mr. Henry from, 675 

Barron's, Mr., retirement, 133, 158, 161, 
1J-6. 214. 244. 246, 270. 304, 335, 
337, S71, 372, 400, 682, 712; a 
national testimonial to, 494, 526 746 

Basket, Seaseli's patent Orchid-, 748 ; 
West's improved Orchid-, 306 

Bateman's, Mr., garden, sale at, 130 

Battersea Park, Palms at, 650 

Bauhinia Galpini, 452 
Bean, the Climbing French, 246, 272, 
304, 652; kidnev, dwarf Parisian, 
167 ; the Carob, 264 
Beech, round- leaved, 18 
Begonia disease, 304, 337, 544, 586 
Begonia Gioire de Sceaux, 720; B x 
Mrs, J. H^al, 5^5; B. incompara- 
bilisX, 680, 715; the tuberous- 
rooted, 267 
Begonias at Messrs, Ware & Sons, 

~464~ ' " 

Belgium, notes from, 162, 182,298 391 
Belli* perennis, 206 ; " The Bride," 131 
Balvoir Castle, notes on the hardiness 

of some plants at, 38 
Benefit and Provident Association, 

United Horticultural, 501 
Bentley Priory, the gardens at, 556 
Berlin Industrial Exhibition, 1896, 

770 
Berlin notes, 424, 610. 708 
Berlin, the International Exhibition 

at, 45 
Bermuda Lily, 304; introduction of 

the, 271 
Bible, plants of the, 735 
Birmingham Botanical Gardens, 156 
Black Currant X Gooseberry hybrid, 

218 
Bletia Shepherdi, 154 
Bommer, the late J. E., 17 
Book-learned gardener, the, 616 

Books, Notices of-.— a Garden of 

Pleasure (E KA), 130, 215 ; Agri- 
culture, Practical and Scientific (Jos. 
Muir), 717 ; A History of Garden- 
ing in England (Hon. Alicia Am- 
herst), 733; Amateur Orchid Cul- 
tivator's Guide-Book, 2nd edition 



(ff. A. Burberry), 618; Biology 
Notes (J. Houston), 463 ; B Jtanical 
Magaz-ne, 44, 215, 429, 616, 714 ; 
Cedar of Goa (Or. M. T. Masters), 
translation of, 271 ; Dai Trocknen 
und Fiirben Natiirlicber B.uroen 
Guiier (Heimich Hein), 430; Dic- 
tionnaire Pratiq ae d'Horfciculture, 
44 341, 430; Diseases of Plants, 
(Freiherr von Tubeuf), 66; Ever- 
greens, 2nd iisue, (Patrick Geddes), 
430; Flora of Dumfriesshire (G. F. 
Scott-Elliot, and others), announced, 
650 ; Flore de ITsle de la R6anioa 
(Bourbon), (E Jacob de Coredemoy), 
736; Gardening a la Mode (Mrs. de 
Sato), 496; Guide Pratiqie del' Ama- 
teur de Fruits (Simon Louir), 553; 
Frutta Minori (Prof. A. Pucci), 131 ; 
Handbook to the Flora of Ceylon 
(Trirnen), ±30 ; Hand-list of Herba- 
ceous Plants grown in the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, 70 ; Hints on Plant- 
ing Roses (National Hose Society), 
671 ; Histoire des PJantes (Baillon), 
131 ; Honey and its Uses (Rev. S. N. 
Bancks), 462 ; Hooker's Icones 
Plantarum, 72, 716 ; Horticulturist's 
Rule Book (L. H. Baily), 131; 
Hortus Fiuminensi*, 462; In a 
Gloucestershire Garden (H. N. Ella* 

crmhe), 33; Index Kewensis, 430, 
460; Imects and Insecticides 
(C. Weed), 717; Journal of Botany, 
682; Journal of the Kew Guild, 
188; Journal of the Royal Horti- 
cultural Society, 270, 682 ; Kerner's 
Natural History of Plants, 72, 
430; Kew Bulletin, 70, 430, 458, 
459, 650, 717; Kniphof's Botanica 
in Original!, 210 ; Les Piantes Al- 
pines et des Rocailles (M. H. Corre- 
von), 244; Manual of Forestry, 72 ; 
Manures and their Application ( J¥, 
Dyke), 238 ; Mead, and how to make 
it (Rev. G. N. Bancks) A62; Mesny's 
Ciiinese Miscellany, 682 ; 0;chids : 
their Culture and Management, 2 ad 
Ed. (W. Watson), 618; Petit Atlas 
de Poche des Cdampignons Comes- 
tibles et Ven&ieux (Edible and 
Poisonous Fungi), (Paul Dumie), 
188; Pflanzan Krankheiten durch 
Kryptogamische Parasiten verur- 
sacht (Diseases of Plant*), (Freiherr 
von Tubeuf), 66; Pharmaceutical 
Journal, The, 99; Pre- historical 
Botany of the Cultivated and 
-Ui*fu* — Plant* _jof the Old 
World, founded on Ancient Relics 
((?. Buschan), 130; Rare Books and 
their Prices (W. Roberts), 770 i 
Rosarians' Year- Book for 1896, 
announced, 650 ; Roses and Rose 
Culture, 8th El, (W. Paul), 
462 ; Select Extra - Tropical 
Piants, 9&h edition (Baron F. 
von Mueller), 497; Special Manures 
for the Garden (Dr. A. B. Griffith), 

496; Synoptical Fiora of North 
America (Dr. Asa Gray, §c.) t 

618, 740; The Autocar, 716; The 
Case against Butchers' Meat ( C. W. 
Forward). 462 ; The Central African 
Planter, 771 ; The Genus Masde- 
valiia (Marquess of Lothian and Miss 
F. H. Woolward), 550 ; The History 
of Gardening in England (Hon. 
Alicia Amherst), 398,733; The Pig, 
announced (W. J. Maiden), 430; 
The Plants of the Bibie (Rev. 
Geo. Bcnslow), 735; Through the 
Copse (Uncle Matt), 131 ; Trails' 
de Culture Pota#&re (J. Dybowski), 
129; Tropical Agriculturist, The, 
244 ; Vorgeschichtliche Botanik 
der Coltur und Natzpflarj&*n der 



alten Welt auf Grund Prehis- 
toriscber Funds (Gcorg Butchan), 
130; Weather of the Past Season, 
and its Effect on the Garden (Rev* 
Canon Ellacombe), 130 

Bosahan, view in the gardens at, 214 
Botanic Gardens at Honcr Kong, the, 

306; Birmingham, 156; Calcutta, 

96; Cambridge, 518 643; Glasnevin, 

ISO; Manchester, 244; New York, 

334 
Botanic Society, the Royal, 616 
Botanical Station, a, in Central Africa, 

453 
Botanical gardens for N^w York, 130 
Botanical teaching, 294 
Botany and gardening in Harvard 

University, 177 
Botany and the American Government, 

365 
Bougainviilea Sanderiana, 463, 526 

Bouquets, appliances to diipiay, 339 

Bourbon, the flora of, 736 

British Association and Agriculture, 
the, 332; Mr. Dyer's address to 
the botanical section of the, 294; 
Botanical section of the, 328 

Browallia specicsa m* j jr, 294 

Brown, Robert, memorial to, 493 

Bruasvigia Josephine, 460 

Budding-knife, a new, 306 

Bad-growth, 246 

Balb garden, the. 454, 708 

Bulbs in water, 774 

486 



Bulbophyilum Med 

Bull's, Mr., nursery, corridor at, ltO 

Barbank, Luther, an American bvbri- 

diser, 391 
Burford, group of Cattlejas at, 428 ; 

Orchids at, 328 
Buteshire, horticultural features of 

Rothesay and, 291 
Batter-markef, and the fat from the 



Cocoa-nut, 491 



C 



Cacti, giant, at Kew, 190 

Calcutta Royal Botanic Garden*, i 6 

Californian notes, 334 

Calochortus varieties and their cul- 
ture, 14 

Cambridge Botau;c Gardens, notes 
from, 518, 643 

Campanula mirabilis, 616; C. nitida, 

335 
Camptosema erythronioides. 642 

Canada, flowers of the North-west 
Prairie in, 67 

Cannas, 106; at Chiswick, 71; im- 
proved varieties of, 293; in Italy, 
362; Italian, 703 

Carnation, the development of the, 210 

Carnation diseases, 72 

Carnation, Duke of York, and others, 

74 
Carnations, 191 ; and Picotees, 8, 644 ; 

attacked by grubs, 685, 748; at 
Eaton Hail, Chester, 371; at the 
National S:ciety's Show, 134; 
lecture on, 103 ; Marguerite seedling, 

161 
Carrot, Veitch's Scarlet Mode!, 425 
Carvopteris Mastacanthus, 486, 612, 

684 
Cassiobury Park, the gardens at, 355 
Castanea vesca. female replacing male 

flowers in, 218 
Catasetum Christyanum, 618 ; C, tabu- 

lare var, bracbyglossum, 464; C. 

tabular* var. rbinophoruai, 44 
Cat tin poisoning by the Common Yew, 

160 
Cattleya, a malformed, 705 ; C. aurea, 

454 ; C. Bowringians, 640, 672, 746; 



IV The Gardenerg' Chroniolo,] 



INDEX. 



[December 28, i8t»5. 



— 



C. Candida, 486; culture at Stand 

Hall, 454; C. Dowiana aurea, 388; 
C. elongata, 422 ; flowers, abnormal, 
495; C. Gaskeliiana,206; C. granu- 
losa, 180; C. X Hardyana, 154; C. 
Hardyana, var. Lindeni, 36; C. 
labiata, 510; C. labiate, albino 
varieties of, 762 ; C. labiata MossiaB, 
DO ; Mendeli, malformed, 35 : Mossiao, 
Linden's Champion, 188; with 
double growth, 526; G. Schilleriana 
Dalcotensis, 154; C. veiutina, 180; 
C. Warscewiczii, 360 

Cattleyas, a list of hybrid, 10; at 
Laeken, 672; group of, at Burford, 
428 

Ceanothus Gloire de Versailles, 392 

Cedar of Goa, the, 430 

Cedar of Lebanon at Tapley, 17 ; large, 
134; a large, at Baechwood Park, 

272 ; some historic, 526 ; C. Libani 

blooming out of season, 620 
Cedrns Daodara, struck by lightning, 

photo of, 218 
Cephalotaxus drupacea, 717, 747 
Ceratonia Siliqua, 264 
Cereus giganteus, 330; C. triangularis, 

421 

Ceropegia S*ndersoni,643; C.stapeliw- 

forrnis, 643 
Chelmsford, syllabus of the summer 

school of horticulture at, 361 
Chelone barbata, 188 
Chemistry, protoplasmic, 330 
Cherimolia, fruits of the, 737 
Cherry, the Lutovka, 462; Morello, 

culture, o92 ; trees, pyramidal sweet, 

74 

China Asters, 152 

China, opium and morphia in, 334 
Chinese insect- wax, 365 

Chiswick, the Royal Horticultural 
Gardens af, 233 522. 620; cost in 
maintenance, 246 272; inspecting 
committee, the, 300; new saperia* 
tendent, 586 

Chiswick Carol, e, 750 
Chiswick trials, tbe, 304, 336 371. 463 
Chiswick vegetable show, 271, 300, 307 
Chou de Barghley, 463. 556 
Christmas plants and flowers at, 742; 
Christmas Riser, 736 
Chrysanthemum Bjule d'Or *95, 493 
Chrysanthemum exhibition, the 
National, 552 

Chrysanthemum, food requirements 

of the, 181, 272, 305, 486 
Chrysanthemum Golden Weddinjr, 
643, 684; M. Chenon de L*cb6, 
683, 720; maximum and its allies, 
327; X Princess May, 295 
Chrysanthemums, about. 495, 580, 
546. 618, 652 706 ; finishing the 
bloomi of. 422; grafted on An- 
t.hemis, 688 ; in the East of London, 
553; late-flowered varieties of, 720, 
775 ; National Society's Jubilee cele- 
bration, 492 ; propagation of, 677 ; 
taking the buds of, 64 
Cider, Messrs. Gaymer & Son's 132 
Cider-making, the industry of, 130 355 
Cineraria, origin o', 17, 89. 134, 186, 
City corporation markets, 302 
Clematis Davidiana, 293, 336 ; and C. 
graveolens, 501 

Clematises as useful climbers, 303 

Clerodendron failax, 710 ; C trichoto- 
mum, 210, 642 

Climate and its influence on the 

origin of root crops, 451 
Cochliodas, 360 
Cocoa-nut, fat from, 491 
Cocos australis, fruits of, 620. 685, 737; 

C. leioipatha, 620, 685, 737 
CcElogyne cristate in a wire baiket, 45 
Colchester Roses, 22 
Collector, an Orchid, 335 
Collinson, Peter, 5, 36, 
Collooney, hardy plants at, 642 
Colonial notes, 8 68, 456 74 J 
Colour in butterflies,' 682' 
Colours in flower*, 744, 748 
Compasses, Low's ground-, 218 
Conservatories, grouping for effect in, 

—Jo 

Convolyulu* macrostegius, 405 



Coombe Court, Kingston-on-Thames, 

36 
Coomber, retirement of Mr. W„ 583 
Co- operative Festival, National, 242 
Cordyline Banksi, on Stewart Island, 

613 
Cornell University, subjects of teach- 
ing at, 189, 494 
Cornus canadensis, 643 

Coryanthes leucocorys, 154 
Cotton Plant in America, 45 
Cow Parsnip, the, as fodder, 685 
Crab, the uses of, in the garden, 432, 

499, 500, 556, 587, 620, 684 
Crabs in the garden and wood, 584, 

719 
Crataegus mollis, 453 

Crinum purpuraicens, 330; C. R>ozen- 

ianum, 132 
Crops for the garden, rotation of, 399 ; 

rotation of, 38, 367. 464 
Cucumbers, winter, 738 
Cultoquhey, Perthshire, notes from, 431 
Cultural Memoranda, 12 
Cupressus squarrosa (Retinospora),360 
Currant, black, pest, 101 
Cycas stem producing branches, 722 
Cyclamen culture, 684 
Cyclamens, German and British, 610, 

652, 708 
Cycnoches Haagei, 485 
Cymbidium giganteum, 424 
Cypripedium Charlesworthii. 424 ; 

hybrid, peculiarities in, 620 ; C. 

insigne, with peloriated sepals. 763 ; 

C. Kimballianum, 154, 265. 292 ; C. 

Lebandjanum X, 90; C. Little- 

anum, 36 ; C. X Lord Derby, 245, 

271 ; malformed, 135 ; C. selligerum, 
206, 641 

Cypripediumr, origin of the slipper in, 

748 

Cyrtopodium Andersoni, 126; C. 
Woodfordi, 612 



D 



Dahlia, Cactus, Mrs. Wilson Noble. 
367 

Daisy, the double- flowered, 206, 336, 
376 

Diphne indica rubra at Berkeley 
Castle, 684 

Darlington, the public park at, 424 
Darmstadt exhibition, 61 
Davidson, Mr., presentation to, 650 
Dall, Orchids at The, 577 
Dendrobium cruentum, 91 ; D. Hilde- 

brandi, 93; D. X illuitre, 15; D. 

PaalsBuopsis var. hololeuca 396 
Dendrobium, red-flowered, 337, 371 
Deodar struck by lightning at Kew, 

190 

Deutzia Lemoinei x , 389 
Devonport People's Park, 553 
Diacrium, the species of, 610 
Diastase in foliage leaves, 463 
Dichorisandra thyrsiflora, 643 

Diospyros Kaki, 577 

Dipladenia amabilis, 620; D. bolivi- 
ensis, 643 

Diplosis pyrivora, 556 

Disa grandiflora, 215; at Joldwynds, 
179; in Edinburgh Botanic Garden, 
183 ; D. kewensis, 273 

Disease in Begonias, 544, 586; the 
■pot, of Orchids, 419; of Carna- 
tion, 72 

Diseased Parsnip, 526 ; Pear, 526 
Dormant period in plants, the, 675 
Doryphora sassafras, 245 
Dresden, the coming International 

Horticultural Exhibition at, 748 
Drill- Hall meetings, regulations at 

the, 587, 618. 619 
Drink, a tasteful summer, 303 
Droitwich, a park for, 7 
Droseras, and their cultivation, 267; 

in Scotland, 101 
D *yas octopetala, 643 
Dachartre, the late M.. 72 
Dunedin, Streatham Hill, 426 
Dyer's, Mr., address to the Botanical 

Section of the British Association, 
328 



E 



Eccrbmocabpus scaber, 392 

Edinburgh Botanic Garden, 456; 
plants in flower at, 37, 721 

Egypt, gardening in, 41 

Elder, a new golden, 458; the red- 
berried, 210 

Elmet Hall, Leeds, 40 

Embankment gardens, Charing Cross, 
99, 715 

Epidendrum Godseffiannm, 424, 640 

Epping Forest and the Commissioners, 
71; report by the Commissioners 
upon, 648 ; the treatment of, 680 

Eritrichium strictum, 336, 372 

Essex Summer School of Horticul- 
ture, 73 — l ™ 

Eucharis grandiflora, 716 
Eucomis punctata, 501 
Eugenia malaccensis. 132 
E alalia japonica, 685 
Eupatorium serrulatum, 265 
Erelyn,Jno.,575, 772 
Evelyn Park, the, D^ptford, 577 
Events of the year, 768 
Examinations in horticulture, 70 
Exhibiting, prizes and point values 
in, 305 

Exhibitions, judging at, 336; a ques- 
tion relating to international horti- 
cultural, 709 



F 



Fasciated Lilium speciosum, 301 
Fern hjbrid, a bi-creneric, 365; apo- 
gamic, 211,271, 305 

Fernerj, a British, 746 

Ferns in pots, 639 

Fibres, vegetable, 682 

Ficus, a, strangling a Mango tree, 327 

Figs in pots, early, 500 

Finger-andtoe in Turnips, 618 

Fire tree, a, 488 

Fiies attacked by a fungus, 18, 135, 

685; and plant-lie?, 266 
Flies, dead, adhering to Birley, 620 
Flora, the. of the Amour littoral, 

676 ; of Kashmir, 646 
Floriculture in Hanlev, 6 15 
Florists' flowers, 7, 64, 325, 432, 613, 

677, 708, 739 

Fower garden, the, 13 41. 69, 98, 

126, 157, 184, 213 241. 269 293. 

330. 363, 395 426. 459, 490, 520. 

551, 582, 614, 647. 678, 711. 741, 766 

Flowering shrubs, the use of, 748 

Flowers, as food, 762 ; preserved for 

winter 761 
Flowers, sacred, 483 ; sexuality in, 428 
Food requirements of the Chrysanthe- 
mum, 272, 305, 486 
Food requisite for the Tomato, 235 
Foods and drinks, vegetable, 498 
Forester, the education of the, 581, 612 
Forestry, 39, 165. 387, 3&7 r 487, 581, 
612, 739; in Scotland, the promo- 
tion of, 493 
Fossil-tree, a Welsh, 521 
France, notes from, 292 ; the Institute 
o% and its relation to botany and 
horticulture, 492 

French Horticultural School at Ver- 
sailles, 26 1 

Frog, a tropical, at Kew, 658 706 
Frost and drought, effects of, on British 

medicinal plants, 462 
Fruit and market gardens, 714; at 
Glewston Court, 180; Canadian, 
429; crops, remarks upon the, 119 
126,128,150,207.262; cultivation in 
New Zealand, 766; essay compe- 
tition, 335; farming in 8ou*,h 
Africa, 525; growing for small gar- 
dens, 610; in British Cilunbia, 
716 ; for small gardens, 674 J in the 
United Kingdom, the commercial 

?o? eCt of ' 432; hard y Proipects, 
133; marketing in Worcestershire, 

64; market sale of. 498; the pre- 

serving, 92, 180, 216, 450 j in tran- 
sit, a new system of, 462 
Fruit and vegetables, Covent Garden 
prices for, in, 322, 587 



Fruit, new and strange, at Christina^ 
737 ' 

Fruit register, 426 

Fruit, the prices of, 525, 587, 619 

Fruit show, the great, at the Crystal 
Palace, 364, 396 432, 556, 588 

Fruit, the glut of, 400 ; trade, oar, 182 ; 
tree bark used in packing, 131 ; trees 
and the weather, 246; on house- 
tops, 370 ; preparing land fo»\ and 
planting, 550 ; pruning, 403 488 

Fruits, new, of recent introduction, 
403 ; new tropical. 737 

Fruits under glass, 13. 41. 69, 97, 126 
157, 184, 213. 240, 269. 299, 330. 
362, 394, 427, 459. 491. 520. 551, 
582, 614, 647, 679, 710, 741, 767 

Fuchsia coccinea, 294 

Fuchsias, seedling, 134 

Fungi, Australian, 716 

Fungus, a remarkable, 773 

Fungus on flies and plant-lie*, 266, on 
Pears, 620 

Furcrcea gigantea, 421 



. G 

Garden, a town, 707 

Garden manures, prices of. 706 

Gardeners' characters, 133 ; Company, 
the, 524 

Gardeners' Royal Benevolent Institu- 
tion, 44, 129, 186,396,429. 714 74 ', 
771; annual dinner of, 16; Worces- 
tershire Branch of, 626 

Gardeners, young, and written charac- 
ters, 45 

Gardening, history of Eoglisb, 733 
Gardening, Mr. Gladstone on. 158 
Gardens, some Old-world. 355 

Gas-lime as a manure. 685, 720 
Gatterosteus species, 3^9 
Genista virgata, 22 
Gentiana phlogifolia. 101 
Gerbera Jamesoni, 643, 719 
Germany, fruit, flower, and vegetable 

cultivation in, 394 
Ghent district, notes from, 63 
Gladiolus from offsets, 72; G. Shah- 

zada, 305 
Glasnevin Botanic Gardens, the, 180 
Glass, coloured, and Strawberries, 521, 

749 
Glewston Court, fruit at, 180 
Gloxinias at Tring Park, 160 
Godden Green, S^venoaks, 453 
Gooseberry, a new white oae. 216; a 
spiaeleis, 101,135; White Warring- 
ton, 246, 303 
Grafting, a curious case of nature', 770 
Grape-vines in towos. out-of-door, 431 
Grapes, Coopers B .ack and Gros M *r c e, 

769 
Grapes, diseased, 135; n»n tine poison- 
ing from eating, 334; s..c;uleur; 
seeds in, 430 
Grasses of Tennessee, 462 
Grasses, preserved for winter, 761 
Grouoiog for effect in c mierv*OJrie f , 

298 
Gustavia pterocarpa. 577 
Gynerium jubatum, 462 



H 



Habenaria Susanose, 452 
Hackthorn Hall, the Vine at 337 
Hailstorm at Haroenden 241 
Hampton Court House Gi p deni, 155 
Hanley, floriculture in, 615 
Harvard University, botany aal gir- 

deniog at, 177 
Hardy fruit garden, th*», 12, 40. 68 97 
127, 157, 183, 212. 241 »H 2M 
331, 363, 395 427 458 4U0 »»■ 
551. 582, 615, 646, 678, 711, 741 70 i 
Hawthorn, the scarlet, 454 



Hazel, prehistoric, 18 
Hedysarum mult'jugum. 8 41, 63 

Hehnium grandicaphalum slriaiBm, 

464 
Hellebores, the culture of, 736 
Henna, the production of, 159 
Heracleum Sphondylium as fodder, 685 



The Gardeners' Chronicle, J 



IND EX. 



[December *8. 1895. V 



Herbaceous border, G6. 235, 372,391, 

458, 488, 626, 643, 687 
Herbarium, the Cape, 770 
Hencherasanguinea, 07; and hybrid, 305 
Highclere, vegetable! at, 207 

HiDp*astrum, 718; II. brachyandrum, 
132 

Hoe, the patent Stamford, 162 
Holland, horticultural progress in, 715 ; 
importation of cut bulbous flowers 
from, 100; the exportation of cut 
flowers from, 159 

Hollyhock, the, 644, 70S 
Hong-Kong, Botanic Gardens at. 306 ; 

notes from , 306 
Honoun to horticulturist!, 082 
Horse-radish, the importation of. 6 : 

720, 746 

Horticulture, examination! in, 70; in 
Western Au!tralia, 078 ; syllabus of 
the summer school of, at Chelms- 
ford, 361 

Houlletia Brocklehurstiana, 454 ; 11. 
tigrina, 540 

House-garden at Gunncrsbury, 431 
House-tops for fruit growing, 
Hunnemannia fumariifolia, 100 
II) de Park, the gardening in, 164 
Hydrangea hortensis, var. Lindeni, 92 ; 
H, icandens, 643 

Hypericum Moterianum X f 642; II. 
leptans, 642 




I 

Idbia columnaria. 642 

Indian note!, 675 

Inula Hookeri, 18 

Ireland, Potato- digging in, 133 246 

Ml Kasmpferi, 520 ; Spanish, 708 

Italian Cannas, 703 

Italy, flower-carpets in, 362; notes 

from. 362; Tomatos in, 325 
IxiaF, 708 



J 



Jacquemoktia violacea, 456 
J^doo fibre, a new use for, 40 ; Potatos 
in, 100. 135 

Jamaica, notea from, 132; the Blue 
Mountains in, 493 

Japanese editor-nurseryman, p, 740 

Japanese matting, 463 

Joldwynds, Disas, &c, at, 179 

Jubsa spectabilis, 518 

Judging, a code for, 685; at exhibi- 
tions, the, 305. 336. 500 653 



K 



Kashmir, the flora of, 616 

Kentish Strawberry gardens, 73 

Kew, a tropical fro% at, 658 ; em- 
ploy 6$, pay of, 430; giant Cacti at, 
100; in September. 618; notes, 22 
132, 190, 330, 392 421, 452, 481, 
544, 577; the temperate-hoose as, 
430 ; suicide in the gardens, 553 

Kitchen garden, the, 12. 40. 69, 96. 
127, 156, 184. 212, 340, 269, 290, 
331, 363. 394, 427. 459, 490. 520. 
550, 583. 615, 646. 679. 711, 740, 767 

Knife, a new budding, 306 

Kniphofias, 245 

Kniphol's Botanica in OriqinaH 210 

K6 reuteria paniculate, 247 

Kyoto industrial exhibition of 1£95 05 



L%mium aureuro, 642 
Lamp, a new safety, 46S 
Laurel, Portugal, a wonderful, 707 
Lavandula dentata foliage, venation 
in, 135 

LAW NOTES : — Frederick Pendle 
(Bankruptcy), 102; Ueaton v. Cour- 
tenay ( Wrongful dismissal of a gar* 
doner), 501 ; Native Guano Co. v. 
Ilibberd (Recovery of debt). 217; 
Toogood & Sons v Shepherd (In- 
fringe imnt of Trade Mark) 218, 330 

Lawson & Son, Ltd., Pater, 916 
Leaver, preserved, for winter, 761 

Leicester Abbey Park, 240 

Lemons from Australia. 462 

Lespedeza Sieboldi, 453 

Lettuces, aphides on, 218. 526; forcing, 

in pots, 150; giant, 245 
L ; ghtning, effects of, on trefs, 271 ; 

Deodar struck by, 190; photo of, 

Lilies at Mr, Tracy's at Twickenham, 
150; Belladonna, {454; diseased, 
218; new, 745; Tige*, 708 

L'lium auratum at Bricklehampton 
Hall Gardens, 610; L. Biondi, 745 ; 
L. chinense, 745; dwarf form of, 
018; Harrisi, the introduction of, 
271, 304; Parryi, 208; speciosum, 
a fasciated, 301 

Lily, show at Manchester, 249 ; the 
Bermuda, 304 

Lime and bees, 218 

Limes, synopsis of the. 764 

~ ime-tree mite, the, 399 

JLinaria vulgaris with double flowere, 
554 

Lincoln arboretum, additions to the, 
215 

Liquorice- root in the United States, 
the cultivation of, 737 

Liverpool Window-garden Associa- 
tion, 130 

Lornbardy, a tour in, 486 

Low's ground-compasses, 218 

Luculia gratissima, 131 

Luddemannia Pescatorei, 63; L tri- 
loba, 63, 713 

Lycoris aurea, 545, 577 

Lygodiumsas roof and pillar plants, 425 




M 



Macao tobacco factory, a, 61 
Machinery exhibition in Vienna, 334 
Madagascar, 460 

Magnolia glauca, 210; M. Wationi, 46 
Magpie- moth, the, 553 
Maize, large yield of, 101 
Malformed Cattleya, a, 705 
Manchester, Alexandra Park, 236; 

\e Garden*. 244 



L 



La krn, pUnta at the Koial Chateau 

at, 298; Cattieyas at, 673 
J aeiia Digbyana, 152; glauca 35 
Laelio-Cattleya Andreana, 293; L-C 

x Brymeriana.338; L.-C. xClonfa 

•°perba,420; L.-C. Varjene?skyana, 
35 

L i gerati cemia Fordii in H* n«. Kong 3C6 
Lake evolution of a, 132; an arti- 
ficial, at Minley Manor, N. Hantr, 



Mango tree, a Ficus strangling a. 327 
Manure, artificial, in Melon growing, 

215; trials at Richmond, 712 
Manures, a lecture on garden, 308; 

prices of garden. 706 

Maple, Lorberg's, 706 

Marguerite, Carnations, 739 

Market growers and salesmen, 64 

Markets, the City Corporation, 302 

Marrow, Vegetable, Courge Patate, 
764 

Masdevallia guttulata, 388 ; M. Lowii, 
360 

Matthew Arnold as a lover of flowers. 

738 
Matting, Japanese, 463 

Medicinal plant?, the crop of British. 
462 

Melon, the Lady, 554 

Mebille Castle Gardens, 543 

Metrical system, report of the House 

of Commons Committee upon the, 

130 

Micrcspatha guineensis, 642 
Microstylis macrochila. 325 
Mignonette, Burkhill New White, 710 
Miltonia, Empress Augusta Victoria, 

360 ; M. vexillaria, a specimen plant 

of, 743 
Miltonias. natural hybrid, 265 



Missouri, botanic garden, 188 
Mitchell, Mr. G,, of S&ranratr, at J l\, 

188 

Monstrous Anemone japonic*, 526 
Moor Park, gardens at, 356 

Morello Cherry culture, notes on, 2') I, 

392 

Morello Cherries at Scone Palace, 455, 

555,747 
Moss litter and peat industry, 716 
Moth-catching plant, 211 
Mountain Ash, orange berried. 361 
Mulched Hose Garden, the, 266 
Mulching Roses, 236 
Musa Cavendishii, fruiting of, 566, 687 
Musa Frehi, 544 
Musas at Hampton, 706 
Museum arrangement, 296 

Mushroom spawn, the preparation of, 

107 
Mushrooms at Mr, Johnson's farm at 

Hanger Hill, Ealinir, 117 
Mussrcnda luteola, 456 



N 



Nagpuh, the public gardens at, 458 

Narcissus flowering in September, 3 90 

Nasturtium LUiput, 700 

Natal, prospects in, 716 

Natural history, modern school of, 296 ; 

the old school of, 296 
Natural selection, what is it ? 584 
Nectarine, Baltet, 293 
Nelumbium in Egypt, the, 271 
Nepenthes, Curtisi, a green pitcher 

upon, 620 

Neuwiedia Griffithii, 44 

New South Wales, winter in, 215 

New York, botanic garden for, 334 

New Zealand, a town garden in, 8 

Nicotine poisoning from eating Grapes, 
334 

Nitrification, tillage and, 332 
Nomenclature of garden plants, 301 ; 

botanical, of plants, 328 
Nova Scotian Apples, 334 
Novaya Zemlya, 273 

NUR8ERY NOTE8:— Birkenhead, W. 

& J., Sale, 94; Brownhill. Henry, 
Sale, Manchester, 466; Bull, Wm., 
Chelsea, 100 ; Bunyard & Co., Geo., 
Maidstone, 67, 548 ; Csnnell, H„ & 
Sons, 652; Cheal, J., & Sons, 
Crawley, 464 ; Douglas, Jas., Book- 
ham, 138; Downie, Jno., Edinburgh, 
164; Fisher, Son, & Sibray, Shef- 
field, 644 ; Heath & Son, Chelten- 
ham, 434; Linden, MM., Brussels, 
162 ; Little & Ballantyne, Carlisle, 
338 ; Makoy et Cie., M. Jacob, Bel- 
gium. 162; Mortimer, S., Farn ham, 

11; Paul & Sons. Cheahunt, 500; 

Rivers & Son. T. F. t Sawbridge- 

worth. 368; Veitch & Sons, Jas., 
50, 360; Wallace & Co., Col- 
chester, 94; Webb & Sons, Stour- 
bridge, 398 ; Whiteley's, W., Hil- 

lingdon, 651 



O 



Oak-gall and Oak-apple. 370 
Oakwood, notes from, 672 
Oil, a new ptrfume-, 615 

Obituary:— Atkinson, C. L., 744; 

Babington. Professor, 99 ; Baillon, 
Henry, 106 ; B*use, Christian 
Friedericb, 503; Crispin, J., 468; 
Eaton, Professor, 130; Find lay, Mrs. 
Bruce, 658 ; Gilbert, Richard, 658 ; 
Grieve, Peter, 405; Hardinge. Jno. 
Josiah Coles, 342; Harris, James, 
341; Heath, Vernon,524; Hellriegel, 
Hermann, Professor, 618; Huxley, 
Professor, 14; Jamieson, Andrew, 
429; Lawes, Lady, 687; Lawson, 
George, 658; Masters, Alderman, 22; 
Measures, Mrs. R. L, 275 ; Meulen, 

Monsieur Li£?in Spfce-van der, 249 ; 



Noiting Ptettm, 711 p4st*nr t 
Louis, 3%; K.bortft. T. U. ,105; 
Rtley, Chas. V., 405; Riley, Pro- 
fessor, Washington, 620; Saul, Miss 
Jane, 275; Seebohm. Henry, 660; 
Slocomb*. C. P., 308; Sienjrer, Her- 
mann, 372 ; Stratford, J., 7H ; Sorb, 

Geo., 744 ; Tabley, Lord d#, 658; 
Townshend, Mary, 660; V*rva*t, 
Itidore.372 ; Vesque. M J, -15; 
Walters, James, 660; Wills. Jno., 
45, 78; Woods, S. A , 22 ; Young, 
K. H. t 628 

Olontoglosmtn coronarium, 489; O. 

crispum at home, 487 ; malformed, 

35; O. Halli-xanthinurnx, 36 j O. 

maculatum, 577; O. Uro-Skinnen, 

Crawsbay's variety, 292 
O Jontoglossums at Baokfield. 90 ; 

from Mr, Brooman- White, 126 
tE lothera suaveolens, opening of the 

dowers of, 775 
Oleanders, 61 

Oncidium ornithorbycchum albiflururo. 
360 

Onion Highclere Tankard, 746 
Onion and Leek show at R utiesay, 43 1 
Onion show at Banbury, 405 
Onions, large, 46 

Opium and morphia in China, 334 
Orchid-basket, Seasell'* patent, 748; 

West's improved, 306 
Orchid, collecting, 422 487; collector, 

an, 335; houses at KarobooilUt, 31 
< » chid-houses, the, 13, 40 6X 97, 127, 

156, 185, 212. 241. 268. 298, 331. 

362, 395, 426 458 491 520, 583, 

614,646,679,710,740,767 

Orchid notes and gleanings, 34 62 90, 
126. 154. 180, 206, 265. 292, ; *, 
360, 388 424, 454, 518, 597, 640, 
672 705,762 

< hchids and poets, 79 

Orcbidr, at Antwerp, 392 ; at Br u« self, 
298; at Borford, Dirkiog, 326; at 
Camberwell Lodge, <J72; at CasM* 
Hill, 672; at Fair 0*k Lodge, 36; 
at Messrs. Jas. Veitch & Sons, 360 ; 
at Kosslyn, Stamford Hill, 518; at 
Koundhay Mount, Leeds, 62; at 
The Ashlands, 388; at the Belcian 
exhibitions. 391; Hi The D-»H, 
E>$ham, 577 ; at L'Horticulture In- 
ternationale, 3^2; at Oswald Hou»e, 

Eiioburgh, 705; at Trenton, N.J, 
152 

Orchid*, in their home, 422 487; lift 
of garden, 5. SO ; peculiarities of 
growth in, 338; seedling. 162; spr*t 
disease, 419; the sale of the Stamford 
Hall, 365 ; of W. K. Lees, Esq.'*, col- 
lection of, 365; at Stevens' H omi 
(Lindens'), 461 ; the spot diiease of, 
419 

Orphan Fund, Royal Gardeners' 17, 
44, 129, 524 683, 771 

Oswald House, Edinburgh, Orchids at. 
705 

Oxalis tropaaoloides, 393 



P 



Pachtstoma chinense in Hong-Kuag, 

306 
Packing competition at the Crystal 

Palace Fruit Show, 499, 554/ L i, 

654, 685 
Pasonies, herbaceous, 626 

Paintings, exhibition of flower, 651 
Paleobotany, 329 

Palms, useful, for living-rooms, 424 
Pancratium canariense, 294 
Pandanua Vandermeerscbii, 237 
Fangium edule and hydrocyanic acid. 

462 
Pansies, too many, 46 
Parasites, 6 
Paris, notes from, 552, 642; the 

gardens of, 130 
Park, Alexandra, Manchester, 236; 

for D/oitwich 7; the public, at 

Darlington, 424 
Parsnip, diseased, 526 

Paatfcur, Louis, the late, 396 



VI The Gardeners' Chronicle,] 



INDEX. 



[December 28, 1895 



Paulownia imperialii, 75 

Pea, CannelL'i English Wonder, 9; 
R*nt-payer, 96; St. Duthus, 96, 
160; Satton's Peerless Marrowfat, 
96; trials in Lincolnshire, 423 

P«?as and Popjies. 102 

P*as, early, 37, 74; Sareet, colour and 
perfume in, 217 

Peach and Nectarine, a composite fruit 
of, 37 

Peach, fruiting of double, 463 

Peaches, large, 305 

Peaches and Nectarioes, 653 ; on the 

open wall, 370 
Pear, Beanl Olairgeau, 268; Lacy 

Grieve, 677, 720 
P^ars, diseased, 526 ; a dish of Catillac, 

745 ; fungtn on, 620 
Pelargonium Madame Chas. Kieaig,291 
Pelargoniums, root- propagation of 

show and fancy, 208; disease of 

(Wheatear), 134 
Pellionia Daveauanana, 643 
Peloriated Cyprippdinmi, 763 
Pencil, a new, 213 
Pentstemon barbatu*, 235 
Peppermint culture, 464 
Perfume-oil, a new, 615 

Perfumes in Roses and Sveet Peas, 431 
Petriea volabilis alba, 546 
Phateaopiis Lindeni, 36 
Pniladelphas, Boule d'Argent, 18; P. 
Lemoinei, 22 

Phloxes, the herbaceous, 325, 391 
Phylloxera certificate, the, 130, 158: 
law, the, 99, 134 

Paysiolofixexperimental plant, 188,329 
Pinks, 644 

Pinus Davcniana, 707 

Pitcairnia ferru^inea, 421 

Plant decoration, 133 

Plant life, the advance of, 166 

Plant Portraits :— Acacia glau- 

eeieens,95; Actinotas II*liauthi,95; 
Adiantum line*tum, 683; Aerides 
Houlletianam, 335,495 ; Atlamanda 
violacea, 717, 746; Aloe Lantii, 714 ; 
Amasonia erecta var. bracteata, 616; 
Amoroha caneicens, 45; Angrse- 
cum Kotscbyi, 616 ; Antharium G is- 
tavi. 429; A, salmoneum x, 495; 

A. Scherz^riarjum, 189; Aphelandra 
niteni, 335 ; Aponogeton distachyum 
var. Ligraugei, 335 ; Apple Jefferis, 
160; A. Nonpareiile de Peasgood, 
495 ; Aretostaphylos diversifolia, 
746; Arethuia balbosa, 683; Aris- 
tolochia uoguli folia. 44 ; Aspidium 
marginal*, 746; Birtholina pecti- 
nata, 714 ; B*g«mia Faureiana, 683 ; 

B. Mrs. Joseph Eliat, 717; Berberis 
heteropoda, 746 ; Brownea arhiza, 
160 ; Baddieia Colvilei, 714 • 
Caladium LUiputense, 771; Calo- 
chortui luteui concolor, 746 ; Cam- 
panula Vidalii, 495 ; Cannas Sarah 
Hill and Maurice Massey, 45 ; Car- 
pinus cordata, 160; Catasetum 
L^mosii, 616; C. stupendum. 717 • 
Cattleya Lwpoldi II., 335 . q 
Mossisb amceia, 189; Chrysanthe- 
mum Captain Lucien Chanrl 746 ■ 
p- „ Walter Seaman, 160; Cosh-' 
iioda Noezliana, 335; Coreopsis 
g'andiflora, 683; Corylus roitrata, 
000; Cosmos sulphureas, 771 ■ 
Cmbidiam eburneo - Liwiaaum', 
WW h Cypnpediaan Felix F*are, 189 ; 
UG*rtra1» H*Uia*ton, 683; Dan- 
drobmm Donneti® x D, Dathousei- 
anum 495; D. nobile candidalum, 
«6; D. nobile nobiiius, 45 ; Dipla- 
denia atro-purpurea, 45 ; Echidnop- 
tis Dammaniana, 746; Eucalyptus 
corymbosa, 95; Ealophia congoen- 
«J. 717; Eulophiella Elisabeths;, 
160; Fothergill* Gardnari. 746; 
Godefiia Whitneyi var., 335, 495; 
lleUeborus altifolius, 95 ; Hem*ro- 
callis aurantiaca var. major, 335 ; 
Hemitelia Lindeni, 746; Hiooeai- 
trum equestre var. Wotteri, 495 ; II. 
e. var. splendens, 495 ; Huernia ma- 
crocarpa, 45 ; Hybrid Willows, 746 ; 
Ins Garmamca var, Kharput, 495 ; 



Kaempferia Gilbert!, 160; Kalmia 
cnniata, 746 ; Lamourouxia Pringlei, 
160; Lilium Biondi, 717; L. chi- 
nense, 717; L. sulphureum, 717; 
Lotus peltorhyncus, 45 ; Lupinus 
arboreus, 45; Lychnis Haageana 
and L. chalcedonica. 189 ; Lygo- 
dium palmatum, 683; Magnolia 
Campbelli, 335; Marica Northiana 
var. splendent, 335; Masdevallia 
ludibunda and M. triangularis, 189; 
Maxillaria nigrescens, 335; Mor- 
raodes Rolfeanum, 429; Mnsa rubra, 
714 ; Neuwiedia Griffithii, 44 ; Nidu- 
larium Chantrieri x, 495; Nympb^ei 
marliacea ignea. 717; Odontoglos- 
sum citrosmum,717, 746 ; O. E 1 wardi, 
189; O. Haivengtense x, 335; O. 
pulchellum majus, 189; Oncidium 
oraithorhyncum albiflorum, 335; 
O. spilopterum, 335 ; Oxalis violscea, 
95; Pear Audr<§ Desportes, 683; 
Pear Frac 5 lis Hutin, 771 ; 
Pennisetum RanDellianum, 717; 
Pentas carnea, 495; Phaius macu- 
latus, 335; Phyllocactus Hild- 
manni X, 746; P. Kermesinns, 
746; Pieurothallis scapha, 215; 
Plum Gabriel Combes, 95; P. 
Rivers' Transparent Gage, 717; 
Polygala Galpini, 429; Polygonum 
baldschuanicum. 717; Prochynaa- 
thes Balliana, 215; Pyrus Gr&tssgi- 
folia Targioni, 44; P. sikkimensis, 
215; Rhododendron grande, 335; 
R. virgatum, 683; R'chardia Pent- 
landii, 717; R. Rehmanni,335; Rosa 
Lucias, 335 ; Rose G. Nabonnand, 
771 ; Rabat capensis, 335 ; 
Roie Marchioness of Londonderry, 

717;R.MoselIapolyandha l 717;Rubus 

lasiostylus, 44 ; Rudbeckia maxima, 

45; R. pinnata, 45; Saccolabium 

ampullaceum, 717; S. Mooreanum, 

215; Sarracenia flava. 495; Scilla 

sibirica muitiflora. 335; Schom- 

bur^kia rosea. 189; Selenipedium 

Dalleanum, 717; S. Sargentianum, 

616; Sanecio Hualtata, 44; Sollya 

heterophylla, 683 ; Spiroa bracteata, 

215; Sphceralcea abutiloides, 160; 

Spathoglottis Kimballiana, 616 ; 

Stauropsis gigantea, 189; Stern- 

bergia Fischeriana, 429; Syringa 

Emodivar. rosea, 683; S. vulgaris, 

95; S. v. Madame Lemoine, 45; 

Tecoma Smithiix, 95; Telopia 

speciosissima, 95 ; Trichostemma 

dichotoma, 683 ; Thunbergia grandi- 

flora, 45 ; Thunia Marsballiana, 

495; Tulipa violacea, 429; Vanda 

Parishii var. Marriottiana, 717; 

Verbesina pinnatifida and V. Mame- 

ana, 95; Viilarsia nvmphaoides, 

717; Willowy hybrid, 746; Yucca 

Whipple?. 746 ; Zygopetalum Wend- 

landi, 189 

Planting fruit-trees, 550 

Plant8, New or Noteworthy :— 

Ancestochilus Sanderianus, 484 ; As- 
plenium Orouponchense, 388 ; Cata- 
setum ferox, 262 ; Cattleya Fow- 
led x, 178; C. X Juno, 118; C. 
labiata Broomeana, 608 ; Ceropegia 
d^bilis. 358; Chlorocodon Whitei, 
234; Cirrhopetalum Rothschildia- 
num, 608 ; Cupressus macrocarpa, 
var. guadeloupensis, 62 ; Cypripe- 
dium X Lord Derby, 358 ; Dendro- 
bium glomeriflorum, 206; D. im- 
peratrix, 34 ; D. sanguiaeum, 292 ; 
Doryphora sassafras, 34 ; Entero- 
sora Fawcetti, 62 ; Hemerocallis 
aurantiaca, var. major, 62; Laelia 
anceps, var. lineate, 734; L. x Fincke- 
niana, var. Schroderse, 762 ; Lino- 
spadix Mtcholitzii. 262 ; Ludde- 
mannia triloba, 63 ; Masdevallia 
eciyptrata, 577 ; M. Forgetiana, 484 ; 
M. Lawrencei, 324 ; Musa, a hybrid, 
516; Nephrodium dfjectum, 640; 
Odontoglostum asDidorbinum, 357'; 
Pilea Spruceara, 388; Polypodinm 
trmidadensis, 235; Rosa Wichura- 



iaaa, 90; Stapelia longidens, 324; 

Tchihatchewia isatidea, 150 
Plant?, the dormant period in, 675 
Plant*, culture of, under glass, 12, 41, 

68, 97. 127, 157. 184, 213, 241, 269, 
299, 331, 363, 394 427. 458, 491, 
520, 550, 583, 615, 647, 678, 711, 741, 
766 

Piatyclinis glumacea, 553 

Pleione lagenaria, 454 

Pium, abicolor,271; Grand Duke, 710 

Piumiera alba, 456 

Poetry and Orchids, 79 

Poisoning from eating Grapes, 334, 390 

Polygonum Brunonis, 643 

Polypodium, a proliferous, 75; P. 

xiphopteroidsefolium, 612 
Poppies, hybrid, 45 

Porto Rico, vegetable products in, 4.0 
Potash in fruit growing, 7 
Potato and Tomato grafted, 528 
Potato, crop the, 392 ; in Jersey, 99 ; 

digging in Ireland, 133, 246 ; Mona's 

Pride, 74, 101 ; scale, remedies for 

the, 682 

Potatos, 578 ; a heavy crop of, 684,775 ; 
diseased, 218 ; experiments with, 
712; lecture on, 527; sportiDg in, 
619 ; the out-growing of, 158 ; Vale 
of Cleveland and Sharped Victor, 

464, 556, 587, 653 
Poultry, our, 46, 238, 489, 764 
Prairie, flowers of the North-west, 67 
Preserving fruit, 180, 216 
Preston Manor Gardens, Brighton, 239 
Prices of fruif, 587 ; and vegetables in 

the year 1822, 587, 619 

Primula kashmeriana, 545; P. scotica, 
18 

Propagation of Pelargoniums by roots, 

208; Restio subverticillatus, 12 
Protoplasmic chemistry, 330 
Prune culture in America, 494 
Pruning fruit trees, 488, 520, 525 
Puccini a, a remarkable, 773 
Pyrethrums, single and double- 
flowered, 66 

Pyros Aucuparia, the orange -berried 
variety of, 361 ; P. crataegifolia Tar- 
gioni, 44 



Q 

Quabry grounds, the, Shrewsbury, 337 



R 



Rabbit -proof plants, 685 719,747,775 
Rabone, the late Mr. T. H., 137 
Railway companies and agricultural 
produce, 493 

Railway rates, redaction of, on the 

Great Eastern, 681 
Rainfall, heavy, in Yorkshire, 134 
liambouiilet, Orchid-houses at, 34 
Riuunculus asiaticus varieties, 7 ; R. 

cortussefolius, 645 
Raspberry Belle de Fontenay, 710; 

the black, 72, 303 ; the Strawberry, 

426 J 

Raspberries at Dover House Gardens, 
101 ; late, 556 

Ravenscourt Park, Hammersmith, 216 
Reading University Extension College 
at, 100 * 

Restio subverticillatus, 12 
Retarding instead of forcing, 715 
Rhododendron Cunninghami, 747 
Rhododendron, hybrid, 620 
Rhododendrons, choice hardy, 74 
Rhopala obovata as a fire tree, 488 
Richardia Pentlandi, 160 
Rockery, the, at Warnham Court, 364 
Racket, the double, 216 
Rodigas, M., honours to, 17 
Rc0bltns>, Mr. C. G., Trenton, Orchids 

Roofs of cottages suitable for fruit 

growing, 270 
Root crops, origin of, and climate, 451 
Rosa muitiflora at Kew, 22 ; R. rugosa 

and its varieties. 7; R. rugosa for 

game covert, 653, 684, 719; R. 

•etigera, 92 



R °*97*m e ' 7 ' 67 ' 91, 118 ' 236 ^ 266 J 

Rose, a red Marshal Niel, 64, 160- a 
white Moss, 118 ; R. Enchant^., 
673; garden in autumn, the, 205- 
the mulched, 266; R. Kaiierin 
Augusta Victoria, a yellow- coloured 
64; R. Mrs. W. J. Grant, 247; R 
Papa Gontier, a white sport of, 64* 
season of 1895.. the, 323; the double 
white Coubert, 67 ; R. William Allan 
Richardson, 7 

Rosea at Colchester, 22 ; at the Crystal 
Palace and at Glouceiter, 42 ; at the 
Derby Show, 98; at the National 
Show at Gloucester, 13; button- 
hole, 497; Christmas, 736; notei 
upon new, 91 ; on Briars for bud- 
ding, the watering of, 101 ; stocks for, 
734 ; the naming of by their perfume, 
431; the planting of, 671; two 
modes of mulching, 236 
Rotation of crops, 38, 366, 399, 464 
Rothesay, horticultural features of, 291 
Roundhay Mount, Leeds, Orchid «at, 62 
Royal Horticultural Society's Com- 
mittees, 712, 719, 748, 774 
Royal Institution, arrangements of the, 
714 

Rubber from Kickxia africana, 618 
R ibus capensis, 215; R, lasiostylui, 
44, 210; R. pboeaicolasius (Wine- 
berry), 134 

Russia, agricultural machinery in, 130 
Peas and Poppies in, 102 



S 



Saccolabium ampullaceum, 672 
Sacred flowers, 483 
Sagittaria montevidensis, 518 
St. James' Park, bedding arrangement! 
in, 216 

Sambucui nigra foliis aureis, 210 ; S. 

n. var. foliis luteo-marginatis, 210; 

S. racemosa, 210 ; S, r. plumoia 

foliis aureis, 458 
Sandhills of Nebraska, the, 767 

Sayes Court, Deptford, 575 
Scheelea species, 485 
School, summer, of horticulture, in 
Essex, 73 

Scientific Committee : Abiei, 

hybrid. 685; iEcidium chenopodii, 
135; JE, nymphseoides, D.C., 135; 
Anemone jsponica, monstrous, 526; 
Aphides on Lettuces, 526 ; Apple, 
diseased, 635 ; A. fruit, second crop 
of, 526; A. black-skinned, 620; 
Asters, hybrid, 620; A , supposed 
natural hybrid, 526; Beech, round- 
leaved, 18 ; Black Currant x Gooie- 
berry hybrid, 218; Carnations at- 
tacked by grubs, 685, 748 ; Caatanea 
vesca, female replacing male floweri 
in, 218; Cattleya Mosii® with 
double growth, 526 ; Cedrus Daodara 
■truck by lightning, photo of, 218; 
Cedars, some historic, 526; Cocoi 
australis? fruits of, 620; 0. *rio- 
■patha, 685; colours of flower*, 
the, 748 ; Cypripedium, hybrid, 
peculiarities in, 620 ; C. malformed, 
135; CvDripediums, origin of theplip- 
per in, 748 ; D.geased Pear,526; Dis- 
eased Parsnip. 526 ; Flies attacked 
by fungi, 18, 135, 635; Flies, dead, 
adhering to Barley, 620; Fang^ 1 
on Pears, 620 ; Gooseberry, »pw*' 
less, 135; Grapes, diseased, looi 
Hazel, prehistoric, 18 ; Jadoo fibre, 
Potatos grown in, 135; Lavan- 
dula dentata fo'iaflfe, venation £» 
135 ; Lettuces, aphides on, 218, 5-o , 
Lightning, photo of Cedrus Deodar* 
struck by, 218 ; Lilies, diseased, 21N 
lime and bees, 218 ; monatroui 
Anemone japonic*, 526; ¥*** 
fangus on, 620 ; Potatos, diseaie^ 
218; Primula sc tica, 18; Rhodo- 
dendron, hybrid, 620 ; Kiley, ^' 
fessor/death of. 620 ; Sex, excbaoP 
of, in Bowers, 218 ; Sweet Wilb^Pj 
sudden reversion of, 135 ; V1 















Hie Gardeners' Chronicle,] 



INDEX. 



[December 28, 18W. Vll 



ems, malformed, 685 ; wind, in- 
.ry to foliage by, 526 

ticaria Steeli ; , 762 
>hI and iti growth, relation between 
I ie weight of the, 93 

1 croni in the eastern midlands, 

t ie, 156 
1 farm, a midland, 398 
1 trade, the, 358 

Is, succulent, in Grapes, 430; the 
.tent vitality of, 607 
<>f Ismen's trade marks, 371. 399. 400 
ction. natural, what is it? 584 
ecio Hualtata, 44 ™ 

101a regioD, flora of the, 130 
, exchange of, in flowers, 218 
xuality in flowers, 428 
.hamrcck of Ireland, the true, 160, 272 
Sbortia, a school founded out of the 

cceeds from the, 244 
Shrewsbury, the Quarry grounds at, 337 
Shi ibs, use of deciduous flowering, 748 

She ang root, 459 

s and worms, 216, 336 
S ■ dpfcendioj? by a line of slime, 

0, 190, 216, 245 

i, worm-eating, 432 
ob alia Lindeni, 424 

S0CIETIE8: — Alderley Edge, &c, 

rysantbemnm, 721 ; Ancient So- 
cifty of York Fioristt, 770; Ascot 

rysanthe mum, 590 ; Aylesbury 
C rysanthpmam, 657; Ayrshire Gar- 
deners', 586, 744 ; Basingstoke Hor- 
ticiltural, 248; Bith Floral, 274; 
Rath Rose and Begonia Show, 
77; Battle Horticultural, 340; 
Beekenham Horticultural, 104, 586 ; 
Bi« bop's Stortford Horticultural, 
219 ; Bournemouth and D strict 
Chrysanthemum, 622 ; Bradford 

ysanthemum, 625 ; Brighton 
Sussex Horticultural, 274, 

; Bristol Chrysanthemum, 623; 

,ish Pceridological, 189 ; Brix- 
to &c.» Chrysanthemum, 590; 

ssaIi Orchid6snne,494. 617,744; 

diff Horticultural, 194, 622; 

aation and Picotee Union, 137 ; 
Oanhalton. Beddington, and Wal- 
ngton, 333; Chambre Syndicale 
des Horticulteurs Beiges, 182; 
C rlwood and District Horticul- 
tural, 218; Chertsey, Walton, and 
Weybridge Horticultural, 50; Ches- 
hmt, Worrnley, and District, 302, 
5, 494, 591, 650, 715 ; Chester 
Paxton, 686; Cirencester Chrysan- 

uum, 590; Croydon Horticul- 
mA, 21 ; Crystal Palace Cbrysan- 

oum, 560; D^von and Exeter 

doners', 134, 397, 592, 622, 744 ; 

on and Exeter Horticultural, 20; 

dee — — Ca ryiao them una i T19 J 

rjg Horticultural, 44, 623; E> 
s and District Chrysanthemum, 

; Edinburgh Botanical, 76, 623, 
749; Exeter Gardeners', 685; 

ibam Chrysanthemum, 621 ; 

2hley Chrysanthemum, 625 ; 

sit Gate Chrysanthemum, 591 ; 

gus Foray, 341 ; Ghent Horti- 

aral, 99, 300, 651; Glasgow 

jsanthemum. 656 ; Glasgow 

feicultural, 310; Grand York- 
**» e Gala, 405; Great Grimsby 
£ ticultural, 214; Hammersmith 
** ticultural. 137; Hanley Chrys- 

lemum. 589; Havant Chrysan- 
1 nam, 558; Hereford Fruit and 

ysanthemum, 589 ; Highgate, 
_. Chrysanthemum, 560. 721; 

chin Chrysanthemum, 590 ; Hor- 

tural Club, 72, 160.493.616,744; 
uuu Lhry«anthemum, 622; Ipswich 

"ticultural, 75 . Irith Gardener." 

J Isle of Wight Horticultural 

fmuw, 620; Lee, Blackheatb, 
; i^wuham, 21 ; Leicester Hor- 
f*nl, 158, 192 ; Lswes Cbrys- 
Jemum 622; Lichfield Chry- 
^um, 6 23 . Lirmean> 585 ^ 649# 

» ^werpool Chrysanthemum, 

4 



I 



621 ; London Pansy and Viola, 75; 
Longton Chrysanthemum, 625 ; 
Maidstone Hardy Fruit, 434; Maid- 
enhead Horticultural, 220; Man- 
chester Royal Botanic, 103, 249. 657 ; 
Margate and Isle of Thanet, 625; 
Midland Carnation and Picotee, 162 ; 
National Amateur Gardeners, 16, 
771 ; National Auricula and Primula, 
553; National Carnation and Pico- 
tee, 104, 553 ; National Chrysanthe- 
mum, 131, 270, 309. 396, 433, 
463, 492, 528 556, 592, 616, 
656, 684, 686, 714, 720, 721,744; 
National Co-operative, 242 ; National 

Dahlia, 309 ; National* d'Horticui- 
ture of Paris, 17, 100, 681 ; National 
Pink, 104; National Rose, 98, 650, 
680, 714 : at Crystal Palace, 
47: Derby, 77: Gloucester, 19; 
Neath Chrysanthemum, 65; New- 
castle District II )rticultural Ma- 
taal Improvement, 72, 103, 
215, 333, 618, 744; Newmarket 
Horticultural, 103 ; Northampton 
Horticaltural, 163; North of Scot- 
land R)Ot, Frait, and Vegetable, 
554; Norwich Horticultural. 657; 
Peeblesshire Horticultural, 524, 650 ; 
People's Palace Horticultural, 50, 
715; Pomological of Boskoop, 398; 
Putney, &c, Chrysanthemum, 591, 
744; Reading and District Gar- 
deners'. 686 ; Richmond Horticul- 
tural, 18; Royal Agricultural and 
Horticaltural of Jersev, 559 ; Royal 
Bjtanic, 159, 586, 616, 650, 744; 
Royal Ca'edonian, 340; R>yal 
Horticulture, 48, 102, 135, 19!, 

247, 307. 373, 400. 432. 466, 
526, 588, 654 720; Royal Horti- 
caltural of Aberdeen, 274, 682; 
Royal Scottish Agricultural, trip 
to Germany of, 387; St. Neot's 
Horticultural, 163; St. Osyth's 
Cottagers' Horticultural, 162 ; Sandy 
Horticultural. 275 ; Scottish Horti- 
cultural, 99, 554, 624. 716 ; Scottish 
Pansy and Viola, 103; Sevenoaks 
Horticultural, 219 ; Shirley and 
District Gardeners' and Amateurs' 
Mutual Improvement, 245, 248, 
334, 494, 529, 618; Shirley, Mil- 
brook, and Fremantle Hortcul- 
tural, 771 : Shropshire Horticul- 
tural, 221, 242, 246; Soctftf Rwale 
d'Horticuiture of Antwerp, 651 ; 

Society of Jersey Gardeners, 771 ; 
South Shields and Northern Coun- 
ties Chrysanthemum, 656 ; South- 
ampton Horticultural, 163, 589 ; 
Stirling Horticultural, 300; Stock- 
port Chrysanthemum, 624 ; Stoke 
Pogis Horticultural, 219 ; Surrey 

Floricultural, 136 ; Taunton Horti- 
TJuTluraT, — I93T~Teign mouth G ir- 

denerV Mutual Improvement, 72; 
Tooting, &c.» Horticultural, 593; 
Torquay District Gardeners', 159, 
398, 559 ; Tottenham Chryianthe- 
mum, 72; Trentham Horticultural, 
136; Trowbridge Horticultural, 220; 
Tunbridge Wells, Mid- Kent, and 
Eist Sussex Chrysanthemum, 623; 
Tunbridge Weils Horticultural, 76 ; 
Twickenham Chrysanthemum, 656 ; 
Ulster Horticultural. 655 ; Watford 
Chrysanthemum, 559 ; Welling- 
borough Horticulture 137 ; Welsh- 
pool Horticaltural, 193 ; West of 
England Chrysanthemum, 621 ; 
Weston-super-Mare Horticultural, 

220; WhiteebapelFiowershowatSfc. 
Mary's, 222 ; Wilts Horticultural, 219; 
Wimbledon and District Horticul- 
cultural, 50. 623 ; Winchester Hor- 
ticultural. 623; Windsor and Eton 
Rose and Horticultural. 20 ; Windsor 
Chrysanthemum, 593 ; Wolver- 
hampton Floral Fdte, 76 589 ; Yeo- 
vil Chrysanthemum. 62~> ; York 
Chrysanthemum, 656 ; Yoikshire 
Naturalists' Union, 311 



bowerby, retirement of Mr., from the 
Royal Botanic Gardens, 215 

Sparaxis, 703 

Spiraea bracteata at Kew, 22 ; S. fili- 
pendula, fl.-pl„ 235 ; S. venusta, 236 

Sporting in Potatos, 61^ 

Spye Park, notes from, 65 

Squirrels, 17 

Stand Hall, Cattleya culture at, 454 
Stanhopea Haselo wiana, 422 ; S. Lowii 

var. Amesiana, 155 
Stapelia gigmtea, 485 
Sticklebacks, 399 
Stock, Princesi Alica, 212 
Stocks for Roses, 734 

Stocktaking, 4 1, 188, 302, 429, 5S6, 715 

Scoring of fruit. 561 

Strawberries, 369; S, late, 327.398; 
S , old and new varieties of, 18 ; S,, 
varieties of, for forcing. 178 

Strawberry gardens at Knole, 73; S. 
Hlricart de Thury, 17; S. Sensa- 
tion, 17 ; S. the Hautbois, 153 

Street-planting, 149 
Sjrelitzia Augusta, 562 
Sireptocarpus, 123 ; A S., Laing's multi- 
flora, 211 

Sareet Pea, Cupid, 398 
Sweet Peai, the naming of, by their 
perfume, 431 

Swat Williams, sudden reversion in, 

135 

Saccalent seeds, 430 
Sundew, the round-leaved, 74 
Sundorne Castle, hardy fruits at, 518 
S-mstroke, death of trees by, 365 
Sirrey County Council and its Potato 

experiments, 712 
Sydney Botanic Gardens, view in the, 

270 
Synaudrospadix vermitoxicuro, 769 
Sjringa japonica, 92 



Turnip-fly, the, 99 

Turnips, cause of finger-and-toe in, 
618 

Turvey Abbey gardens, 515 



Solanum Wendlandi, 190; 
var. Wallaceii, 405 



S. zanti 



T 



Table decorations at the National 
Carnation Society's shows, 160 ; 
with cat flowers. 190 

Tacca paimata, 330 

Tahiti, Cotton, Coffee, and Vanilla 

culture in, 159 
Technical education, 618, 716 
Tecoma radicans, 392 

Telekia speciosa and T. speciosisiima, 
458 

Temple show, exhibits at the, 133 

Thames Embankment Gardens, 715 

Thunderstorm!, 17 

Tiarella cordifolia, 642 

Tiger Lilies, 708 

Tilia, the species and varieties o', 764 

Tillage and nitrification. 332 

Timber, Australian, 335 ; felling and 
planting park, 165 ; price s of British- 
grown, 739 ; v. game, 654 

Tobacco factory, a primitive, 61 

Todea superba, 620 

Tomato crop, food requirements of the, 
235 ; T. Duke of York, 92, 133, 190 ; 
fruits not swelling, 63,74; houses, 
method of ventilating, 369; trade, 
the, 188 

Tomatos, 190. 556 ; at Mr. La wrens on's 
nursery, 271 ; in Italy, 325 ; the 
sleepy disease o F , 45 ; true to name, 

337 
Town garden, a, 707 
Trade marks, seedsmen's, 371 
Tragacanth and Persian berries in 

Angora, 365 
Tree planting at Exmouth, 720 
Trees, death of, by sunstroke, 365 
Trees, insect enemies to, 487; of West 
Prussia, rare, 463; received during 
frost, treatment of, 687; soils and 
situation. 567 ; the over-thinning of 
forest. 387 ; and shrubs, 8, 46, 68, 

2 10, 458, 707 
Trentham, plants and flowers at, 771 

Trichopilia brevis, 641 

Trop»:>Ium speciosum, 488 

Tulip, the cultivation of the English 

show. 46i; th« show, 579 
Tapa Feailiei, 642 
Tarf-catter, a new, 501 



U 



University College, London, 16 
Utricularia^reniformis, 132 



V 



Vanillas of commerce, 390 
Vegetable, assimilation and respiration, 

132; crops in 1895,613; foods and 

drinks, 498; physiology, 32*. 

products in Porto Rico, 130 ; show, 

the Chiswick, 271, 300 
Vegetable Marrows, Courge Patate, 701 
Vegetables, 9, 96. 167 ; at Brighton, 

an exhibition of, 334; at Uighclere, 

297; at Reading, 297 
Vegetarian luncheon, a, 302; the, at 

Chiswick, 370 
Vegetating, assimilation to, 329 
Venidium calendulaceum, 305 
Ventilating, method of, Tomato- 
house, 369 

Verbaicam Chaixi and Radbeckia 

Newmaui, 163 
Versailles, the National Horticultural 

School at, 261 
Victoria regia -in the gardens of the 

Royal Botanic Societv, 335 ; in the 

Sheffield Botanic Garden. 371; 

measurement of leaves of, 371 
Victorian fruits, 716 
Vienna, machinery exhibition in, 334 

View in the garden of A Pendarves 
Vivian, Eiq., Bosahan, 214 

Villamilla octandra, 546 

Vine, a fine, at Hackthorn Hall, 293, 
337; Peronospora, 74; stems, mal- 
formed, 685 ; sport, a, 336 ; the 
properties of the Grape, 390 

Violet perfump, 555 

Vitality of seeds, the latent, 607 



W 



Wallichia caryotoides, 54 1 

Walton Lea, Azaleas at, 65 

Warnham Court, the rockery at, 361 

Warter Priory, Yorkshire, 652 

Wasps, how to eradicate, 370 ; how to 

destroy, 271 
Water, red, and its cause, 17 

Watering f the pre cess of, 214 

Watkins, Mr. Jno., elected a J. P., 73 

Wax, Chinese insect, 365 

Weather of 1895, the, 773 

Weather and the crops of 1894, 72 ; 

and the fruit trees, 246 ; wintry, in 

Yorkshire, 525 
Weed-killer, the, 162 ; the danger ot 

130 
West's improved Ore hid -basket, 306 
West Indian plants, 612 
Wheat, and a national loaf, 461 crop 

of 1895, the, 609 ; crops, the world V, 

271 

Wheat-ear Pelargoniums, 134 
Whiteiey's nurseries. Hillingdc >1 
Willow, the white, 458 
Wills, the late Jno., 160 
Wind, icjury to foliage by, 526 
Windsor Castle, floral decorations at, 15 
Winter Cucumbers, 738 
Wistaria chinensir, 303 ; a fine speci- 
men of, 498 
Wistarias, species of, 237 
Witte, banquet to M. H , 429 
Woburn experimental fruit farm, 215 
Woodman, proposed memorial to Dr., 

682 
Woods, natural regeneration of, 39 



Y 



i?0 



•;» 



Ybar, events of the, 7 

Yorkshire College, the. at Leeds, 716 

Yucca guatemalensir, 524 



Vlll The Gardeners' Chronicle,} 



INDEX 



[December 28, IS* 5. 



LIST 



OF 



LLLUSTBATIONS. 



A 



Abebia caffra. fraitr, and sections of 

fruits of, 737 
Kichynanthus llilrfebrandi, 333 
Anona Cherimolia, fruit ot, 735; ia 

fruit at Constantinople, 735 
Aathuriuni Schejzerianum, bracteale 

form of, 73 
Aiticboke, the Paris, Green or Lior, 

649 
Arundinaria nitida, 179; A. j*ponice, 

185; A.Simoni, 181 
Aster field at Orpington, Messrs. 

Dobbie & Co,'s, 485 

Attilbe Lemoineii. 359 

Azilea-hooie at Walton L*a, War- 
rington, 65; A. indica alba, grasp 
of, at Penrice Caitle, Swansea, 129 



B 



Bambusa tesieilata, 189 
Bed, carpet, plan of, in Ravemcourt 
Park, 217 

Begonia incoroparabilisX, 681; B. X 

Mrs. Heal, 585 
Beilu perennis, The Bride 131 
Bouquet diiplajer, a new, 339 
Br unsvigia JosephiDse, 461 
Budding-knife, a new, 306 



C 



Cacti, giant, at Kew. 187 
Campanula Vidalli. 95 

Canna Italia, 704, 705 
Carrot, Scarlet Mode', 425 
Catasetum Cbrutyanuro, 617 ; C. ta- 
bular© var. rhinophoroip, 4i 

Cattleya labiata, variegattd pelal of a. 

495 

Cephalotaxas pednnculata, 717; C. 

peduoculata, seed-bearing »boot 0% 

716; C. drupacea, 717 
CMcrocodon Whitei, 243 
Chrysanthemum Boule d'Or '95,499; 

a M. Cbenon d* L«ct6, 683; C x 

Princess May, 295 

Cirrhopetalam Rothscbildiantim, 609 
Clematis indiviia lobata in the con- 
fer vatory corridor at Falkland Paik, 
301 ; C. montana, on the residence 
of G. Ratcliff Steel, Eiq , 303 

Cocoa australis, fruits and sections of 
fruits of, 739 

Codonopeia ovata, 311 

Oollinson, Peter, portrait of, 6 

Compastes, Low's ground-, 219 



Cordtline Bankii, on Stewart Island, 

613 
Cupreiaua arizonica, foliage, cooea,aod 

leaf- section o r , 63; C. macrocarpa 
var, guadeloupensi*, 62 ; C. macro* 
carpa, leaf- section o f , 63 
Cypripedium insigne, a pel or i at* d, 763 
Cypripedium X Lord Dtrby, 357 



D 



Dahlia- Cactus, Mrs. Wilson Noblf, 

367 
Dendrobium crnentum, 91 ; D. Hild*- 

brandi, 93; D. X illuatrr, 15; D 

PbaJaenopsis bololeuca, 397 
Deptford, viers in fh«* new Evelyn 

Park as 577, 579 581: 
Deutzia LemoiD'i', 389 
Diia kewensis, 273 
Daryphora Sassafras, 35 



E 



Edpatohium serrulatum, D.C., 265 
Evelyr*, Jno,, portrait of, 772; residence 

0', 773 
Evelyn Park at Deptfoid, views in the 

new, 577, 579, 581 



F 



Falkland Park, Clematis indivisa 

lobata in the conservatory at, 301 
Ficus, a species of, strangling a Mango, 

327 



Q 



Garden, a town, 707 
Gilbert, Richard, portrait of, 658 
Godden Green House, view 0% 453 
Gooseberry, a spineless, 100 101 
Grapes, succulent seeds in, 431 
Grieve, Peter, portrait of, 405 



H 



Hackthobn Hall, Lincoln, Vine at, 

293 
Hanley, a town garden at. 645 
Hedysamm multijugum, 8, 9 
Hemerocallis aurantiaca var. majo^, 71 
Hoe, the patent Stamford, 163 
Houlletia tigrina, 549 



I 



Ice- house, a plan for, 503 



Jub^i 
516; 

517 



J 



spectabilis, fruit and stone of, 
in the King's garden, Lisbon, 



K 



Kkw, giant Cacti at, 187 



L 



L^lia Digbyana, 153 

Lselio- Cattleya X Clonia superba, 421 ; 

L.-C. X Dfgbyana Moan'co, 161 ; 

L.-C. Fowleri, 239 
Lilium Parryi, 209 
Linaria vulgaris with double flowers, 

554 



Low's ground-compasses. 219 
Lnddemannia triloba, 713 
Lycoris aurea, 545 



M 



Madagascar, a royal garden in, 465 ; 
fall of Anevoca in the forests ut 

Aoalamazaotra, 457 
Malformed Cattleya, s, 495 
Mango, a Ficus strangling a, 327 
Marguerite Chrysanthf nium x Princess 

May, 295 
Marrow, Vegetable, Patate, 765 
Melon, The Lady, 555; M. E*ri's 

Favourite, 393 
Microitylis macrochila, 325 
Miltonia vexillaria, a specimen plant 

o', 743 
Mushroom culture, 118; spawn, pre- 
paring, 118 



N 



Nasturtium LMiput, 709 



O 




Odontoglobsum coronarium . 4 * 
Oaion, Highclere Tankard, 747 
Orchid-basket, West's improved, 306 



P 



PANDANUi Vandermwschii, 237 

Park, Evelyn, 577, 579, 581 



Peach and Nectarine, a cempositr, o7 
Pear, Lucy Grieve, 677 
Pearr, a dish of Catillac, 745 
Pelargonium, Wheat- ear, J 35 

Peloriated Cypripedium, a, 763 

Philadelpbus Boule d'Argenr, 19 

Phyllostacbys Khumasaca, ltd , P. 

nigra, 185; P. Quilioi, 183; P vinu 
glancescens, 183 

Polycycnis Lehmanni, 245 

Poly podium, a proliferous, 75 

Potato* digging in Tipperary, 133 



R 



Rabone, T. H., portrait of, 105 
Rain and root crop, diagram, 453 
Ravenscourt Park, plan of cau* 

in, 217 ' 

Root crop and rain diagram, 452 
K ne t Enchantress, 673 



t-b*d 



S 



Sayes Court, Jno. Evelyn's rfaidtt.ee at 

Deptford, 773 
Seed*, succulent, in Grants, 431 
Strawberry-leaf fungus, 750 
Streptocarpus multiflora, 211 
Synandrcspaa>x vermitoxicus, 769 



T 



Tchihatchewia isatider, 151 
Tipperary, Potato-digging in, 133 
Town garden, at Bow, 707 ; at Uaoley 

645 
Trichopilia brevis, 611 
Turf- catting implement, a, 501 



> 



V 



Vegetable Marrow, the Patate, 76j 
Ventilating Tomato-hou«er, method 
of, 369 , , 

Vm« at Hackthorn Hall, L'ncolo, 
293 

w 

Walton Lea, Azalea-house at, 65 
West's improved Orchid- basket, 3* 
Wheat-ear Pelargonium, 135 
Wbiteley's nurseries, the older n 
of elasshouses at. 653 



Y 



.Yucca guatemalensis, 519, 523. 52a 



SUPPLEMENTARY ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Aug 



man, Cornwall, view in the Gardens 
Au fuss 24. 



Bcjll'c* Nursery, Corridor at, July 27. r ^ . 

n r, ™ [October 12. 

C-ATrLBTAS, GROUP Of, IN TUB GARDENS OF Si* TREVOR LAWRENCE, Bt„ BuRFORD, 



Platyclinis glumacea in Sir Trevor Lawrence's Collkchon, November 9. 
Rockery in the Gardens of Warnham Court, Horsham, the. September 2i 

Sidney Botanic Gardens, Palms and Lake, with Blur Water- Lily, at *?* 

September 7. 

View in t«e Blue Mountains, Jamaica, October 26, 




Established i84i: 









No . 445.— Vol. XVIII. {£££} SATURDAY, JULY 




1895 









CONTENTS. 



t • * 



the past 






•«• 



•«• 



Artichoke, the 
Bar X708 and 

iter 
Boniuier, the late Mr. J. K. 

Cakxhortus 

C m eyas, a list of hybrid 

Oedarof Lebanon atTapley 

eraria, the origin of ... 

Cotliasoo, Peter ... 

Dendrobium X illustre 
I>rottwich, a park for ... 
iorists' flowers— 

C -nation and Picotee, 

the 
»*« ••• ... ... 

Ranunculus asiaticus 

Gardeners' Royal Benevo- 
lent Institution 

Gardeners' Royal Orphan 
F.i ad, the 

Huxley, the late Professor 

Innif Hookeri 

Hew Zealand, a town 

garden in 
Nursery notes— 

y rtimer, S., Farnham 
lary — 
. sters, Alderman 
Woods, S. A. ... 
Parasites 

Pea Cannell's English 
W 'nder 

Poilodelphus Lemoinei x 
Bcaled'Argent 

Potash, use and abuse of 
in fruit growing 

Bad *ater 



9 

17 
17 
14 
10 
17 

17 

ft 

15 

7 



• •• 



• ■ • 



Rosary, the... 
Scientific Committee of 
the R.H.S, 



. .. 



• it 



7 
18 



■ • • 



• •• 



• • # 



• •• 



• •• 



8 

7 
16 

17 
14 
18 

8 
11 

22 

2i 

6 

9 

18 

7 
17 



Societies— 
Croydon Horticultural 
Exeter Horticultural ... 

Lee, Black heath, and 
Lewisham Horticul- 

LllTO* ... »•• ••• 

National Horticultural 

of France 

National Rose at GIou- 

CWIvCl ... ... ... 

Richmond Horticultural 
"Windsor Horticultural . 



21 

20 



••• 






• * » 







Squirrels 

Strawberry •'Sensation*' 

Strawberry Vicomtesse 
Hericart de Thury 

Strawberries, old and new 
varieties of 

Thunderstorms 

Trees and shru 

Hedysarum multiju- 
gum 

University College, Lon- 
don ... 

Week's work, the 
Flower garden, the 
Fruits under glass 
Hardy fruit garden 
Kitchen garden, the 
Orchid houses, the 
Plants under glass 

Windsor Castl*», floral 
decorations at 



21 

17 

19 

18 
20 

17 
17 

17 

18 
17 



• •• 



• • • 



• • • 



• •« 



8 

16 

13 
13 
12 
12 
13 
12 

15 



ILLU8TRATION8. 



Der drobium x illustre 

H* saTum multijugum 

Fer*rCollinson ... 

Philadelphua Lemoinei x Boule d'Argent 



• « • 






• •• 



• • • 



• •# 



*«• 



• -• 



• *» 



• •• 

■ •• 



8 and 



• •• 



15 
9 
6 

19 



NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS. 



In 



alteration of the hour of 



going to Press, consequent on the larg 



for Advertisements should 



received 



Copy 



THURSDAY MORNING 



latest 



pRIMULA SINENSIS.— Although we grow 

-»- 5 houses, each 100 feet long, full for seed, yet we have 
ufficient, and should be glad to purchase any of our cus- 
tomers who have saved from any of varieties, Cannell's Pink 
In particular. 

1. CANNELL asp 8QNS, Sw anley. 

The Beat Present for a Gardener. 

IflNES AND VINE CULTURE. 

▼ The most complete and exhaustive Treatise on 

Grapes and their Culture ever published . 

Third Edition just out. 
Price 5*.; post free, 5f. <W. 
BARRON, Royal Horticultural Society, Chiswiok. 

^.10 000 CABBAGE PLANTS, all strong 

£ ZY\ « nY « and wU-woted. Robinson's Champion 

s^faW 2 t' & V* ai £ hlUI \* c . U. 6d. ; Savoy. Drumhead, 
special select, St. 3d. ; Brussel's Sprouts, beet sorts, 3s. 6d. ; 
Aaoarajjrus Borecole, 2s. per 1000. 

BRADLEY BROTHERS^TheJfurseries, Bard ney .Lincoln. 

WHAT OFFERS for clean healthTplants „ 

PAVnAtT\t U ^H^o?? CELSA ' 10fe*thigh, 6 feet through; 

ti. u 5 Tv5£!Li! ITOU * h : B ^CHARIS AMAZONICA, 5 feet 

fah«SL. D ^ ra i B0B 7 TM N0BILE * * feet through. Fit for 
F ^J^JSJP ' or Advertiser. Inspection invited. 
*. TXINBRIDGE, Brooklands, Broomfield, Chelmsford. 



SUTTON'S FLOWER OF SPRING 
CABBAGE.— The finest variety in cultivation for spring 
use. Of compact habit, having few outer leaves, firm heads of 
excellent quality. Mr. .1. Hounslow, Gardener to the Most 
Hon. the Marquis of Head fort, says :— " Your Flower of 
Spring is the best Cabbage I have seen. From seed sown 
last July I commenced cutting March 28. The quality is all 
that could be desired. Price of seed, Is. per oz„ post free. 

SUTTON'S SEEDS GENUINE ONLY DIRECT FROM 

UTTON and SONS, THE ROYAL 

SE EDSMEN, READING. 

TO the Trade. 

FERNS. — Finest Stock in the World. 
All the most useful sorts in various sizes. 

Price*, &c, on application. 
• H. B. MAY, Dyson VLane Nurseries, Upper Edmonton, 

AUL I FLO W E R PLANTS. — Veitch's 

Autumn Giant, strong and well-rooted, about 100,000. 
3f. per 1000, on rail.— R. H. BATH, Osborne Farm, Wisbech. 




RARE OPPORTUNITY. 
healthy C ATTLEYAS, LiELIAS, Ate. ; 
varieties at about a third of dealer's prices. 

Mr. STAMPER, Ulverston. 



Established 

plants and 




NOW is the TIME to PLANT PYRETH- 
RUMS, GAILLARDIAS, DELPHINIUMS, and CANNAS. 
Catalogue of KELWAY akd SON, Langport, Somerset. 

OUVARDIAS. — Best Market varieties ; 

Vreelandii, Mrs. R. Green, P. Cleveland, Ac., our selec- 
tion in eight or ten sorts. 2s. 6d. per doz.. 12s. per 100; £5 
par 1000. Well-rooted stuff fit for 60's. Cash with Order. 
CRANE AND CLARKE, The Nurseries. March, Camas. 

Paul's Nurseries, Waltham Cross. 

WM. PAUL & SON invite inspection of their 
ROSES, FRUIT TREES, and HARDY ORNAMENTAL 
TREES, now in perfection of Leaf and Bloom. Many new 
Roses, not to be seen elsewhere, are now in bloom. South 
entrance four minutes* walk from Waltham Cross Station, 
west entrance three minutes' walk from Theobald's Grove Sta- 
tion, G.E.R., twelve miles from Liverpool Street Station, 
London. Everything for the Garden. 

PALMS, CORYPHAS and L ATANIAS from 
Stores, 10s. per 100. Cash or exchange for Carnations, 
Pelargonium Cuttings, or Bedding Geraniums. 
F. ROSS & CO., Merstham. Surrey. 

DOUBLE WHITE PRIMULAS.— Strong 
plants, in 6Vs, 20*. per 100. Strong-rooted Cuttings, 
10*. per 100. Cash with order. 

D. ANDERSON, Teddington Nursery, S.W. 



FOR ORCHIDS of every desoript 
Reasonable Prices, and efficient men to cultivi 

ipply to— 

W. L. LEWIS Aim CO., Southgate, London, ] 

PRICE LIST free. 



At 



PRIMULAS! PRIMULAS! PRIMULAS 
26th year of Distribution. 
Williams' Superb Strain, Is. 6d. per dozen ; 10s. per 100. 
CINERARIAS, same price ; also DOUBLE WHITE PRIM 
ULAS, 6d. each. Package and Carriage free for Cash wit! 
Order.— JOHN STEVENS, The Nurseries, Coventry. 



MESSRS. JOHN PEED and SONS beg to 
intimate that they intend holding their ANNUAL 
EXHIBITION of GLOXINIAS and CALADIUMS, at their 
Roupell Park Nurseries, Norwood Road, S.E., on TUESDAY 

and WEDNESDAY, July 9 and 10, to which they cordially 
invite all interested. 

QJ* The Nurseries adjoin Tulse Hill Station, and are 

within a few minutes' walk of West Norwood, Dulwich. and 
Heme Hill. 



BEGONIAS, Double and Single, for Bedding 
Extra superb in quality. Selected large tubers. Also foi 
Conservatory and Exhibition. Descriptive CATALOGUE free 

B. R. DAVIS, Yeovil Nurseries. Somerset. 



H 



ENRY RIDES, Salesman, 

Avenue, Covsnt Garden, W.C. 
Highest Market Prices. Prompt eash , 



Central 






[Regt. as a Newspaper. 



(Price 3d. 

\ Post-free, tyrf. 



Notice. 

THE Estate of JOHN SHURRIE IRELAND, 
Nurseryman and Seedsman, Edinburgh. 
The TRUSTEE begs to REMIND CREDITORS that a FIRST 
and FINAL DIVIDEND of 12s . 6<*. per £ was payable at hii 
Chambers on Thursday, July 4 current. 

JOHN SCOTT TAIT, C.A., Trustee. 
Chambers :— 67, George Street, Edinburgh, June 28, 1S9*. 

TVTARCISSUS.— Grand Monarque Naroiss, and 

1* the large- flowering Jonquil, Campernelli, exceptionally 
fine home-grown Bulbs, at very low prices. 

I T. GELL, Week Farm, Ventnor, Isle of Wight. 

. Important to Mushroom Growers. 

CUTHBERT'S SPECIALITY MUSHROOM 
SPAWN. Always alike; most productive. Hundreds 

of testimonials. Per bushel, 6*. 

R. AKD G. CUTHBERT, Seed, Bulb, and Plant Merchants, 
Southgate. N. Establis h ed 1 797. ' ^^ 

M A T E U R 8,-AMATEURS. 




12 Primulas, Is. 6rf. ; 12 Coleus, 3f. ; 12 Geraniums. 3s. 6d. ; 
Heliotropes, 2s. ; 12 fuchsias, 4s. The lot 10s. All post free. 

C. WALKER, F.R.H.S.. Florist. Leyland. 






Peaches, Nectarines, Melons, Strawberries, &c. 

JOHN NATHAN, Jun., Long Market, Covent 
Garden, W.C, is open to receive Consignments of above. 
Best price guaranteed ; 5 °/ Commission. Bankers references. 

ARR'S AUTUMN-FLOWERING BULBS. 

— Send for full Descriptive LIST of Beautiful Autumn- 
flowering Crocuses, Colchicums (Meadow Saffrons), 
Cyclamen, Scillas, Snowflakes, &c. 

BARR'S SEEDS for present sowing, Catalogue on application. 

BARBS DAFFODILS and SPRING FLOWERING BULBS, 
Catalogues ready in August. 
BARR AHD SON, 12, King Street, Covent Garden, London. 




FERNS AND DECORATIVE PLANTS 
(TRADE) :— Ferns, in 2J-inch pots. Stove and Green- 
house, 30 best selling sorts, 12s. 100 ; ditto large, in 48's, 10 best 
selling sorts, 6f. dor. ; strong seedlings, 6s. 100, 60s. 1000; Adi- 
antum cuneatum, in 48's, for cutting, 6s. and 8s. doz. ; ditto, 
for making large plants quickly, 16s. and 20s, 100 ; Aralias, 10s. 
100 ; Cyperus, Aralias, Grevilleas, Geraniums, in 48*8. 6s. doz. ; 
Heliotrope, Fuchsias. Double Petunias, Marguerites. Double 
Tropi**olums, in bloom, in 48's, 8s. doz. ; Ficus, Palms, Dra- 
caenas, Crassulas, Hydrangeas, Pelargoniums, 12s. doz. Lists 
free. Packed free. Cash with order.— J. SMITH, London Fern 
Nurseries. Louirhborouirh Junction. London. S.W. 



Petroleum ! Petroleum I ! Petroleum 1 ! ! 

BRILLIANT ILLUMINANT. 
In casks, carriage paid. Sd. per gallon. 
ANDREW POTTER, Melbourne Works, Wolverhampton. 

Maker to the Queen and Prince of Wales. 

ISHURST COMPOUND, used since 1859 

for Red Spider, Mildew, Thrips, Greenfly, and otfcsr 
blight ; 2 ounces to the gallon of soft water ; 4 to 16 ounces 
a winter dressing for Vines and Orchard-house trees, in iatl 
from cake, for American blight, and as an emulsion wh 
paraffin is used. Has outlived many preparations intended 
supersede it. Boxes, It., 3s.. and 10s. 64. 



GISHURSTINE keeps Boots dry and soft on 
wet ground. Boxes, 6<f. and Is., from the Trade. 
Wholesale from PRICE'S PATENT CANDLE COMPANY 
(Limited), London. 




CBEESON'S MANURE.— Composed of 
• Blood and Bone. The best Fertiliser for all pi„ 
Sold in tins, Is., 2s. 6d. t and 5s. 6<f. ; also in air-tight 
i cwt., 6t. ; 1 cwt., 10s. Full directions for use sent with 

1 bag. 1 cwt. and above sent carriage paid, cash 
O. BEESON. Bone Mills, St. NeoTe, Hunts. 

" 12, Knowle Road, Brixton, Lond 
ave tried this fertiliser on various garden crops, i 
ft to say that it it an excellent Manure for Vegefc 
i, Vines, and Fruit Trees. 

M A. B. GRIFFITHS. Ph.D.. F.R.S.E.. F.Q. 



order. 



J WEEKS & CO., Horticultural Builders 
• to Her Majesty. H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, H.M. 
Government, Admii ally Dept., War Dept. , Royal Hort. 8oc.. 
Royal Botanic Soc., Parks and Public Buildings, Patentees of 
the Duplex Upright Tubular Boilers, Kina'sRoad. Chelsea.S. W. 







2 



THE 



GAB DENE PS 1 



CHRONICLE 



[July <>, 1896, 



SALE S by AUC TION. 

THURSDAY NEXT. 



CREAT SALE 




ORCHIDS 



A GRAND IMPORTATION OF 

C ATT LEY A SPECIES, 

Just Received Direct, ln Splehdid Order. 

Without Reserve. 

Including some Fine Masses. 

also, 

AN IMPORTATION in SPLENDID ORDER 

From Messrs. F. SANDER and CO., St. Albans, 

Comprising— 
Lailia autumnalis atro- Aerides odoratum 



rubens 
Lycaste cruenta 
Cypripedium Rothschildia- 

num 
Oncidium pellicanum 

Lcelia anceps 



Liclia Brassavola glauca 
Dendrobium Dalhcusiear * 
Saccolabium retusum 
Odontogiossum citrosmum 
Dendrobium cambridgeanum 
Cypripedium bellatulum 



Another 

IMPORTATION from Messrs. LEWIS & CO., 

consisting of a grand lot of 

ONCIDIUM TIGRINUM. 

ODONTOGLOSSUM HASTATUM, 

ODONTOGLOSSUM INSLEAYIl (varieties). 

Established Orchids, chiefly In Flower and Bud, 

from several well-known Collections. 

And 

The Second Portion of the Collection of Established 

ORCHIDS formed by H. B. MILDMAY, Esq., of Shore- 
ham Place, Shoreham, Kent. 

MR. J. C. STEVENS will SELL the above 
by AUCTION, at his Great Rooms, 38, King Street, 
Covent Garden, W.C., on THURSDAY NEXT, July 11, at 
half-past 12 o'Clock precisely. 

On view morning of Sale, and Catalogues had. 

Tuesday, Next. 

The COLLECTION of ORCHIDS formed by R. A. Todd, Esq.. 
of M Honeyden," Foot's Cray, who is relinquishing their 
cultivation. The Collection is well known for its variety 
of botanical rarities and other choice kinds, which will be 
enumerated in the Catalogue. All the plants are well 
grown, and present a unique opportunity for obtaining 
rare and choice varieties seldom met with at Auction 
Sales. Amongst others, the following may be men- 
tioned : — 

Angrsecum virens superbum 

,, sesqui peri ale 
Cypripedium Schroderoe Both- 

schildianum 

frande 
.athamianum 
Elhottianum 
Niobe 

caudatum Wallisii 
Arthurian um 
Morganise 
Dendrobium nobile Cooksoni 
Cassiope 
Grimtnianum 
nobile nobiiius 
crass mode album 



»• 
»• 






ii 



• » 






tf 



»» 



» 



Cymbidium eburneum 
Cattleya exoniensis 
Mossise 
Mendeli 
Coelog y ne Massan gea n a 
Dayana 
„ Micholetzii 
Laelia autumnalis alba 
,, anceps alba 
„ purpurata 

Maxillaria Sanderiana 
Phalsenopsis amabilis 

„ Schilieriana 

,, grand i flora 

Vanda Dennisoniana 
„ Batemanniana 



Johnson ii 

Together with Masdevallias, Pleonies, Dendrobiums, Epiden- 
drums, Zygopetalums, Habenarias, Coelogynes, Brassavolas, 
and others in great variety. 

MESSRS. PROTHEROE and MORRIS will 
SELL the above by AUCTION, at their Central Sale 
Rooms, 67 and 68, Cheapside, London, E.C., on TUESDAY 
NEXT, July 9, at half-past 12 o'Clock. 
On view morning of Sale , and Catalogues had. 

Friday Next, July 12. 

By Order of Messrs. F. SANDER & CO., St. Albans. 

CATTLEYA SALE, WITHOUT RESERVE. 

CATTLEYA MENDELI. 
Now very scarce in its native home. It is well known that 
the finest forms have turned up in our importations. Every 
plant received is offered. 

CATTLEYA SPECIES. 
A large- flowered Cattleya, with short, round, Apple-shaped 
bulbs, and thick, board-like leaves. This very distinct-looking 
Cattleya may be a natural hybrid between the Chirgua Mossiee 
and Cattleya Percivaliana. 

CATTLEYA ROEZLH. 
In large masses. This, the very finest of the type, has not 
«en offered in the Sale Rooms for many years, and Buyers 
hould not lose this opportunity of securing plants of this, one 
)f the largest flowered and most magnificent of all Cattleyas. 

PHAL.ENOPSIS VIOLACEA. 
Imported plants, in fine condition. The flowers are of large 
size, rich rosy-purple and yellow, most deliciously scented. 

ODONTOGLOSSUM GRANDE. O. CITROSMUM. 

A DENDROBIUM SPECIES from Bhoran. 
(?) DENDROBIUM CUCULLATUM GIGANTEUM, 

but probably new. 

CYPRIPEDIUM ELLIOT PIANUM. 
The light variety of C. Rothschildianum, Plants in grand 
condition. C. BELLATULUM. 

L^ELIA ANCEPS MORADA. 

VANDA HOOKERIANA GIG ANTE A. 
DENDROBIUM JENKINSII. 

CYPRIPEDIUM PARISHn, Ac. 

MESSRS. PROTHEROE and MORRIS will 
SELL the above, on FRIDAY NEXT, July 12, at theii 
Central Auction Rooms, 67 and 68, Cheapside, London, E.C., 
at half-past 12 o'Clock precisely. 

On view morni d* of Sale, and Catalogues had. 






Walthamstow, Essex. 

AS A GOING CONCERN. VERY LOW RESERVE. 

MR. JASPER J. KELF will SELL by AUC- 
TION, at the u Tower Hotel " (opposite Hoe Street 

Station), Walthamstow. on WEDNESDAY, July -10, at 8pm.. 
the FREEHOLD PREMISES known as MARKTOU6E ROAD 
NURSERIES, together with the brick-built House thereon, 
seven Greenhouses, Stabling, Sheds, Stock-in-Trade, Utensils, 
and Goodwill, prominently situated near St. James Street 
Station. This offers an exceptional opportunity for those 
desirous of commencing business. 

Detailed particulars of FRANCIS GREENUP, Esq,, Solicitor, 
44, William Street, Woolwich; and of the Auctioneer, 
Walthamstow, Essex. • 

Southend-on-Sea, Essex. 

To FLORISTS, NURSERYMEN, MARKET GARDENERS, 

and OTHERS. 

MESSRS. TALBOT and WHITE are 
favoured with instructions to SELL by AUCTION, at 
tbeir Sale Room, Cliff Town Road, Southend, on SATURDAY, 
July 20, 1895, commencing at 4 o'Clock precisely in the after- 
noon, the beneficial interest in the LEASE of the old- 
established NURSERY GARDENS, known as the li BEACH 
NURSERIES," Southchurch Beach (late Reed's), having an 
area of about 7i Acres of Land, well stocked with choice 
Fruit Trees in full bearing, and showing well for the present 
season. The Premises include Two capital Dwelling-houses 
(one of which is let off, and produces £20 per annum) ; also, a 
Workman s Cottage, at present let at 35. per week ; extensive 
Vineries, 136 feet in length, planted with choice Vines, and 
heated by hot- water pipes ; Peach-house, 59 feet by 12 feet ; 
Greenhouses and Forcing-houses, Sheds and Out-buildings, 
and numerous useful Erections. The Land is held upon a 
Lease (14 years) direct from the Freeholder, at the very 
moderate rental of £50 per annum. 

This attractive and excellent Nursery Garden has for many 
years been justly celebrated fcr its choice Grapes and other 
Fruit, and being within 1 mile of Southend, the demand for it 
is very great. A considerable business could also be done with 

Teas and Refreshments. 

Printed particulars, with conditions of Sale, can be obtained 
of A. A. TIMBRELL, Esq., Solicitor, 24, Martin's Lane, 
Cannon Street, E.C. ; of Messrs. TIMBRELL and WILKIN- 
SON, Solicitors, Town Hall Chambers, Stratford, E. ; or of the 
Auctioneers, Auctioneers' Offices, High Street, Southend. 




For Sale by Private Treaty. 



THOUSANDS of TEA and OTHER ROSES, 

in pots. Just coming into bloom. 

THOUSANDS of ORNAMENTAL FOLIAGE 
PLANTS, in great variety. 

THOUSANDS of ORCHIDS, in great variety. 



JOHN COWAN 




CO. 



(LIMITED), 



Are offering the above for SALE by PRIVATE 

TREATY, during the next week, at 

SPECIAL PRICES. 
INSPECTION is EARNESTLY INVITED. 



Descriptive and Priced Catalogues post-free, 

on application to the Company, 

THE VINEYARD and NURSERIES, 

GARSTON, near LIVERPOOL. 



WANTED, to Rent, 300 or 400 feet run of 
GLASS, m good condition, for Cucumber and Tomato 
Forcing, for Market. All particulars to — 

R. SMITH, 11, Agnes Street, Keighley. 

WANTED, to Rent, a small MARKET 
GARDEN, with some Glass, and a six-roomed COT- 
TAGE. Near a station.— FuU particulars to R. LONSDALE, 
Sbepperton Green, Middlesex. 

FOR SALE, South of England, small NUR- 
SERY, in good position, near seaside resoit. Rent mode- 
rate. Lease. Immediate Possession.— Apply, FLORIST, 41, 
Wellington Street, Strand, W.C. 

To Market Gardeners, Fruit and Flower Growers, 

FLORISTS, &c. 
SUSSEX, Delightful Situation near TJCKFIELD. 

TO BE SOLD, very cheap, with Possession, 
FREEHOLD RICH MEADOW, &c, 14 acres, witli an 
extensive range of modern Greenhouses, 73,900 super, feet (of 
wfcich two cover £ an acre), fitted with lO.OuO teet ot Hot- water 
Fiping, Boilers, &c, adapted for raising Choice Early Vege- 
tables, Flowers, Mushrooms, Salading, on a large scale. The 
Glass erections cost nearly £10,000. Taxes very low. Price, 
£4500.— Apply, by letter, to W. A., 41, Wellington Street, 
Strand, London, W.C. 

To Nurserymen, Florists, Market Gardeners, and 

Others. Large MARKET GARDEN and NURSERY, with 
about Four Acres, Greenhouses, Heated, Constant Water 
Supply, Stabling, Potting-sheds, Offices, Ac, about four- 
teen miles from Covent Garden, 

TO BE LET or SOLD as a going concern, with 
Possession, or could be divided to suit intending pur- 
chasers or tenants. Principals or tbeir solicitors only dealt 
with. For particulars apply to Messrs. DOWSON, AINSLIE 
_JO MARTINEAU, 28, Bedford Row, London, W.C. 



EX HIBITIO NS. 

ROYAL BOTANIC SOCIETY 
GARDENS, REGENT'S PARK, 

EVENING FI8TE and EXHIBITION of TABLE DECORA. 
TIONS, BOUQUETS, FLOWER PAINTINGS, & c . 

WEDNESDAY NEXT, July 10. 

Gates open at 8 p.m. to 12. The Bands of the 1st Lift 
Guards and the Royal Horse Guards, by permission of their 
commanding officers, will play, and the Gardens be illuminat^ 
from 8 to 12 

Tickets to be obtained at the Gardens, and of the principal 
agents, 10s each; or on the day of the fete 155. each. 

EKEFOKD and WEST OJF ENGLAND 

ROSE SOCIETY. 
The TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL EXHIBITION of R0SE8 
(Open to the United Kingdom), will be he id in the Assembly 
Rooms, Great Malvern, on THURSDAY, July 11, 1895. 

£150 IN PRIZES. 
Prize Schedules may be obtained from the Hon. Sec, the 
Rev. PREBENDARY ASHLEY, Stretton Rectory, Hereford. 

EWCASTLE-ON-TYNE GREAT SUM- 

MER FLOWER SHOW, 
Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, July 24, 25, and 26, 18 

Entries close July 17. For Schedules apply to— 

J. J. GILLESPIE, Jun ., 



Cross House Chambers. 



SALTEKHEBBLE and DISTRICT ROSE 
SHOW.— THURSDAY, July 18, 1895. Schedules, &c, 
from JNO. E. BROOKS. Sec, 4, Savile Park Street, Halifax. 



Trentham Gardens. 

THE TRENTHAM and HANFORD HOR- 
TICULTURAL SOCIETY will hold their EIGHTH 

ANNUAL EXHIBITION on July 25. 

£400 GIVEN IN PRIZES. 
GROUP OF PLANTS, for effect— 1st. £20, and Silver Cup, 

value £10 lOf. ; 2nd, £20; 3rd, £13 ; 4th, £9. 
48 CUT ROSES— 1st and Special, £13 7s. ; 2nd, £5; 3rd, £3. 
36 ,, —1st, £5, and National Rose Society's Gold 

Medal ; 2nd, £3 ; 3rd. £2. 
COLLECTION OF FRUIT (9 dishes)— 1st, £10; 2nd, £6; 

3rd, £3. . * 

4 BUNCHES OF GRAPES— 1st, £5 ; 2nd. £3 ; 3rd, £h 
Schedules on application to Mr. L. T. ALFORD. 
Hanford, Stoke-on-Trent. 



A 



BBEY PARK, LEICESTER 



The TENTH ANNUAL FLOWER SHOW and GALA w. 
be held in the above Park on TUESDAY, August 6 next. 

JNO. BURN. Hon. Sec. 




To Florists and Landscape Gardeners with Capital. 

FOR SALE, the 30 years' LEASE, GOOD- 
WILL, STOCK, PLANT, and 12 well-built GLASS- 
HOUSES in complete repair, well fitted with Pipes ana 
Boilers throughout- in all about an acre. Constant supply oi 
water. Prominent position, eight miles from Covent Garden. 
High-class trade. Established over 20 years. Dwelling- 
house, Potting-sheds, Stabling, &c. Rent moderate. 

Apply to Mr. DELL, North Finchiey, N. 

fureerymen and Florists commencing business. 

HAMPTON-ON-THAMES, on The Marling 
Park Estate, free from London fogs, » £*JE' T c n 
loam, the favourite neighbourhood for Growers, FREERW£ 
LAND for SALE, on easy system of payment. ExcelleDtaue 
for residences.— For full particulars apply to Mr. FBIU£. £ 
HUGHE S (Surveyor), the Estate Office, Hampton-on-in amea; 

TO BE LET, a NURSERY, FLORIST, and 
SEED BUSINESS ; 1 acre of Ground, three Houses, an 
Dwelling-house with Shop. Market town in South, bw . 
* c„ about £150.-G., 41. Wellington Street. Strand ^W^ 

TO BE LET or SOLD.— A capital NURSERj 
with small Cottage, near London. . ^^uSjjSrr, 
sell cheap. First-rate position. -Apply to ROBT. PECKiu. 
45, Plumstead R oad, Plumstead. 

A LBION NURSERY.-TO BE LET, at once, 

XV nearly half-an-acre, with seven Glass-houses, two ow* 
long, in good repair, heated with hot-water Moderate t 
Southerly aspect.— Apply to Mr. BATES, Nursery, lnaw» 
House, Hammer «mith, W. _^________------- 

O BE LET, the old-established NURSERj 

BUSINESS at Hail Santon. Hoimrook, in ^ n 




Cumberland, being carried 
J. J. Gaitskell. comDrisinflr 



Land, partly stocked 



Railway. The Stock can be taken at a Valuation if r^ ul ™^ 
There are also Cottages for workmen on the premises. */ 
other information can be had from the Executors of toe 
Jacob Gaitskell. WM. GAITSKELL, } Exe cutor9. 

WM. HODGKItf. f 







OR SALE, a CHATSWORTH BOILER 

80 inches long by 14 by 14, and fittings in good condit 
R. J. WOLTON, Newland Toft Nursery, Hull 




DOUBLE WHITE PRIMULAS. — Strong 
plants, in 60_, 25*. per 100, free on rail for casii 
order.— G. BENNETT, Florist, Han well. 




SUPERB ORCHIDS, CHEAP.— Thousao* 
to select from. Write for LIST, free. ^ 

P.McARTHUR,TheLondonNursery,4, MaidaVale.London- 





RCHID PEAT; Best Quality; 

FIBROUS PEAT for Stove and Greenhouse use. - . 
DODENDRON and AZALEA PEAT. Samples and Prices w 

WALKER A3fD CO. , Farnborough, Hante. 









July 6, 1895.J 



THE 



GARDENERS' CHRONICLE. 



3 



London County Council. 

To NURSERYMEN and BULB GROWERS. ^ 

rpilE LONDON COUNTY COUNCIL is 

X prepared to receive TENDERS for the SUPPLY of 
BULBS for the various Parks and Gardens. Persons desiring 
to submit tenders may obtain a copy of the specification, form 
of tender, and other particulars, at the Parks and Open 
Spacps Sub-Department. County Hall, Spring Gardens. S.W. 
Tenders must be upon the official forms, and the printed in- 
structions con t a' ned therein must be strictly complied with. 
Tenders are to be delivered at the County Hall, in a sealed 
cover, addressed to the Clerk of the London County Council, 
and marked *• Tender for Bulbs." No tender will be received 
after 10 o'Clock A.M., on Friday, July 19, 1895. Any tender 
which does not comply with the printed instructions may be 
rejected. The Council does not bind itself to accept the lowest 
or any tender. H. DE LA HOOKE, Clerk of the Council. 

Council Hall, Spring Gardens, S.W., July 4, 1895. 

TENDERS are invited for the ERECTION 
and HEATING of a CONSERVATORY to be elected in 
the WEST END PARK. WOLVERHAMPTON, in accord- 
ance with plans and specifications which may be obtained from 
THOMAS H. MAWSON, Park and Garden Architect, Win- 
dermere, on a deposit of 10*. 6d., which will be returned on 
receipt of band fide Tender. 

Tenders are to be addressed to the Chairman of Floral F3te, 
Town Hall, for receipt on July 16. 

N.B. — The Conservatory is to be erected on the putty less 
glazing system. 

DINBURGH SCHOOL of RUliAL 

ECONOMY.-SESSION 1895 96. 

BOARD OF MANAGEMENT appointed by the University 
Court, the Highland and Agricultural Society, the Town 
Council of Edinburgh, and Contributing County Councils. 
Chairman — The Right Hon. J. P. B. Robertson, Lord Justice- 
General. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION are provided both in DAY 
and EVENING CLASSES for FARMERS, GARDENERS, 
FORESTERS, and others interested in Rural Economy. 

The SESSION begins in October and ends in March. 
Fees Specially Moderate. 

Copies of the Syllabus may be had from The Secretary 
of the University Court, Edinburgh. 



ZFlfty Nurseries, Market Gardens, Florist and Seed 

BUSINESSES to be DISPOSED OF. _ 

MESSRS. PROTHEROE and MORRIS' 
HORTICULTURAL REGISTER contains full parti- 
culars of the above, and can be obtained, gratis, at 

67 and 68, Cheapside, London. E.C. 



FOR ORCHIDS and GARDENERS 
to Grow them, apply to SANDER'S. St. Albans. The finest 
stock of Orchids in the World. — 30 minutes from St. Pancraa. 




1,000,000 PLANTS. 

Covent Garden Brussels, 2s. 6rf. p. 1000 
Myatt's Offenham Cabbage, 2s. 6rf. 

per 1000. 
Enfield Market, 2s. $d. per 1000. 
Drumhead Savoy, 2s. 6rf. per 1000. 
Vei ten's Autumn Giant Cauliflower, 

4s. per 1000. 

Early London, 4s. per 1000. 

Edmond's Superb White Spring Broc- 
coli, 5s. per 1000. 

W. HORNE, 

CLIFFE, ROCHESTER. 



EARLY BULBS 



Our Special Offer of Early Bulbs ia Now Ready, and will be sent 

post-free on application. Prices very low. We are now lifting 

DAFFODILS, 

and can despatch orders in July for Early Planting. The 
Bulbs are really splendid, and thoroughly ripened. 



J. R. PEARSON & SONS, 

CHILWELL NURSERIES, NOT IS. 




CHAS. P. KINNELL 




GO. 



Largest and best Stook of HOT- WATER 
BOILERS, PIPES, VALVES, and HORTI- 
CULTURAL SUNDRIES in the United 
Jungdom. HEATING APPARATUS erected 
J? specially-trained staff of skilled Engineers. 

rfwmates fr ee. New Illustrated Catalogue 
*j Q t on receipt of post-oard. Contractors to 
a -&. Government, &c, &c. 



SOUTHWARK 





ST., LONDON", S.E. 



* , ETS — NETS. -Tanned, Oiled, Waterproof, 

*iKU ^ r p £ otectiD R Strawberry Beds, Fruit Trees, Ac. , from 
' ** excellent Tennis boundaries. 

200 yards, 8s. : second quality, 55. 



8PASHETT 



BOULTON 




PAUL 



Manufacturers, 
NORWICH. 



GARDEN RE QUI SITES in Great Variety 

No. 6. — Wrought -Iron 
Ashes or Offal Barrow, 

Garden Barrow and Cinder 
Sifter combined. 
The top can be taken off, 
making an excellent Leaf 
and Garden Barrow. 

Cash Price, 

Painted 30/- 

Body galvanized, extra 6/- 

If fitted with Registered Cinder Sifter, A/6 extra, 





No. 7.-Wrought-Iron 

Barrow. 

For ASHES, OOALS, 

STABLE, &c. 



Cash Pkice 



• ft 



... 2.V- 






No. 87. The Hamburg Prize 
Watering Machine, 

With Poweiful Gaiden Engine. 

Cash Price, Carr. Paid. 

To hold 36 gallons £5 

If without pump £4 

Suction pipe at 1/3 per ft. 

If fitted with extra powerful 
pump, two delivery hose jets 
and sprayers, for spraying fruit 
trees, &c. ; also dashers, for 
keeping the solution mixed 
whilst in use. £8. 

Send for ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE free. 

Carriage Paid on all Orders above 40*. value to the principal 

Railway Stations in England and Wales. 

BOULTON & PAUL, NORWICH. 



GLASS I 




15-oz., per 100 ft., 7s. 6d 
21-oz., M 10*. 04 




CHEAP GLASS I 

In Stock Sizes. 
12X10, 18X12, 18X14, 24X14 
14X12, 20X12, 18X16. 24X16 
16X12, 16X14, 20X16, 24x18, 8lq, 
If X 3 Prepared Sash Bar at 55. per 100 feet. 
Flooring, 5/9 per square; Matching, 4/9; 2 X 4, at fd. per 
foot run. Garden Utensils, Trellis, Ironmongery, Paints, ho. 

Catalogues free. 

THE CHEAP WOOD COMPANY, 

72, B18HOP8OATE Street Within. London, E.G. 



HILL 




SMITH'S 



BLACK VARNISH 



For Preserving Ironwork, Wood, or Stone. 



J 




a 

i 

2 

W 

H 

M 

o 



An Excellent Substitute for Oil Paint, 

at one-third the cost. 

This unrivalled varnish has for forty years given un- 
bounded satisfaction, obtained a laroe consumption, and 
earned a high refutation throughout the kingdom. It 
requires no mixing, can be applied cold by any ordinary 
labourer, and dries in ten minutes with a perfect gloss. 
Fences periodically coated with it are effectually preserved 
from deterioration for an indefinite period. 

Price, 1*. 6d. per gallon at the manufactory, or If. 84. 
per gallon, carriage paid to any railway station, in casks 
of 36, 18, or 9 gallons. 

Testimonial from Chas. Patrick, Esq., Cloughfold, 
Manchester (Numerous others) :— " I have used your Black 
Varnibh for upwards of twenty years, and find none to 
equal it in economy and quality." 

^ . wrn-rsx »-r I EVERY CASK BEARS THE ABOVE 

CA TIT ION. \ REGISTERED TRADE MARK. 

I Beware of Cheap Imitations. 



HILL 




SMITH 



WIBE 



±*n> CO., Net Manufacturers, Lowestoft. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

IRON FENCING, STRAINED 
IENCINO, HURDLES, GATES, &c. 

Illustrated CATALOGUE and Price LIST on application 

Brlerley Ironworks, Dudley ; 

Queen Victoria Street, London, £.0 ; 

47, Dawson Street, Dublin. 







p 



HUDSONURE 

KING OF FERTILISERS 

Composed of the v»*ry finest ingredient*, nrrmmj for ail 
plants. A genuine up-to-date Manure, and will be found to 
supersede all the old-fafhioned mixtures offered. Con tains 
Nitrogen, Phosphoric Acid, and Potash in the most available 
form, and will be found Quick in Art ion, yet lasts tig and 
reliable. Try it on anything. 

In Tins, 6d. and Is., post-free, for trial, and in Btgs of- 
71b., 141b.. 281b., 661b., 11216., 

2s. 6d. 4s. 6d. 7s. 12s. 20s. 

Sent Carriage Paid, or can be obtained from gh-cUui 
men and Florists at above prices. 

Insist upon having HUDSONURE. 

SULPHATE OK AMMONIA, NITRATK OF SOPA. 1««NE 
MKAL, KAINIT, PERUVIAN GUANO, DISSOLVED B< NRS, 
TOBACCO PAPER, Ac, all of finest quality, at lowest prices. 

HUDSON'S FERTILISERS, 



*.».-»• 



* **: 



KlLBURN, LONDON, N W. 



• 



THOMSON'S 



VINE AND PUNT MANURE. 

The very best for all purposes. 

The result of many years' experience. Largely 

used both at home and abroad. 






Agent for London s — J. GEORGE, 14, Redgrave Road, 
Putney, S.W. 

Agent for Channel Islands :— J. H. PARSONS, Market 
Place, Guernsey. 

Sole Makers :— WM. THOMSON AND SONS, Ltd., Twetd 
Vineyard, Clovenfords, N.B. 



Price Lists and Testimonials on application. 

Analysis sent with orders of J-cwt. and upwards. 

SOLD B Y ALL 8 E E D 8 M E X. 

NATIVE GUANO.— Best and Cheapest 
Manure for Garden Use. Price £3 10i. per ton, in 
bags. Lots under 10 cwt., As. per cwt. ; 1 cwt. sample bag sent 
carriage paid to any station in England, on receipt of P. O. 
for 55. Extracts from 19th Annual Collection of Reports :— 

NATIVE GUANO FOR POTATOS, VEGETABLES, he. 
A. SIMMONS. Nurseryman, Barnet, used for Peas, Celery, 
Onions, Cabbage, Turnips, and Carrots. Results :— •• In eve»y 
way satisfactory." J. T. Yates, Coventry, used for Onions, 
Peas, Beans, and other vegetables, Strawberries, and Tomatos : 
"All crops proved satisfactory; a valuable manure, cheap, 
clean, and portable." F. J. Fletcher, Maidenhead, with 
Onions. — "Results splendid ; very pleased." 

NATIVE GUANO FOR FRUIT, ROSES. TOMATOS, he. 

H. Gillett, Florist, Sevenoaks.— "Used for three years for 
Tomatos, Cucumbers, Begonias, Geraniums, Ferns, and Palms, 
with very good results; prefer it to Peruvian; can highly 
recommend it as good and cheap." E. Parry, Head Gardener, 
Castlemans, says : " I found it an excellent, cheap manure for 
Vines, Fruit trees, Roses, Carnations, Pot plants, and all 
kitchen-garden crops." Orders to the Native Guano CO., Ltd„ 
29, New Bridge Street, Blackfriars, London, where pamphlet! 
of testimonials, &c, may be obtained. AGENTS WANTED. 



■■■■ ■ 




EESON'S MANU 

Crushed Bones and all High-class Fertiliser! , 

Genuine only from — 
W. H. BEESON. Carbrook Bone Mills. Sheffielc 



R E, 



a 



EUREKA 



JJ 



WEED 



KILLER. 



Safe, Effective, and Cheap. 

There is no risk of poisoning Birds or Animals if directions 
are followed when applying this preparation. Guaranteed to 
clear all weeds ; mixes at once ; no sediment ; leaves the paths 
bright and clean, without stains. 

J-gall., Is. 9d.; 1 gall., 3*. (tins included). 
2-gall. drums, 2s. 9d. per gall.; 5-gall. drums, 2s. 6rf. per gall. 
10-gall, drums, 2s. Zd. per gall. ; 40 gallons at 2s. per gall. 

Double Strength, Mixes 1 to 50. 

Sample Half Gallon Tin, post-free for stamps, 2s. 6d. 

ONLY ADDRESS.— 

TOMLINSON & HAYWARD, 

MINT STREET CHEMICAL WORKS, LINCOLN. 

Wholesale London Agents:— 

S M A N & CO., 132, Commercial Street, E. 

Ask your Chemist or seedsman for this make. 



'*■ 




■■^HH 



'^— ■-, — 



4 



THE 



GARDENERS 1 CHRONICLE. 



(Joly 6, 1895. 



Crompf* 





Cfiefm&ford 



• 




HORTICULTURAL BUILDERS AND HOT-WATER ENGINEERS. 

Designers and Manufacturers of Ranges, Conservatories, Vineries, Foroing-houses, Greenhouses, and every description of Glasshouse. Best work. Lowest 
Prices. Every modern appliance. Surveys made in any part of the Kingdom. Estimates free. Large New Illustrated Catalogue post-free on application. 



CROMPTON 




FAWKES, CHELMSFORD 








THE 




CELEBRATED 




ALL VAPORISING 



FUMIGATOR. 



Evaporated 



Fumigator 



A Liquid Compound simply 



in Bond, from Duty-Free Tobac< 

ofH.M 



12X10 1 14X12 
14X10 16X12 



18X12 
20X12 



SIZES 

16X14 
18X14 



20X14 
20X15 



20X16 24X16 92X18 
22X16 <H)X 18 24X18 



21-OZ. Foreign, of above sizes, 100 and 200 feet boxes, 3rd* 
and 4ths qualities, always in stock. 15-OZ. Foreign similar 
current sizes in 200 feet boxes. 

English Glass, cut to buyer's sizes at lowest prices, delivered 

free a*d sound in the country in quantity. 
„ PROPAGATING and CUCUMBER GLASSES, Ac. 

PUT Jr£ JY HITE LEAD . PAINTS, OILS. BRUSHES, Ac. 
PIT LIGHTS, cheap line of 21-OZ. 200 feet, 9 inches by 
7 inches, and 10 inches by 8 inches. 

GEORGE FABMILOE & SONS 
34, St. John Street, West Smithfleld. London. E.C. 

Stock Lists and Priceson application. Please quote Gard. Chnm. 



-— -o — . VM ..*„— „_ *„ w.^f... UVM »^» w» A ^»^v/v» iui uwuvau mo icu^tu ui Lime mat uau i 

plished by the use of any other Fumigator. Note the remarkable saving of expense : 



acoom 




o w 



o 



and HORTICULTURAL POTTERY. 

CONWAY G. WABNE (Ltd 

Royal Potteries, 

WESTON-SUPER-MARE. 

The Largest Manufacturers of Gar 

Pottery in the world. 
Millions in Stock. Contractors t 

H.M. Government. 

30 Gold and Sliver Medals Award 

Price Cists free nn Awnl-trni-iZm 



ORCHID 




D 



THE FINEST OBTAINABLE. 

For particulars apply to— 
MERON. Forester's Lodge, Mount Mascal, Bexle 

Special Terms to the Trade. 



Compound 

For using in the Fumigatora. 



1 1 ttle. 
>0. 1 

No. 2 
No. 3 

No. 4 



• • 



• • 



• • 



• t 



• • 



• t 



• • 



Enough for 
cubic feet. 

40,000 

20,000 

10,000 

5,000 



24 



d. 




• • 



18 
6 6 
3 3 




Fumigators 

(WiU last for Years). 



000 



time 



,000 



PATENT 




8d. per 1000 cubic feet of ep 





ing is a Specimen from hundreds of Testimonials : 

From W. & G. DROVER, Nurserymen, Trinity Street, Fareham, June 26, 1895. 

.«-.r!i' Y0UrXL *t LL Va P° ri » in 8 legator -we have tried in our Gardenia and Orchid-houses and it eeliwes everything-* 
se^r there!" """" * W<$ *™ *"" ° U ' ******** *™<* «™1 tonw, and now there » nXTmelSR » b. 

Beware.-Ioferlor Imitations of the Compound are reported to be In the Market 

Every label on the bottles and tins ol the genuine article bears my Registered Trade Mark No it* m »7th Vine-leaf a*l 

^ 

To be had from all Nurserymen, Seedsmen, FlorUtt, and Sundriesmen ; or, direct from the Sole Proprietor. 

PRICE LIST POST FREE. 

G. H. RICHARDS, OLD SHOT TOWER WHARF, LAMBETH. LONDON. Si 




COOPER 




I 



Ltd 




HORTICULTURAL PROVIDERS, 

The Original Inventors of Cheap Greenhouses, 



9 



755, OLD KENT ROAD, LONDON, Si. 

lX. Works tw twit ot<^ott> Tve«n nn »A„ t ? I 



The Largest Steam Horticultural Works in the World. Inspection Invited. 



1000 Houses in Stock to Select from. 

Works cover 5 acres. 
Nurseries-Hanworth & Feltham. 



IMPORTANT. 

We beg to inform all readers of 
this Paper that the Fourth Edition 
(100.000 copies) of our Revised 
PRICE LIST, consisting of 400 pp. 
and about 1200 Illustrations, 
bound in cloth, is Now Ready. 
We thall have much pleasure in 
forwarding to every person one 
post-free on application. This 
List is the most complete in the 
Trade, and has cost several thou- 
sand pounds to produce. 




Amateur Span-roof Greenhouse. 
Complete, from £216*. 




i 



CONTENTS OF 8ECTIONS. 






Rustic Summer 
Houses from £4. 




Span-roof Conservatory. 
See No. 19 in List. 



Cooper's •• Beatall » 



IRON 

BUILDINGS 

of every 
detcription. 

Estimates 
free. 



... 



••• 



. • • 



••• 




Nest Boxes, 2/9 each. 



section. 

I.— Conservatories. Greenhouses, Vineries, 
Orchid Houses, Plant and Forcing 
Houses, Frames, Pits, Hand-Lights. Ac. 

-Poultry, Kennel, Rabbit, and Pigeon 
Appliances, Ac 

-Rustic Work 

-Iron Buildings and Roofing 
Furniture, Ac 

-Heating Apparatus, Cooking Stoves, Ac. 

-Horticultural Manures, Fertilisers. In- 
secticides, Worm and Weed Destroyers, 
Sunshades, Soils, Ao 

-Lawn Mowers and Edge Cutters, Tennis 
Markers, Garden Rollers, Ac. 

-Horticultural Timber 

-Horticultural Sundries, Wire work, 
Fountains, Vases, Statuary, Ac. 

-Vegetable and Flower Seeds. Plants, 
Dutch Bulbs, Ac. 



page* 



II. 

III. 
IV. 

v.- 

VI. 



17 



.64 

65- * 
99-13* 

136-17* 

179-2$ 



VII. 

VUI. 
IX. 

X. 



229-** 

247-3* 



_Stf 



*»t 



281 



343-3** 



Jult 6. 1895.] 



THE 



GARDENERS' CHRONICLE. 



5 



LAXTON 



J 




STRAWBER 






TWO GRAND NEW & DISTINCT VARIETIES FOR 1895. 

Both First-class Certificates Royal Horticultural Society. 



MONARCH. 

To follow Royal Sovereign. Brilliant scarlet 
colour, flavour very rich, enormous size, 
and great cropper. Compact habit. 



LEADER. 

Handsome main crop, rich crimson colour, of 
the largest size, fruit weighing 2 oz*. — true 
Pine-like flavour. 



Both equally as indispensable as Royal Sovereign to all Growers. 
Price, open ground, £3 per 100, 12s. per dozen ; in pots, £4 per 100, 15s. per dozen. 

These Varieties can on y v be obtained Direct from un. 




THE 




r&mm? (Jptromdr. 

SATURDAY, JULY 6, 1895. 



Also ROYAL SOVEREICN, price 20s. per 100; in pots, 27s. 6d. per 100. 

And every other variety worth growing. Lists on Application. 



LAXTON 



BROTHERS 



> 



BEDFORD. 




JAPAN LILY BULBS, 

PLANTS, SEEDS, &c. 

CATALOGUE on application. 
TOKIO NUB SE HIES 

Komagomi, Tokio, Japan. 
Cable Address : " Nurseries, Tokio. 

F. TAKAGHI, Proprietor. 




STRAWBERRIES. 

All the leading varieties, new or old, in small 
pots for fruiting first year. Open-air plants, very 
cheap. Special low quotations for quantities for 
Market Growing, 



FRUIT 



TREES 



OF ALL SORTS. SEND FOR LISTS. 

JOHN WATKINS, 

POMONA FARM NURSERIES, WITHINGTON, HEREFORD. 



If 



KENT, THE GARDEN OF ENGLAND.'' 



GEORGE BUNYARD & GO. 

Beg to ask Buyers to consult their 1895 



STRAWBERRY 



LIST 



Before Ordering their Supplies. Now Ready. 

• Plants will be grand, both for Forcing 
little pots, and as Runners. 



Send Orders and Enquiries direct to— 

THE OLD NURSERIES, MAIDSTONE 

STRAWBERRIES 



ROYAL SOVEREIGN 



3 



EMPRESS of IJTDIA, LORD 8UFFIELD.GUNT0N PARK, 

AND ALL THE BEST NOVELTIES. 

Descriptive ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE Now R*ady, 

Post-free on application. 

J. R. PEARSON & SONS, 

CHILWELL NURSERIES. NOTTS. 









SPECIALITY. 



Oar Collection is unrivalled. Over 140© specie* and varieties 
of Stove, Greenhouse, Filmy, Hardy Exotic, and British Ferns. 
For prices of these and for specially cheap collections in beau- 
tiful variety, see our Catalogue, free on application. 

W. Si J. BIRKENHEAD. F.R.H.S.. 






KZTRSERmS 



FOR PRESENT AND LATER SOWING, 



THE TBREE BEST 



WALLFLOWERS 



DICKSONS GOLDEN BEAUTY, 
DICKSONS SELECTED DARK RED, 
DICKSONS PRIMROSE DAME 



J 



Per packet, 

6d. and iff., 

free by Post. 



Choice Mixed DOUBLE WALLFLOWER, M 
SILENES, Ac. For Prices and all other particulai 
ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE, free on application. 




DICKSONS, 



Seed Growers 
Nurserymen, &c, 



PETFR COLLINSON. 

T may be fairly questioned whether the 
annals of horticulture contain a more 
anomalous an individuality than that of Peter 
Collinson, who did more to encourage the culti- 
vation of exotic plants during the earlier half 
of the last century than any other man, and who 
never wrote a book ! It is more than passing 
strange that this restless and enthusiastic culti- 
vator should have fallen into the great obscurity 
which surrounds his name and his work; for 
even the memoir of him in the Dictionary of 
National Biography } by the late Robert Hunt, 
F.K.S. (vol. xi., pp. 382-3), is far from satis- 
factory, one or two of the most important sources 



CHESTER. ot i nfon,iation concerning him being entirely 



THE NEW EARLY STRAWBERRY 



o 



1895 



STEVENS' WONDER. 

The earliest variety in cultivation, and very prolific. 

Solid fruit, good flavour, high perfume. 
Awarded First-class Certificates, Royal Horticultural Society 
and Royal Botanic Society, 1895. See Gardeners' Chronicle, 
March 2; Journal of Horticulture, March 14; and The Garden, 
March 16. Having purchased the whole of the Stock of this 
grand New Early Strawberry from the Raiser, we have pleasure 
in offering it as follows : — 
Strong Plants in pots ... £5 per 100 ... )5*. per dozen. 

Strong Runners £3 per 100 ... 9*. per dozen. 

Ready for delivery early in July. 

Early Orders requested, ±s Stock is Limited. 

Further particulars upon application. 

Wm. CTJTBUSH & SON, Bighgate Nurseries, London ; 

AndBARNET, HERTS. 



overlooked. Posthumous fame is more often 
than not the only species of gratitude vouchsafed 
to men who have done much on behalf of their 
country; but if the post-mortem eulogies of 



Peter Colli 




FERNS! 



FERNS!! 



Well-grown Stuff, at Moderate Prices. 



A large quantity, in 2£-inoh pots, ohiefly Pteris 

cristata; also Alba lineata, Adiantum fulvum and pubes- 
cent, at 9*. per 100. 

Good bushy stuff in 48's.— Pteris cristata, nobilis, 

and tremula ; also Aralias, at 4*. 6d. per dozen. 

The above prices are for Cash with Order only. Packing 
free. All orders carefully and promptly executed. 



B. PRIMROSE, 

NURSERIES. ST. JOHN'S PARK, BLACKHEATH 



PALMS, FICUS, FERNS, &o., in any 

quantity.— PALMS, Mixed 6f., 12*., 18*., 36*. per doz. 

FICUS ELASTICA 15*., 18*., 24*. 

MAIDENHAIR FERNS 3*., 9*. f 12*. 

FERNS, in variety 2* , 6*., 12*., 24*. 

CYPEttlTS ALTERNIFOLIUS ... 2*., 6*., 9*. 

ARALIA SIEBOLDI 2*., 6j., 9f., 12*. 

FLOWERING PLANTS, Mixed... 9.*.. 12*. 18*. 

COLLECTION of PLANTS ... 4*, 6*., 9*., 12*. 

Carefully packed, free on rail. Cash with Order.— ALFRED 
MAR TIN. Florist, Wiltshir e Road. Brixton, London, 8.W. 

NCLE BEG NIAS H W! 



M 

tf 
*♦ 




H 




JONES 



Respectfully Invites all Begonia Growers (both 
Private and Trade), to Inspect Ms Show of 
Begonias, which is admitted by all who have 
seen them to be the finest display in the country. 

RYECROFT NURSERY, HITHER GREEN, 

LEWISHAM. 



have been few, faint, and far 
between, he enjoyed the much more substantial 
and satisfying advantages of an exceedingly wide 
repute and appreciation during half a century of 
his long and busy life. 

Peter Collinson was born at the paternal estate 
of Hugall Hall, or Height of Hugal, near Win- 
dermere Lake, in the parish of Staveley, about 
ten miles from Kendal, Westmoreland, on 
January 14, 1693-4. His parents were members 
of the Society of Friends, and were engaged in 
business as mercers. At a very early age Peter 
developed a passion for natural history, and when 
quite a young man had secured the friendship 
of the leading naturalists of the day — Doctors 
Derham, Woodward, Dale, Lloyd, and Sir Hans 
Sloane. The Earl of Bute was another distin- 
guished naturalist who encouraged Collinson; 
and it was at the suggestion of the latter that 
Admiral Sir Charles Wager systematised his 
search for illustrative examples of natural products 
during his voyages— a considerable portion of 
the collections thus formed passed into the pos- 
session of Sir Hans Sloane, now an integral part 
of the British Museum. Collinson naturally 
experienced no difficulty in becoming a Fellow of 
the Royal Society— in his time, as present, the 
most exclusive of the learned bodies in this 
country — and was elected December 12, 1723, at 
the unusually early age of thirty-four years. 
He was an exceedingly diligent and useful 
member, not only in supplying the Society with 
"curious observations n and materials for dis- 
cussion, but in promoting and preserving a most 
extensive correspondence with learned me^j in 
various parts of the world. His diligence and 
economy of time are described as such that, 
* though he never appeared to be in a hurry, he 
maintained an extensive correspondence with 
great punctuality ; acquainting the learned and 
ingenious in different parts of the globe with 
the diFcoveriej and improvements in natural 



6 



THE 



GARDENERS' CHRONICLE. 



f July 6, 1895. 



history in this oountry, receiving the like infor- 
mation from the most eminent persons in almost 

every other." 
The most noteworthy of Collinson's oorre- 



your former you informed that you bad the true 
Scammony from Alyayio growing in your garden. I 
am confident it will agree well with this climate. I 
ahould be glad of some of the teed to be tent 10 ai 



spondents were Cadwallader Colden, of New to sowit next spring and some of the seed of the 



York, and Benjamin Franklin 

The latter communicated his; first essays on 



true Hellebore. Dr. Whytte in his last letter in- 
forms me that the Colchicum autumnale, or Meadow 



Petre appears to have thoroughly entered into the 
spirit of their culture. He describes the great itor* 
house of Lord Petre as " the most extraordinary 
light in the world." All the plants, he goei on to 
say, * are of such magnitude ; and the novelty of the 
appearance strikes every one with pleasure. The 
trellices all round are covered with all ipeciei of 



. . . .. . n n . . , ■. . Saffron, is found to be an extraordinary Dacrelia. ^ssion flowers, which run up near 30 feet high: 

electricity to Oolhnson, in a series of letters, and effecfcual in Dropiief . j wiih to have it| ^ X the creeping, great flowering Oreus blows annuall, 



which were afterwards published,* and which 
will be found in the colleoted editions of Frank- 



think it is not a native of this country." 
Only two letters appear to have been preserved 



with such quantities of flowers that surprises every 
one with their beauty, and at the same timeperfumethe 



lin's works. In 1730 a subscription library was ut of the many which must have passed between house with their scent." He does not tell ui of the 
set on foot at Philadelphia, and Collinson not p e ter Collinson and Richard Richardson, the equally ,ize of the & reat ,t0Te » bat the leiiGr on « measured 



only encouraged the movement by making enthusiastic naturalist ; these have been printed by 
several very valuable presents to it, and by pro- Dawson Turner in his Extracts from the Literary and 
curing others from his friends, but he voluntarily Scientific Correspondence of Richard Richardson, 1835. 

Neither appears to be in Collinson's handwriting, 



undertook 



books — a task whioh he performed to great ftD d wer « probably dictated by him to a secretary. 



The earlier of these is dated August 12, 1742, and 
deals chiefly with the death of Lord Petre, but it 



satisfaction for over thirty years. At the same 
time he transmitted to the directors or committee 
of the library, accounts of every new European C0Qtain » ieveral horticultural items, which will be 

improvement in agriculture and the arts, and 
every philosophical discovery, among which, in 
1745, he sent over an account of the new German 
experiments in electricity, together with a glass 
tube, and some directions for using it. 

A few months ago a very important series of 
long and interesting letters from Colden to Col- 
linson, and a few from Franklin also, came into 
the market at Sotheby's, and realised very high 
prices. A few extraots from these letters will be 
valuable for future reference, although botanical 
matters formed but one of the many subjects 
dealt with in these epistles. 

Writing to Peter Collinson from New Haven, 
in Connecticut, on June 26, 1753, Benjamin 
Franklin, inter alia, condoles with the former 
" on the death of good Mrs. Collinson." " I do 
not," he says, " offer to comfort you by argu- 
ments drawn from philosophy or religion, such 
will readily occur to a person of your under- 



standing 



Natural affections must 



have their course. The best remedy of grief is 
time." A contemporary has noted on the fly- 
leaf of this letter the following somewhat un- 
pleasantly candid opinion :— " There was no 
occasion of any philosophy on this ever-to-be- 
lamented occasion. P. C. had few feelings but 
for himself, the same principle that led him to 
deprive his son of his birthright, when that son 
lay in the agonies of death, and knew not what 
he put his hand to, supported P. C* in the loss 
of the best woman in a manner that did no 
honour to his feelings, his gratitude, or his 
humanity." How far the charge made in the 
anonymous annotation to this letter is true, it is 
now impossible to say ; but unsupported evidence 
of this kind is not of serious value. 

From 1749 to 1757 Peter Collinson sent to and 
received a large number of exceedingly interesting 
letters from Cadwallader Colden, Lieutenant Gover- 
nor of New York, author of A History of the Five 
Indian Nations. In the earliest of these, dated from 
New York, July 18, 1749, Collinson was asked to 
view "a chamber fire-engine, with long leather 
pipes, such as I am told are likewise used to water 
gardens, and cost about £5, if from experience they 
are found to answer the end for which they are 
designed;" and also 200 lb. weight of red Clover 
seed." A letter dated again from New York, 
March 17, 1758, Colden refers at length to botanical 
matters, one of the sentences being :— u I sent by 
last packet to Dr. Fothergill a description of a new 
genus, with a drawing of the plant by her [hit 
danger Jenny], which we have called Filmaurea" 
In another letter, dated August 11. 1764, contains 
th* following interesting paragraph :— " I n tome of 




Fig. 1.— peter collixsow. 

(From Nichols' Literary Anendota.) 



read now with interest. For example, he says, 
" the Laurus indica, Aldini, is nowhere to be sold ; 
the seeds of it were sent to Mr. Brewer, fresh, but 
they have not come up." And again, " Mr, Gordon 
has alto had flower Obeliscotheca (Rudbeckia 
hirta, L.) with a red flower ; he is the only gardener 
now left that has a good stove ; but now Lord Petre 
is gone. I am afraid all stove nlanta will <m <*™™ 



Captai 



I tell you of a curiosity that I saw at 



* These letters ^ere published xn thiae parts, -under the 
^\ ^T^^ 0b$ervati °*s * Electricity t m Loudon 



Tea- tree in great health. It was brought two or 
three years ago, a present, from China, to his wife. 
It is an evergreen, and is housed with the Orange- 
trees, for it grows on the more northerly parts of 
China and Japan, about the latitude of forty degrees 
north." According to Miller, the Tea-tree was not 
imported into England before 1768, which is, there- 
fore an error. 

JTVp"! l T* A ? ril 4 ' 1746 ' ColliMon *g»*n 

frToured Richardion with another of tboie lonRand 
Romping lettert which are now inch valuable contri- 
„. , „ . y of gwdening. Hii feari about 

tue decline m .tore plant calture, consequent on the 
death of Lord Petre, proved unfounded, for Lady 



hiato 



60 feet long and l'U wide, and *' ii full of a rait rarietj 
of all ipeciei of tender exotici." W. Roberts. 



( Tt b* contintud. ) 



animation ii 
of the Dai 



aiite when not 



PARASITES. 

At a seasonable time towards the end of last year 
{Gardeners 9 Chronicle, December, 1894, pp. 745 6), I 
contributed a few notes to this journal on the 
biological peculiarities of certain species of Viicwn 
and Loranthus, having, at a previous meeting of the 
Linnean Society, exhibited a number of specimen! of 
various plants parasitical on the stems and branchei 
of other woody plants, in illustration of the* 
peculiarities. A prominent feature in that exhibition, 
though one merely alluded to in the article cited abort, 
consisted of specimens of Australian Loranths and 
some of the plants on which tbey prey, exhibited to 
demonstrate the striking resemblance in the foliage 
of the parasite and that of the host. In some instance! 
the resemblances are so close that a superficial ex- 

insufficient to detect the presence 

in flower. The 
biological significance of this phenomenon bai 
been interpreted in the sense of advantage to the 
parasite, though apparently without any very good 
reason, for they are in need of no special protection 
to ensure their existence and reproduction. Indeed, 
as I have already jointed out, several of thoie 
species parasitic on plants having similar foliage, 
grow equally as well on plants having totally dis- 
similar foliage. Bearing on this subject, Mr. 1 
Turner, F.L.S , Botanist to the Department of Agri- 
culture, Sydney, has a very interesting article in the 
Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South 
Wales (vol. ix., pp. 567 to 56< I . on exotic trees and 
shrubs affected by Australian Loranths and Viscumi. 
He gives a list of twenty- seven foreign trees and shrubs 
that have become hosts for native parasites ; yet only 
a small number of the latter have been observed to 
attach themselves to introduced plants— only three 
in fact, out of about twenty-five of the Loranthacese. 
They are, Loranthus celaatroidee, L. pendulus, and 
Viscum articulatum. The last is a leafless Misieto 
with broad, flattened, jointed branches, and one of 
the most widely dispersed species, occurring almort 
throughout India and Malaya, and extending to 
China, Japan, and Polynesia, growing on a grest 
variety of plants ; yet Mr. Turner states that be 
never saw it growing on any native Australian tree 
except Doryphora Sassafras (Monimiacese). He h*d 
also seen it growing on cultivated Peach treei, 
but on no other exotic. In the Kew Herbarium, 
however, there are Australian specimens recorded ai 
parasitic on Pilocarpus (Rutaceas), Exocarpus (San- 
talacece), and Baloghia (Eaphorbiac**). In the Sand- 
wich Islands it is common on Acacia Koa ; in Japan 
and China, on Eurya and Camellia ; and in India 
and Malaya, on a variety of trees aud shrubi 
belonging to various other natural orders. 

Curiously enough, the Loranthus that most closelj 
mimics or resembles, if the reader would rather, the 
native host plants, is the one that most commonly 
preys upon exotic plants belonging to a variety of 
natural orders. This is L. pendulus, which ii 
common on some species of Eucalyptus, Santatum, 
Acacia, &c. It, and L. celastroides, between them, 
have been observed growing on twenty-six exotic 
trees and shrubs belonging to thirteen natural orders. 
Among the trees and shrubs on which they prey 1 
ntfy name the Tulip, Orange, Apple, Pear, Locust. 
Plum, Whitethorn, Olive, Eim, Plane, Alder, Wal- 
nut, Oak, and Willow— a sufficiently diverse variety. 



July 6, 1895.] 



THE 



GARDENERS 1 CHRONICLE. 



7 



In connection with the existence of parasites 
parasitic on other parasites, I mentioned in my 
article referred to above that there was an authen- 
ticated record in Bentham's Handbook of the British 
Flora of Viscum album growing on Loranthns euro- 
preus, for which I could find no other authority. I 
have since found a more definite record of the fact in 
Poilim's Flora Veronensis (iii,, p. 176), where the 
author, after enumerating a number of trees on 
which Viscum album grows, continues : — " Atque 
efciam alius speciei parasitica^ scilicet Loranthi 

europsei ; nnnquam vero super Qercuum species." 

W . Bolting Hemsley. 



Thus it is seen that in a majority of cases an 
application of potash benefits an orchard in bearing 
condition. This fact points towards one of two 
suppositions, (1) that the soil is generally deficient 
in potash; or (2) that potash is beneficial when 
present in excess of the requirements of the crop. 
At first thought, a deficiency of potash in the soil 
seems improbable, when chemical analysis shows 

that the total contents of the first 8 inches of a 



A PARK FOR DROITWICH. 

Dboitwich, though situated in an agricultural 
district, finds its chief support in the manufacture 
of salt. But this trade is becoming precarious 
in some respects, because the making of salt in the 
town is not so great as it once was. Many of the 
houses appear to be losing their support also, and 
are leaning in every direction. The churches are 



fertile soil gives nearly 20,000 lb. of potash per ^ Rehouses, mostly out of the perpendicular, and 



acre, 3,521 lb. of nitrogen, and 4,400 lb. of phos- 
phoric acid. The soil then contains over four and 
a half times as much potash as it does of phosphoric 
acid, and more than five and a half times as much 
potash as it does of nitrogen. 



the High Street has lost grade. 

The town is becoming better known on account 
of the brine baths that were provided by Mr. 
John Corbett, of Impney, who built up a gigantic 
salt industry in the town and at Stoke Prior, four 



USE AND ABUSE OF POTASH IN Much of the potash present in the soil becomes P^f^T B *>™8™"-. Th "° baths; aw rightly 



FRUIT GROWING. 



available to plants so slowly, that it has to be 



becoming famous for their curative and alleviative 
properties in rheumatism, sciatica, gout, and kindred 



Attention has heen called bv Prof W E assisted in rendering it more soluble by some other .... XT VvT f. \ 

ATmnoN nas oeen cauea Dy irror. vv. n. ^^ ^ ^ ^ _JL~*: e - a r a ~**„„u complaints. Numerous visitors realise the value and 

Britton in the American Agriculturist to the use 

of the fertiliser potash in orchards. The author 

says, an excess of nitrogen usually tends toward of potash, and it is also present in considerable 

wood production and an increased growth, at the quantities in the fruit. It may be mentioned that 



agent, or by an application of ready-formed potash. 
The ashes of fruit trees contain a large percentage 



expense of the crop of fruit. Potash and phosphoric 

acid, on the other band, are the elements specially 

suited to promote the general vigour of the tree, and 

increase the quantity and improve the quality of the 
fruit. 

The experience of many large fruit growers 
favours the use of potash in manuring orchards. It 
is most commonly applied in the form of muriate 
of potash, from 200 to 300 lb. per acre being con- 
sidered an economical dressing, if the orchard 
receives an application each year. Kainit may be 
used instead of muriate of potash, but double the 



some prominent fruit-growers fail to note any benefit 
derived from potash alone when applied as a ferti- 
liser to orchards, and some claim an iDJary from its 
effects. This fact supports the first supposition 
referred to above, but is fatal to the second. 

Soils differ, and it is likely that we shall find 
potash very beneficial on some soils — perhaps, on 
most soils, while useless on others ; before applying 
large doses we should use it in a small way and 
note its effect. It is also thought that potash applied 
as a fertiliser improves the quality and flavour of the 
fruit; it certainly tends to maturation and to the 



quantity must be employed, as this salt contains a production of sugar. J. «7. Willis, Harpenden. 
much smaller percentage of soluble potash, and it is ===== == 

only about one-third of the price to purchase. 

Professor Britton is inclined to think that the 
practice of applying potash or phosphoric acid 
exclusively is sometimes carried a little too far, and 
thinks that if a complete fertiliser were used, it 
would in many cases give better results. 



The Rosary. 



ROSA WILLIAM ALLAN RICHARDSON. 

I bead somewhere within the last few days a 
The result of experiments on the fertilising of severe condemnation of this Rose, stating that it 
Peach orchards at the New Jersey station shows the was io fugacious as not to be worth growing. Sareiy 
greatest yield of fruit per acre where muriate of the writer could have never seen this charming 



potash and nitrate of soda combined were applied ; 
but potash gave much better results than either 



Rose in free bush form, or climbing up into a tree, 
ascending a church-tower, or clothing a house- 



importance of a prolonged course of baths, and take 
up their residence for weeks and months, according 
to the necessity of their case. The town, though 
small (about 4000 inhabitants) is well provided with 
hotels and boarding-houses. 

To meet the requirements of visitors, Mr. Corbett 
has provided a beautiful park in a central position, 
and within a short distance of the hotels. The site, 
covering nearly 12 acres, was formerly an orchard, 
the fruits being chiefly Appier, Pears, and Medlars. 
Many of the trees are 100 to 150 years old, and of 
immense size. The ground is slightly undulating, 
and has a slope to the west, north, and east. Mr. 
Davies, the head gardener at Impney, has availed 
himself of the natural advantages offered by the lay 
of the land, and has produced, after his own plans, 
a park which is at once beautiful, interesting, and 
unique. 

A few of the fruit trees have been removed for 
artistic reasons, but most of them are retained, 
Rotes, Wistarias, Clematis, Brambles, Honeysuckles, 

Virginian Creepers being planted near them, so as 
to grow up into the crowns, where they will in course 
of time form pictures of floral loveliness. Then 
imagine the glory of the Apple blossom, of the 
ripening golden fruit in autumn, and the feast of 
Roses in summer. A wide carriage-way encircles 
the park, and in one part is carried in a straight line 
through what is an avenue of Apple trees. Wide 



nitrate of soda or phosphoric acid alone. Potash gable in a half-wild and free state. The exquisite footpaths intersect, without marring the appear- 

seemed to promote a certain vigour and thrift which form and great variety of colour in the buds and 

were lacking in trees deprived of them. expanded flowers, the beauty of the leaves, and the 

A later report from the same station confirms this prodigality of the bloom, surely atone for its lack of 

experience, and says, ■• potash has proved the most substance and of staying powers. With the excep- 



valuable of the single elements, the net gain being 
greater than where farmyard manure was used." The 
largest net gain, however, came from using a 
complete fertiliser. 

Mr. S. D. Willard, a well-known western New 
York horticulturist, says : — " In order to have good 
hard wood, healthy leaves, and well-developed buds, 
we must rely upon potash and phosphoric acid." 

Potash was once thought to be a remedy and pre- 
ventive of Peach-yellows, but experiments show this 
to be without foundation. In a recent bulletin from 
the Cornell Station, Professor Bailey says : u I 
believe that the keynote to the proper fertilising of 
Peach orchards is potash and phosphoric acid, and 
not nitrogen; wood-ashes, muriate of potash, bone 
fertilisers — these are some of the money-makers for 
Peach trees. Potash is generally the most important 
element to be applied directly to orchards, particu- 
larly after the trees have reached bearing age." 



tion of L'Id£al, we have nothing in the same style 
among our Roses [ Jaune Desprez. Ed.] And William 
Allan Richardson seems to me worthy to rank with 
Gloire da Dijon and Homere for the production of 
striking and telling effect around the house or in the 
landscape. No Rose can produce similar colours or 
such fresh and fascinating results as William Allan 
Richardson. 

The Extreme Hardiness of Rosa rugosa and its 

Varieties. 

Sussex seems to have been highly favoured in the 
matter of the safety of its Roses this year. From 
all I have seen and heard of the two counties, 
Suffolk has been hit much harder by the 
frosts of February than Sussex. The county has 
doubtless a warmer climate to start with, and has 
more and greater undulations of surface than 
Suffolk, and few things are more potential in affording 



ance of the central area, and skirt the boundary. 
In suitable positions are a large flower-garden 
planted with the usual kinds of bedding plants, a 
Rose garden, and an American garden with masses 
of Ghent Azaleas, Andromedas, Rhododendrons, 
Ericas, and other plants. Conifers and other ever- 
greens are planted in masses about the sward, and 
are used for masking undesirable objects and the 
intersecting points of walks and roads. Seats and 
summer-houses are plentiful. </. TJdale. 



FLORISTS' FL0WER8. 



begun in Sussex. And we can all find one pleasure 
in commoni and that is the extreme beauty and per 



One of the best sources of potash for orchards is changes and ameliorations of climate than are hills 
wood-aBhes, but this material is so often in America and valleys. Rosarians, in localities less favoured by 
weakened by leaching that it cannot be confidently 
recommended when in that condition. Forty to fifty 
bushels to the acre is a good dressing if the ashes 
have been kept dry. Muriate of potash is perhaps 
the best and most reliable form in which to secure 
potash at the present time. Commercial samples 
generally contain from eighty to eighty-five per cent. 
of muriate of potash, or about 50 per cent, of actual 
soluble potash. An Apple orchard in full bearing 
and upon loose soil may receive as high as 1,000 lb. 
of potash per acre, but a normal and economical 
application is from 500 to 700 lb. 



RANUNCULUS ASIAT1CUS VARIETIES. 

Though the Pansy, Tulip, Auricula, &c, are now 
the subjects of reviving interest, Ranunculuses, the 
favourite flowers of my boyhood's days, seem to be 
more and more neglected. Yet no flower is more 
beautiful or perfect in form, they excel most other 
flowers in the symmetry of their shape, their 
brilliancy, and variety of colour ; so that a bed of fine 
Ranunculus is a most attractive object. I have no 
doubt there are still some amateurs to be found who 
nature, rejoice with "A, P." and others who have cultivate Ranunculuses fron whom a choice collec- 
written in hopeful terms of the Rose harvest already tion could be obtained. The once famous collections 



of the Rev. — Tyso, Messrs. Lightbodyand Waterson, 
are, I presume, now defunct. It is not a difficult 



feet hardiness of Rosa rugosa in all its varieties, flower to cultivate, although a-i kinds of soil and 



The only change that I have noted in this striking 
Rose this year is in the colour of the foliage. I 
have noticed this change before, but not to the same 
extent. In some cases, almost entire plants have 
become almost golden. The change of colour in the 
leaves has not affected the bloom, which is plentiful 
as usual. Rom. 



situations are not equally adapted to the require- 
ments, and it has numerous insect enemies. 

I do not now propose to go fully into its cultiva- 
tion, but to say a few words on soils and the 
raising of seedlings. In selecting a situation for a 
bed choose a moist tolerably rich soil, not too fully 
exposed to the sun. Prepare the ground by deep 



8 



THE GA R DEX E fi £T CU U OX Id L i 



m 




garden 



they have greater rigour than the scarlet or crimso 



manure from an old Cucumber-frame, with one-fourth coloured 



ably ot*r the plants, attacking the blooroi i Q w*. 
ference to Ike levers, til* 




loam — mix thee 



© 



bed 



eorne length of time before planting, in order that it 
may fettle firmly ; plant the roots in the end of 
February in rows about 9 inches apart, and from 
3 to 4 inches in the row. Use a marked dibber, to 
that the roots may be all planted at one uniform depth , 
and cover the roots from 1 to Ik inches deep. Should 



Plants of differing degre-i f rigour require 
different treatment. One season the young garde i 




***° destroyed W 
fumigating; if thet* perns appear before it u Un»uj 

remove the planU into the Carnal n- boose, tht best 



who had charge of my plants, gave the entire collec- way to ke*; them down is by syringing, and •]* 



frosty I 
I straw 



material. Whe 



water between the rows 



never water 



from 



protect them with an awning 



withered about six weeks after floweri 
ine day and take the roots up. Place 
room where there is plenty of air to dr 
After they are once dry they must be kej 
least damp would mould them. The b< 



good dressing with a rich compost 
This answered admirably for all the varieties that 
made short stumpy growths, causing them to grow 
much longer. Those of very rigorous constitution, 
and which produced long-jointed layers, spindled up 
for bloom to an alarming extent, causing consider- 
able loee. In a dry season, sucb as this, a rich 
surface- dressing is a great aid to the plants 
Watering has been much needed everywhere 
in the south ; but watering is of little use unless the 
plants can have a mulching of decayed manure, 
and if a thorough soaking is giren once in 
a week, that will be much bettor than giving a small 
quantity daily, but nerer sufficient to well saturate 
the ground. Anyc 
watering on hard, 



dui'.iog with tohactt-powder J. Ztooyis/ 



Trees and Shrubs, 



HKDYBARUM Ml LTIJrGUM • 



R 



Wm are inasfctad to Mr. Lynch, of the Cambridfi 
tanic Garden, for the opportunity of figarisg this 



attracts hardy throb. 
Mongolia, aad was d 



It ii a native of SeatW* 

ribed ▼ the liiaiatU 



HBinowica. ;r illmtrations fig* -, !)sho»a 

leaf ani * port: ■ of the inflfNM»nci N MM nttanl 

, together wMh aa outline showing the gtc il 
obserre the effect of character or habit of the plant. The herbi 






Ml I 



sowing the seed is the middle of October or early in •xamimng it after the water has been 

January, in boxes or pans, covering the seed ' ew hoari ; lt will be quite dry about ! 

Tery lightly. They should be kept in a 

frame during frosty weather, and at all times should 

have constant exposure to the light In May, plunge 

the boxes or pans up to the rim in the open ground, 

where they have only the morning sun ; water them 

almost daily until the grass withers, then let the 

boxes become quite dry. About the middle of July 

lake them up, gradually dry them, and keep them ia 

a box of dry sand. In February they should bo 

planted and treated in the same way as the old roots. 

Edward Bennett, Lyne y Chertny 

Tins Caknation and Picorm, 

I fear the time has come when I must be classed 
with the old florists ; and yot during all the yean it 
has been my pleasure to cultivate, the Carnation, I 
never knew a season anything like the present. It 
has been most trying to the show varieties of Carna- 
tions and Picotees. The scarlet and crimson 



dried ground, by 



inch*s belo 



<* tt V.\ r ■'it/. A 

\ . -1/ Hvm^-; J> 



mort 



COw©^ I 



also felt the effects 



in 



Carnations 



wet, cold autumn, and of the severe frosts 
January and February. All the self 
are doing well, and will flower werj strongly. 

In the first place the layers did not form roots well, 
and many of them did not produce any at all ; this 
necessitated late planting out or potting up, 
and almost before the plants became established 
severe frosts set in, and the roots were thoroughly 

those in 60-sized Dots in frames 








V 



■fe » • ! sr-y •■■:■» 

W** ft v^ V9f 3v*" mrmjti JPW ' ^* 






frozen, 

hard 






as iron, and although 



in 
the 



were 



plants were 



Fig. 3 -nroTSABPM MULTUOOtT*: TO SHOW HABIT 



not killed outright they were very badly crippled 
Indeed, plants were sent to me as late as May in s 
dying state, the cause of which I had every reason to 
believe was owio* to the effects ; f frost upon them 
in February, Oae good effect of the frost i- 



has been 



ned. 



the destruction of the weakly growing varieties • 
it was certainly a testing time, plants which 
passed well through a winter like the last may bo 
regarded as vigorous enough for anything. Nothing 
in Carnation culture is more remarkable than the 
different degrees of vigour and hardiness of varieties. 
Many persons have an idea that the selfs are hardy 
free-growing varieties, and that the flakes, bizarree] 
&c, are delicate things, only fit for greenhouse culture! 
There is no doubt that plants of the scarlet bizarre sec- 
tion are more slender in growth than the others ; but 
it does not follow that they are less hardy in 'con- 
stitution, or that they will not stand the frost so 
well in winter. Indeed, the bizarre* and flake* do 
much better in the county of Durham out-of-doors 
than they do in Essex ; sufficient proof that it is not 
altogether either frost or wet that idj area them. 
The degree of vigour in a Carnation is to a certain 
extent determined by the colour of the flowers, as 
may be seen by tho greater vigour of certain sports 
from tho bizarree. Tho maroon colour in scarlet 
hwarre*, or tho purple in crimsons, giving tho 
strongest growth ; and yet in setft the white-flowered 
Carnatio-i are as viirnrf>n» *n*i aM***;-**. s-j. t 




root* 



The treatment of pot-plants requires 

on the part of the gardener, as some varieties make 

quite three times 

•mfe to say that plant* require three time* as 
nch water, and if the cultivator is not careful 
to water each, with due regard to its requirements, 
the re*nlt* cannot bo altogether satisfactory. The 
time for layering is now at baud, and tho soil 




This may consist of 

od. A 




equal portions 

■--— -"•*•«« ww w ioiuutpu, ana 

this prepared material pot in its place, carefully 
trimming and cutting the layers with a layering-knife. 



helped 

indiarubber ring. 



burst 



thrips 



this year, but there is no better way to deal with them 
than by putting the plants in agreenhouse and fumi- 



gating them. 



astonishing 




this little insect can do to the flowers, it quite spn 
them if left undisturbed. Green-fly, which does „ 
much harm to the layers as thrips do to the flowera 

garden I visited this year had been attacked bv a 

black aphis, aad, unobserred. it had mn***A •—.*/. 



portions are coveted with a thin covering of apprtsjit 
••toe* hair*. The height :■ J to iS feet ; the braachei 
are ascending, slender, rigid, angular, atrial (hi 
pinnate leaves ar« ■ ••* hat distant. 80 to 90 ftflL 



long, the pinnai ar* ai 




♦igh 





or opposite • ileeatt 

In number, ovete-acut* apiculate. 10 to 15 
U. long. Stipule* deltoid, acuminate. Klowtrt ■■' 
morons, in erect rar*me*. with tery short pediosh. 
Calyx oblique, tubular, silt on the upper side. Uflih 

nearly entir* aadard violet. wUh yel w blotchel 
on the middle of the inner surface, 2 

Wing obliquely oblong, with a long claw k**i of 
two oblique halberd -shaped stalked petals. Bumm 




lo* 



Blpe fmit net t*en. 

bod ia a ban ■ me 



hardy 



curved, nine and one. 
The plant abov* d 
shrub, which as « bel.^ve. been distributed frM 
the Cambridge Botanic ftarden. We have not C**- 
pared Mr. Lyach's plant with authentic specimens*! 
the herbarium, but w* may point oat that our pre- 
plant do#s net entirely oorreepond with Hefsli 
figure in the Garttn* - t \\? wherein the flosrsft 




are deecribed and figured km roee- coloured. 



Colonial Notes 



A TOWN GARDEN IN NKW /RALAKD. 

A rumen of ground in the #ntre of * tO«i 
although a small OOe.is not a very encouraging pi*** 
to operate on horticultural!?, but a mixed collec- 
tion all doing w#ll naay interest • me of your rea>rs 
in other parte of the world. In one comer n • 
bush of Aloysia citriodora from Chili, and deemt* 
a fit aooociate for even a Qooaa of ain. In another 
corner I* a dead Willow Q p which are racing <Q 
friendly rivalry a Clematis, a Devonientis R*e, •»<* 
the white Sweet Pea Mrs %n key, all of Furopee* 
wifin* Alongside a fence are the following Tea 
Roses, also from Europe : — Marie Van Hoatf . 
Madame Lam bard. Madame do Watteville, Th« 
Bride, and clooo by, the R#* T. C. Oole. Not to 
from these is a Cantua depeadens, another 8e^ h 
American subject, and if there is one plant more 
than another ia tUe vegeuble kingdom wUlft 
deeerv#s adr ration, it is this. On the otbe* 
side fenoe are Camellias from rhioe, whlth <• 
better planted outside in the shade in theoe reftar • 
an indication that they are native, f a temperate 
clime, aad lourish as undergrowth in woods. Hers 
also are Japanese Chrysanthemums, including Etoii* 
do Lyon bulbs from the Capo of Good Hope *od 
other countries above the * juetor, as Frwofee. Wt* 
Ranunculi, 8cillas, Aotholysas, and Schii^J 1 ^ 
and the Trumpet LUy. Another plant which 
insist* upon being seen I* the Coral tre- ( Erytbri** 
Criste>galli). fror- the cooler part* of B-a*il. Th*« 
frand ornamental Grass Kiyma* condensatus from 
British Columbia is here, but requiioe more roo« 
than I have for it; so is Pmuus ilicifolia fro* 
California, Both these were sent me by !*• 
Francetchi, and Levater* aesurgpntifolia. Aboot 
the middle of this plot of groand is a pendent Willow, 




B*iy***~ ~ ^^^^ Maalasee^es, i* B*U. A 
r"*r9*„,n« (loll.. s§4. 



July 6. 18y5.] 



THE 



GARDENERS 1 CHRONICLE. 



9 



with a rustic seat underneath inviting your leisure. 
Not far from this Willow ii a miniature rock- 
work, smooth atones being unsuitable, ai they 
attract and retain the sun's heat-rays to a destructive 
degree, in the centre of which is an JEthionema 
granditlorura from Asia Minor or the Levant, and 
nestling underneath this is the modest Campanula 
fragilis, and a native Adiantum, which, true to 
itself, refused to grow in pots ; and also the Ivy- 
leaved Cyclamen, an autumnal- flowering variety ; 
and that indispensable plant to all rock work, Ceras- 
tium tomentosam, is amongst them, but the purity 
of its flowers attracts the snails. The climbing 
Gourd of Central America is very ornamental, but 
requires abundance of water. With the exception of a 
few minor subjects, all have been noted that are in 
this enclosure. . . ■ Our own native flora has a decided 
objection to being removed from its natural asso- 
ciations, as if afraid of contamination with the out- 
side world, particularly that part above the equator 
no inducements can reconcile them to any new con- 
ditions of life; ten times out of twelve they 
positively pine away and die. The prevailing colour 
is white, as in Clematis indivisa, Convolvulus sepium, 
Ranunculus Lyalli,Ourisia macrophylla, the Mountain 
Primrose, after the way of Japonica, but with whorls 
of pure white flowers ; Plagianthus Lyalli, one of the 
dwarf ribbon-trees, with clusters of lovely white 
flowers springing from the sides of its branches, 
which at first sight resemble a Tydea. Then there 
are many species of Veronica, Olearia, Pittos- 
porum, Cordyline australis, the latter a common 
feature everywhere, all with white flowers, and many 
others, discovered within the last twenty years, 
many genera of plants hitherto unknown, owing to 
the difficulty of getting into their native wilds. For 
the information of those of your readers who are 
unable to understand what being lost in a forest 
means, let them for a moment imagine themselves in 
an immense area of densely- wooded country, con- 
sisting of evergreen trees, shrubs and Ferns of all 
sizes and ages, many square miles in extent, and far 
away from any human habitation, the prostrate 

trunks of trees in all directions rotted with age, the 
stems and branches of climbing plants impeding 
progress at every step, Mosses and Lichens hanging 
2 or 3 feet long in their silvery girb, fitfully lighting 
up the gloom. Add to this the oppressive, dank 
atmosphere. You shout (or cooey) for help, but 
the sound seems mockingly re-echoed by the 
native birds; in attempting to extricate yourself 
you are found taking a circuitous route ; it is then 
you feel what the words * impenetrable " and 
despair " really mean, and what it is to be lost in a 
bush or forest. Yet there is an inexplicable 
fascination in the perilous position. 



a 



THE ARTICHOKE. 

This plant is of Greek origin, and the ancient 
Greeks engaged in its cultivation ; still more so the 
Komans. The Greeks called the Artichoke Ct/nara, 

did also the Romans. Pliny, combining it with 




the Apullean word tclarea (Cardoon) called it ascalia, 
otherwise Carduus, and the Italians of the middle 
ages Articocce, from which our modern term Carcincjie 
is derived, which points to the similarity existing 
between the form of the cones of Pinus pinea and 
the closed flower- head which afford so well- 
flavoured and wholesome a food. Bat 




all the 

parts of the Artichoke are pleasant eating — roots, 
leaf-stalks, stems, and flower-heads, so the Neapolitan 
of to-day calls it still Cardoni, and the head 
especially Carcitutfe. The true Artichoke is without 
doubt not Italian, but of Greek and oriental 
origin ; yet we find the later Greeks praising the 
Artichokes of Sicily for their special good quality, 
and this is true of them at the present time. That 
the bee- attracting, gigantic, handscme flowers which 
spring from the delicious bud attracted also the 
ancients, whose only trouble was the numerous 
prickles, which are sought for in vain in the best 
varieties of to-day. 

There were in ancient times many different forms ; 
tnJ, as has been said, the Sicilian varieties were 




celebrated. The Spanish Artichokes are dark 
purple — almost black ; and the further north it is 
grown, in rainy, foggy climates, the violet colour 
disappears, and is replaced with green or grey- 
green. The Spanish Artichokes are, like [the Car- 
doon*, upright and tall, the buds hidden from view, 
and the ribs of the leaves of fleshy consistency, as 
in the Cardoon. Pliny extolled the Carthaginian 
Artichokes for their great size, and those of Mauri- 
tania for their excellent flavour. 

In the present age, the Artichokes of Naples and 
the Campania, in size, tenderness, good flavour and 
frnitfulness, excel all others, even those of other 
parts of Italy, and it is believed that these fine forms 
of the plant originated in northern Africa. The 
tncients gave much attention to the cultivation of 
the plant, and we are told that large quantities of 
manure and diligent stirring of the soil were required 
to render the buds tender-eating, and increase the 
frnitfulness of the plants as well. It is a maritime 
plant, and loves proximity to the ocean; it should, 
therefore be chiefly grown on the coast; and with 
the ready means of transit found in most European 
countries, there would be no difficulty in sending the 
produce inland. The ancients increased the plant 
by means of the side- shoots or suckers, which the 
root freely produces. 

In the spring, the surface of the Campania, 
covered by enormous Artichoke fields, astonishes the 
traveller, who sees it for the first time with the 
bundarce and beauty of the plants. No other 
vegetable can compete with it in productiveness and 
value, rivalling Asparagus in flavour and wholesome- 
ness, and in the simplicity of the methods of culti- 
vation. The profits of the Artichoke-grower are 
enormous, exceeding anything obtained in France or 
Germany for vegetables, even such a good paying 
crop as Asparagus, 

In Italy the plant rests during July and August, 
allowing the land to be inter-cropped with some 
quick- growing plant. When the heat of the summer 
is past, and the autumn rains begin to fall, the plant 
commences to grow anew ; tbis is the best time to re- 
move the side- shoots (suckers), and transplant them. 
These shoots soon push roots into the soil, and to 
grow fast, and may be depended upon to produce 
heads the coming year. In November, the plant being 
in full growth, is well dressed with manure. To do 
this, the leaves are bundled up together, and 
trenches are made at the side of the plant, and 
pig-dung-water is poured into them; over this is 
placed half- rotten stable- dung, and the earth 
is returned over all in the form of a ridge. 
In about four weeks anotber application of liquid 
manure is made, and it does no harm if this be fol- 
lowed by another in January. There are varieties in 
Italy wbich produce heads at Christmastide, and 
tome that grow the whole year; but the usual har- 
vest period is from the end of February to the middle 
and end of Joly ; in Sicily earlier, and in northern 
Italy later. The heads are cut with a stalk and a 
neighbouring leaf before the purple flowers expand, 
and tied in bundles for the market. Some special 
varieties are of the size of a child s head, and some 
have a spiny calyx, these being the best flavoured. 
The plant is of use to man and animals from the 
root upwards, and the dried stems are used for 
fuel. Extract Jrom Wiener Illustrirte Garten- Zettung. 



VEGETABLES. 



Fig. 3.— HEDVSARUM MULT JUOt7.tf : FLOWERS BLUE. 

CAMBRIDGE BOT4XIC GlRI I >. 

(SEX PAGE 8.) 



PEA CANNELUS ENGLISH WONDER. 

Those who have not as yet grown this Pea should 
do so. As a dwarf-growing Pea it is one of the best in 
commerce, and in gardens of limited area, and where 
stakes are not obtainable, «s is often the case with 
amateurs in town districts, a Pea like this is a boon. 
In height it is about 1 foot, and requires but 15 
inches space from row to row. The quantity of pods 
produced is simply astounding. The advantage of this 
variety over American Wonder is the excellent way 
the pods fill. I have before me two pods, a fair sample 
of many ; one measures barely 2k inches long with- 
out the stalk, and contains seven extra large Peas. 
The second pod is just 2£ inches long, and has eight 
Peas closely packed inside. If this Pea contained 
all these points of advantage, and was of indifferent 
flavour, I should not appreciate it even then, regard- 
ing, as I do, flavour as being of the first order. 
CanneH's English Wonder has no fault as regards 
flavour, and it is an acquisition in every respect. 

S3*n on February 28 t it was ready for use June 7. 
IS. M. 



* 



10 



THE 



GAB DE NEBS' CHBONl CLE. 



[July 6, 1895. 




LIST 



OF 



HYBRID CATTLEYAS. 



J- hy 

proceeds 



led 



ped 



understood 



This list of hybrid Cattleyas is made up to May 1, 1895, 



Offspring. 

Aclaudi- Loddigesii 

Alberti 

Arthuriana 

Ata.la.nta 

A^ntouiana 

Ballantineana 

Baroness Schroder 

Br&baatiae 
Browne 

Burberry ana 

calummata 

Chamberlainiana 

Chloris 

citrino-intermedia 

Domini ana 

Empress Frederick 

Fabia 

Fausta 

nrnbnata 

fl areola 

Harold 

Harris 

hybnda 

Johnson tana 

K tenant lan a 

leucoglossa 

Lord Rothschild 
Lowryana 
Mauglecii 
Man t in ii 
Mardelli 
Marstersonia? 
minucea 
Miss Harris 

Miss Williams 

Mitchelli 

Mrs. M. Walls 

Parthenia 

Pheidoua 

Philo 

picturata 

porpojropblebia 
Prince ot Wales 
quinquecolor 
saavior 
tnophtUalmj. 
veriiiora 
Wendlandiana 
William Murray 



Batalinii 
Brymeriana 
Cup: do 
Hardyana 
intricata 

Kraxnenana 
Lucianiana 

Massaiana 

Meafcuresiana 

Patrioeiaii 

resplendens 

scita 

sororia 

Telatlna 

venoaa 

Victoria Regina 

Whitei 

Epi-Cattleya guatemalensis 



HYBRID CATTLBYAS. 

Parents. 
m (syD. Brabantiae) Loddigesii 9 X Aclandiae £ 
=syn. porpbvrophlebia 
&a C. luteola 9 X Dormaniana 6* 
= guttata Leopoldi 9 x Warscewiczii £ (gigas) 
= fiarrisonae 9 X Warscewiczii S 

= Trianaei 9 X Warscewiczii 6* 

=TriaDiei? xdolosa<£ 

(syn. Aclandi-Loddigesi) 

= Harnsoniae 9 X Bowringiana <$ 
= x intricata $ X superba^ 

= intermedia ? XAcland«<J 
= guttata Leopoldi 9 X Dowiana £ 
= Bowringiana 9 X maxima 6* 
= intermedia 9 Xcitrinao 
= maxima 9 X intermedia 9 
=Mofc9ise9 X Dowiana £ 

:= labiata autumnalis 9 X Dowiana <£ 
= Loddigesii9 X L. C. exoniensis £ 
=intermedia9 xAclandiae^ 

= intermedia 9 X*uttata? 

— Gaskelliana9 Warscewiczii 6* 

^guttata Leopoldi 9 x Mendeli $ 

=guttata9 X Loddigesii 

as Harrison iae 9 X Warscewiczii <$ 

= Luddemanniana (apeciosissima 9 ) X Dowiana 

, = Loddigesii 9 X Fausta 6* 

= Ga*keliiana 9 X Dowiana aurea £ 
=intermeriia9 X Forbesii <$ 
= Luddemanniana9 X Loddigesii (J 
=± Bowringiana ? x Dowiana £ 
=Luddemanniana9 XL.-C. elegans 
= Loddigesii 9 X labiata vera 

= Loddigesii 9 X Warscewiczii 

= Mossiae 9 xL.-C. SchiileriaD a 

=s Harrisoniae 9 X Gaskelliana 

= guttata Leopoldi 9 xTrianaei 

— X Prince of Wales X Warnerii 

= Xtimbriata 9 X Mossise Wagner's var. o 

= intermedia x maximal 

=Mossiae9 xiricolor<J 

as guttata 9 x intermedia 

= intermedia9 xsuperba 

= Mostiee Wagner's var. 9 Xcalummata 

= Forbesii 9 x Aclandiae <3 

= intermedia 9 XMendelii 

= superba ? X L.-C. x exoniensis 

=labiata vera 9 Trianasio" 

as Bowringiana? X Warscewiczii 

= Mendeli 9 X Lawrenceana 

NATURAL HYBRID3-CATTLEYAS. 

= intermedia X bi color 
= eld ora 1o X superba 
= $chroderaeX Mendel ii 
= Dowiana X Warscewiczii 

= «uttatax intermedia 

as i n termed ia x Forbesi i 

as Forbesii x guttata 

=Dowianax Warscewiczii 

=Aclandiaex Walkeriana 

ss Loddigesii x guttata Leopold it 

=granulosaxL,-C xSchilleriana 

^guttata x intermedia 

= Walkeriana x guttata 

—bicolorx guttata 

= Ha lisODsex Forbesii 

=guttata X labiata 

=iabiatax L.-C. Schiileriana 

=Epidendrum aurantiacum x Catt. Skinn 






Epi-Laeiia 



GARDEN 



Lael 



HYBRID CATTLEYAS 






H 



it 



»• 



t* 



»» 



V 



- 
It 



• • 



Parents'. 
Bowringiana 9 X Dowiana <J 
9 x maxima 6* 

9 X Warscewiczii £ 
X timb'riata 9 x Mossiae, Wagner's var. <$ 
Forbesi9 xAciandiaecJ 
Gaskelliana 9 X Dowiana aurea tf 

„ 9 X Warscewiczii cJ 
guttata 9 x intermedia tf 

Leopoldi 9 X Dowiana cJ 
xLiddigehiitJ 

X Mendeli 6* 
X Trianei <J 

X Warscewiczii <J 

9 X Bowringiana^ 
9 Xliasnelliana<j 

9 x Warscewiczii <$ 

mtermsaia9 xAclandiaed* 
X 

Xcitrina 
X Forbesii 
X guttata? 
X maxima 
X Mendeli 
X su perba 
X .. 
intricata x »» 

labiata autumnalis9 X 1 

., ,, X TrianseicJ 
Loidi«esii9 x Aclandia 

X L -C. exoniensis 
X X Fausta 
X tabiata r«?ra 
X Warscewicxi 



» ' 



»• 






»» 



»» 






it 



»♦ 
»■ 






tyspring. 

Jlantim 
Chloris 

Wendlandi 

Parthenia 

quin«|uecolor 

Lord Rothschild 

Harold 

picturata 

Chamberlainiana 

hybrida 

Harrisii 

Mitchell! 
Atalanta 

Brown ae 

Miss Williams 

*shtoniana 

Johnsoniana 

f*alummata 

timbriata 

citrino-intermedia 
Lowryana 
flaveola 
:Pneidona 
suavior 

: porphyrophlebia 

: Alberti 

:Burberryana 
= Fabia 
=veri flora 

= Aclando-Loddigesi 
- Brabantioe 
= Fausta 

-ieucog'ossa 

: Mars torso l;j& 

^Miaucia 



Raiser, $e, 
Veitch 

White 

Veitch 

Hollington 

Sander 

Sander 

Veitch 

Sander 

Sander 

Bleu 

Veitch 

Veitch 

Dr. Harris 

Veitch 

Sander 

VeitcH 
Veitch 
Bleu 

Backhouse 
Cookson 
Harris 
Veitch 
Hollington 
<$ Sander 

Veitch 

8ander 

Sander 

Veitch 

Mantin 

Veitch 

Veitch 

Veitch 

Harris 

Temple 

Ains worth 

Sauder 

Bleu 

Veitch 

Veitch 

Veitoh 

Veitch 

Sander 

Veitch 

Veitch 

Veitch 

Sander 

Veitch 

Cookson 



San d er 



Raiser, #c. 
Mantin 
Veitch 
Veitch 
Bleu 
Veitch 
Sander 
Cookson 
Veitch 
Veitch 
Veitch 
Harris 
A i? s worth 
Veitch 
Sander 

Temple 

Hollington 

Hollington 
Bleu 

Bieu 

Dr. Harris 

Sander 

Backhouse 
Veitch 

Veitch 

Veitch 

Veitch 

Sander 

Veitch 

Sander 

Veitch 

Veitch 

Veitci 

Veil ch 

Veitch 

Vei ten 



HYBRID CATTLEYAS-CConrtnuei). 









Parents. 

Luddemanniana (speciosissima) 9 X Dowiana <$ 

9 xL.-C. elegans 

xLoddigesi 
luteola $ X Dormaniana (J 

maxima 9 X intermedia o* 

Mendeli 9 X Lawrenceana <$ 

Mossise 9 X Dowiana £ 
X iricolor £ 

XL.-C. xSchilleriana 
Wagner's var. x XcaiuTim«ta 

X Prince of Wales 9 X Warnerii 6* 

Triansei 9 X dolosa <J 
»i 9 X Warscewiczii <$ 

superba 9 X L.-C. exoniensis 






Offspring. 
Kienastiana 
Mardelli 
Mangles i 
Arthuriana 
Dominana 
William Mnrrav 
:Empress Frederick 
: Philo 

Mi as Harris 
Prince of Wales 
Mrs. M. Wells 
: Baroness Schroder 
Ballantineana 
triophthalma 



Offspring. 
Amesiana 
amoena 
Arnoidiana 
Ascania 
Aurora 
Aylingi 

Baroness Schroder 
Behrensiana 
Bella 
Biessensis 
Broomiieldiense 
Brymeriana 
calloglo^sa 
callistoglossa 
Canhamige 
Canhamiana 
Cassandra 
Cassiope 
Chlonia 

Claptonensis 

Clive 

Cornelia 

Devoniensis 

Decia 

Digbyano-Moss se 

Dominiana 

Doris 

epi casta 

eumoea 

eximia 

exoniensis 

Frederick Bayle 

Ingrami 

Ino 

intricata 

Kranzlini 

Mardelli 

Marriottiana 

Mauve Queen 

Maynarai 

Mrs. Harris 

Mylamiana 
Myra 

Normani 
Novelty 
Nysa 
Pallas 

Parysatis 
Pisandra 
Philbrickiana 
Pho3be 

Proserpine 

Ridoltiana 

Sanderas 

Sedeni 

Statteriana 
Stella 
Ti mora 

Trentonensis 

Treaedriana 

triophthalma 

Tydea 

V r aiva?sori 

vedaste 

Veitchiana 

Wellsiae 

Wellsiana 

Zenobia 

Zephyra 



[var. 6* 
Turner's 



HYBRID LiEUO-CATTLEYAS. 

Parents. 

=L. crispa? XC. maxima ^ 
=C. Loddigesii J xl. Perrmi ^ 
=L. purpurata 9 XC Warcewicziio^ 

=C. Trianaei9 XL xanthina^ 
c=C. Loddigesii 6" XL. pumila^ 
= Parents not recorded 

* =C. Trianaei9 xL. Jonghianao* 

= L.-C. Schiileriana 9 xC. Lodaigt»si(J 
=L. purpurata 9 XO. labiata vet*£ 

=L. pumila9 xC. Loddigesii 

=C. Dowiana aurea 9 X L. pumila prsestanso* 

=L.-C. amanda9 X Warscewiczii 

= C. labiata vera 9 X lobata or crispa <$ 

= L. purpurata 9 XO. Warscewiczii 
=C. Mossiae9 XL purpurata <$ 
= L. purpurata 9 X C. Mossiee o* 
=C. Loddigesii 9 X L -C. elegans £ 

=L. pumila 9 X L.-C. exoniensis 6* 
=C. Warscewiczii 9 xL.-C. elega 
= L.-C. elegans 9 XC. Dormaniana S 

=C. Dowiana 9 X L praestans 6* 

— "L. pumila 9 xC. labiaiao* 
= L. crispa 9 X C. guttata 6 

— L. Perrinii 9 X C. Dowiana aurea 6* 
as C. Mossise 9 X L. Digbyana 6* 

= 0. Dowiana 9 X L. purpurata $ 

=L. cinnabarina9 X C. Trianeet 6* 
= L. pumila 9 X Warscewiczii^ 
= C, Trianaei9 XL. majalis^ 
= C. Warnerii 9 XL. purpurata o* 
=C. Mossise 9 X L. crispa 
= C. Trianaei 9 X L. anceps $ 

— L. pumila Davana9 X Dowiana aurea c? 
=C. Loddigesi9 x L.-C. elegans £ 

= C. intermedia 9 X L.-C. elegans <£ 
Moss lc Wagner's var. 9 x L.-C. elegans var. prasiata 6* 

= C. Luddemanniana 9 XL.-C. elegans <$ 

s= L. flava 9 X H. Akinnerii 6* 

=C. Warnerii 9 X L, crispa o 

=L. pumila Dayana 9xC. colosa <$ 

=L.-C. elegang va*. Schiileriana 9 X C. Moesiae 

= C. granulosa 9 xL. cri8pa<? 

=C. Trianaei 9 XL. flava ^ 

=L. pumila 9 XC. DowianacJ 
see Lfcelia 

= L. crispa 9 xC Warscewiczii £ 
= C. Dowiana 9 XL. crispa £ 

= C. Bowringiana 9 xL. pumila 6* 

= L. crispa 9 xC. eldorado^ 

= C. Acianoi83 9 xL.-C. elegans 

=C. Mossias9 XL, cinnabarina 

= L. pumila Dayana 9 xC. velutina 

= L. purpurata Aurora 9 XC. Mo-Mae 

— L. xanthina9 xC. Dormaniana <£ 
=C>uperba9 X L. Devoniensis 6* 
= L. Perrinii xC. labiata 

= L. cri8pa9 XL. C. elegans^ 

= L. pumila Dayana 9 X 0. Luddemanniana £ 

=r(seeLadlia x Novelty var.) 

= L. crispa 9 xC. Loddigesii 
= C. 8Uperba9 XL.-C. exoniensis 
= L. pumila 9 X C. Trianaei 6* 
( (syn. X eximia) 
(syn. Aurora) 

= C. labiata vera 9 X L. crispa £ 
(syn. X eximia) 

= Trianaei Leeana9 xL. purpurata^ 
= O.Lodcigesii 9 x L.-C. elegant, Turner's var. 
=^C. Mendeli 9 xL. xanthinao* 



Albanensia 

amanda 

elegans 

Gottoiaoa 

Ludovacia 

Oweniae 

Pittiana 

porphyrites 

purpurata-intermefha 

,. -guttata Leopoldi 
Schiileriana 



NATURAL HYBRIDS I.ELIO-CATTLEYA. 

=C. Warnerii xt. grandis 
= intermedia xL, crispa or lobata 

= L. purpurata X guttata Leopoldi 

=C. Warnerii x l . tenebrosa 

=C. superba XL.-C. elegans 

=L. Perrinii X unknown 

= C. guttata PrinziixL. grandis 

=L. pumila xC. Dormaniana 

=(ayn. L.-C. Schiileriana) 

— ( *i L.-C. elegans) 

= C. intermedia x L. purpurata 



Parents. 
C. Aclandia 9 x L.-C. X elegans <? 
L.-(>. amanda x Warscewiczii 
C. Bowringiana 9 xL. pumila <J 
L. cinnabarina 9 X C. Trianaei <J 
L. crispa 9 X C. eldorado 

,, XC. guttata 

>« XC. Loddigesii 

,t XC, Maxima 

»• XC, Warscewiczii 



HYBRID L^LIO-CATTLEY 4 . 

Offspring. 

=Philorickiana 
as Brymeriana 

as Parysatis 
as Doris 
as Pisandra 
as Devoniensis 
=Tresideriana 

as Amesiana 

=N*ysa 



Raiser, fyc. 
Sander 
Veitch 
Veitch 
White 
Veitch 
Cookson 
Sander 

Veitch 

Dr. Harris 

Sander 

Sander 

Sander 

Sander 

Veitch 



Raiser, &c. 
Veitch 
Bleu 
Sander 
Veitch 

Hollington 
Baron Schroder 
Sander 
Veitch 

Wells 

Brymer 

Veitch 

Veitch 

Veitck 

Veitch 

Veitch 

Vei tch 

Veitch 

Low 

Cookson 

Veitch 

Veitch 

Veitch 

Veitch 

Veitch 

Veitch 

Veitch 

Veitch 
Veitch 

Veitch 

Sander 

Ingram 

Veitch 

Sander 

Veitch 

Marriott 

Sander 

Sander 

Harris 

Robeson 

Veitch 



Veitch 

Veitch 

Veitoh 

Veitch 

Veitch 

Cookson 

Veitch 

Sander 

Sander 

Veitch 

Veitch 

Ve<tch 

Veitch 

Heath 

Veitch 

Veitch 

Linden 

Perrinoud 

Veitch 

Sander 

Sander 

Veitch 

Vei tch 



Raiser, fa 
Veitch 
Brymer 
Veitch 
Cookson 
Veitch 
Veitch 
Heath 
Veitch 
Veitch 



Jttlt 6, 1895.] 



TEE GARDENERS 1 CHRONICLE. 



ii 



^^^ 



A LIST OF HYBRID CATTLEYA?— (Continue*). 



IX IO-CiTTLEYA 



• t 



HYBRID 

Parnate, 

C. Dowiana 9 XL. eri-pa^ 
H or Mo^sise x L. purpurata 

,, X L. pre«t«ns 

L.-C. x*l*fraot9 X Dormamana £ 

L.-C. Xftlegansvar. Schilleriana? xC.Motsia 
L. flavaxc. Skinneri 

C. Oaakalliana 9 x L. xanthinatf 

C. granuloma x U crisp* 

C. intermedia 9 x L -<\ xe'etrans <$ 

C. labiata vera 9 X L. crmpa 6* 

O. N X L. lobata or cri-pa 

C. Loddi*«»ii x L.-C. X elegant 

x »• »t 

X ,, „ Turner's var. 

XL r»errini 

X pumila 

„ -, x " 

C. Luldemannianaxt.-C. x elegant 

C. MerifMii? x L. xauthiua 6 
C. Motaiap x L. cinnabinna 

•• x ». 

„ xL. criapa 

,, X L. Dgbyan* 
i f X L. purpurea 

., Warner's var. xL.-C, x elegans 
L. Perrini ? xC. Dowiana aurearf 

,, xC. labiata vera 
L. purpurata X „ „ 

„ xC. Mosaite 

•» x , f 

n xC. Waracewiezi 

J9 X ,, 

L.X pumila xC. Dowiana 

„ X L.-C. x exonienais 
XC. labiata vera 
XC. Loddigesi 

XC. Trianaei 

XC. War-owiczi 

Dayana x C. dolosa 

XC. Dowiana aurea 
XC. Luddemaomana 
XC Xrolutina 

L.-C.xSchiileridna9 xC. Loddigesi 
C. supeibixL -C. Devoniensis 

., X L -C. X exonienais 
C. Trianaei ? xL, ancepa 

XL. rUva 

X L. .Tonghiana 

X L. majalia 

XL. xanthina 

Leeanax L. ourpurata [var. <J 

C. Warscewiczii 9 x L.-C elegans, Tuber's 
C. Warneri 9 x L. cnapa <$ 
„ XL. purpurata 

>» X ,, 

X 
xanthina 









«« 
»• 



*f 



•# 



"(Continusd) 

Offspring. 
: p all«s 
Dumiuiana 

:CliT6 

'•aptonense 
Mrs. Harris 
Vfarriottiana 
Hon. Mrs. Aator 

I ylamiaua 
mtncata 
Veitch Una 
oalloglossa 

aatandra 
:Ino 
Z*nobi 

tmirna 
\ur<ra 
▼e<*tte- 

Mirdellii 

Z-phyra 
Pha-be 
Hippolyta 
exonienais 

Digbyano-Moasiae 
Canhamite 
Kranzlinii 
Decia 

^tatcenana 
Bella 

Canhamiana 
Ridolfiana 
Arnold iana 
callastoglos?a 
: Norman ii 
Casaiope 
Cornelia 
B!e»ensia 
Tydea 
erica* ta 
Maynardii 
Ingramii 
Timora 
Proserpine 
Rf*hrena ana 
Sf^eni 

'riophthalma 

Frederick Boyle 
Myra 

Baroness Schroder 
Eumar-a 

A^cinia 

Wellsiana 

Chlonia 

Ylauve Queen 

f*ximia 

Well si ee 

Valvar 

Sande 



Raiser, Sfc. 

Veiteh 

Veitch 
< -ookhon 
Low 
Harris 

SirW. Marriott 

Sander 

Kolhtoa 

Veitch 
Veitch 
Veitch 

Veitoh 
Veitch 
Bleu 

Pern'noui 

Veitch 

Veitck 

Cook son 

Veitch 

Witch 

V««tch 

Veitch 
Sander 

Veitch 
Veitch 
Veitch 
Veitch 
Sander 
Sander 
Veitch 

Coiktoa 

Veitch 
Veitch 

Veitch 

Veitch 

Sander 

Ingram 

Veitch 

Veitch 

Sander 

Veitch 

Veitch 
Binder 

Veitch 

Schroder 

Veitch 

Veitch 

Sander 

Veitch 

Sander 

Veitch 

Sander 

Linden 



Parents. 

Sophrt nitis grandifiora 9 

6 



•• 



[SOPHRO-CATTLBYAS- Co tinu*). 

OHjYing* 

= Cah ..>o 
= Ve tchn 



X Loddi ;e« i <J 
XL.-C. elegant 9 



V-itch 
V«i»ch 



L. 
L. 

L. 
L. 
L. 
L. 

U 

L. 
L. 
L 



•* 

M 



L. 



HYBRID 

crispa9 X L.-C. x Demi nUna£ 

xL.-C. ejegais Wol»tcliolmit 6" 
X lobata 

X ,. 

xpumili Dayana 

XL -C. Schulernna 

cinnabannax Piicb-riana 

., X purpurata 

C. X exonienais 9 xL. pumilao* 

Perrini V Xpumilad" 
pumila X L.-C. elegans 

X ,. .. Turner's var. 

Dayana Xcrispa 

,. X xanthina 

purpurata x L.-C. elegant 



•» 



•t 



l.*:lias. 

= Vi« «• ria 

= ^telia 

= i rieiiana 

s it»*rpa 

= TMm 

= rtsmmra 

~ Latotia 

= "3as*io; ^ 

k iurec t 

= Novel fy 

ss „ var. Trentonentit 
s=. Graves as 

= Oweniana 
= Horniana 



v. h 
Veitch 

Wyatt 

Ve.tch 
\ , <ch 

Ve.trh 

Ve,tch 

Witch 

Vejlch 

ilea 
Veitch 

America 

Sander 
8ander 
Horn 



L. 
L. 
L. 
L. 
L. 
L. 
L. 
L. 
L. 
L. 

L. 

L. 

L. 
L. 
L. 
L. 
L. 



Offspring 

Castiope 

euterpe 

Felix 

flammea 

Gravesee 

Horniana 

juvenilia 

Latona 

Novelty 

Trentonentit 

Owen iana 

Pilcheriana 

lilacioa 

Stella 

Victoria 

vitellina 

Wyattiana 



Crawshayana 
Finckeniana 
Ryermanniana 
Lindleyana 
li lac i ua 



GARDEN HYURIDS.— LKL1M. 

Parents. 
= L.-C. exonien»i§9 xL p\mila<J 
=cri»pa9 xpumila Dayana^ 
=crispa9 xL.-C. 8chillen:iiia<< 
=cinnabarinax xPitcheri 

= pumila Dayana 9 Xcrispa 6" 
= purpurata9 X L.-C. elegant 
= Perrini 9 xpumila^ 
=cinnabarina 9 X purpurata 6* 
=pumila9 XL.-C. «'legan* 

X ., Turner! 

=pumila Dayana 9 x xanthina <J 
=:crispax Perrini ^ 
= crispax Perrini 

= crispa 9 xl.C. elegans Wolstenholmiao* 

= L. crispaV XL.-C. Dominiana 

? harpophylia 9 Perrini 6* 

= crispa9 X lobata^, natural hybrid 

NATURAL HYBRID LJELIAS. 

= autumnalis x albida 

= ilbida x anceps alba var. • 

= msjalisxautumnalis 

= L. (flrataavola) tuberculata X C 

=cntpaxPerrinii 



Jianer, A 
Veitch 

Veitch 

Veitcn 

Veitch 

Sander 
Horn 

Bleu 

Veitch 
Harris 

Ames 

Sander 
Veitch 

Veitch 

Veitch 

Schroder 



intermedia (Brasso-Cattleya) 



NATURAL 



NATURAL HYBRIDS 

C. guttata Leopold i x purpurata 

tf Prinzii x grandit 
C. intermedia x purpurata 
L. pumila x Dormaniana 
L, Perrini x unknown 
L. superba x L.-C. X elegans 
C. Warneri x L. grandis 

it X L # tenebrosa 



L^ELIO-CATTLEYA 

=elegans 
= Pittiana 
— Schilleriana 

= porphyritea 
-Oweniee 
=Ludov%cia 
= 41ban« k nsis 
=Qottoiana 



Batemaniana 
eximia 

laeta 



SOPHRO-CATTLKYAS. 

Sophronitet grandifiora xC. intermedia 

xC, Bower inariana 
X L. pumila Dayana 



Parents. 
Aclandee X Walkenaua 
bicolorX guttata 
Dowiana X Waracewiczii 

»i X ,, 

eldoriidox*upeiba 
Forbesiix guttata 

gutta tax intermedia 
X 

Leopoldi x labiata 
granulosa x L.-C. x Schilleriana 
Harnaonitex Forbesii 
intermedis x bicolor 

,, xForbcsi 
Loddigesu x guttata Leopoldi 
Schrodereex Mendelii 
W alkeriana X guttata 



»» 
»» 



HYRRID CATTLEYAS 

OJfspring. 

= Mea«ure*iana 
= velutina 
= Hardvana 
= Masaaiana 

= Brymenana 

-Lucieniana 

= intricata 

= Scita 

= Victoria Regina 

= resplendent 
-venosa 
= Batalinii 
= Krameriana 
= Patrocinia 
=cupido 
=sororia 



Jiautr, \c. 



99 



Veitch 
Veitch 
Veitch 



NATURAL HYBRID-EPI-CATTLEYA 
Epidendrum aurantiacum x Cattleya Skinneri = Bpi-Cattleyi 



guatemalent 



• GARDEN HYBRID— EPI-L^LIA. 

Epidendrum ciliare x tselia anceps =Epi-L«lia Hardy ana 

Sopbronitis grandifiora 9 X Epidendrum radicant= Veitchii 



Sander 
Veitch 



Nursery Notes. 



SWISS NURSERY, FARNHAM, SURREY. 



Not in the ordinary acceptation of the term it thia Kintore presenting a charming tight. Stilt, the toil 



article, by the way, hat to be brought about 6 milet, are grown, but only aa old pot-plantt, dwarf buafaes, 
from Alderthot, at a cott of 10a. per cartload. Eren jutt to furnith cuttingi, m thete, when rooted, are 
on this apparently dry elerated tpot Violai do well, 
a long row of old planUi of the pretty Countett of 



a nurtery, becaute it teemt to be more generally 
utilised for the production of seed crops, and in this 



is far more retentive of moisture than in the long 
drought could well have been expected. Water is 



told in great quantities. They root in shallow boxes, 

filled with the surface-sand from the heath, with 
remarkable ease. 

The chief subjects of the houses, howerer, are 
Tomatos, Melons, and Cucumbers ; of these latter, 



direction very likely it presents some features of always found at 6 feet from the surface, whilst half huge crops of seed- fruits hare already been taken off 



interest that ordinary nurseries lack. The place is 
situate on a somewhat barren-looking heath, about 
2£ miles from the famous Hop-town of Farnham. 



a mile away a depth of 180 feet has to be dug ere 
water is found. 



from January plantings, and other plants have taken 
their places, to give a second crop. These are 



The wonderfully pretty Nemesia strumosa Suttoni chiefly grown in wooden troughs about 20 inches 
iL a .. m .t U ! r ^° r ^ on // at, ? latioi J t0 the local resi- is found here in great quantity, and blooming freely. wide, having open or trellis bottoms, and stand over 

the hot-water pipes. No plants could do better than 
these, none could be healthier. The houses are low 
spans, and being well down in the ground, always 
have a moist atmosphere. Cucumber Marvel, shown 



?! nti ?£ _? r :. S# Mortimer hM Patched kfa tent The plants were raised under glass, then planted out 

in various blocks of colour, and these are found to 



there, it is all the same a matter of some difficulty 
to those at a distance who find Rose Lodge is not a 
convenient place to reach. The site seemed, at the 
outset, to have been on this barren starved -looking 



come pretty true. Some of these hues are rich 
a'most beyond description. Within the houses a 



. . looking very fine lot of seedling Coleuses may be seen, recently at the Drill Hall twice, is represented here 

neath, about as unpromising an one as could be for strong plants, in 6-inch pots, of varying heights, by younger plants now in full fruit. The sample 

a nursery, but no one can tell the full capacities of Size of leafage and coloration all are beautiful, some hanging remarkably handsome, smooth, even, and 
ground until it is fully tested. Now, after a few " ' " ~" 



superlatively so. Who 



colour, with scarcely anv heel, and about 



years of deep working and good cultivation, it is grow these plants from cuttings and winter them, 16 inches long, is as. perfect a variety as can be 

round possible to grow first-class show Dahlias in when from a packet of seed they can obtain such a desired, a*id is a heavy cropper. Of other varieties 

1"°??-! Jl t .i? fr0a ° diD ? h ^ h " land look \ ai if lt weaIth of beaat 7 **d of variety ? These are grown grown, Sutton's Prize-winner, Improved Telegraph, 

Wft " " "" L ~ " J ~" ^ * expressly to produce seed ; very tiny is the teed, and Al, and Rochford's Market, are now in growth or 

the greatest care and patience is needed to collect it. 



would be dearly purchased at 205. per acre. Amongst 
other accomplishments, Mr. Mortimer is a capital 
Dahlia florist, and he has put out this year of 
'•shows," fancies, pompons, Cactus, seedling*, &c, 
about 1000 plants. These are in every case about 4 
feet apart each way, are all neativ staked, and well 
mulched with long manure. Tais latter useful 



Celosia mm *,— 

feature; the plants range from 16 to 24 inches in 
height, are of perfect form, have many singularly 
rich colours, and are indeed charmingly effective for 
ordinary decoration. All the best sorts of Fuchsias 



cropping. Success, Lockie's Perfection, and other 
varieties are also grown as needed. The year's pro- 
duce of fruits is indeed heavy, and the seed crop a 
great one. 

Melons are grown for seed and for trials. These 
are chiefly put up in Orange-boxes filled with soil 



12 



THE 



GARDE NEBS' CHRONICLE 



[Jult 6, 1895. 



the plants being about 2 feet apart ; they are, as are 
the Cucumbers, trained up beneath the roof on wire*. 
Melons and Cucumber* sometimes are grown in the 
lame house, getting almost identical treatment. 
There are jast now, perhaps, thirty or more varieties 
of Melons being grown. All have good, even- sized, 
handsomely-netted fruits ; none are big, or ungainly, 
or small. Every one is presentable, and they harg 
thickly. The largest crop of any one variety is 
Eclipse, a green-flesh, of great beauty and of high 
flavour. 

Tomatos of all the best sorts are grown, both as 
erect or upright plants, and trained to wires under 
the glass. A. fine new 100-feet house, having plants 
put out in rows of four on each side, and 3 feet apart, 
seems to present as admirable a structure for the 
purpose as can well be conceived. The sorts are 
Conqueror, very early ; Perfection, Mitchell's Hybrid, 
A 1, Ham Green Favourite, Best of All, Abundance, 
Frogmore Selected, &c. There are no unduly large 
fruits. A good smooth, medium-sized sample, firm, 
and richly coloured, is most esteemed. This house 
is very light, has ample ventilation, and the plants 
are in perfect heath. About 12 cwt. have already 
been taken from it, and fully 8 cwt. more fruits are 
maturing now, Tomatos are grown for market, and 
so far the return for good samples seems to have 
been most satisfactory.' Mr. Mortimer's exhibits at 
the Drill Hall and elsewhere fully show that he is a 
first-class cultivator. A. I). 



Cultural Memoranda. 

• ■ 

PROPAGATION OF KESTIO SUBVERTI- 

CttLATUS, 

The propagation of this rare Cape plant, I believe, 
has hitherto been effected by the division of the 
roots aud Thizome, and by this method the trials 
have often been attended by failure. Lately, roots 
were noticed about the nodes of the stem, apparently 
springing from the base of the young growths, but 
only upon stems of not less than two or three years 
old. Several stems were taken off and cut up, 
leaving about a couple of inches of old stem with 
the node in the centre ; these were put into thumb 
pots and placed in a handlight where they were 
shaded from the sun in an intermediate temperature. 
Here in about a month's time the plants in some 
cases began to root, and when root action is once 
set up the growth is vigorous. As the plant in a 
small state would be useful as a decorative plant on 
account of its long feathery plume-like stems, it 
should soon become more generally known in our 
gardens. Grown in a cool greenhouse, it soon forms 
a very large plant if encouraged, and for planting in 
large structures is always pretty and attractive. 

JR. L. Harrow , 



The Week's Work 



THE KITCHEiST GARDEN. 

By JOBDf Lambert. Gardener, Powis CanU, Wehhpool. 
H1NT8 ON WORK IN GENERAL.— Owing to the 

drought, gardeners ia most parts of the country will 
be heavily handicapped in this department, and in 
some districts crops will have been left unthinaed in 
the hope of rain coming so as to render the work 
possible. Where rain has fallen and the land is 
moistened, the thinning should be forthwith com- 
pleted. Other crops, such as Salsafy, Scorzonera, 
Tarnipt* Beetroot, late Onions, and Cauliflowers, will 
need heavy applications of water at the root' and 
syringing* of the foliage. Go over the plantations 
of Cauliflowers at short intervals of tima 
protecting the heads by breaking down a leaf 
or two over them. For show Cauliflowers I 
would not recommend this as general practice 
and certainly not in the case of Autumn Giant, th« 
heads of which variety are a long time in coming to 
perfection, and breaking down the leaves sometimes 
lets in the light at the sides. It is a better method 
to gather up the leaves near the tops, and tie them 
loosely together, not crushing them. This allows of 
as examination of the head by removing the tie 



Another, but more costly way, is to use two thick- 
nesses of calico which fit close, keep out damp, and 
the heads readily develop underneath them, and keep 
perfectly white. Sufficient care is, I think, not 
taken by some cultivators, or we should not see 
so many badly- coloured Cauliflowers in August 
on exhibition tables. The best way to keep lull- 
grown heads is to stand them in an erect position in 
a cool, rather dark shed or cellar, with the roots in 
damp soil. Dj not crowd them together. If the 
roots are plunged in water, as is sometimes advised, 
the curl soon opens. Do not be over-desirous of 
siz* in Cauliflowers, but cut or lift them when the 
curd ia firm and white. 

BROCCOLI.— Carefully prick out the best plants 
from the seed-beds when large enoagh to handle, the 
plants being more easily looted after in these small 
beds until we get rain than when planted in the 
quarters. I do not advise early planting, or on soil 
tnat is loose or very rich. It may not be amiss to 
descrihe my method of procedure with Broccoli in 
lb94 5, as it was generally a disastrous year for 
them. Our hardest frost was 35°, or 3° below zsro. 
The seed was sown on May 24 and June 13. The 
majority of the plants put out were of the June 
sowing. These plants were planted direct from the 
seed-beds. 



... 



••« 



... 



Of Knight's Protecting 

Cattell's Eclipse 

Sulphur or Portsmouth. ... 

Backhouse's Winter White 

Perfection Late White 

Veitch's Main Crop 

,-Vlodel .., 



»• • 



• •• 



• •• 



»1 



II 



M 



ft 



»! 



jy 



135 were planted, 33 died. 

180 * „ 29 
180 „ 60 
135 „ 70 

230 „ 57 
408 „ 63 
610 ,, 56 

• 1878 370 

CELERY. — The main crop of Celery should now 
be planted, affording the plants one good watering to 
settle the soil. Damp them overhead after hot days. 

THE SOWING OF 8EED8 OF C0LEWORT8 — A 

sowing may now be made of Cole wort and early- 
hearting Cabbages for autumn use, making other 
sowings of the same in the coarse of a fortnight. 

HERBS. — The cutting of herbs for drying sho aid 
take place as soon as any kind shows flower, if later 
than this the leaves drop. Parsley should be 
gathered in quantity for drying whenever it is plen- 
tiful. When dried and bottled there is a great saving 
of green Parsley for flavouring purposes effected. 



PLANTS UNDER GLASS. 

By W. H. Smith, Gardener, West Dean Park, Chichester. 

PLANT8 IN FRAMES.— By this time of the year 
Freesia bulbs should be thoroughly ripened, and may 
be shaken out of the soil, the large- flowering ones 
being put on one side for potting. The smaller 
bulbs, so as to economise space, may, when the 
suitable time for starting them arrives, b* planted in 
boxes. The Bride (Gladiolus Colvillei) and other 
varieties of Gladiolus cultivated in pots should be 
placed in the open air as soon as the flowers have 
faded or are removed. Afford weak manure- water 
occasionally to them till the growth begins to die 
dowo, when clear water only may be afforded, and 
then very sparingly, 

, NERINE8 should be examined, removing decayed 
leaves, and cleaning the plants generally. Those 
which are showing for flower should be separated 
from the rest, and the soil afforded a thorough water- 
ing. The stock of Nerines should be examined 
erery few days, for no sooner is a flower-spike 
visible than the plant needs water at the root. 

8ALVIA8 may be removed from the frames and 
potted on in their flowering pots. Good loam and 
leaf-soil with plenty of well-decayed manure will 
suit them. After re-potting, place them out-of- 
doors on a coal-ash floor, syringing the foliage daily, 
and affording planty of water at the roots when the' 
Dots are permeated with the roots. Let the plants 
be provided with neat stakes before they become 
tall, or damage by wind or heavy rain may occur. 

MIGNONETTE —If large pots of Mignonette are 
required in the early winter months, seed should 
now be sown, three or four seeds beincr placed in as 
many 60 -pots as may be considered sufficient for the 
demand. These should be filled with loam, leaf- 
soii, and finely-broken old mortar. Make the soil 
.very firm before sowing, and cover the seeds to the 
depth of a quarter of an inch, and place the pots 
out-of-doors on the north side of a wall. Mignonette 



- 

succeeds if kept partially shaded during the summer, 
and the soil never allowed to become dry. A few of 
the best varieties for winter are golden Qieen, 
Miles' Hybrid Spiral, Parson's White, Girra way's 
White, and Matchet, the latter being sown a little 
later and kept in smaller pots; the habit of the 
plant is very dwarf and bushy. 

HERBACEOUS CALCEOLARIA8 — Sow the seed 

in shallow pans filled with sifted loam and leaf- soil, 
previously moistened thoroughly, scattering it thinly 
on the surface. Do not cover the seeds at ail, but 
after pressing them into the soil place a bit of glass 
over the pans, and keep shaded till the seedlings 
appear, when more light and air should be gradually 
afforded. 

VALLOTA PURPUREA.— This plant, as soon as 
the flower-spikes push up, requires abundance of 
water at the roots, and a slight top-dressing of Clay's 
or some other fertiliser. Sickly plants should be 
shaken out of the soil, the bulbs washed in water, 
and repotted in turfy loam, leaf-soil, and wood-ashes 
or charcoal in the proportion of one shovelful to 
one bushel of soil. Ramose the flower-spikes from all 
weakly bulbs. The plants should be lightly shaded 
till they are firmly established. 



THE HAEDY FKUIT GARDEN. 

By W.Pope, Gardiner, Bighziere Cattle, Newbury. 
FURNISHING BLANK 8PACE8 ON TRAINED 

TREES.— It sometimes happens that unsightly blanks 
occur on Peach and other trained trees, owing to 
bad attacks o> blister or some other cause. The 
symmetry of the tree may be restored and fresh main 
branches secured if desired by inarching, and the 
operation should be performed now or during the 
next two months, when the young shoots attain the 
requisite length and firmness. Suitable growing 
shoots should be inarched on to the bare 
portions of the older branches. The method of 
operation is much the same as in ordinary 
budding, but in addition a transverse cut has 
to be made at each end of the longitudinal 
slit in the bark, which should be on a clean healthy 
branch; and about 1.J inch in length. Raise the 
bark carefully with the handle of a budding-knife, 
then take a thin slice of bark and wood from the 
young shoot on the side to be joined to the stock, 
and place the growth thus prepared under the bark, 
afterwards binding it closely, yet not too tightly, with 
soft matting, or budding cotton. When the union 
is effected, which, under favourable conditions, will 
be in the course of a month or two, the young branch 
should behalf cut through below the junction, and 
after a further interval of a few weeks, it may be 
severed entirely. 

REMOVING 8NAG8 FROM PEACH-TREES.— Look 

over and remove snags of dead wood from Peach, 
Nectarine, and Apricot trees, paring such off closely 
and neatly with a sharp knife, so that the wound 
will heal over before winter. Young, newly-planted, 
and other trees that may have been cut back require 
special attention at this season in this matter, such 
snags, in addition to being unsightly, form harbours 
for insects later on, and are otherwise injurious. 

RA8PBERRIE8 are generally looking well this 
season, and there is every prospect of a good crop. 
See that all fruiting canes are properly secured 
to wires or other supports, and protect from 
birds by fixing nets well above the plants, 
which is best done by erecting a light framework of 
wood sufficiently high to allow room to walk under, 
then stretching nets over all. If surface suckers 
have been removed, and only sufficient for next year's 
requirements have been reserved, this will admit 
more light and air to the crop of fruit now maturing, 
and it will strengthen the growth of those reserved 
for future fruiting. If it be desired to form new 
beds from surplus suckers, these may be stopped at a 
foot in height, so as not to interfere with permanent 
canes. 

PROTECTING RED AND WHITE CURRANTS.— 

Lose no time in protecting Red and White Car- 
rants by netting if birds are troublesome. First make 
sure that all are free from caterpillars or apbii. I' 
caterpillars are present, the best remedy is hand- 
picking; whilst aphis may be destroyed to a great 
extent by first taking off and destroying all infested 
taps, afterwards thoroughly washing the trees with 
clean, sofc-water, applied with force from the 
garden-engine. 



Jtlt 6, 1895.] 




GARDENERS' CHRONICLE. 



13 



FLO 



t « 



2?y Bailey Wadds. Gardener. Birdsall Gardens, York. 

RAI8INQ ROSE8 FROM SEED. — The cross- 
fertilisation of Rjiei is not much understood or 
practised in this country by amateurs ; it is, how- 
ever, a most interesting occupation. In our uncertain 
climate, the plants operated upon should either be 
grown under glass or in a sheltered parf. The 
flowers selected as seed-bearers would require to 
have the stamens removed with a pair of finely- 
pointed scissors before the pollen has become mature. 
General Jacqueminot is a variety which should be 
fertilised, or the pollen used to fertilise others, in 
about four hours after expanding ; and in deter- 
mining the time, a good deal of attention is required, 
for if the pistils are not nearly matured, they will 
not be in a condition to be fertilised. The petals 
are then gently pulled off, the stamens cut away, 
and the pollen applied to the stigma of the 
seed-bearing flowers by the aid of a camel's- 
hair pencil, or by gently rubbing them with 
the bloom of the fertilising sort. Very 
double flowers do not make such good seed- 
bearers as the less doable ones, and they pos- 
sess less pollen. After the operation the fertilised 
flowers should be enclosed in fine netting to ward 
off flies, &c. The ripe seed-pods or hips when 
gathered should be buried in damp sand until the 
beginniDg of the year, and then sown in pots or 
boxes placed in gentle heat. The seedlings appear 
in a few weeks, and will require carefully potting 
and planting out when all danger of frost is over. 

PLEASURE GROUNDS —Grass lawns that have 
become browned by the recent dry weather should 
not be mown very closely. Kaise the knives in the 
machine well up, and remove the grass-box, so that 
the cut grass may remain as it is scattered about by 
the machine; it will then assist in keeping the lawn 
green. If the lawn has not been mown for some 
time owing to the drought, it will be well to mow 
it lightly over with a sharp scythe before the lawn- 
mower is used on it again. Grass-edgings should be 
kept tidy by clipping with the edging-shears, and 
narrow verges of grass in dry situations require to be 
well watered during dry weather. 

8HRUBBERY BORDERS AND BEDS should be 

frequently hoed and raked, to give them a tidy 
appearance. Gravel walks and drives which are 
made with materials that become very loose during 
dry weather should be watered and rolled. Keep 
them clean from weeds by hand- weeding, or by 
applications of a weed- killer, which is a much 
cheaper process in the end than using hoe and rake 
to them, especially where large gravel is used. The 
watering of trees and shrubs that were planted late in 
the season should be continued during dry weather. 

R08EMARY (ROSMARINUS OFFICINALIS).— Seed- 
ling plants of tnis useful sweet-scented undershrub 
that were raised in the spring should be planted out 
into sheltered situations against walls or other 
places where they are likely to stand well through 
the winter. They are unable to stand the winter in 
the north in exposed places, or on cold, wet soil. 
They may be propagated by cuttings struck in gentle 
heat, or by layering. The present time is a good 
one to make layers from the old plants into a light, 
rich, well-drained soil. There is a great demand in 
most gardens for this very valuable plant. 

LAVENDER (LAVANDULA SPICA).— This popular 

sweet-scented plant requires a warm, light, loamy 
soil ; it is easily increased by seeds sown in gentle heat 
in the spring, or by layers of it put down now, and 
planted out in August or September, when it has be- 
come well rooted. It should then be planted in rows 
about 3 feet apart, or it may be planted in shrubbery 
borders in places where it can get the full sunlight. 
It requires well-drained soil, and in northern dis- 
tricts shelter from north and east wirds also. The 
flower-spikes should be cut when the bottom part of 
the spike begins to turn brown. If they are long 
enough, they should be tied tightly just below the 
flowers, then turn up the stalks, and tie the ends to 
form a protection for the flowers, which will last 
much longer if tied in this way. 



FRUITS UHDEB GLASS. 

By Richard Parker, Gardener, Goodwood. Chichester. 

PINES. — As the fruits are cut from the plants, 
the old foliage may be shortened back to allow the 
suckers to develop as much as possible. Keep the 
roots in a moiat condition, and syringe overhead and 



between the pots during bright weather, allowing a 
little manure-water to collect at the base of each 
sucker to encourage new roots. Only sufficient 
shading should be afforded to prevent the young 
foliage being damaged, plenty of light and a fair 
amount of ventilation being necessary to promote 
sturdy growth. In the meantime clean some 6 -inch 
pots, and prepare a good heap of compost, ready for 
potting up the suckers as soon as these are large 
enough. The compost will be all the better if prepared 
some time before required. Turn it over well several 
times, so that the whole be thoroughly mixed, and 
let it consist of good turfy loam, spent Mushroom 
dung, crushed charcoal, and sharp sand, with a slight 
dusting of soot. Keep the soil covered with mats to 
prevent it becoming dry. The pots should have one 
large crock at the bottom, and a few finer ones placed 
over; or what is better, a sprinkling of broken oyster 
shells. The house or pit in which the young stock 
of plants is to be wintered should be thoroughly 
cleansed, and the plunging material renewed to 
ensure a steady bottom heat of about 85°. Smooth 
Cayennes should be induced to throw up a few fruit 
in succession from now onwards, so as to keep up a 
regular supply during the autumn and winter months. 
Commence to feed the plants as soon as there is the 
appearance of fruit, and encourage growth by giving 
plenty of heat and moisture. Fruit in different 
stages should be kept in an upright position, as the 
beauty of a good fruit is often destroyed by allowing 
the crown to grow on one side. 

MELONS.— The hot weather has caused these to 
turn in quickly ; and where successional crops are 
not following closely, shading should be afforded to 
those changing colour, to retard them as much as 
possible, and as the flavour of the fruit improves by 
being allowed to become thoroughly ripened on 
the plant, it is better to shade the roof-glass 
than to cut the fruit before it is ripe and store away 
in a cool place. Later crops in different stages of 
growth should be frequently dressed with fresh loam, 
and well supplied witn moisture at the roots, and the 
foliage kept regularly syringed in hot weather. Seed 
may still be sown to raise plants to supply fruit 
during September and October, but the houses in 
which these are to be planted must be thoroughly 
cleansed and fresh soil afforded, or it is likely they 
will prove a failure from the attack of red- spider, 
and the poorness of the soil that has produced a 
previous crop. 

WINTER T0MATO8. — These were recently potted 
into small 60*8 and placed on ashes in a cold pit. 
To ensure plenty of fruit during the winter, the 
plants must be grown well during the summer 
months. As soon as ready, these plants will be put 
into 6- inch pots, and again placed in the cold pit, 
until established, when they will be stood on ashes 
in a sunny position. By the end of the present 
month they will be ready for the fruiting-pots, which 
will be 10-inch ones. In the final potting a space 
of several inches should be allowed, so that the 
plants may receive several top-dressings as the fruit 
swells. The plants should be staked and placed 
in a sheltered place, but one open to the 
sun. All side- shoots must be kept pinched, 
and each plant grown on the cordon sys- 
tem. By the end of September the plants 
will be from 4 to 6 feet high, wit'i clusters of fruit in 
different stages of growth, the whole length of the 
stem. Avoid too rich a soil when potting, as it is 
best to feed the plants alter the fruit is set. Keep 
the roots well supplied with moisture, but should 
a period of wet weather set in, see that the drainage 
is free, and the pots should be stood on a couple of 

bricks. 

CUCUMBER8.— A few plants may be raised now 
to supply fruit during autumn and early winter, and 
thus save to a great extent those plants intended to 
yield fruit from December onwards. 



THB OBOHIB HOUSES. 

Bv W. H. White, Orchid Grower, Burford, Dirkinq. 
CATA8ETUM8, MORMCDE8, AND CYCNOCHE8. 

— These singular and interesting Orchids now grow- 
ing rapidly, enjoy strong heat and a clear light whilst 
growing ; and a capital place for them is in the East 
Indian- house, where they may be suspended from the 
roof with their foliage about an inch or two from 
the glasf. The flowers appear as the balbs get 
matured, and until the growth is fully mad* up 
abundant watering is required by the plants. After 
flowering is past, the plants should be exposed to 



full sunshine, and be plentifully supplied with water 
at the root till the new pseudo-bulbs are ripe and 
the leaves fallen. Cyrtopodium Andersonii and C. 
punctatum wiil require similar treatment, but these 
flower during the spring months, the spikes appear- 
ing in conjunction with the young breaks. 

BROUQHTONIA, 8ANGUINEA, ETC.— A very strik- 
ing Orchid now in bloom is this species, which is 
worth adding to any collection. Tne colour of its 
flowers is deep red. and these last for a long time in 

good condition. It succeeds when fastened on to a 
wooden raftor block, with alittlesphagnum-moss about 

it, and suspended from the roof of the Mexican- 
house. The same kind of treatment as that afforded 
to the other inmates will suit its requirements. 
Another beautiful species which usually does well in 
the Mexican-house is Odontoglossum citrosmum. 
Its flowering seaion is now over, and the young 
growths are on the move. Any plants that require 
tresh material or more space should be at once 
attended to. Baskets are preferable to pots for 
this plant, as when suspended the racemes of 
blossom are seen to better advantage. They should 
have a light position, and water carefully afforded 
till the new growths have made some progress, 
or decay may result if the roots are not in full ac- 
tivity. When established, abundance of moisture is 
necessary, the plants being placed in nearly full sun- 
shine, and a good overhead syringing administered 
at closing-time every day. If the plants must be 
grown in the shade, less water at the root will be 
required, and syringing may be dispensed with. 
Barkerias require exactly the same kind of treat- 
ment, and now that these plants are in full growth, 
the young shoots should be frequently examined for 
mealy-bug, which if not kept in check wiildis6gure 
them. 

EPIDENDRUM RADICANS, which has been in flower 
for several months, should have the flower-spikes 
removed,the plants having started into growth. I: is a 
plant of a scandent habit, and the shoots should be tied 
around a few neat stakes, keeping the young growths 
well up towards the light. Throughout the growing 
season, it should be kept moist at the root, and 
frequently syringed overhead. E. radicans may be 
easily propagated by taking the offshoots which 
appear on the old growth and flower-stems, and 
inserting them thickly around the edge of a dower- 
pot, in well-drained sphagnum-moss. 

EPIDENDRUM 8TAMFORDIANUM is now starting 

new growths from the base of the current year's 
spikes. It is a species that has baffled numerous culti- 
vators, and from the information which I have received 
from Mr. C. Payne, who for a long time successfully 
cultivated the splendid specimen exhibited at the 
recent Temple show (see Gardeners' Chronicle, p. (587, 
with fig.), the principal cause of failure appears 
to have been through affording it tco much 
heat and moisture. The plant, when it came under 
Mr. Payne's care about a dozen years ago, was a very 
little piece, with only a few pseudo- bulbs, and he 
put it into a small shallow pan, affording it plenty of 
drainage, elevating the plant well above the rim, and 
uaing as compost two parts of rough fibry peat to 
one of sphagnum-moss. It was placed in a light 
moist corner of an intermediate-house, where, with 
careful attention as to watering, &c, the plant soon 
began to grow luxuriantly, and it has continued 
to grow and bloom well up to the present tim*. 
Daring growth, and until the flower-spikes became 
well advanced, abundance of water was always af- 
forded, but as the flowers commenced to open less 
water was afforded, and at no period was the 
plant allowed to become quite dry. The proper 
time to re-pot E. Stamfordianum is about the time 
that growth recommences. I may mention, that 
according to Mr. Payne's recommendation, I have 
placed several small plants which for years past have 
been gradually deteriorating, in such a position as 
above indicated, and they already appear to appreciate 
the change. 



ROSES.— 3656 Rose blooms were staged, as we 
learn from the secretary, in competition at the 
National Rose Society's Southern Show. Tae total 
above given does not include the Roses exhibited in* 
the section for garden Roses, and in the decorative 



j 



classes. With the exception of those at Birming- 
ham in 1890, and Chester in 1892, this was the 
largest provincial exhibition that has yet been hel 
by the Society. 



14 



THE 



GABDENERS* 



CHS ONI CLE. 



[Jolt 6, 1895. 






EDITORIAL NOTICES. 



Advertisements should be sent to the PUBLISHER. 

Newspapers.— Correspondents sending newspapers should be 
careful to mark the paragraphs they wish the Editor to see. 

Illustrations.— The Editor will thankfully receive and select 
photographs or drawings, suitable for reproduction in these 
pages, of gardens, or of remarkable plants, flowers, trees, 
dc. ; but he cannot be responsible for loss or injury. 



physiologist or botanist, it is of direct practical 
importance also. A carious illustration of this 

Wallace 



to us may serve to convey some notion of the 
colouring of the varieties, though nothing but a 
well-executed coloured illustration can suffice to 




that one particular form, C. venustus var. citrina convey any adequate idea of their beauty : 
is injured by a leaf- cutter bee. The insect 
destroys nearly all the flowers of this variety, 
and, to a less extent, those of the similarly- 
coloured C. luteus. Why the insect should thus 
manifest a preference for yellow, and take no 
heed of flowers of other colour, is a mystery to 



be solved. 



Wallace ask for a remedy 



" Q. splendens atrovfolaceus" — Flowers upwards ot 
3 inches acron. Sepals linear-lanceolate acuminate ; 
petals pale lavender, with a small purple blotch at 
the very bate, elsewhere self-coloured, thinly beiet 
with white hairs ; filaments deep violet, ovary 

glaucous, pale violet. 
"C. citrinus"— Flower* upwards of 3£ inches 



APPOINTMENTS FOR THE ENSUING WEEK. ™* J^^TSS^iiTSK «* .-»*■ ^^T^T-TT 'j~% 



TUESDAY, 



SATURDAY, 



TUESDAY, 



WEDNESDAY, 



THURSDAY, July 11 



MEETINGS. 

/ Royal Horticultural Society's Com- 
July 9 { mittees, at the DriU HaU, James 

(. Street, Westminster. 

SHOWS. 

(National Rose Society, at the 
Crystal Palace. 
London Pansy and Viola Society, 
at the Crystal Palace. 

i Wolverhampton Floral F3te (three 
JULY 9< days). 

( Ipswich Horticultural and Rose. 

{Rose Shows at Chelmsford, Farn- 
ham, and Hitchin. 
Reigate Cottage and Horticultural, 
at Redhill. 
Royal Botanic Society, Evening 
Fete. 

{Bath Bose and Begonia, Wortsop 
Rose, Woodbridge Rose, Helens- 
bu'gh Rose, Qieat Malvern (Here- 
ford Rose). 



. . . ., , . . .. 11 WA Ar , ^i. externally, with a small eye-spot iu the centre of the 
which would be very objectionable, we do not 7 AW V A , Ln*« w ;*k o «.*,*;«« 

... LTJ Zl f/L ui -; ' +~* wner surface; petals canary-yellow, with a median 



see how the enemy is to be circumvented. 



purplUh-brown iqaarish blotch ; claw with numerous 



Calochortus differs from Tulips or Lilies, fi ae radiating linear spots, and a central crescentic 
though allied to both. On handling the bulbs band of orange hairs pointing downwards; stamens 
for the first time, one marvels most of all at the 
prodigality of blossoms that keep following each 
other in rapid succession from the tiny bulbs or 



yellowish ; ovary green. 

11 C, luteus"— Flowers upwards of 9} inches across. 
Sepals oblong, tapering acuminate, gre 



root-stook. By growing a fair collection of ternally, yellowish internally 



few purplish 



these plants in early, mid -season, and late 



streaks and lines ; petals 



varieties, these bulbs may be had in succession blotch, but numerous small radiating purplish lines 
from April 1 to the end^of July. These bulbs 
are quite hardy under proper cultural conditions. 
Planted in cold, wet, or crowded herbaceous 
borders, where the struggle for life and growth 



in the centre, and a broad crescentic tuft of orange 
hairs pointing downwards; filaments and ovary 



yellowish. 
M 0. oculatus 



* 

Flowers upwards of 4 inches across. 



TUESDAY, 
FRIDAY, 



SALES. 

, Q f Established Orchids at Protheroe &. 

JULYy \ Morris' Rooms. 

t-*- , ) Imported Orchids at Protheroe & 
JULY12 1 Morris' Rooms. 



# -...*.. . Sepals broadly oblong acuminate, greenish internally, 

is incessant, and the survival of the strongest ^ § central purpliih . browil ipot e dged with canary- 

only the bitter end of so many brilliant hopes, yeUow . petaU creamy .y e iiow with a central blotch 
the Calochortus might not oome to much. ^ The M in the iepft i f> bat larger, claw with numerous 

minute radiating purplish lines or spots, and pro- 
vided with a crescentic band of orange-brown hairs ; 
stamens cream-coloured ; ovary glaucous. 

11 C. venustus pictus" — Flowers upwards of 4 inches 



drained 



border, facing and also sloping south, and raised 
1 foot or so above the surrounding surface. The 
soil should be compounded of sea-sand, leaf- 



proportions, across, sepals recurved acuminate, aristate, spotted 



CORRECTED AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR THE ENSU- 
ING WEEK, DEDUCED FROM THE OBSERVATIONS 
OF FORTY-THREE TEARS, AT CHISWICK.-63\3. 



Messrs 



and blotched on the inner surface. Petals creamy 
white, blotch irregularly wedge-shaped, reddish- 
brown, surrounded by a thin band of pale yellow, 
claw with reddish-brown spots and hairs, and a 
central circular pit. Stamens pale pink. Oary 

greenish. 

" C Vesta." — Flowers upwards of 4 inches across, 
sepals broadly oblong, aristate- acuminate, recurved, 
of this lovely genus. Their markings are so The plants make little foliage, and produce gree nish, finely spotted on the inner surface ; petals 
delicate and so intricate, their shades of colour almost a forest of flowers. They are greatly pa j e lavender, with a central reddish-brown, square 

helped through the blooming season, and espe- blotch, surrounded by a halo of yellow, claw marked 



Sandy loam might compensate for the absence 
of sea-sand and road-grit, where neither is easily 
available ; but the former is the compost for 
Calochortus at Colchester. 

It is good practice to take up the bulbs in the 
Calochortus. Colchester, send us a box of cut month of August, and replant again towards the 

flowers of some of their varieties end of October or the beginning of November. 



so nicely graduated, that a verbal description is 

more than ever inadequate to convey an idea of oially through such droughts as we have had 



beauty 



There are still many 



this season, by good thorough waterings every 
alternate day. Many ohoioe collections of 
these showy bulbs were exhibited at the Col- 
chester Rose show, oontaining some of the 



choicest varieties. 



who care little for the significance of all this 
variety and beauty; to them the flowers are 
beautiful, and that is enough. But the real 
plant-lover finds in them an added interest, and 
is able, in some degree, to invest the material 
with the spiritual. Taking the flowers before 
us, it is obvious that all this variety of oolour 
and spotting is connected with the fertilisation 
of the flowers by inseots, and we do not doubt The mid-season bloomers : C. 



with minute reddish spots, and with a ring of gold and 
brown hairs midway between the blotch and the 
bud. Filaments and anthers cream-coloured. Orary 
glaucous, pinkish. 



L£ 



Flowers upwards of 3.} inches across 



had faded 



time of our visit on July 2, the following were 
among the best in the different sections. 



Sepals green, oblong, acuminate, aristate, with a 
small purplish blotch within at the base ; petals 
cream-coloured, with two oblong blotches, one above 
the other in the middle line, the upper pale, the 

brown: claw with a central 



Earliest : C. albas C. amoenus, C. pulohellos. fqnftriih pa<J of yell<mi-h ^ Md nnmeron- fine 



ami, C. 



but that adaptation to purpose directly or indi- 
reotly governs the whole arrangement. It is 
curious also to observe how the same end 
is accomplished by various means. 
in most of the flowers before us the 



coaruleus elegans, C. lilaoinus, C. Tolmei. 

The latest section are the tallest and the 
most showy, the flower-stems rising to a height 
Thus, of 2 feet in some ot the varieties, one flower- 
stem showing a dozen or more blooms, some, 



reddish- brown radiating streaks; anthers and ovary 
pale. 



Professor 

Huxley. 



eye-spots," and fringes of coloured hairs such as one of the largest venustus oculatus 



The death of Professor Huxley 
entails the loss of one of the 
most industrious, persevering, and 



chance 



guest, per- being 



clear-headed students of science and philosophy 



In all such flowers, so far as we have seen, the 
stamens and the ovary are pale- coloured and 



among others, were beautifully in bloom in 



The following, in our times. His work is remarkable, not only 



for quantity and diversity but also for excellence 



and luteus, C. 1. ooncolor, C. splendens atroviolaceus, 
relatively inconspicuous, but in one labelled C. venustus ooulatus, v. citrinus, v. purpurascens, 
splendens atroviolaceus, the flower is self-coloured, v. roseus, v. vesta. 



Wallaces nursery on July 2:-C. These are qualifications which will be best appraised 



besprinkled 
hairs, with no eye-spots or blotches, and no fringe 



s. Wallace 
best adapted 



mpacted 
forms. 




the stamens and 
colour ! 

What the ins* 



are 



hand 



ptember, October] 



depth of 3 inches in a light porous soil, sunny 



by his colleagues, but his lucidity of exposition, 
his disinterestedness, directness of purpose, and 
we are afraid we must say his pugnacity, gained 
him the ear of the public It is as the great 
apostle of Darwinism or rather of * evolution,' 
that he is best known. Darwin himself was the 
most modest and retiring of men, shrinking from 



position, protection from heavy winter-rains, publicity, a verse from controversy, and consider ate 



coddl 



in their^ Calif ornian homes, and what precise either by taking them up or by placing lights 

* __ ^ .. .... . ^^ them." We should be glad to hear the 



to his opponents to a fault. Such a man was 
growth, and thorough ripening of the bulbs considered "fair game" for the wielders of ridi- 



occur in the mechanism of fertilisation 
we do not know ; growers might, with advantage, experience of those 



what 
visitants. This matter 



cultivated 



plants in pots. 



submitted 



cule, and an excellent target for the heavy artil 
lery of those who, eminent in their own depart- 
ment, considered that they should have the 
monopoly of orthodoxy in matters of natural 
science also. Understanding nothing of the 






Jcly 6, 18950 



THE GARDENERS* CHRONICLE. 



10 



subject, except at second - hand, fearful of 



DENDROBIUM X ILLUSTRE (chrysotoxum ? , 



assaults that would never have been made, they Dalhousieanum <J ).— Even to far ai can be judged by 



lip being purple, 
beautiful 



aeaailed the author of the Orig 
his book with a virulence and one-sidedness which 

unaccountable 



It it a remarkably interesting and 
plant now; when it wai exhibited by 
Messrs. Jas. Witch & Son at the meeting of the 
yean careful tending, in this showy hybrid we bare a Orchid Committee of the Royal Horticultural 



its first inflorescence, secured after something like ten 



good 



grown up since and takes the general principle of in P rod « c ' D 8 n«*r garden plants. The species crossed 



Society, June 25, it received a First-class Certificate. 



evolution as a " working hypothesis » as a matter !* ? Jf TJ!^ *?:^gy yP^^t*™ " tUt * _ RoYAI ; "°*7 ,CUL 7, URAL , S ° C ! E ! Y \~ Th * £?* 
of course. For the condition of things that 



common, except that they both inhabit Burmese terri- 
tory. D. Dalhousieanum was first introduced in 1837, 



existed at the time ,Hl xley was ]n it the right and D. chry.otoxum .ome ten year, later. The former 



man. 



read 



and philosophy, exceptionally familiar with the 
details of his subject, clear in logic, incisive 



has tall terete stems, leafy when young, and the latter 
clavate pseudo-bulbs, bearing a few leaves at the top, 
and yet in Messrs. Veitchs hybrid the amalgams- "The effects of Darkness on the forms of plants. 



meeting of the K «>al Horticultural Society will be 
held in the Drill Hall, J tmes Street, Victoria Street, 

Westminster, on Tuesday, July 9, when a special 
show of Hoses will be an attractive feature. At M 
o'clock, Mr. Francis Darwin will deliver a lecture on 










Fig. 4. — dbndrobium x illustrb: flowers vellow; lip purple. 






m speech, he rushed into the fray, and the 
railera and vitnnprators soon found they had 

could, when 
their 



an 



who 



use 



own weapons with 



necessary, 

overpowering 
efficiency. One may regret that each party did 
not keep to its own department, and we must 
deplore the unscientific temper that was mani- 
fested, but we must remember the provocation, 
and bear in minri that, f Ha m^nna na^A VA . A «+ 



tion of the two is distinctly traceable, the swollen 
stems and fleshier leaves indicating D. chryso- 
toxum, while the way in which the leaves are 
borne, and the characteristic light line on the 
sheath covering the stems, point as conclusively to 
D. Dalhousieanum. The flowers also in form merge 
the two parents, and it will not be too much to tay 
that as D. Dalhousieanum often has ten or twelve 



s 



be 



led were t flowers oa a •Dik«# and D. chrysotoxum often 

. two dozen, a sufficiently fine inflorescence, so far as 

ITt- V t™ *u u a i.^ ■ * p P rM * ated - number of flowers go, may be expected from the 

<J « il 9 ng * ~ tu ?! l . 8t 1 m the br ° ad hybrid on it. gaining strength. A curious circum- 

•enae of the term, contributed little to botanical, -tance iu the resemblance in some particulars which 

ana nothing to horticultural literature. His D. X iilnstre bears to D.albo-sanguineum, although 

paper on Gentians, in the Journal of the Linnean its flowers are thicker in substance, and of a clear, 

Society, is suggestive rather than practical. shining straw-yellow, the markings on the downy 



Floral Decorations at Windsor Castle.— 

As befits the residence of royalty, on the occasion of 
a visit from a foreign potentate whom Her Msjesty 
wishes to honour, the art of the gardener is nearly 
always called in to aid in imparting an appearance 
of gaiety to the rich appointments and furnishing of 
the State apartments at the Castle. And such was 
the case when, on Her Majesty's reception of the 
Shahzada on Tuesday last, we had the pleasure of 
inspecting the floral decorations. Mr. Owen Thomas, 
the ruyal gardener, has a good eye for effect, and 
whilst not striving in the least after eccentricity in 
arrangement, as is the habit of some, he attains 
very satisfactory results by the use of a few species 
of plants and flowers instead of a multiplicity, 
and by the avoidance of any undue crowding. 



A 



16 



THE 



GJADENEES' CHRONICLE. 



[Jul* 6, 1895. 



The general scheme of arrangement wai one pre- 



The Gardeners' Royal Benevolent Insti- collection of Cactacea and other succulents did full 



cisely adapted, as regarded some parts of it, to the TUTION.— The fifty- sixth anniversary festival dinner 



•nmmer season, namely, to fill up the fireplaces 
with plants, to flank all doorways with small 
groups, and make assemblages of plants in spaces 
that admit of its being done by their remoteness 
from the customary lines of traffic through the 
various saloons. The only departure from these 
ideas was that remarked in St. George's Hall, 
which will be noted further on. The grand 
staircase, with its white marble statue of 
George IV., and bronze figures of naiads, was beau- 
tified by a group of tall Palms, standing apart 
from, and a little lower than the statue, the 

foreground being filled in with Codiaeuma (Crotons), in spite of universal depression, enormous sums were 
which have foliage with yellow colours predomi- spent every year in charity, and last year in London 



justice to Messrs. Henry Cannell & Sons ; whilst 
Messrs. B. S. Williams & Son and Mr. T. S. Ware 
both sent attractive and well-selected exhibits. In 
the botanical laboratory was a group of portraits of 



of the Gardeners' Royal Benevolent Institution took 
place on the evening of Friday, June 28. in the 
Whitehall Rooms of the Hotel Metropole. The 

Duke of Fife presided, and the numerous company former members of the botanical staff, including a 
included Sir Trevor Lawhence, President of the large crayon portrait of the late Prof. John Lindley 
Royal Horticultural Society ; and Messrs. G. A. (lent by his son Lord Justice Lindley), a head in 
Dickson, N. N. Sherwood, W. Gibbs, T. Ellis, Ed. oils of Professor D. Oliver, and photographs of Pro- 
Ssern, G. J. Brackenridge, David Syme, G. Monro, fessor F. 0. Bower, Dr. D. H. Scott, the Rev. 



George Henslow, Professor F. E. Weiss, and others. 
Here also was a selection of old flower- drawings by 



Jas. Webber. T. F. Peacock, F.S.A ; G. W. Dawes, 
W. J. Jeffries, E. W. Cathie, G. Bishop, &c. In 

proposing the toast of " Continued Success to the Ehret and Madame Mebian, large photographs of 
Institution," the Chairman said that in these days, forest vegetation (lent by Dc. D. Morris, Assistant 

Director, Royal Gardens, Kew), and photographs of 

plants ac Kew, by Mr. F. A. Bridge. On the tables 

nating, such being considered more cheerful-looking alone there was disbursed by the different societies were exhibits of physiological interest, and a few 



in the half-light than the richer-coloured varieties. and agencies which existed for the purpose no less a 



Other plants consisted of pink Hydrangeas, yellow- 
flowered Marguerites, Lilium longifloruro, and 
besides these a finishing of Adiantum, Panicum 
variegatum, and the like. Sprays of the variegated- 
leafed Lonicera and Ivies possessing small foliage 



sum than £5,200,000, to say nothing of the very 
considerable sum which could not be calculated 
that flowed along the hidden channels of private 
benevolence. But, unfortunately, these huge sums 
did not bring about the beneficial results which we 



slides of fossil plants from the collection of the late 
Professor W. C. Williamson. Of special note were 
the large models of dividing cell-nuclei exhibited by 
Professor J. B. Farmer ; they are likely to be 
of great help to the student of minute cell his- 
tology. The laboratory had been very skilfully 



hung down over the solid, low walls of the staircase; all desired, because there was not sufficient concen- decorated by the lady students of the department, 
and on the top of them were disposed Hydrangea*, tration in charitable effort, and because there were too and the banks of flowers which they had arranged 
Cape Pelargoniums, more yellow-flowered Mar- 
guerites, and the seldom- used Humea elegans, pro- 



fusely-flowered sprays or plants of Rosa Felicite- Benevolent Institution, for it was, be believed, the 



many societies doing the same or similar work. His an d which were illuminated by the electric light, 
remarks, however, did not apply to the Gardeners' were singularly effective, as also was a tank of white 



Perf<5tue, clothing the small pillars, which gave a 
finish to the head of the stairs. The wall behind 
was slightly masked by slender Palms, as far as 
regarded the large bare spaces between the lancet- 
shaped windows. Small groups were disposed on 
either hand a little further on under the arch, 



only society of its kind in Great Britain. Its prin- 
cipal object was to assist the aged and infirm 
by means of pensions, and it inculcated the 
admirable principle of self-help by giving: preference 
to those who bad subscribed to its funds. Now-a- 



and yellow Water- Lilies. A series of living Seaweeds 
and other aquatic plants, shown as transparencies by 
this department were much admired, Ulva, Lami- 
naria, Cladophora, and Utricalaria, were perhaps the 
most beautiful. Other botanical exhibits included 
photographs and tables illustrating the fixation of 



days it seemed as if all parties in the State had free nitrogen (lent by Sir Henry Gilbert, F.K.S.); 
*™^™*™\" ^ approach to the ante-room. agreed to do that which was regarded as thoroughly plant skeletons, by Mrs. Hodgkinson; and artiflciaily- 

coloured flowers, by Wm. Bbockbank, Etq., F.L.S. In 
the Slade school we noted an effective combination of 



In this room the large fauteuil was topped with a unsound by the old Whig school in which be was 
cluster of gay-coloured Caladiums of moderate size, brought up, namely, to establish a system of State- 



surmounted by a nice specimen of Pandanus Veitchi. aided pensions. But the Gardeners' Benevolent flowers, statuary, and Chinese lanterns; and in the 
A doorway was here masked by a fine piece of Institution had been doing for many years for the physical lecture- room, Argon and Helium, the main 

output of the chemical department of the college 
during the session, were on view. The soiree was 
attended by several thousand guests, including many 
well known in literary and scientific circles. 

Royal Botanic Society.— At a meeting of the 

of a mast of the Victory, was flanked on each side them, and it was to meet cases of this kind that that council of this society, held on Saturday last, it was 
of the two doors with Palms, and a few flowering Institution was established nearly sixty years ago. decided to open their gardens in Begent's Park to the 
plants of a kind to sufficiently light up the rather Since then pensions and gratuities had been granted public on every Monday in July, August and Sep- 



Alocasia metallica, some Palms, Codiaeums, and 
Kalosanthes coccinea, with a bordering of Pilea 
muscosa, Ferns, Selaginella denticulata, Isolepis, 
and other dwarf plants. The vestibule leading from 
this to the next one— Nelson's room, so called from 
a white marble bust of the hero perched on a piece 



gardeners what the State now proposed to do for 
everybody. The life of a gardener was not entirely 
a bed of Roses. Many had to toil unceasingly at all 
times of the year, and in all weathers, and the result 
of their toil was to provide us with some of Nature's 
choicest gifts. But misfortune sometimes overtook 



darkened place. An imposing group, consisting of 
Lilies, Kalosanthes, Marguerites, and Codiseums, 
filled the fireplace in the Nelson- room, and a 
•mailer group was arranged on the opposite 
side. St. George's Hall is entered from this last 
apartment, and is lighted by eleven very high 
windows, all on one side. In each window was 
hung a basket of cut flowers of one variety, the 
baskets being literally covered in every part with 
them; and the flowers— long sprays and spikes — 
consisted of a white variety of Intermediate Stock 
(spring-sown, as Mr. Thomas remarked); Cassia 
corymbose, the only yellow flowers employed for 
this purpose; Sweet Pea Her Majesty, a deep pink, 
profuse- flowering variety, which filled five of the' 
baskets, and the stocks also five. The window- 
seats were filled up with much the same kind of 
material as that previously noted, with the addition 
of Gloxinias, Hj-drangea paniculata, the white 
blossoms and graceful habit of which render it 
an almost ideal plant for indoor use; Spiraa 
Aruncus and S. Bamalda, Dractenas with 



to the amount of £65 COO, and at the present moment tember, at an admission fee of Is. 



156 persons were receiving the assistance of the 
Society, 77 of them being men, and 79 women, 
while there were many pressing cases on the list 
waiting for election. The toast, which was heartily 
received, wat responded to by Mr. G. A, Dickson of 
Chester. Mr. W. J. Jeffries of Cirencester gave 
the toast of t4 Horticulture," which was acknowledged 
by Sir Trevor Lawrence. The Secretary, Mr. G. 
J. Ingram, having announced subscriptions amount- 
ing to over £1900, including £30 from the Dake of 
Fife, £105 from Messrs. Rothschild, 10 guineas 
from Alfred db Rothschild, E*q. ; and £10 from 
the Hon. Walter Rothschild, £21 from N. Sher- 
wood, E§q , and £25 from Messrs. James Veitch & 
Sons ; the proceedings closed with the toast of * The 
Chairman," proposed by Mr. N. Sherwood. The 
Dake of Westminster has increased his annual 
subscription to the Institution, of which he is 
President, to £15 15$. 

University College, London. — On the 



An Outing of the National Amateur 
Gardeners' Association.— On Saturday, June 22, 

in response to aa invitation from H. Hucks Gibbs, 
Esq., upwards of 150 members of the National 
Amateur Gardeners' Association paid a visit to 
Aldenham House, Herts, for tbe purpose of inspect- 
ing the gardens. Tne headquarters of this Society 
are in London, and meetings are held the first 
Tuesday in every month at the Memorial Hall, Far- 
ringdon Street. In order to promote the objects 
the Society have at heart, visits are made during the 
spring and summer months to various gardens and 
nurseries. The parent Society numbers between 
400 and 500 members, besides branches in different 
parts of the country. The visitors, among whom 
were a number of ladies, were met on their arrival 
by Mr. Beckett, the head gardener at Aldenham, 
and some amateurs resident in the neighbourhood, 
and conducted by him round the lovely gardens. 

HERBACEOUS PLANTS.— Now that these are in 
full season, we hasten to announce the publication 
of a Hand List of herbaceous plants cultivated in the 
Rojal Gardens, Kew. We 



coloured leaves, Francoa ramosa, Gladiolus The evening of the 27th ult., the President and staff of 

Bride, with Ferns, Isolepis, &c, as a finish. this Institution gave a largely attended and brilliant 

A group of Palm*, Codamms, Dracaenas, and mis- conversazione. The scientific and engineering depart- 

cellaneous subjects made an effective filling for the ments of the College, and the Slade school of fine K : ' ~ ~ -— mm iu,«u** «~ — , 

enormous fire-place, which finds a place on the side arts were all in gala array. The department of 5* m ff meatlon fchat & may be obtained at the 

«jfti.-xr-ii ..... . r Kojal Gardens, K«?w, at the cost of one shilling. 

The Newcastle-on-Tyne Horticultural 

SOCIETY. — The summer show of this society will be 
held in the Recreation Ground, North Road, on 
Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, 24th, 25th, and 
26th inst. This year additional* prizes are offered 
for group*, dinner-table, and fireplace decoration" 



of the Hall opposite th? windows. Some tall, slender 
Palms at a doorway, and flanking the throne, com- 
pleted the design of the decorations. A capital 
method of showing off the flowering sprays of Bou- 
gainviiiea was remarked, which being new tour, may 
be deserving of mention. A Kentia or some such 
species of Palm about 5 feet in height is selected, 
and into the axil of each leaf a long flowering shoot 
of Bougainvilleaspectabiiis is stuck, the whole form- 
ing a very pretty kind of floral fountain. 



botany was well to the fore, and its exhibits included 
superb collections of plants from well - known 
growers. Messrs. James Veitch & Son sent an 
interesting collection of insectivorous plants, hybrid 
Orchids, and other plants. The hybrids, being 
grouped with their parent forms, made a particularly 
interesting exhibit. Messrs. Wm. Paul & Son had a 



thlrWM'n «K e ° Tk r H r; Ed,tb Giff ° rd ' and P ared « M ™ ar « informed.to give increased facilities 
the yellow Medea being particularly admired. A large to attractive trade stands. 






* 






* 



Jclt 6. 1803.] 



THE GARDENERS' CHRONICLE 



U 



late J. E. Bommer, whose name it 10 well known in 
connection with hii monograph! on Ferns. M. 

at the Horticultural Club on th* 27th ult., W. Mae- Bommer, it will be remembered, wai a native of 

Brussels, and hit death took place laat February. 



THE ROfAL GARDENERS' ORPHAN FUND 

The monthly meetiag of the Ommifiee took place 



shall, Eiq , presiding. Toe *o lowing special dona- 
tions were announced : — From th#» William Thomaon _ 
Memorial Fjnd, £65 13*. 2d ; Mr. J. T. Anderson, 

£1 5s 5 Umm. J Lung & Sjna, Forest Hill, £11*; HOME CORRESPONDENCE. 

K. I. Measures, Esq , proceeds of tale of third edition 

of "Cypripedinms Hybrid Species," £7 10s.; and 

Mr. A. Stirton, Wrexham, 5s. A cheque was drawn 

for the children's quarterly alio vances, which now 

amounts to £2 M 10j ; and the gardeners about the 

country who do not yet subscribe to the Fond or 

•upport it in any way should make a note of the fact 

that ao large a sum is paid annually to assist in 

the maintenance of the orphan children of dead 
gardeners. 

The Origin of the Cineraria.— We have 

sora* further remarks to make on this subject, but 
defer them for the present. In the meantime, we 
observe that our colleague The Gardeners' Magazine 
* conclusively proves fi [to his own satisfaction] that 
the evidence in favour of hybridity will not bear 
examination. An important statement of fac> from 
Mr. Kelwav is published in the same journal, to the 
effect that be. Mr. Kelwav, raised the florists 
Cineraria in J »7, by selection from seedlings of C. 
omenta. If the records are to be relied on, this is 
ten years after Dbcmmond's experiments, but this, 
of course, does not invalidate Mr. Kelway's state- 
ment. We shall also have to refer later on to the 
alleged hybrids that have appeared in the Cambridge 
Botanic Garden, and in that; of Mr. Poe. 

M. RODfGiS — S^me of the Belgian papers give 
full details concerning the compliments paid to M. 
Euils Rodigas, the Director of the School of Horti- 
culture at Ghent, on the occasion of his completing 
thirty-five years as a professor. Many of us in this 
country are also familiar with the unceasing 
labours of M. Rodigas, his accuracy of perception, 
his impartiality, his powers as an administrator, and 
tome of us are fortunate enough to reckon him as a 
personal friend. MVI. Bcbyenich, Pyxaebt, Rodi- 
gas, and Vax Hulle, constitute the m four-leaved 
Trefoil,' 1 a body to whose joint efforts for more than 
thirty years no small part of the progress of Belgian 
horticulture %9 dae. The stalk of this four-leaved 
unity is Crant Da Kkhchove de DfiKTEaoHEM. 
Floreat temper diuquefiortant. 

■ 

National Horticultural Society of 

France. — AS the last meeting of the Orchid Com- 
mittee of the National Horticultural Society of 
France, Mr. Jacob, Orchid Foreman to the Baron 
Ed. de Rothschild, Armainvilliers, showed a mag- 
nificent group or new hybrid Cattleyas. I noticed 
amongst them a particularly interesting plant, 
Cattleya Armainvillea alba (C. Mendeli x C. 
Rigat). petals and sepals large, pure white ; lip 
broadly opm, crimim ; pare gold yellow at the 
base. Another plant of the same cross had the 
divisions slightly flushed with clear rose. A splendid 
thing is Lselio-Cittieya Jacobiana (Lselia purpurata 
X Cattleya M-mdeli), the division of the flower 
white, tinged with rosy-mauve colour ; the front 
lobe of the lip dark crimson-purple, and the base 
nearly white. A fine Laslio Cattleya Canhamiana, 
raised from L. purpurata X C. Moseise, was shown ; 
the parentage j f certain, and the plant is" exactly the 
•ame as the one obtained at Messrs. Veitch & Sons. 
Mr. Page, gardener to Mr. Leb^udy, Bougival, 
exhibited a very handsome new hybrid Oypripedium ; 

the parents are C. Iserigatum and C. Haynaldianum, 
and the plant which resembles C. Parishii, received 
the name of C. Lsbaudyanum : scape with six flowers, 
each having its dorsal sepal emerald-green at the 
base, vertically streaked with brown ; petals twisting, 
pale green at the base, and vinons-purple at their 
extremity ; the whitish inferior sepal is very large 
and arched. This plant received a first-class certi- 
ficate. Georges Trvffaut. 

The Late M J. E. BomMcR,— We have re- 
ceived a biographical notice by Prof. Leo EaaEaa of the 



THE 8TRAWBERRY, 8EN8ATION — This Straw- 
berry has turned out well with us this season. 
Planted on a border by the side of Noble, it has 
ripened its fruit as early at that variety, and the 
fruit ii very much finer in appearance, and of better 
flavour than that variety. What its merits may be 
for pot-work I cannot say, but I intend to give it a 
trial next season. If we coold only get some of the 
British Queen flavour in the large eariv Strawberries, 
what an acquisition it would be ! W. S. Hurhtone % 
Parhfitld, Hallow. 

BAMB008 AND THE PA8T WINTER.— Mr. Bean's 

instructive paper on the subject of Bimboos and the 
past winter, is most interesting. His conclusions 
are fully borne out by our experience here. As 
regards Canon Eilacombe's suggestion, that the 
severe winter has actually been of service to his 
Bamboos, I should rather be of opinion that the 
great shoots to which he alludes are due to the wet 
summer of 18'J4, which greatly encouraged root- 
action, and, consequently, the stem-buds which are 
formed on the rhizomes. Tusan-chikee, which he 
mentions as being killed, is not hardy, and would 
die in any ordinary English winter. It is supposed 
not to ba a native Japanese plant, but a degenerate 
form of one of the giant tropical Bamboos, partially 
acclimatised in Japan, but doomed to certain death 
here. Its position in Japan would be analogous to 
that of the Japanese and Chinese Bamboos in this 
country. We can grow them, but in a dwarfed 
form ; and if they were to be carried to a still more 
unfavourable climate, th»y would nerish altogether. 
A. T. Fraun Mitford, Battford Park, Moreton in- 
Marsh. 

THE CINERARIA. — As authentic recorda are 
wanting upon the early history of tbe subject, a few 
experiments ought to be made with the view of 
ascertaining the value of the two conjectures. If it 
originated by the crossing of cruenta and lanata, it 
was evidently not designed, and it may be said that 
our greenhouse Cinerarias came by chance. A few 
plants of Cineraria cruenta when in flower should be 
isolated, so as to make sure against their becoming 
pollinated with other Cinerarias; seeds should be 
saved from such a stock, the seeds sown, and the 
plants when in flower carefully examined for 
variations. Then a few plants of Cineraria 
cruenta might be pollinated with the pollen of Cine- 
raria lanata, and vice versd, saving the seeds, and 
raising plants from them, and watching the results. 
As far as my experience goes, the seeds of Cineraria 
cruenta are not abortive, as is stated in the Botanical 
Magazine, for a plant which was in flower in these 
gardens a short time ago has produced several seed- 
lings, many having sprung up from tbe surface of 
the soil of tbe pot in which it was grown, also from 
the seeds gathered from the plant. And I can 
endorse Mr. Drummond's remark, that" the flowers 
retain their beauty until the very day the seeds are 
scattered." It may be that our plant had become 
pollinated by the florists' Cinerarias, which were in 
bloom at the same time as C. cruenta. These seed- 
lings from C. cruenta which we have will be watched 
with interest, to note whether any variation takes 
place from the parent plant, and I will send you a 
note upon the subject in due season. Mr. Douglas 
has expressed a wish for a plant of C. cruenta and C. 
lanata. I shall be pleased to send him a plant of 
the latter and two or three seedlings of the former 
for experimenting upon, if he is not already 
supplied. Wm. Harrow, Botanical and Horticultural 
Society's Garden , Sheffield. 



CEDAR OF LEBANON AT TAPLEY. 

of this tree is about 50 feet. Its top 
flat. It was planted in 1825. W. T. T. 



The height 
is large and 



RED WATER.— I have in my garden a small pond 
of about 500 square yards area, with an average 
depth of about 2| feet. It is contained in a cemented 
basin, and is supplied by means of a hydraulic ram 
from a deep spring a quarter of a mile distant, the 
water of which is especially pure and bright. In 
each spring time for some years past the water of 
this pond baa turned a deep blood-red colour, iu 



which state it remains for some months, and then 
becomes cUar a?ain. U*>on microscopic examination 
it appears that the colour is due to numberless red- 
coloured organismi, which, according to Prantl and 
Vines, art* referable to li.ematococcas. I do not 
know whether this rrd water is often seen and well 
known, but as it is very unsightly, I should beextretnely 
obliged to anyone who would tell cae if there be any 
means of destroying the growth, or of preventing its 

recurrence. S. Courtauld. Bockina Place. June 26. 



SQUIRRELS —The note of Dr. Morris regarding 
the lujury to scarlet Chestnuts by these sprightly 
little thieves is very interesting. I have known 
them injure the shoots of the Scotch Fir in the same 
way ; here they eat the green cones of that tree by 
hundred', but fortunately they do not injure the 
trees. f J neir power of adapting themselves to altered 
circumstances is most extraordinary. I believe they 
disposed of at least a bushel or two of my Parsnips 
during the last winter, and now they eat my Straw- 
berries by wholesale and bite the nets to pieces. 
Last season Apples and Piums were annexed in 
large quantities. During the winter one little 
fellow came regularly every morning on to tbe till 
of my breakfast-room window. Ic gave us great 
pleasure to see him sit and munch up pieces of bread 
which were provided for him. The most extra- 
ordinary freak I have ever heard of squirrels is the 
following: I have a bell to summon mv workmen, 
which is hung in a little cage about 15 or 20 feet 
high. The other day, when the time came for ring- 
ing the bell, a squirrel was found sitting by the bell, 
his mouth fall of frayed hemp, and the rope bitten 
in two. We presume he found the soft hemp suitable 
for lining his nest, and my bellman bad to climb up 
to fix another rope. Qiery : Did the squirrel find 
the rope frayed, or did he manufacture a soft wadding 
from tbe rope ? Charles Noble. 

heavy THUNDERSTORM— A short note of what 

happened at Eige last week may interest some of 
your readers. At 4 p.m on June 26 a thunderstorm 
suddenly collected in the sky after a brilliant and 
scorching day. About a thousand flashes of light- 
ning, all within five or six miles, occurred in an hour, 
during which I estimated that nearly 2 inches of rain 
fell. At one time 1 counted over thirty flashes! in a 
minute. Toirteen large trees — there may be more 
yet to be discovered — were struck within about half 
a mile of my house, twelve Oaks and one Ash, six 
of these were within 300 yards of the house. At 
five o'clock the storm had all passed over. The next 
day, June 27, at half-pass twelve, we had another 
sharp thunderstorm, lasting an hour, a fall of large 
hail, lasting twenty minutes, completely demolished 
every op*n flower in the garden, and many of the 
plants. The Rhubarb leaves are a curious sight, 
looking as if they had been used for rifle targets. A 
few cattle were killed in the neighbourhood, but, as 
far as I bar* heard, no human beings. ft Woliey Dod t 
Edge Hall, Malpas, June 29. 

8TORM m YORKSHIRE.— The storm of June 26 
was the worst the oldest man in Mirfield could 
remember. The hail was as big as marbles, and in 
my garden of nearly 2 acres in extent, Peas, Beans, 
Strawberries, Rispberries, and all vegetables, flowers, 
and everything else, were completely destroyed, and 
nearly every pane of glass in tbe house was broken. 
I am by no means the only one who has suffered, 
but when a man is depending on his garden, it is a 
serious thing. D. Brown, Nab Nurseries, Battyeford, 

Mirfield. 

VICOMTES8E H£qnCART DE THURY STRAW- 
BERRY. — The engraving, p. 775, well represents this 
fine variety at its best. This variety was a favourite 
with Mr. Wildamitb, of Heckfield Place, for early 
forcing, and none could be obtain that was better for 
ripening in the middle of February — in fact, he 
regarded it as being the best Strawberry for forcing 
or out of doors. Its flavour is excellent, and in this 
respect it is only second to British Qieen. It is a 
splendid cropper, but unfitted for market, the 
berries being smallish, and its flavour does not make 
up for its want of size. About Liverpool the Vi- 
comtesse was always a favourite variety, it going 
there under the name of Garibaldi. So little is it 
known out of private gardens that in this district, 
where at least 1000 acres are devoted to Straw- 
berry culture, I do not know a single instance of it* 
being grown for market. It is a rery free grower, 
and a very hardy plant, with ample foliage, which i* 
short-stalked, if the bulk of the old leaves are 
removed when fruitinc is over. E. M. 



18 



niFs 



GARDENERS' CHRO.\ : LkL 



( Jci % 




• 














OLD AMD M€W VAUH Dtl OF OTKAW 

Thar* it nothing naw to ba aatd y tooU sirts, 
and I totaad lo eoafitts my raaiarfct lo naw tatroda 
t:ooa. lo th*ir Talaa asforcan, and to tha b«-tt mathodo 
"f ioipartto,t fltaoar to tha fruit- of naa ?trt*ti*a 
Wftfio • >aid first bo rnal* of tha rtraty s «?*a« 
Woodar, tf*ara<i ta G*rdm*r$ CtrtWaaJt. p. 2T71 tad 
cartiricatod by tha | >? at il>rticaltaral ciHf 
Mi :b 1 thto yaar. I hart | >c grown it. *od 
*hor •* r* anabU to apoak of its mtnta at a forear. but 
I tti eartaia > itapraaa«d. at war* otbora, by tu • t . 

ani frmtfalaata, mad bf th* qaaatitioa Mr. 8t»f . 
hod ttot to atr kaC Th* fratia ar* of larga m \ 
»o ooloar a pal* r«i, vuh a tottd palp, an 1 of 
•lap*. It vm aotod tha*. moa: of th* fnut oa tbo 
plant* • noo that occaaoa woro of ©oo ata«\ ttaall 
ooaa baiag faw. Tola point ia a gra*t gain, aa to cat 
wail kaoara rtriatJaa a Bath two or thrta6aafraiaa\aad 
a aambar ol •m*ii oom, aa J to tbaoo »ya wbao •vary 
thuw caaac ba l*r*a t tach acaaU frait la not 
It ta d«« met ta growth, aod rtaaarkablo for tbo 
•mail • i* of iu l*ar*a aod abort Waf-ttalk, which 
>< aaothar gala la a forcing *ari*ty. at too piaata 
may bo plactd ctoawr t a g a t h i r Aaotbor aawolty 
that I aaa plaaaad arith, aad *h»ch protattta to 

ataadard forctr, it K>yal Suraratga. which 
baoa a turfi jitat Uogth ol tiro a caUt**&too to 
bora tu qoali&iaa sotod. It it a good 
ita ricb.bnak. para tlif^tr it a itroag p>m: 
faaaar. Tbit it a tariaty that bat a fatan 
oao that will bo Urg-iy «m ploy ad at a 
I aa glad to nolo tha old practic*. ooca vary g*aorai. 
of t taadi ag tbo piaata ia aaac-ra, or oa dtaaytd 
manor*, ia ttttl* practiaad. It was tbo caato ol 
maeb poor taatpld «*roar. at saifbt bo assassad. frao 
t rala a tta boiag aa aaaaattal at a frao circa taMoa of 
air ta obtaining tbo parfcetioa of flaroar. High 
tool too to forcing hoaaoa ara aot goo>{ pit * ia 
which to stand tbo piaata. Aftor April ia oat tbo 
soil tooa gait dry. girtng acidity to tbo f - 
aad tbo aarroudiag aridity faroara rod aotaV 

it waa witd tbo tdoa of sbatiag tbaoo two 
avila that th* saaoar aad layar of man art waro 
tboagbtof. TV Lau-fortwd piaata ara coach b*U*r 

a cool bard coal ash bottom, ia 
pita or fraoctaa. g ▼tag smaah ioaa iroabto to regard to 
rad-tpidaa aad ia tbo SMttor of wat tag Too aaly 
trwoblo tacarrad is ta raWag th« b waab aa of frait by 
otaana if cratchaa caada oat of forbad twtft t to aa to 

ap to tha light, aad to a port wbora tbor* 

frao carraat of air. K#tnraiaft to n- * raHatiot, f 

pay toy boro that I iatoad to .row Royal Sotor {% 

>r baaidaa boiag a good aaUog fruit it pacta 

graoJ|7 tha totals cowing tha fraita to aoatplataty 

that at tbo aod of a long jot «y by ra-.way tbo fraiu 

appaar qaita p-rfrc* Tha *trt«t? waa rtcaoUy 

praiaad bf tbo Frait Coma ^ of tbo Royal tfaflt- 

caltaral Sooiaty aa a forcar. tnd for ita briak 1 

aad fraitftstoaoa. Aaoiba novelty io Oantoa Park. 

whiob I liba ^ary siacb it io tbo haajt faraor of tbo 

trio which Mr. Alloa ratwatly tara at, It tat? aoi 

is faoov tqoal E proaa of India, wHob io tbo 

batx-daroarad f tbo tbraw . tttlt it it saotsltat, 

withoat ta a if i d tty. with rmip that ia *ary fna ia 

tartar*, aad ia a haadootaa dark toloarad frait. la 

***&* botwaoa rooital aad oooktooaib, aad a proMo 

aaaaamartot ▼ iOB B it t tt i I do Tbary or La grots 

will oartataiy plaatw tbo growor. A 









*#ttr that 

waaraiawd 



! tea 



oara 



■oar Ubt a w l t k, aod ttfo»* sptoaaHdiy 
akboagb baariag a rPtfblaan t* Sir J. Paatnn 
thapo. it maeb tariiar, of hotter 6trtj«r. a 
It it a frao baara? (Q 4 f g^j | 9Jfoijr 

▼aHaty, taut oat by Lax too 
a tea fruit, tatat o bat 

Mi abapo aad ooloar. I 

Boblo. which has 

Lotaot of All 






To 



ia 

largar 

A oaw 

Brot.. ootjtad T a ilar. to 

sabbag Royal 

• aatd to bo a croaa t»*w< 

raoot aata a d 




*f\* 




gat tha boot r toa lt t ta 

Btrawborry forcing, ttroag maaa*-, , 

obteiaad as arlf ao poaoibto froa piaata that koto 
boaa dopritwd of tbair towar^traoaaa. G. W#km* 

* lutA WOOatlut — Fiowota bearing tbit aata^ 
woro sur i l aat wd lataiy by tbo Royal 

?**? ^^Vl Tlty "" f •*-**** *f *r Oaorga 
r aal, aad I boliooo tb* tot* cam* arigiaall; (r*m 

fardaa ; aaybow, [ ha*o dlatribattjd daring tbo 

tow yaosa. tbi o a gh Mr. W. Tboatpaoa of too* 
****** tJKtjfh aa#t), eallad laala paadifora, to atoob 
oaoay gartjM ia EogJan I A 1 ooattoa baa booa 

arbatbor tbo aor tHaat s d iowora ho t+4 to 
i'jpoaditoara, I. Hoofcari, or I. glandaioaa. aod I 
artt t kp ta l t a toil what I know aboot tbato. & 
graodliata WiiMaarw tad [ giaodotooa f Waw*- 
mm) aro ioaortbad aa Cooaaaiaa piaata la Bnaatat . 









#Wa On***'* i*X iu. # p. 1M aad I. graawitara 

Wm. ail Baaa *ad 1 UjoI I (C ..-*-• * 
d start bad aa Uism ataa plaau ta 1 • 

/tJat, rol. at ?• ->i I bora growa I gtaadalooa 
lor twooty yoart. 1 irtt bad it from tha gardoa of 

tbo load- works, Cbaaitr, aad at that utaa it 

itttlakaaa to oartanaa i Uoohart wot gitoo 

saaaboat toaywara afo» I tbtab frota K.w It io 

I foot high . tha rays of Ut 1 
tbortsr, bat tbo disc oa >*rt*. aad tha • tat aad 

at wo rthott. tha laoraa braadar. aa>! Ioaa 

tapanag at tbo boao. I bod aar#r abia r sit f*riita 
aood oa I gtaadalnn bat I. Hookon ai oaoo bagaa 

to aaaka tood. Wwteb I towad. aad r*arad baodtoda 
of piaata, a^loh oo rr atp aadsd 'tartly to a at t b a r 
poraat. I aaat aoaao of tbo towara to o dlUJajgattbai 

baiaaioal totabliabtaaat, aartiag iboaa ao 9ft\ 1 X 
Tb*y wara rotamaM a* * 1 1 g^oadiljra n % 
I. gUodaloaa | lljohatu N iw. tho taat two 

aata«a woro oortaialy tbo oal* tpaotaa of tha alad I 
bad awor la tr a daa a d iato tay gardao. aoi i waa g<o4 






Et4' craa&ai i gri 

j^taW^aa W^Kw t H tj |f 

ebara-^ara of H •« 
aratl OMagh. Tha 

tba agb I will ait 
poata\ t^alr 

pttfead oat aYoaa 

of all 

ooltao to Hadrad 

Pooovar 






lata for ti y os lf , aad I 

OOrafal aoa spa r i toa anth 
aad Hsabor. thoy ttiad 

I drmw ha thtaV 

that tbaoo 










ta-a, Uadl-v aad niajaj g|bo 

4HaaaJ^ t>l a>* m 



r *% 




w 




PHILAOIF.I'HUS. BOULE 

ITAtjUtjn 

This IW ■ mint Ull ■ PMtafrlt*** «w nim4 

MP. UmMxM M. 



. 



4 



it 



ybrldbot 



pby • Ig. p. I»), 




I ttaajatix 



• - 



• • • 

war* iaipragaaui wtkk poOoa 

of taWwaaattjtjL aad 






• •rad 





«raJ 



rm w 



lAk. t 



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pmUm* of P. t..<rt>pfc 7 jia. tt ••• »m! 

*•• • •* bj M ill- T. 





OHfrnh 



Societies 



a O T A L 



X* 



t. i«ntifl« Com 



. ft* 



*» 



Jmt« M Pratttaf Mr aULotbaOO a tbo rbob 

Dr . Rwiaaia, Pro' U dttar . Vmf. Coort a. Mr Wifooo 

Mr. Lraob. taad Kaa. Q Hatja ^ «,» . 





m»tx*,-Mr Wibaa oabifeaaal • 

i« att^ twrfh 

fawaai ia t aaf t Qiiasy, Oaltaaw *m* $ 

ataotba 

dM b ita at t ft tj tb t aa la aaaat stbtt 

Ihrta f y t a l taa, «itb taV 

taw tr * * «aaawatati as 

ta it* '-hsO af • 




* pa tt 

/aaat I 
- aool ttasat 
laiag aiao fbat ftapl 








a# 
•a* *aa» 

ata « asoa 





I 



OHW 








|H '■■igt g * ■•*, l -f N-4 






4 ** ^aawg Mf " T intjjan «wb 







* *t*m+ 




* -.i 

ta 

nbs 

W emm * faay awwa rwaj 

C ■ iaaa j af Owttaw ChttBuH. -W -~^t~> m _ 

#0 f^Ft^XaW^ 1 9 ^ ■ ^- ^wtwta/^» 

_ m m ^ •taaaata** a OImIiwiI aaf. twttta. ao 7aaw ta f 

»aaa sWOaa *n * t -%mjMwmrr ilflHB^M* **— - 

, ^ ^ ■■ r ^^a»»»^Bi»^ ytjr a atav* 

awawt a Otaaa atjtsra rwK tba t\rawr ^ 



Oaaaaaa wtta aamw a d wita a km* awaa - - -* 







■- -i w • 





tt aiaatlar ta that urn ao tba 
<^4B| |gr* T ^ up^- 






ag saaas. i taaa 
katti tsa»fw1 *itt tba dsu . 

T^* *« w*m **> ?w foaai ah 

parttf tt* Haata. tod tot ta soy te» *~ 

m 

anasb<M ?* 




■ - 



iv 





br 




ft aaay vivaaatk a* • ■ t at f tT 

***** ■w'oa abtwt, bat OM sot aatta 




BtcmoKo HoanauLTaaiL 

J m a -L'«iM ImUmm «4fcM —t a 




«• 












a 



tttaat gaaao at bag 

r % tawax - 





tad • 

Ca ta aa j o % 



A rsaajaah 




atat 




w 



a t» 






•a L 










at>, r 

a a 









r* 



tax a 

aw tnaVm , a, w. r- up, Qmwj % ta» 

• «w a to** *««. IN I 

a waaWtatta * awo attw * 











w »k t» -. w r • 

»«a |a> 

naaiita iaaf wftt fjgtj 





•aw * 



■"*awaat ■» 












?■ 



• ¥ 



aaa* Ooaa afi a i ' i 










Jot* <;. i8i>6 j 



77/ E (A li h E S K 11 S * v ii I; ONI C L t . 



19 



, Mr, J. Q Fowler wi« ut 

K. K. West. Rugate, bring 
R. Rl'TTEM, Emq . Halliford. 

tad good, Mr. What again 



' 



is rat - r 7 Caroline Ku»t«r; Mr. F. CART being Jud with 
Marie Van Houtte. 

In the open amateur'* cla 
with twenty »ur bloom • Mr. 
J|n<1 ; ml with t we've bloom-. 

waa bss\ Rowatl r«rjr bright 
coming 2nd. 

Hardy Flower t were in imm* 
viou. experience— far too many, and far too crowded. The 
following trade firm- had larga collections: Msasra. J a*. 
\eiuii & 8o*> 1. Peed a\ 8o*9 C. Jacxma* at 8o*s, T. 
Bikr&8or>, R. Bo roydon. DoitniK A Bogs. Rotaseey. 
eliiefly I jlas aod 8weet Peaa ; Jaj Carter V Co, J. CiiKii 
h%0^ aw:#y;T. 8. \V aEI. Tottenham . R WaiXAOSA 

GO.. Colchester, Ac. In the oompe it ion for twenty-four 
bunches, Mr. W. PmjCRA**, Chri*tchurch. waa lat. aod Mr. 
O. H. Sage, gr. - Earl DTS4 
Pa fi ABossbeing With twelvebunches MV.Baok waa 

ao easy lat. How eff# five wara the** bunchai thus aet op aa 
compared with the daaaa mum crowded into the trade ool- 
lertiona! Some li hould be put on the«e. 



Wait*-, gr. to the 11 >n. Col. Tai.Hor, Eeher waa lit in the 
Ro.*iety'a oolle on far twelve kiali, also tiking the Veitcli 
Mem i U Medal. He oy*s aUo lat in Mean. Sutton A Son's 

ola*s for eix dishes ; whiUt Mr. Wilkina. gr. tn Lady THEO ORa 
Oi i- , was lat uah nins dishes for M~%>rs. Jaa. Carter A Co.'a 
pn/aa; Mr. Jaa. Gibson, gr. to R. H. Watts, Esq , Devon- 
hur.t. Chiiwick, ci me 3rd in each case. We cannot here par- 
ticularise the varieties shown, but both in those classes and 
in the cottagers' section they wars fi'st rate. 




NATIONAL ROSE EXHIBITION AT 

GLOUCESTER. 

Join 27.— This waa a most successful mating. 
In almost all classea the competition waa numerous, 
and in many it was exceptionally cloae. The Mayor, 
aeoompanied by the sheriff and several of the council, 
also the Mavor of Cheltenham, opened the show. 
Good as Windsor waa laat season, tha present 







Fin 5. — FHiiat»*LrniTt BOt t daMBKt tower* wbttk, fraoravt. (see f. 19) 



Wnttt *tp yg — tA Btt^ 

Th« heat « « \ she* rasas from M- W. Feed. **, *o 
v h. stl i I . H Wow, wh-»hsd good 1 a Hsm^irgh 
and Foat-r* teehil.n* Urapea, Hale's Early Peaehee. BfD«n 
T irkey Figs A- M« Pa<*R was 2>d, hsviot rmrj good 
Orep r,«rd Kapler v«*Harine*. F g % Be | Mr ma* 
•haw Park GsM*o« ming 3-d. In the Open class for Black 

wrap**. M V >rt> w%a again 1* bat was so close ma by Mt 
*wa*, thst aoiBa twovir the h * baiswsn taa bast Hi 
W. Tidv, fr. to W K*q. f Stat bad the bast 

White Grapes, ia asaalh-h h inche with good b« »*. of 
Duk# of HspelSSJU> Mr M4V being Tad, witb Ha» and 

Swao'w.tar In the lor»l daan. M^ Bitfton |rr, to Sir J P 
Pauu Tw, ri: awb%SB, waa Is' a til Haav *h«, sad Mr. 
fatos bsd tha best w! - m rat bar raagh Mnsrat of A i 
sndria, Mesav* W *E. Wfi t,a. gr , Mr rhorapsoa, showed 
good n\*«\ Hasabargh and Madr#»*fi-ld OowH Grapea. with 
Peach—, A* . not for amorttticm. Mr. M ' had iae 





Melon ia the Conaa»«*. «\*c N* bast Pea^bea in pale eriaa red 
Alexanlsa Koblewe; M Far a being las). Mr. 8imm xpe 
had goad Load Kai ier lasaaariaea, ana Mr. 9a««f rood Aagaata 

N aiaasMsf OojsHsl l«#l tltawh-rriaa, Mt, M< U« ps Early 
I.yoaaChamea srare vary tin- a tan • Peffacttoa Tomitos 
frosa Mr. Fo R n and Mr. Ss«r w##* first rate. 

V^gotaMsss were, far taa soase% *« -i'Uoaally good. Mr 



•onthern show waa considerably in advanc* of it. 
<tr*a* s3s>tirtasv and hospiulity was shown to tha 
National Hos* Society from all sides. The quality of 
tb* Eo ass waa first-class, not an indifferent stand 

being staffed. 

If r RitoTif ca'« Clam**.. 

Is to* premie* Use f r for^r 'gat rti«t«sH aiagle irusset 
Uissa s*soa e*gat n asa oet i t oa* taa 1st pHas irking to M»wr» i 

HiHK ^KfJS it »*a, HMale. >raaaire, for s nsoat baaoMful and 
»ven oallertiaa. In t># Sack row areee Caarlea Darwin. «n- 
{tan^MtrfRn J oca* arln C rawne T Sf Als t., GaatavaFigannenq . 

<ptaia Oo'i^f 'Isan-e si R« mbawd Francos Miohetoo, 
T'.'ri -li Bmnner, Masn-ce Bernardm Mar # Veraier. Osptaia 
Haywar Lady Mary Fitrwillisaa, Alfred CoJoatb. Mrs. Jaka 
Laing. Marie Baamana. sad Her Msieaty. 8 ■ sa n d row. Dase 
of Fif- U Baale d'Or, A. K Willi in*. Oaastaase |e Nadsills^. 
Charlea Lefebvre, La France I>opny Jamtin, Pride of Wal- 
ts***. 8* Rowland Hill, M« ana* Haste, nsate«ae d* Lad re 
(Medal HP ). Qomr+nir d'Kiiee, Horace Varaat, Jeaa Daaber. 
so 4 Madame T. Vardier, Front row f Madstae K. Fa*s^a*i 
9isb«r Hoi oa- lede Lyon, Ooaatass of Rosebery, Madame 

O Lair* Dnrhsasa da Mora* Catbariae Marasaf, aenatear 
*/ai**a, Marie Bady, Fraaciacs Krnger. Dr. Aadry. Bari of Dai- 
ferin. 0awerai J s e qaea s i aa t, M^nratBe ia Lyoa, Daaaasa of 
BssMora. aad Qaaaa of Qaaasm It waald be dlfficait to caoase 



among tbess after the most perfect specimen, Comtesss < 
Ludrs, was removed. Mr. B. B. Cant, Colchester, was 
capital and close 2nd, snd had the following very good :— Eari 
of Dufferin, Comtsase d^ Nadaillac. 8.-M. Rodocanachi, A. K. 
Wilhams, H*r Majesty. Caroline Teatout, La Franca, Dupuy 
Jamain, aad Lady Mary Kit/- lliam. 

Seven competed in a class for twenty-four singles, Messrs. 
TowgSHKKD It Sok, Worcester, winning with a good stand, 
a moo g their beat flowers being Rubens, Mare Bad y. Charles 
JMflbvre, and Oustave Pijranneau ; the 2nd prize *tand, from 

leaara. CooLUro Bl Sohs, Bath, was larger, but not so well 
formed. 

The strongest class was that for twenty-four varieties, three 
trasses of ea ch , tea competing with i era ark ably clone stands. 
Messrs. B. Havkxes* Ac Soma were 1st, showing in superb 
form; Mr. B. B. Cajtt, Colchester, was place 1 2nd, his lot 
bsiag particularly bright and clean, but smaller. 

Mr. B. B. Ca*T, Colchester, was well in front for twelve 
singles of any H.-P. Rose, and staged a dozen beautiful Lad> 
Mary FiUwilliam ; Messrs. TowjtaHKWD & SOKS, Worcester 
2nd, with Mrs. J. Laing. 

Amateurs. 

There was a vary strong and close competition in an extrc 
lass for twelve single trusses, opea to all amateurs irre*pec 
firm of the number of plants grown. The Rev. J. H. Pkm 
BKBTOJT, H*verinf-ette-B»wer, was 1st with a good stand 
V - h Ii runner. Gabrielle Lutiet, li jrace Verne t (a grand 
bloom), Maris Besumann, Karl of Dufferin. Ousts ve Piganneau. 
etc. Mr. E. B. LlirnstXL, Hitchin, a close 2nd, had younger 
flowers, and in all probability a couple of hours later in 
judging would have seen these two redoubtable growers m 
reverse p osit io as. Boms sixteen or eeventeen lots were staged. 
A (lass for t weaty-four diati net, singles, was also very strong, 
Mr. W. Drew, Ledbury, being suooasafu . This stand con- 
tained a bloom marked "seedling " but which was far too 
aearly like M «rie Bady in every respect. It was a good bloom. 
Others thst deserve mention were Innocents Pirola, Marie 
Verdier, B.-M. Bodocanachi. and Her Majesty. Mr. E. B. 
I'lMvSSLL, Hi* chin, was 2nd wish a remarkably gool example 
of Comte Baimband, while Her Majesty. 1Mb* of Wellington, 
Marie Baumano, aad Horace Vemet were also fraud. 

A class of eigbteaa single trusses, distinct, open only to 
ir row* of less than 9000 plants of recognised exhibition 
at etiea, founl Mr. J. Paeker Hitchin, a good let, His 
beet blooms ware La Franca, Gsbrielle Luizet, Innocenta 
Pirola, and Ihicheaae de VaUombrosa. M'. E. Mawlev. 
Rerkhamsted, was 2nd, aad ba1 Horses \ eroet ia splendid 
condition. 

In a class of six disttact, three blooms of each, eleven com- 
petitors turned up, Mr. E B LisTDBEL) H .tenia, wsslst, 
having very bngbt at*d clean fljwers. Mr. Wiltf.r Drlw, 
Ledbury, made a good 2a i. 

7 i« Minfk trjiMtm. dittimct, for gmusrt of leti than 1003 
1 /dsaat. lat, Mr CoxwAvJo.*F- Huc^leoote; 2nd, 

Mr O. a. ^ui EM, Colchester ; 3rd, Mr. Jamks Parkm, 
Heaaingtoa. The beat bloom in his class was a splendid 
Oomtessede Nadaillac ia Mr. Parker's stand, the Innocent 

rola in Mr. Laxotvut's, and taa beautiful Souvenir <V ise 
\ ardon la that of Mr. Cos way Jones, also being remarkable. 

A class for a ma tears growing less than 500 j.lants— six 
■tog ea, dlsttast, sjajaj to Mr. G. Mot taa, Hitchin; Mr. H. 
P. Lakdo*, Brentwood, waa *sd. 

An extra class, open only to those entitled to cos* pete in the 
***o preceding, produced eight com pet r» Four vatsaties, 
iliree blooms of each, were shown here. Mr. O. G. Obpev, 
« o cheater , was 1st . ffir. OoirWAT Joksb, Huoclrton. wss ted. 

For ax blooms of any Base but a Tea or Moisets-, and open 
la all amateurs, a **ty even aad good half-a-doren of Horace 
Veraet woa for Mr. E. B. Lunssaaj . Her Majesty taking 2nd 
for Mr. W. Durw. 

In a class of tw#]r« baacbea, distinct Mr. H V, MaCHIH 
Gat ef or J Hail, Worksop, was 1st with vary pretty bunches. 

Tea a*t» Kor«FnE Brctioh. 






Ver aaldom hsve we seen better Teas. Messrs. D. PRIOR 
s\ So*s and Mr. F Ca> •< iota were indeed grand. 

In the premier class of went? four single truw**, distinct, 
Messrs. D. PRIOR A to*, Ccl +T t were 1st, the r ba< s row 

coasi ng of Ls Boale S*Or. > i heto» Bubeas, Elbe! Brown- 
low. Catherine Mermet, Madame Margr-fm, Braest M^t/. 
and Comtesee de Nadaillac; middle row aouvealr d*r *e 
v ardan. Marfsjial Kiel, a *m roses. Madam* Host*. Souvenir 
dun Ami, Boavaair » 8. A. Prince. Madame Ouaia. aod tn- 
nocent' -ola; the front row being Edith G ff >rd. Fra n ataoa 
Kruger, Madame de Wstte-vill- Caroline Kuster. The Bhde, 
Amarooe. Marie Quills' aad Marie %*sn Houtte The 2nd 
pHre lot of Mr. FRARK ( r con tain e I the Silver M al T-* 
n Edith Brownie w, aad also extra goad examples of Madams 
( i Gi fiord, Carolina Koeter, aad Oorinna 

Twelve di«U*ct amgles were well shown, M L T KsasjgDER. 
Ca- iff, being 1st with Catherine Mermet The Bride, and La 
Boole d*Or, at their beet; Messrs TowgaCRP k 8* <. 
vroreeater, 2nd. 

AWiTET"**. 

Open elase. iireepaafjee of number of plants, for eighteen 



distinct, single 



a, sevan very eoceiient 




wee* put 



ap, Mr. O. G. Orpe* < jIimssSji-. wioaBog with arraod flowers 

of Cleopatra. Madame H. iaaaasa. Fraaatsea Kruger, Madame 

asia, Ma? hal Kiel, Boaveair d'aa Am*, and Madaase de 

Watteville. Taw Bod pnaa stand, fro** t be Rev. A. Foster- 

Mf.liur BOfa & oaR-s5*a)f», I ;>*wrh. was but little behind, 

and contamed a saperb bloom of La Bone d'Or, to whioa toe 
Silver Meiai was awarded. 

h oa aftagla b sa sm i . for growers of fearer fhea 500 piaats. 
brought oat eigjat tots. Mr B. H. LaiooM*. Headoa, wiaaiag 
with Iraeet Met? aad la aaasa ta Pirola, extra goad Mr. W. 
Bote*, Darby, was tod. 









20 



THE GARDENERS' CHRONICLE. 



[July 6. 1895 



In a class of six sing'e?, for growers of less than 500 plants, 
Mr. G. Moules, Hitchin, was a capital 1st ; Mr. R. F. H0BB3, 

Worcester, 2nd. 
An extra class of six trebles, open to all amateurs, was won 

by the Rev. A. Foster Melliar. Ipswich ; Mr. Conway 

Jones, Hu^cleton, was 2nd. Six trusses cf any Tea or 

Noisette, Souvenir d'filise Vardon wo a here for the Rev. 

Foster-MelliaR ; while 2nd was taken by Edith Gifford, for 

the Rev. F. R. Burnside, 

Open Classes. 

For twelve varieties, three of each, some of the grandest 
Teas we have geen were put up. Mr. B. R. Cant, Colchester, 
being Ut, with La Boule o'Or, Madame Cusin, Innocente Pirola, 
Madame de Watteville, Edith Gifford, and Ernest Metz in 
particularly good form. 

Twelve trusses of any Tea or Noisette brought a dozen of 
Marie Van Houtte in its prettiest form, Messrs. D. PRIOR 
& Son, Colchester, taking 1st. 

Garden Roses. 

These were not quite so extensively shown as usual. In a 
class for nurserymen, of thirty-six bunches, distinct, with not 
fewer than three, nor more than six trusses to a bunch, Mr. C. 
Turner, Slough, was 1st, with very pretty trusses of rugosas, 
Crimson Rambler, Persian Yellow, Mosses, macrantha. Poly- 
ant ha, Hebe's Lip, and Moschata alba among many others. 

The amateur's classes of these were good. For eighteen 
bunches, Mr. A. Tate, Leatherhead, was 1st; Marquis of 
Salisbury, Hebe's Lip, Crested Moss, Gioire de Rossmanes, 
Rosa Mundi, and macrantha were his best. 

For six bunches, not open to the exhibitors in the preceding 
classes, the Rev. J. H. Pemberton was a capital 1st, having 
a peculiarly semi-double form of Polyantha, the old Red 

Provins or Provence, multiflora simplex, Rosa Mundi, &c. 
Mr. J. Ough, Hereford, was 2nd. 

Open Classes. 

A display of Roses, not to exceed 6 feet by 3 feet, in which 
any Rose may be shown and arranged to individual taste, was 
very pretty, but not so striking as several lots we have seen. 
Mr. H. Whitehead, Heathville Nursery, Gloucester, was 1st, 
with an arrangement of Roses forming the letters N. R. S., 
the society's initials. Edith Gifford, Marie Van Houtte, and 
Lamarque, formed these letters in like order, while the whole 
was surrounded with various other Roses, but too formally 
arranged. We hope this silly practice will not find favour. 
A good box of Turner's Crimson Rambler wa* included here. 

Three trusses of any new seedling or distinct sport did not 
provide a startling novelty, Pride of the Valley was the only 
one shown, no award being made. It looked far too much like 
a pale indifferent Mrs, Jno. Laing. 1 

Local Classes. 

These were good, but the excellent quality and enormous 
number from other districts, not to mention the fact that the 
strongest growers also went into higher classes, considerably 
detracted from rheir beauty. 

Mr. Conway Jones, Hucclecote, won the Silver Cup for 
eighteen distinct tingle trusses ; and Mr. T. A. Wa&hbourn, 
Huccleton, was placed 2nd. 

Mr. J. F. Fuleord won the Silver Medal for twelve varie- 
ties : Mr. Gambier Parry was 2nd. 

A Challenge Plate, presented by the Rev. F. R. Bfrnsidb, 
for twelve Teas or Noisettes, went to Mr. T. A. Washbotjrn ; 
Mr. E. C. Hoptow being 2nd. 

Mr. Conway Jones also won the Silver Medal for six Teas 
or Noisettes, Mr. T. Thorpe, Hilldrop, near Gloucester, 
taking a similar honour for twelve trusses ; while the 1st for 
six singles was won by Mr. G. Pratt, 39, Park End Road. 

The Corporation of Gloucester presented a silver salver for 
twelve distinct singles, which was won by Mr. Conway 
Jones ; the 2nd went to Mr. C. Rrown, Saint's Bridge House. 

A silver medal for twelve singles, grown by cottagers, was 
presented by T. Thorpe. Esj., and won by Mr. E. C. Hoptoic. 
Hucclecote. For six singles, Mr. J. Middecote, Malson ; 
Mr. F. Bircher, Hucclecote; and Mr. A. Michell, Coney 
Hill, won in like order. 

A bronze medal and money was won by Mr. E. Poole, 
Upton, St. Leonards. 

Among the cottagers. Mr. F. W. Bolton had the best single 
truss in Mrs. Jno. Laing. 

* 

SlLVER-MfcDAL ROSES. 

The Silver Medal for the best hybrid perpetual in the nursery- 
men classes, was awarded to Messrs. Hark n ess & Sons, for 
Comtesse de Ludre ; that for Teas or Noisettes going to Mr, 
F. Cant, for Ethel Brownlow. 

In the amateurs' classes, Horace Vernet won, for the Rev. 
J. fl. Pemberton ; and La Bouie d'Or for the Bev. Foster- 
Melliab. 

A good lot of hybrid Sweet Briars came from Messrs 
Keynes, Williams & Co., Salisbury, who staged all the oldei 

kinds except Meg Merrilie*. They now had some that ar« 
not yet in commerce, the best of which is undoubtedly Jeanni< 
Deans, a brixht and semi-double varietv. 



DEVON AND EXETEB HOBTICTJL- 



TTJRAL. 



Junb 28. 



-The 18lst exhibition of this Society 
was held on the above date, the day being wet and 
unfavourable. The summer exhibition is nioally 
held in August, and it is fifteen years since the last 
Rote ahow took place. Toe entries promised great 



thingi, many of the well-known exhibitor! having 
entered, bat only a imail number pat in an appear- 
ance. This not only earned great disappointment, 
but alio much inconvenience. Toe quality wai 
generally fine, Tea Ro«ei being excellent. 

Roses. 

In tbe nurserymen's class, for forty-eight distinct, Messrs. 
Curtis. Sanford & Co., Torquay, were 1st; and Messrs. D. 
Prior ft Son, Colchester, a Rood 2nd. In the winning 
exhibit were Ernest Metz. Jean Ducher, Victor Hugo, Maman 
Cochet, Captain Christy, Xavier Olibo. Madame Cusin, Star of 
Waltham, Black Piince, Alfred Colomb, Marie Baumann, and 
Suzanne-M. Rodocanachi, the blooms being distinguished for 
fine form and colour. 

In the twenty-four distinct, Mr. John Mattock, New 
Headington, Oxford, was 1st ; Messrs Robert Veitch & Son, 
Exeter, 2nd ; and Messrs. Jarman & Co., Chard, 3rd. In the 
twenty-four distinct (three trusses of each), M-jssrs. D. Prior 
& Son were 1st; Messrs. Curtis, Sanford 8l Co., 2nd. In 
the winning collection were Souvenir de S. A. Prince, Her 
Majesty, A. K. Williams, Marie van Houtte, Horace Vernet, 
and Madame Gabrielle Luizet. In the 2nd lot were Margaret 
Dickson, The Bride, Jean Ducher, and Innocente Pirola, all very 

good indeed. 

For the eighteen Teas or Noisettes, Messrs. D. Prior & SON 
were 1st; Messrs. CURTIS. Sanford & Co., 2nd; and Mr. 
John Mattock, 3rd. Messrs. Phior & Sox had go*l examples 
of Comtesse de Nadailiac, Madame Hoste, Hon. Edith Gifford, 
Caroline Ku*ter, 8ouvenir d'Klise Vardon, Cleopatra, and 
Marie Van Houtte. Messrs. Curtis, Sanford & Co. showed 
a very fine bloom of Souvenir d'un Ami. 

In the open classes, Messrs. Prior * Son were again 1st for 
twenty-four Teas or Noisettes, Mr. J. Mattock 2nd, and 
A. Hill Gray, Esq., of Bath, 3rd. The prize exhibit had 
excellent blooms of Madame Lambird, Madame Bravy, The 
Bridesmaid. Innocente Pirola, Catherine Mermet, and Marie 
Van Houtte. The latter was superb in this and several other 

classes. 

For twelve blooms of any light H.-P.'s, Messrs. PRIOR & 
Son were 1st with Her Majesty, as nearly perfection as it is 
passible to show them. Mr. Walter Drew, Ledbury, came 
2nd with the same variety, a magnificent lot. 

For twelve blooms of any dark H.-P. s, Messrs. Curtis, 
Sanford Bl Co. were well 1st with a grand box of Marie 
Baumann. R. N. G. Baker, Esq., of Heavitree, Exeter, 2nd, 
with a very fine lot of Ulrica Brunner. 

A. Hill Gray was 1st for twelve Marechal Niel of magni- 
ficent colour ; and Prior & Son took Jpremier place for twelve 
of any other Tea or Noisette, with a good box of Caroline 
Kuster. For six bunches of garden Roses Messrs. Prior & 
Son were 1st, and James Jerman, Esq., The Bungalow, 

Exeter, 2nd. 

In the amateur classes, Mr. Waltkr Drkw took premier 
honours with thirty-iix fine blooms, among which were Dingee 
Conard, Marchioness of Londonderry, Marie Finger, C. Testout, 
Ulrich Brunner, Caroline Kuster, Thomas Mills, Her Majesty, 
and Etoile de Lyon. In this collection, the bloom of Mar- 
chioness of Londonderry was awarded the Medal for the best 
H.P. in the show. R. N. G. Baker was a good 2nd. 

For the twenty-four blooms, R. E. West, Esq., of Reigate, 
was 1st, with a fine lot ; and A. Hill Grat, 2nd. 

For twelve sorts, three trusses of each, Mr. Walter Drew 

was 1st. 
For twelve Teas or Noisettes, A. Hill Gray had in his 

winning lot Reine du Portugal, Souvenir de S. A. Prince, 

Ernest Metz, and Souv. d'Rlise Vardon. 

Mr. R. N. G. Baker took premier place for six of any one 
sort of Tea or Noisette, with a fine stand of Princess of Wales. 

The class for twelve Teas or Noisettes, distinct, three trusses 
of each, was won by Mr. A. HILL Gray, with a fine lot. 

Mr. N. G. Baker took honours for the best Tea or Noisette 
in the ahow, wilh Comtesse de Nadailiac. 

Miscellaneous Plants and Flowers. 

In hardy herbaceous flowers, some excellent bunchei were 
shown, particularly fine being a bunch of Thalictrum aqui- 
legifolium. Pelargoniums in trusses were good, but Pansies 
very poor, and the 1st prize was withheld. Fuchsias and 
Pelargoniums in pots were fair, especially the latter. 

The groups were not at all up to the usual form at the 
Exeter August shows, they sadly wanted colour and variety. 
The 1st prize group, W. Brock, Esq., Parker's Well, Exeter 
(gr., Mr. W. Rowland), was an easy 1st. The twelve Gloxinias, 
1st prize for which was awarded to Mrs. A. D. Sim, Knowle, 
Exeter (gr., Mr. A. Williams)., were verj good indeed. 



Fruit. 

Fruit was indifferently shown in most classes. Grapes were 
fair, Melons uneven, but Strawberries were splendid. For 
Black Grapes other than Hamburghs, Trentham Black was 
the winning sort, and in White Grapes, Buckland Sweet- 
water. The 1st in Gooseberries was Golden Drop, but tbe 
competition in these classes was not keen. The class for four 
dishes of Strawberries was won by H. Hammond Spescer, 
Esq., Teignmouth (gr., Mr. Foster), with Sensation, Waterloo, 
Commander, and James Vet ton, all first-rate. The two dishes 
were won with Sir Joseph Paxton and President, and the one 
dish class by Miss Drew, Kenton, with a grand exhibit of 
Sir Joseph Paxton. Mrs. A. D. Sim showed a fin* dish of 
Baby Castle Currants. 

Vegetables. 

In vegetables, premier place was again taken by Sir John 
Shelley, Bart., High Sheriff of Devon (gr., Mr. R. Mavis), 
with a grand collection of eight varieties, consisting of 
Veitch's Model Carrot, Duke of York Potato. Gradus Pei 



Veitch's Midsummer Day Cauliflower, Veitch's Red Garden 
Globe Turnip, Perfection Tomato, Veitch's Exhibition Broad 
Beans, and Canadian Wonder Dwarf Beans. The 2nd prize 
collection was al«o good. Veitch's Perfection, Veitch's Gem, 
and Blend worth Perfection Cucumbers were well shown. 
Perfection Tomato, Model Carrot, Mammoth Coa Lettuce, Red 
Garden Globe Turnip, Early Puritan Potato, and Mein's No. 1 
Cabbage, were prominent among the winning dUhes, 

Trade Exhibits. 



In the Nurserymen's exhibits were some very good things. 
By far the largest exhibit was that of Messrs. ROBERT Veitch 
& Sox, who, in addition to a goo I general collection, showed 
some new hybrid Water Lilies, a grand box of Carnations, and 
a rich collection of alpine and rock plants. 

Messrs. Randall k Sosf hid n good miscellaneous collection, 
as also had Mr. W. B. Sm ale, Torquay, this exhibitor showing 
good Petunias and Double Shirley Poppies, with three Chrys- 
anthemums. Charles Davis flowering out of season. Mr. W. J. 
Godfrey, Exmouth, had good Carnations, amongst them 
being Goldmine, Sunrise, and Primrose League. Four new 
and well-coloured Cole uses were also in this stand, and a good 
assortment of cut flowers. Mr. J. Walker. Mount Radford ; 
Messrs. Jar max St Co , Chard ; Messrs. Beach Y At Co., King's 
Kerswell, also exhibited; as did the Jadoo Company, who 
had a large stand of well grown specimens, grown in Jadoo, 
from the conservatories of Colonel Half or i Thorn; -on. 




• •:• 



WINDSOR, ETON, AND DISTRICT 
ROSE AND HORTICULTURAL. 

June 29. — The annual exhibition of this lociety 
was held on Saturday last in the private grounds of 
Windsor Cattle. Rdsos were by far the strongest 
classes, and in the most important of these the 
quality of the blooms was excellent. There was not 
much competition in the plant classes, and the three 
tents that had been provided were not more than 
furnished. We would suggest to the committee that 
on another occasion the names of tbe exhibitors 
should be more plainly written. Considerable trouble 
and error might thus be saved the spectators, while 
it would also be convenient if tbe addresses of ex- 
hibitors were included on the cards. 

Roses. 

We have already said thit the quality of the Rose* was gi 
and this was particularly the case in the three riret open 
classes. Mr. Benj. R. Cast, Colchester, was 1st for thirty- 
six distinct single trusses, and the most noticeable in his 
stand were Ulrich Brunner, Gintave Piganneau, Madame G. 
Luizet, Marchioness of Downshire, White Lady. Lady Mary 
FitzwiUiam. March onesi of Dufferin. an i A. K. Williams. 
Messrs. Harkhh — A Sons. Bad ale, Yorks. were 2nd. Their 
blooms were smaller, but they were of cipital colour and nice 
in form; Messrs. Phiou & Sox*, Colchester, were 3rd 
in this class, but won in that for eighteen Terns or Noisettes, 
which included very fine blooms of Catherine Mermet and 
Souvenir d'un Ami. 

The third open class— three trusses each of twelve distinct 
varieties— fell to an amateur, and to win he had to beat 
splendid blooms from the trade. The Rev. J. H. Pemberton, 
Havering atte- Bower, Romford, Essex, had large full bloom*, 
and of excellent colour ; Mews. Har kx ess & Sons were 2nd, 
and Mr, B. R. Cant 3rd. The National Society's Silver Medal 
for best Rose in the show was swarded to a capital bloom of 
Marchioness of Dufferin. exhibited by Mr. Frank Cawt. 

Amateurs.— The Rev. J. H. Pemberton was 1st for eighteen 
distinct Roses, and a splendid bloom of Marie Baumann gained 
the National Society's Silver Medal for beat Rose exhibited 
by an amateur. Others in the stand were also very good. 
The Rev. J. H. Pemberton, won, for six single trusses of one 
kind, with Caroline Testout; and H. V. MacHIN, Esq*» 
Worksop, for twelve Teas or Noisette, in not fewer than eight 
varieties; R. E. WttT. K*q.. Reigate, was 2nd. The qnality 
in this class was not remarkable. 

Local Classes.— There were six classes open only to exhibi- 
tors within ten miles of Windsor, and the 1st of these— f<> r 
eighteen single trusses— was won by N. L. Cohen. R*q., Kngl«- 
field Green (gr., Mr. A. Sturt); also the class for twelve §ingl« 
trusses. In the 1st class, A. Gilleat, Esq., Slough, was 2nd; 
and Miss Bailey Denton, Wingfield, took a similar position 
in the other. Six single trusrea were best from Mr. JoH*" 
SON, Manor College Gardens ; and 8ir Robert HaryeY, BU 
was 1st for six single ti u«es of any H. P. or H. Tea. N. I" 
Cohen, Esq., with Innocente Pirola, was 1st for the *& e 
number of any Tea or Noisette ; and the Dowager Duchess of 
Sutherland for six Teas or Noisettes in distinct varieties. Mr*. 
F. Heneage and Mrs. Irvine were 1st respectively for* 
basket of Roses, and for six bunches of garden Roses, distm*t 
open to local ladies only. 

Open to Mbmbbbs onxy. 

P9t Plants.— The winner of the 1st prise for an effective 
group of miscellaneous plant*, arranged in a circle 12 f««t by 
6 feet, was Sir Robert Harvey, Bart, (gr., Mr. GilK**£ 
whose group, composed wholly of dot plants with a grouo * 
work of Ferns and Gloxinias, contained some rather tsneommoa 
flowers. The 2nd prize went to Henry Gold, E*q. (g*»f ***' 
D. Phillips), who had also a tasteful exhibit. 

Sir R. Harvey (gr., Mr. A. Giiliss), wn 1st for six specif 
plants and for tix plants for table decoration, having t*** 1 ' 
good plants in each case. The Hon. C. S. Irby, with »u 
specimen Fuchsia*, and Mrs. J. Heneaof («r., Mr. GuttiWa' 6 * 
with six zonal I e'a'g>uiums we e 1st in these classes. 






IT, 



JutT 6, 1895.] 



THE 



GARDENERS' CHRONICLE, 



21 



F. Ricardo, Esq., had 1st for six tuberous Begonias, and 
the Hon. O. S. Irby had the best Ferns. 

Fruit was of fair quality generally. L. Baker, Esq., was 
1st for two bunches of black Grapes, with ripe Alicantes; and 
N. L. Cohen, Esq , with unripe bunches of what we judged to 
be Foster's Seedling, was 1st for white Grapes. 

The best Peaches came from Major Legge, Fulmer (gr., 
Mr. J. G. Mowbray), who had Royal George of fine quality ; 
and L. Baker, Esq., the best Nectarines. Major Leggx had 
also good Nectarines, showing delicately-coloured Pitmaston 
Orange. Mrs. Irving (gr„ Mr. Elisha), had the best Straw- 
berries, showing Laxton's Latest of All, and Frogmore Late 
Pine. There were seven entries of Melons for prizes offered 
by Messrs. Sutton & Sons, Reading; and Mrs. Burton (gr., 
Mr. W. Wicks), was 1st, with Hero of Lockinge. 

Vegetables.— The Hon. C. S. Irby, Taplow, was 1st for a 
collection of Vegetables in six varieties, quality only fair. 
Hi» Peas, Duchess, weie not full. There were also classes for 
Tom at os, Cucumbers, and a Cottager's class for a collection of 
four varieties of Vegetables. 

For Messrs. Jas. Carter 8l Co 'a prizes for produce from their 

seeds, Mr. G. P. Quelch, gr., House of Mercy, Clewer, was 

1st ; and the Hon. C. S. Irby was 1st with a collection of four 

kinds grown from seeds supplied by Mr. W. H. Titt, Thames 
Street, Windsor. 

Miscellaneous. 

Her Majesty the Queen, from the Royal Gardens, Windsor(gr., 
Mr. O. Thomas), exhibited an excellent group of miscellaneous 
plants, both foliage and flowering specimens. The plants in 
this group were well grown, and included large Palms, 
Crotons, Liliums, Hydrangeas, Spiraea palmata, a capital 
plant of Calathea (Maranta) zebrina, Gladiolus, Crassulas, a 
nice plant of Alocasia Thibautiana, Humea elegans, and other 
decorative species. 

The trade was well represented at this exhibition. Messrs. 
Jno. Laing 8l Sons, Forest Hill, London, S E., were the 
exhibitors of a pretty group of miscellaneous plants. There 
were choice plants of Caladiums, Crotons, Begonias, *c. 

Messrs. John Peed & Sons had a group of miscellaneous 
plants, composed of Caladiums, Dracaenas, Gloxinias, &c, 
containing some nice plants, but the group was too heavily 
arranged. A collection of hardy herbaceous flowers, and a few 
Roses, exhibited on two tables, were also from Messrs. Peed. 

Mr. Chas. Turner, Royal Nurseries, Slough, had three 
groups, one large low group upon the grass, consisting of Car- 
nations in pots, and in front a couple of dozen baskets, fur- 
nished with Rose blooms in sprays, each containing one variety 
only, and surrounded with Fern. The quality of this exhibit 
deserves remark. 

A small central group encircling one of the tent poles was 
composed of Lilies and Palms, and Roses in baskets and Pelar- 
goniums were well exhibited in another group. 

Hardy herbaceous perennial flowers were capitally shown by 
Messrs. Jas. Veitch 8l Sons, Royal Exotic Nursery, King's 
Road, Chelsea. They included a fine lot of Delphiniums in 
variety, and a representative collection of other species now in 
flower, beside a collection of Rose blooms. 

Messrs. Wm. Cutbush & Son, nurserymen, Highgate, 
London, N., exhibited a nice group of Carnations in pots,' 
composed principally of Souvenir de la Malmaisou varieties. 

Mr. Thos. S. Ware, Hale Farm Nurseries, near Tottenham, 
had a large double-faced group of Begonias arranged on a 
central table, including single and double varieties. Mr, B. 
Ladhams, Southampton, had an excellent lot of hardy flowers • 
and Messrs. Geo. Jackman & Sons, Woking, the same kind 
of plants in fewer varieties. Mr. H. Eckford, Wem, Salop, 
had one of his elegant exhibits of Sweet Peas, including 
another batch of new varieties, all pretty, and exhibiting 
endless variety in colour and considerable variation in form. 

Mr. Geo. Phippen, Reading, had an attractive stand of 
florists* productions, *c. ; and Mr. W. H. Fitt, Thames St., 
Windsor, had a smaller exhibit of a similar character. 



CROYDOW HORTICULTURAL. 

July 3. — The twenty-eighth summer exhibition 
wa§ held on Wednesday last in the grounds of Brick- 
wood House, the residence of J. W. Prince, Esq. 
As usual, the show was very comprehensive. Classes 
for Roses and plants were numerous and well sus- 
tained, non- competitive exhibits forming a smaller 
proportion of the show that is becoming common at 
many places. 

racf 

Roses were not quite so numerous as last year, and although 
the quality was good i n i s t pr ize stands, many of the blooms 
had been damaged by recent rains. The leading class for 
nurserymen only, fell to Mr. B. R. Cant, Colchester, whose 
forty-eight distinct blooms were good, but not exceptional 
Her Majesty, Madame Cusin, Marechal Niel, Marchioness 
of Downshire, Thomas Mills, Gustave Piganneau, Madame 
Bois, and Baroness Rothschild were among the best blooms 
in this stand. Mr. Frank Cant, Braiswick Nursery, Col- 
chester, with a younger, brighter, though smaller lot, was 
a very close 2nd. We noticed very pretty blooms of Ethel 
Brownlow, Marie Baumann, and Madame Gabrielle Luizef. 
The class for twenty-four Roses, distinct, three trusses of each 
was also won by Mr. B. R. Caw t. 

Messrs. G. and W. H. Burch, Peterborough, had an excel- 
ent lot of Roses in the class for twenty-four blooms distinct, 
such as Charles Lefebvre, Duke of Fife, Mrs. Jno. Laing, Earl 
Bufferin, Marie Baumann, Jeannie Dickson, and Ulrich 
Brunner, having great substance. Messrs. Towxsend St Sons, 
Lower Broad Heath. Worcester, were 2nd. 

Mr. Fran* Cant was easily 1st for eighteen Teas or 
Noisettes, including in his collection pretty blooms of Ethel 



Brownlow, Catherine Mermet, Corinna, and Madame Cusin. 
Mr. B. R. Cant was 2nd. 

The best dozen of one variety was from Mr. F. Cant, being 
fair blooms only of Her Majesty; Mr. B. R. Cant, with Gus- 
tave Piganneau was 2nd. The best dozen blooms of a Tea were 
Madame de Watteviile, from Mr. Frank Cant. 

Amateurs' and Gardeners' Classes.— -The leading open class, 
nurserymen excluded, was won by the Rev. J. H. Pemberton, 
Havering-atte-Bower, Essex, who had thiity-six excellent 
blooms ; and A. Tate, Esq., Downside, was 2nd. 

A. Tate, Esq., was 1st for eighteen Tea or Noisettes, but the 
quality in this class was not remarkable. 

The Rev. J. H. Pemberton won for six Roses, in three 
trusses of each ; and A. Tate, Esq , was 2nd. 

The best twelve blooms of one variety were from H. V. 
Machin, Esq., Gateford Hill, Worksop, who showed La 
France; T. B. Haywood, Esq., Woodhatch Lodge, Reigate 
(gr., Mr. C. J. Salter), was 2nd, with Alfred Colomb. Three 
classes were reserved for growers of fewer than 2000 Rose 
plants, and the first of these was won by Jas. Barker, Esq., 
Oak field, Hitchin, who had twelve distinct blooms of com- 
mendable quality. A bloom of Fisher Holmes in this stand 
was awarded the National Rose Society's Medal. The same 
exhibitor had the best twelve Teas, and the best four Roses, 
three trusses of each. R H. Langton, Esq , Ray mead, 
Hendon, was 1st for nine Roses distinct among growers of 
fewer than 10G0 plants, and also for nine Teas or Noisettes. 

Groups, — The winner of the class for the best group of 
plants, arranged for effect, was Mr. C. Lane, gr. to E. H. 
Coles, Esq., Brentwood, Caterham. He had a prettily- 
arranged group, bright with many flowering plants, and some 
well-coloured Crotons. Mr. E. Mills, gr. to Frank Lloyd, 
Esq., Coombe House, Croydon, was 2nd. There were six 
entries. 

In a district amateurs' class for a smaller group, the winner 
was Mr. J. Galvin, gr, to Mrs. Da vies, Purley ; while a 2nd 
prize only was awarded to Mr. G. Eaies, gr. to J. Claisher, 
Esq., Heathfield Road, Croydon, an exhibitor in an open class 
for amateurs and single- banded gardeners. 

Plants.— Jno. Warren, Esq,, Handcross Park, Crawley 
(gr., Mr. Offer), was the exhibitor in a class for nine store and 
greenhouse plants, the quality of which was commendable ; 
Boronia elatior, Ixora Fraseri, and Darwinia fuctuioides 
were his best plants. John Warren, Esq., was also 1st for a 
specimen plant with ornamental foliage, showing a capital 
Croton, Queen Victoria. Philip Crowley, Esq., Waddon 
House, Croydon (gr., Mr. J # Harris), had the best flowering 
specimen, in a good plant of Clerodendron Balfourianum. 

For six ornamental foliage plants (greenhouse), Mr. M, E. 
Mills, gr. to Frank Lloyd, Esq., Coombe House, Croydon, 
was 1st. He had a good plant of Pritchardia pacifica, An- 
thurium crystallinum, A. Warocqueanum, &c. Mr. H. G. 
Filbey, gr. to Mrs. F. Berns, was 2nd. 

The 1st prize for six exotic Ferns was taken by Mr. Home, 
gr. to H.Tate, Esq., Streatham Common, who had capital 
specimens of Adiantum cuneatum, A. cardiochlcena, Micro- 
lepia hirta cristata, Marattia fraxinea, and Nephrolepis ensi- 
folia. 

Nine ornamental foliage plants were very good from J. 
Warren, Esq., his Croton Williamsii, C. Warreni, Cycas 
revoluta, and Kentia Belmoreana being very worthy of 
remark. Philip Crowley, Esq., was 2nd. Begonias in a 
collection of nine were best from Mr. J. Slater, gr. to Mrs. 
Hulse, Shepley House, Carshalton ; and Mr. J. Knapp, gr. to 
F. W. Amsden, Esq., Chichester Road, Croydon, was 1st for 
six plants. Pelargoniums in six plants were won by Mr. E. 
Perrett, gr.to Mrs. Fuller, Duppas Hill ; and Frank Lloyd, 
E?q., was 1st for six plants of Caladiums. 

Selaginellas from Philip Crowley, Esq., were excellent, 
particularly S. apoda and S. Poulteri. Tne same exhibitor 
was 1st for nine distinct Ferns in 6-inch pots. Fuchsias and 
Pelargoniums were shown in other classes, and were of average 
quality. 

An uncommon class was that arranged for a collection of 
succulents. There was only one exhibitor, Mr. C. A. Blogg, 
Brighton Road, Croydon, but his plants were worth notice. 

Fruit was not shown extensively, but the quality was good. 
Mr. E. Blurton who won for Black Grapes, had three large, 
tolerably well-coloured bunches of Black Hamburgh ; and Mr. 
E. M. BfiTHUXE, Denne Park, Horsham, won in the cla*s 
for White Grapes, with three bunches of Foster'* Seedling. For 
a collection of fruit in six dishes, a good lot was staged by Mr. 
J. Munro, gr. to James L. Bricknell, Esq., Langiey Court, 
Beckenham. His black Hamburgh Grapes, Peaches, and Straw- 
berries were remarkable. Mr. E. Mills, gr. to Frank Lloyd, 
Esq., with Princess Alice, had 1st prize for a dish of Straw- 
berries. 

Vegetables were of good quality, and table decorations were 
attractive and tasteful. 

Miscellaneous.— Messrs. Jno. Laing & Sons, Forest Hill, 
London, S.E., had a central and two side groups at the entrance 
to the large plant teat. The two smaller groups were com- 
posed of a collection of choice Caladiums, aud the centre ooe 
was made up of double and single-flowered Begonias of ex- 
ceptional merit. We noted Duchess of Fife as one of the 
prettiest and most attractive single-flowered varieties we have 
seen. Messrs. Laing had also cut Roses, &c. 

Mr. Jno. R. Box, nurseryman, W*st Wickham and Croydon, 
staged a group of bingle-flowering tuberous Begonias, remark- 
able for their bright colours and good form. A group of her- 
baceous plants and flowers were also shown by this exhibitor. 

Messrs. J. Cheal & Sons, Crawley, Sussex, exhibited a nice 
lot of hardy flowers, including some fine Gaillardias, Violas, &c. 

Mr. T. W. Edmunds, nurseryman, Webterham, Kent, had 
hardy flowers and Roses. 

Messrs. CttbVBh & Sot, Highgate Nurseries, London, K., 

had an excellent group of Carnations in not s. 



Mr. K, Chaff, nurseryman, Croydon, exhibited ft 
arrangements. 

Messrs. Jno. Peed & Sons, Roupell Park Nurseries, Norw 
Road, London, had a tasteful group composed of Crot 
Lilies, Caladiums, Ferns, &c. 




• •:■ 



LEE, BLACK HEATH, AND LEWISHAM 

HORTICULTURAL. 

July 3 — The annual exhibition by this society 
was held oa Tuesday last in the grounds of " The 
Cedars," Lee. Several tents were well filled, and the 
display in each was good, Roses, decorative and 
flowering plants, cut flowers, fruits, aud vegetables, 
were all well represented. 

Roses. 

The largest class for these is equal in its requirements to 
that of the National Society at the Crystal Palace. The best 
seventy-two blooms were undoubtedly those from Messrs. 
Harkness & Sons, Bedale, Yorkshire, and this firm was 
awarded 1st prize; Messrs. D. Prior & Son, Colchester, 
coming 2nd. Later in the day, however, the exhibit from Messrs. 
Harkness was disqualified, as "not according to schedule,'* 
and Messrs. D. Prior & Son were placed 1st, followed by 
Messrs. G. & W. H. Burch, Peterborough. In Messrs. Bare- 
ness* stand we noticed very fine examples of Her Majesty, 
Madame V. Verdier, Augusta Rigotard, Captain Hayward, 
Horace Vernet, Mrs. John Laing, Marie Baumann, and Gustave 
Piganneau. 

In the class for forty-eight blooms, Messrs. Harkness were 
1st, and Messrs. Prior h Son 2nd ; but positions were 
reversed in the class for twenty-four blooms, and Messrs. Prior 
were 1st and Messrs. Harkness 2nd. There were a few other 
minor classes. 

Plants, &c. 

Mr. P. Fox, f^r. to Mrs. Penn, The Cedars, Lee, with 
six niee Palms, took 1st in this class; and was similarly 
successful with twelve very commendable stove and green- 
Jiouse plants, Mr. C. Birch, gr. to R. Whyte, Esq , Old 
Road, Lee, who was 2nd in the latter class, included a well- 
flowered specimen of Aristolochia elegans. Mr. Birch was 
1st also for six exotic Ferns, including excellent plants of 
Davallia fijiensis, and Adiantum scutum roseum ; 2nd, Mr. 
C. Nunn, gr. to W. Soames. Esq., Maize Hill House, Green- 
wich. With a very fine Ixora Pilgrimi, Mr. Birch was 1st 
for a specimen plant in flower; and Mr. Nunn 2nd, with 
Clerodendron Balfourianum. Mr. Birch was again successful 
in the class for six stove or greenhouse plants, and included 
capital specimens of Ixora Prince of Orange, Plumbago 
capensis, and P. c. alba. 

Six foliage plants were best from Mr. J. Lambert, gr. to H. 
W. Segelcke, Esq., Heme Hill, who had very commendable 
specimens. Mr. Lambert was 1st for an effective group, and 
Mr. C. Nunn 2nd, neither exhibits calling for remark. 

Begonias were fairly good, and 1st prizes were taken by Mr. 
F. Fox, Mr. H. Horton, gr. to Major-General Ashburner, 
St. John's Park, Blackheath ; and Mr. F. Johnson, gr. to 8. 
Brailsford, Esq., Tudor Hou*e, Blackheath Park. Cala- 
diums were also of good quality. Mr, Nunn was 1st for six 
plants, and Mr. W. Payne, gr. to C. D, Abel, Esq., Eastcombe 
Villas, Blackheath, 2nd, Dracaenas were well grown as exhi- 
bited by Mr. J. Lambert in the class for six plants, and Mr. 
T. Alley, gr. to R. Kelsey, Esq., Hurst Lodge, Lee, was 
commendable in a class for four plants. 

Mr. F. Fox took 1st honours for a group of plants arranged 
upon a table ; and Mr. C. Nunn * t was 2nd. The contrast be- 
tween the two exhibits was great, Mr. Fox having made his 
group exceptionally bright by a free use of flowering and 
variegated plants, while the one from Mr, Nunn was uncom- 
monly dull. 

A class which is almost peculiar to this exhibition, is 
arranged for twenty-four miscellaneous stove and greenhouse 
plants. The specimens exhibited are always moderate in size, 
generally of good quality, but calling for no special remark. 
Mr. C. Birch was 1st in this class on Tuesday last, and Mr. F. 
Fox, 2nd. 

There were minor classes for Orchids, Gloxinias, Fuchsias, 
Pelargoniums, &c, and for various cut flowers. 

Two classes for sprays of Violas were easily won by A. J. 
Rowberry, Eeq., The Crescent, South Woodford, his exhibits 
in the classes for twelve sprays and for six sprays being 
superb. 

Fruit and Vegetables. 

This was present in moderate quantity only, Mr. J. Ft'L- 
FORD, Bickley Hall Gardens, was 1st for a collection, and 
included in this a magnificent dish of British Queen Straw- 
berries. Mr. C. Birch was 2nd. Mr. Fulford was also 1st 
for one bunch of black Grapes, showing Gros Maroc, but the 
class for three bunches was won by Mr. R. Goadard, gr. to 
T. M. Whittaker, Esq., Eltham Road, Lee, with good Black 
Hamburgh, and the same exhibitor showing Buckland Sweet- 
water, won in the class for three bunched of white Grapes. 

Vegetab'es were very excellent in quality. The principal 
prize winners were Mr. Fulford, Mr. Fox and Mr. Mark 
Webster. 

Miscellaneous. 

Jones, Ryecroft Nursery, Lewisham, showed 
group of Begonias ttstefully relieved by a 
the light varieties of Ferns. Messrs. Peed 
& Sons, Roupell Park Nurseries. Upper Norwood, had a 
group of Caladiums and other choice plants. Messrs. H. Can- 
kell & Sons, Swanley, Kent, exhibited a group of Begonias 
and some sprayB of Caaua Queen Charlotte. The Agricultural 
and Horticultural Association exhibited plants that had been 



Mr. H. J. 

an excellent 
free use of 



** 



22 



THE 



GARDENERS' CHRONICLE 



[July 6, 1895. 



grown from seeds supplied by them ; and Mr. Holland, \ 
Nurseries, Lee, exhibited groups of miscellaneous plants. 

Cottagers* Exhibits .—The produce from cottagers, arran 
in one of the tents, was very satisfactory. 



KEW NOTES. 



Lemoinei 



behaviour of several other leguminiferoua plants, 
amongst which are natives even of oar own country. 
A good many years ago some scores of plants were 
put out in the wild semi- wooded part of Kew Gar- 
dens nearest Richmond. Although the soil here is 
the poorest sand, these plants have succeeded well, 
some having grown into large spreading bushes 8 to 



Of the Mock Orange. 1Q fw6 high) ftnd eyen mofe acr0M It ^ iQ f ftCt> 



and sizes. Almost the only mark they bear of 
having passed through a semi- arctic winter is that 
the majority of the Roses are a week, perhaps two 
behind time. Hence, had the show been a fortnight 
later, Colchester's best would have been yet more 
brilliant and perfect than on June 20. 

Without exaggeration, the Colchester Roiei 
were without speck or flaw of any sort. On ex 



been raised by Mons. Lemoine of Nancy, by crossing 
P. coronarius with P. microphyllus. In leaf charac- 
ters, stature, and size of flower, it is intermediate 



now in bloom there is not one possessing more the , arge§t of all the hardy Geniitai# Every July amining acre after acre, not a sign of mildew nor 

u! " C A\".?1. Il?«. "i "I. *" 8 [ h * h ! ld > hav ! D « these bushes are crowded with racemes of bright speck of rust were seen, nor a bud bored, nor a leaf 

golden yellow flowers, and amidst the surrounding browned, nor burrowed by caterpillars or maggoti, 

greenery these masses of glowing colour are particu- And yet the persistent drought and the ever-present 

, . . larly effective. The leaves are small, lanceolate, and north-east winds, are held to be the most potent 

between its parents, but besides being quite distinct, not divided- It wai introduced ai long ag0 a , 1777f fe ct0 r in the prodaction of disease. Neither hai 

" t 8UPe w°Ki aft * - ga i P a t0 61ther ° f lt- and wa8 fi 8 ared b ? Llndle y in hi " Botanical Register the trade in Colchester the means nor the will to 

parents. Whilst it is larger and more showy than in 1844i but itill rema ins quite an uncommon plant, adopt artificial watering. But they fight the drought 
P. microphallus, it has purer white flowers than Dari the la8t few arg it h howeverj been through liberal, deep culture, and a loose surface- 
P. coronarius, ana their delicate, almost pine-apple lanted more extensively. W. J. B. 

like fragrance is much to be preferred to the heavy 

perfame of that species. A circular bed about 14 
feet across in the Arboretum at Kew filled with this 
plant is now in perfect condition, and makes one of 
the most charming masses of flower to be seen in 
the garden. The shoots made last year are 2 to 2£ 
feet high, each one an erect columnar mass of pure 
white, fragrant blossom. Mons. Lemoine sent out 
this hybrid some seven or eight years ago, but its 
exquisite beauty is far from being as generally 
known as it deserves to be. 

Rosa multiflora (syn. R. polyantha). 

For the past few weeks this Asiatic Rose has been 
the most effective of all the snecies in Anwar. The 



COLCHESTEE HOSES, 1895. 

It was with many misgivings that I turned my 



blossoms 



small 



produced 



as many Rose gardens as possible. A glimpse at the 
Roses in this show was most encouraging. 

_ w The Colchester Rose and Horticultural Society 

their want of size is no defect, but adds rather to wai ■pecially favoured this year by the weather, 
the distinctive character of the species. A large thongh a soaking shower passed over the tents about 
mass of it is grown in the Rose collection at Kew, 12 o'clock. It also enjoyed the warm patronage of 
and it occurs in various other parts of the grounds. the «- Mayor, Henry Goody. Esq., and of the present 
Most strikingly, perhaps, is its beauty seen in the Mayor, E. Egerton Green, Eiq., the President of the 
Bamboo garden, where it is planted on a bank and Horticultural Society, who has been indefatigable in 

his efforts to make the Rose show one of the chief 

, features of the year. In this, assisted by the Mayoress, 

fragrance may be detected many yards away, its who presented four Medals for the four best Roses, 
cone-shaped, numerously-flowered trusses, and the he ha< admirably succeeded, and be crowned the 
fimbriated stipules at the base of the leaf, render edifice, as it were, of his other gifts by devoting his 
the species an easily recognised one. The long, Phonal service on the day of the show, and grant- 



mulch of frequently-boed soil. 

It seems that bat few of the Roses bad had their 
heads or roots protected last winter, and it was 
marvellous to see such survivals of standard per- 
petuals, and dwarf Teas— acre after acre, in well- 
head towards Colchester on the early morning of " l * e( * rowi > in robust health and highest vigour. 
June 20. I had seen many Roses cut hard by the ^e ** 0ie grounds in and around Colchester vary 
frost of February, and had many sorry tidings about somewhat in character and aspect, and in some por- 
others. And now the opportunity had come to test lions the standard Teas were hit very hard, and the 
the condition of the Roses in their great and ever dwarfs cut to the ground. Others covered their 
enlarging home in East Anglia. To this end I was standard Teas with Pea-straw, and these were saved; 
to assist as judge at the Colchester Rose, Flower, and the enormous brakes of the latter, in robust health, 
and Fruit Show. Lunch among the Roses, and with rushing into bud, were worth a journey of a hundred 

rosarians at Mr. Frank Cant's, and walk through milei *° ,ee in the%& times, when we hear such 

depressing reports of the wholesale slaughter of the 
innocent Roses in February, and the lingering, 
enfeebled life of yet larger numbers ever since. D. T.F, 



allowed to clamber over old tree-roots, forming huge 
mounds of white flowers. Its small flowers, whose 



Obitttarj!* 

S. A. WOOD8.— We regret to hear, through the 
Journal of Horticulture, of the death of Mr. Woods 
of Osberton on the 26sh ult. from poisoning. It 
appears that the deceased has suffered from gout, 
and from nervous depression. On the morning 
of his death he was in great trouble about his 
Grapes, and asked his wife to go and see them, 
remarking, " I know I shall go mad." Shortly after 

Wasp 



Z h tL^°% T* t0 ♦* ,M ? h n ' 8 ° r T 10feet iD l ' 1 ?,?;^ the "• of Jil. beaatifui grounds at resulted in hi. death. Mr. Woods, who w'as fifty- 



one season. It is a native of China, Japan, and East Hil l House, near the Castle. 



Corea, but although the double- flowered variety has So far 

k nnn L....— _ 2_ *r* * «... _ •* _i 




one, has been gardener to the Foljambe family for 



the trade were concerned, the Col- eighteen years, and has given great satisfaction 



been known in England since the early years of this Chester growers won and held the field for prizes 

century, the trae single-flowered type was introduced a^ong them, courteously changing places among 

as lately as 1875. A fine specimen is figured in the themselves, but resisting the ingress of outsiders. A * ™ L . . A 

Gardener*' Chronicle for November 26, 1887, under Mr - Benjamin Cant, the veteran grower, and founder ^1 5!L a Efei , ham ' ^ the L ft ? e of sixty-eight 
the name of Rosa polyantha. 



Alderman Masters.— The death is recorded 

x andard of this well-known 



BRACTEATA 



of the Rose industry, was 1st for thirty-six, and 
Mr. Frank Cant and the Messrs. Prior & Sons 
winning the other chief prizes. 



The deceased gardener was thrice Mayor of hii 
native borough. A few years ago he was Secretary 



to the Fruit Pests Committee, a committee of inves 
If not one of the rarj latest addition, to the AmoDg amateuri there wa. a wider competition u ^ tlon which mad « experiment, a. to the beat 
genus, this u at least one of the moet uncommon of thongh a very creditable ahare of prize, were also method " of d"t'°J«nK fruit-pests ; and before the 
*„,,»*. :„ v-^..u __.,... . ~ . . r. revision of rates, Mr. Master, was one of a deputa- 
tion who laid the view, of the gardener, before the 
,„_. _„ „.„„„,. „, uuo imu BllTer President of the Board of Trade. In every par- 
medal, presented by the Mayor... were Mia. Pern- tlcular con, »ected with the market gardening industry 
berton for a grand bloom of Horace Vernet Mr the . deceMed brought to bear an exceptional degree 



Spit sea. in Engli.h gardena. It ia a very pretty 
specua, of compact habit, growing to a height of 2 or 
6 feet (perhape more eventually), with abundant 
obovate or almost orbicular leaves, which fre- 
quently have a few ahallow teeth near the apex, 
and are of a peculiarly rich, lustroua green, 
lhe flower, are pare white, and fragrant, and 
are borne on .hort, cone-shaped corymb.. The name 
bracteata refers to a bract midway on the .talk of 
the flower ; on the lower one. it is large and leaf- 
like, becoming smaller and .mailer toward, the ter- 



won by Colchester grower., «nch a. the present 
Mayor with the energetic aecretary of the aociety, 
Mr. C. G. Orpen. The winnera of the four ailver 



minal flowera of the corymb. According to Professor 20 



O. G. Orpen for the best Tea, The Bride, Mr. 

Frank Cant for a beautiful bloom, La Fraicheur 

an award rather aeverely criticieed. Mr. Wilaon 

Marriage had the fourth medal for the beat dozen 
Roses. 

Among other fine Roses at Colchester on the 



culture. 



Journal of 



MARKET8. 



w&uv, tnis species u a native of the mountainous 
regions of ihe main bland of Japan, and among 
other places is found on the slopes of Foji-san. It 
aopears to have beeo first introduced to Europe by 
Von Sieboid. A flowering shoot is figured in the 
Gardeners' Chronicle for February 28 1*85, as S. 
media var. rotundifolia alba. It may be increased by 
means of cuttings taken as loon as the wood has 
become fairly firm [See alio H*mtley in Gardeners' 
Chronicle, June 16, 1894, p. 746. Ed.] 

Genista vibgata. 

Although a native of Madeira, this beautiful 
Geaista passed through the frosts of last February 
wrh scarcely any iojury— a marked contrast to the 



de S. A. Prince, Catherine Mermet, Jean Ducher, 
ComtessedeNadaillac, Belle Lyonnaise, and Marie Van 
Houtte. Among perpetuus, the following, among 
others, were good for colour, size, form, quality :— 
Horace Vernet, Mrs. John Laing, Duchess of Oxford, 
Dr. Andry, Dupuy Jamain, La France, Marie Baumann,' 
Madame Gabrielie Laizn, General Jacqueminot, 
Prince Arthur, John H >pper, Earl Daff-rin, Senateur 
Vaisse, Duke of Teck, Dake of Edinburgh, A. K. 
Williann, Charles Lefebvre, Grandeur of Cheshunt, 
Lady Mary Fitzwilliam, Marie Rady, &c. 

And now, after a most successful meeting of 
rosarians, and a most hospitable lunch at Braiswick, 

we are face to face with thousands and tens of 

thousands of Reset, and Briars of all possible sorts 



CO VENT GARDEN, July 4. 

Out Flowkrs.— Averaok Wholesale Pbiobs. 

t . d. s.d. # . d. 9. d. 



4 0-60 
2 6-30 
6-10 
16-26 
4 0-60 



Arums, per dozen 

blooms 

Asters, per bunch... 
Bouvardias, p. bun. 
Carnations, 12 blms. 
Buchans, per dozen 
Gardenias, per doz. 3 0-40 
Lapageria, 12 blms. 10-20 
Liiao (French), per 

bunch 

Lilies of the Valley, 

doz. sprays 
Lilium Harrisn, 

dozen 

Lilium Lancifolium, 

per dozen 

Maidenhair Fern, 

per 12 bunches ... 

Marguerites, 12 bun. 
Mignonette, 12 bun. 






. . • 



• «• 



4 6 5 

2 2 6 

3 0-40 
3 0-40 



6 0- 8 
1 T- 3 
3 0-40 



Pelargoniums, scar- 
let, per 12 tranche! 4 0-60 

— 12 sprays ... 6-09 
Orchids : — 

Cattleya, 12 bi 

Odon togloesum 

crispum t 12blm. 

Pyrethrums f 12bun. 
Boses. Tea, per doz. 

— coloured, p.dz. 

— yellow (Mare- 
ohals), per dozen 

— red, per dozen 

— red. per dozen 
bunches 

Iris, per doz. buns 
Stephanotis, dozen 

sprays 

Tuberoses. 12 blms. 



6 0-12 

3 0-60 
2 0-40 
10-20 

2 0-40 



2 0-60 

40-00 

3 0-^0 

1 6-20 
4-0 



Obckiivbloom in Tarfety 



■» 



July 6, 1895.] 



THE 



GAB BE NEB S' CEB ON I CLE, 



23 



Fbuit.— Average Wholesale Prices. 



-• • 



tit 



■ i • 



Cherries, Black 

— White 
Figs, per dozen 
Grapes, 1st quality, 

black, English, lb. 

— 2nd quality... 

— Muscats 

— Guernsey 

Melons, each 

Pine-apples, St. Mi- 
chael, each 



• • • 



••• 



••• 



«. d. s. d. 

3 0-40 
2 0-40 
2 0-40 

2 0-26 
9-10 
2 6-40 
10-16 
16-20 

2 0-60 



Peaches, 1st size, doz 

— 2nd size 

— 3rd size 
Red Currants, 

half -si eve 

— black, 

half- sieve 
Strawberries, morn- 
ing gathered, lb. 

— per peck 



»» 
per 

• •• 

per 



i.d. 
6 0- 
2 0- 
1 0- 



s. d. 

10 
4 
1 6 



• • • 



2 0-26 
4 0-46 

3-09 

2 0-26 



Pulhts di Pots.— Average Wholesale Prices. 



Adiantum, per doz. 
Aspidistra, per doz. 

— specimen, each 
Calceolaria, per doz. 
Coleus, per dozen... 
Cyperus, per dozen 
Dracaena, each 

— various, doz. 
Evergreen Shrubs, 

in variety, per 
dozen 

Ferns, small, doz.... 

Ferns, various, doz. 

Ficus elastica, each 

Foliage plants, doz. 



- 

f. 

4 
12 
5 
4 
4 
4 
1 
12 



d. s. d. 
0-12 
0-30 
0-15 
0-6 
0-6 
0-10 
0-7 6 
0-24 






6 
4 
5 
1 
9 



0-24 
0-12 
0-12 
0-7 6 
0-24 



Fuchsias, per doz. .. 
Heliotrope, per doz. 
Hydrangeas, p. doz. 
Ivy Geraniums, doz. 
Lobelia, per doz ... 
Marguerites, p. doz. 
Mignonette, p. doz. 
Palms, various, ea. 

— specimens, ea. 10 6-84 
Pelargoniums, doz. 9 0-15 
R hod an the, per doz. 
Schizanthus, per 

doz. 

Spiraeas, per doz. ... 



s. d. s. d. 

6 0-80 
4 0-60 
9 0-24 
4 0-60 
4 0-60 
6 0-90 
4 0-60 
2 O-10 



4 0-60 



6 0-90 
6 0-90 



Vegetables.-- Average 

s. d. s.d. | 



Beans, Broad, per 

sieve 10-1 6 

Beans, French, p. lb 4 
Cauliflowers, p. doz. 2 6-30 
Cucumbers, per doz. 2 0-30 
Marrows, veg„ doz. 2 6-3 0, 



Mushrooms, per lb. 
Peas, white, p. bosh. 

— blue 

Tomatos, Home- 
grown, per doz. lb. 

— Guernsey, do. 



t.d. s.d. 
6-09 

2 0-26 

3 0-36 

4 6-50 
3 0-40 



New Potatos. 



French and Channel Islands' arrivals heavy, prices lower. 

Home grown now coming in, and selling at 8s. to 105. per 
cwt. *^ 

Old Potatos. 

A few still uncleared. /. B. Thomas. 



SEEDS. 

London: July 3.— Messrs. John Shaw & Sons, Seed 
Merchants, of Great Maze Pond, Borough, London, S.B., 
write that but few buyers visited to-day's seed market, and 
their requirements were neither large nor numerous. French 
Trifolium attracts increased attention. For sowing Mustard 
and Rape seed there is a somewhat improved inquiry. Hari- 
cot Beans being exceedingly scarce, realise full prices. Blue 
Peas are harder in value. Bird-seeds at this inactive period 
show no fresh feature. Linseed steady. Buckwheat rather 
cheaper. 



FRUITS AND VEGETABLES. 

Bobouoh : July 2. -Quotations :-Peas, 2s, Gd. to 35. *2. per 
bushel; Horseradish, Is. to Is. 3d. per bundle; Apples, 
Tasmaman 4s. to 8s. per case ; Strawberries, Is. U. to U. M. 
per peck ; Gooseberries, \ s . 3d. to 1*. 9d. per half-sieve. 

Spitalfxelds : Jury 2 -Quotations: -Cabbages. 3s. to bs. 
per ta'ly; Carrots. French, 2s. ftf. to 3s. per dozen bunches; 
Turnip., at. to 3*. erf. do. ; Peas, best blues, 2*. to 2s. 6rf. per 
bushel; do., bags, 4*. 6rf. to 5..; white do., 3#. 6rf. to 4f. ; 
Broad Beans, 2s. to 2s. 6rf. per bushel. 

Stratford : July 2.-There has been an excellent supply 
of all kinds of produce at this market during the past week, 
with a good attendence of buyers, a brisk trade was done,— 
Quotations: Cabbages, Is. to 3s. per tally ; Cauliflowers, Is. to 
Is. 6rf. per dozen; Gooseberries, Is. 9rf. to 2s. 3d. per half- 
neve ; ditto, 3s. 6rf. to 4s. per flat ; Red Currants, 3s. 6rf. to 
4t. 6rf. per half-sieve ; black, ditto, 5s. to 5s. 6rf. per half- 
sieve; White Cherries, 4s. 6rf. to 5s. per half-sieve; black, 
ditto, 4s. to 4s. 6rf. per half-sieve ; Cucumbers, If. 6rf. to 
3s. 6rf. per dozen ; Green Peas, 3# . 6rf. to 5s. per bag ; ditto, 

U. 9rf. to 2s. 3d, per sieve; Onions, Egyptian, 100s. to 120s. 
per ton. 

Farringdon: Ju r y 4. -Quotations:— Apples, Tasmanian. 
8s. 6rf to 9s. 6rf. per case ; Strawberries, 2s. erf. per peck ; 
Gooseberries, 3*. 6rf. to 4s. per half-bushel ; Raspberries, 2s. 
per small basket; Cherries, 5s. per ha If- flat ; Currants, red, 
3t. to 3s. 6rf. per half-bushel ; do., black, 6s. do. ; Pine apples, 
M. 6rf. to 3s. each; Tomatos, English, 5i. per dozen (3 lb.) ; 
Cucumbers, 2s to 2s. 6rf. per dozen ; Lettuce, 9rf. per score ; 
Cabbage. 4s. 6rf. per tally; Carrots. Is. per dozen bunches. 



POTATOS. 

Borough: July 2.- Quotations: Old, 50*. to 100s. per 
ton ; New, 4s. to 10s. per cwt. 

Spitalfields : July 2. -Quotations :-01d, Lincoln Bruce, 
i-i 10s. to m ; Scotch Bruce, £d 15s. to £3 10s. New, English 
FunUns, £6 to £7 ; Hebrons, £5 10s. to £6 ; Early Rose, £5 to 
W 10s. ; Kidneys. £6 10s. to £7 per ton. 

Stratford : Ju'y 2. — Quotations : — Old, prices ranged 
»om 15s. to 80s. per ton. New : English, 120s. to 150s. ; 
Jersey 130s. to 150s. ; Cherbourg, HOs. to UQs. per ton. 

Farrikgdon : Juy 4. — Quotations :— Old : best, TO*, to 
SO/.; seconds, 40s. to 60s. per ton. New: 130*. to 150s. 
per ton. 



London Averages : July 3.— New : Hebrons, 120s, to 130s. ; 
Early Rose, 110s. to 120s. ; Jersey Kidneys, 120s. to 140s. ; 
Cherbourg, 110«. to 120s. per ton. Old z Magnums, 30s. to 
50s. per ton. 



HAY. 

Averages. — The following are the averages of the prices at 
the principal metropolitan markets during the past week :— 
Clover, prime, 90s. to 115s. ; do., inferior, 50s. to 80s. ; hay, 
best, 60s. to 92s. 6rf. ; do., inferior, 36s. to 60s. ; mixture, 70s. 
to 90s. : and straw. 15s. to 3 it. ner load. 



CORN. 

Averages.— Official statement of the average prices of 
British Corn, imperial measure Cqr.), for the week ending 
June 29, and for the corresponding period last year :— 1895 : 
Wheat, 26s. lrf. ; Barley, 20s. 3rf. ; Oats, 16s. Id. ; 1894 : 
Wheat, 24f . lrf. ; Barley, 20s. 5rf. ; Oats, 19s. 2rf. 




[The term "accumulated temperature" indicates the aggre- 
gate amount, as well as the duration, of degrees of 
temperature above or below 42° Fahx. for the period 
named: and this combined result is expressed in Day- 
degrees — a •• Day-degree ■ signifying 1° continued for 
twenty-four hours, or any other number of degrees for 
an inversely proportional number of hours. | 



s 



Temperature. 






Rainfall. 



I 




*2 



m 

hf 1 

s 



Accumulated, 



L H ^ 






5 



5 , 

O V 

s~ 



2 






3 
S 






l 



£ 



d 

9 

i 



9 • 

is 



s 

2 • • 

lis 








M 

Is 



o 



a 



• 



as 

CO 



o 

d 

'S3 

1 

I 



Bright 
Suw. 






d.2 

0)-fc3 

2 



I. 

OS 

©00 




i 



2« 

34 




Day- 

deg. 














Day- 

deg. 

■f 103 



Day- 

deg. 

+ 262 



lOths 
Inch. 

aver 



+ 3 + 415 2 + 



4- 51 

+ 12 

+ 43 

— 24 



+ 56 
+ 42 










+ 277 
+ 283 
+ 372 
+ 333 
+ 364 
+ 303 
+ 15 + 337 



6 + 
3 — 



Ins. 



108 118 9 39 

86 11-4 48 

90 jll'7 38 

79 8*5 46 



5+70 



1 



4- 6 

— 40 

- 13 



+ 275 



4 + 

aver 
1 + 



67 

88 

78 



9 5 37 

7'8| 54 

11 6j 41 
34 






1P3 



72 125 



98 



+ 195 3 + I 81 
+ 248 2 — 



86 



13 2 
14-2 



48 
33 

44 



10 9! 59 



32 

37 

34 
39 

37 
39 

35 
36 
45 
36 
38 
49 



The districts indicated by number in the first oolum 
ie following ;— 

0, Scotland, N. Principal Wheat-producing Distr 
1, Scotland, E. ; 2, England, N.E. ; 3, England 
4, Midland Counties ; 5, England, including Londo 

Principal Grazing, Afc, Districts— -6, Scotland, M? 
England, N.W, ; 8, England, S.W.; 9, Ireland 

10. Ireland, S. : *Channel Islands. 



THE PAST WEEK. 

The following summary record of the weather throughout 
the British Islands for the week ending June 29, is furnished 
from the Meteorological Office :— 

"The weather was again fine and dry during the earlier 
part of the period, but later on the conditions became showery 
and unsettled generally, with thunder and lightning in many 
places. Over our extreme south-east counties, however, the 
rain was very slight and local. During a thunderstorm on the 
26th the rainfall at Churchstoke was exceedingly heavy. 

44 The temperature was above the mean, the excess ranging 
from 2° in * England, E. and the Channel Islands,' to 5° in 
• Scotland, W. and Ireland, N.' The highest of the maxima 
were recorded during the early day* of the week, when the 
thermometer rose to 87° in ' England, S.W7 (at Llandovery), 
to 86° in the * Midland Counties ' (at Bawtry). and to between 
81° and 83° in most other parts of the Kingdom. In the 
' Channel Islands,' however, the highest reading was 79°, and 
in 4 Scotland, N. and W.,' 78°. The lowest of the minima were 
registered between the 24th and 26th, and ranged from 37° in 
•Scotland, E., f and 39° in 'England, E., and the Midland 
Counties.' to 48° in * Scotland, W„'aud to 53° in the 4 Channel 
Islands/ 



"The rainfall was again less than the mean in ' England, 
E. and S , and in the Channel Islands, as well as in Scotland, 
W.,' but just equalled the normal in 4 Scotland, N. and 
England, S.W.,' while in all other districts there was an 
exeess. At Churchstoke on the 26th, the abnormally large fall 
of 4*83 inches was recorded. 

44 The bright sunshine continued very prevalent generally, 
and exceeded the mean in all districts. The percentage of 
the possible duration ranged from 59 in the 4 Channel Islands, 
and 51 in ' England, S.,' to 34 in 4 England, N.W.,' and 33 in 
•Ireland, N."' 




Corr&pojwlenk 




**• Owing to the large increase in our circulation, we are 
reluctantly under the necessity of going to press some hours 
earlier. Our contributors, who well know what this implies, wUl 
kindly aid us by sending their communications as early in the 
week as possible. Communications should reach us not later than 
Wednesday. 

•«* Points, Fruits, etc., to be Najced.— Correspondents 
sending plants or fruits to be named, or asking questions 

demanding time and research for their solution, must not expect 
to obtain an answer to their enquiries in the current week. 
Specimens should be good ones, carefully packed and numbered, 
and not more than six should be sent at one time. Leaves only t or 
Florists varieties cannot, as a rule, be named. 

Addendum: Monarch Strawberry. We inadvertently 
omitted to mention in oar report of the last meet- 
ing of the Royal Horticultural Society that a 
First- class Certificate was awarded the above 
variety, ihown by Messrs. Laxton Bros, of Bedford. 

Annual Importations, etc f of Hardy Fruits : 
Enquirer, I. W* A summary is to be found once 
a month in oar columns. The consumption is not 
known, and cannot be known in the present con- 
dition of internal statistical information. The 
value of imports is usually given in our monthly 
tables. Falier information could be obtained from 
the reports of the Board of Trade. For your fifth 
question, we muat again refer you to your Chronicle 
p. 714, issue for June 8 this year. 



Hamburgh 



The 



inarching of an early on a late variety is seldom 
desirable ; besides, if the Muscats do not succeed 
you cannot expect that the Black Hamburgh 
would do any better on the roots of the former. 
There might be a slight trace of Muscat flavour 
imparted to the fruit by the union, and probably 
there might result a diminution of the dark purple 
colour, and maybe a toughening of the skin of the 
berries. 

Books: W. G. S. The Carnation, by E. S. DodweYI, 
published at the office of Gardening World 
1, Clement's Inn, W.C.— E Tri)nellin. Horticultural 
Handbook and Exhibitors' Guide t second edition, 
published by Blackwood & Sons, London and 
Edinburgh.— J, V. 1, The Chemistry of the Farm, 
R. Warington. Yes, apply to Secretary, Kinfc's 
College, Strand, London; 3, There is no one 
book that includes all you desire. W. G. Smiths 
Diseases of Field and Garden Crops (Macmillan). 
H. Marshall Ward's Diseases of Plants (Society for 
Promoting Christian Knowledge). 

Campanulate Foxglove: J. B m Many thanks. It 
is of frequent occurrence for several of the topmost 
flowers to become fused into one regular flower. 

Carnations: Constant Reader should know that the 
publisher has no more to do with such matters 
than the editor has with advertisements. Your 
Carnations are attacked with eel- worms. Burn 
the plants, and use fresh soil. No insecticide 
should be used on fruits approaching the ripening 
state. 

Correction.— For " germinules," on p. 791, read 
" gemmates." — Report of York Gala : Mr. 
McPherson, of Londesborough Park Gardens, 
desires us to say that it was he who took the 2 ad 
prize for black Grapes, and not Mr. J. Johnson, as 
was stated by our reporter. 

Cottage: Merton. If the cottage is gi?en you in 
part payment for services rendered, yoa will have 
to quit it when the engagement comes to an end. 

Galls on Lime Trees : H.H. The galls are the work 
of a minute midge, Cecidomyia floricola. The larva 
will be found in the centre of the gall. 

Grapes Rusted: J.B. Tte Grapes have been exposed 
to currents of cold air, or har'd firing, or the 
excessive use of sulphur whilst young. Sometimes 







24 



THE 



GARDENERS' CHRONICLE. 



[July 6, 1895. 



touching the berries with the band, or hair of the 
bead will came it. There i§ no remedy, and all 
rnited berries should be cut out as soon as noticed. 

Mildew on Vines : In Trouble. Beyond doing what 
you hare done, you might place saucers about the 
house filled with water in which flowers- of- 
tlphur bare been mixed, which will give off 
sulphurous fumes inimical to the mildew. The 
spots on the berries that you remark, are the 
dead patches of mildew. The skin thus affected 
has lost its vitality, and cannot expand as the 
berry grows in size, the comequence being tbat 
the skin will be ruptured, and the berry decay. 
When mildew attacks the fruit tbat is inevitable. 

Names of Plants: W. T. T. Idesia polycarps, 
Japan, Bixacese dioecious, Halesia tetraptera. — 
Marshall. Leaf of Poplar, Popului monilifera, the 
Canadian Poplar probably. — G. T. D Hyoicyamus 
Differ, Henbane.— J. A. Rota polyautba — Bog- 
Cotton. 1. Hjmenophyllum tunbridgense ; 2, Aspi- 
dium spinulosum ; 3, Eriopborum polystachyum ; 4, 
Cotyledon umbilicus; 5, Stellaria graminea. — W. H. 
Magnolia glauca— A. M. 1, Potentilla fruticoia ; 
2, Spiraea confuia ; 3, an evergreen Oak ; 4 Orchis 
pyrsmidalis ; 5, Orchis pyramidalis ; 6, Orcbin 
maculata — Bibes. 1, Epidendrum oncidioides; 2 
Dendrobium Pierardi; 3. Pelargonium tomentosum 
(Peppermint- scented Geranium of gardens); 4, 
Sedum Sieboldi ; 5. send in flower ; 6, Bougain- 
villea spectabilis ; 7, Gesnera bulbosa, often called 
aplendens in gardens. — J. 8. U. Kalmia angus- 
tifolia.— J. AM. Pendulous tree, Planera Richardi ; 
Rosa viridiflora, the green Rose ; the other plant 
not recogniied. 



Pea : A B. H. $ Co. 

. of the Marly. 

Tennis Lawn : G. G. 



The 



36 



Testimonial : Merton. It belonged to you, and you 
should not have parted with it. You may claim 
it, but the difficulty will lie in obtaining possession, 
if your late employer should objf ct to give it up. 

Tomato8 : A. W. E. Refer to recent numbers, where 
you will find the disease mentioned under tne head 
of "sleepy disease." 

Vines: S. A. The fungus is called Cladosporium 
viticolum. Burn all infested leaves, and mx% 
season spray with a dilute solution of Bordeaux 
Mixture at intervals of a fortnight, during the 
growth of the leaves. G. M. 

Vines not Growing : W. W. They will do no good, 
the Vine being above all things a sun-loving plant, 
and by your own showing the sun cannot shine 
on the vinery or the border for more than four 
hours a day. Fancy what that means in cloudy 
weather. All your endeavours to carry out a 
proper mode of cultivation will be fruitless. 

Vines and Mealy-bug: IK Z. Having failed to 
extirpate the pest by means of the old recipes, why 
do you not give Richards' XI All Vaporiser a 
trial. It will not do harm to the Grapes or any- 
thing else, and it is deadly to every kind of insect. 

White- flowered Rosa rtjgosa at Kbw : L. G. G. 

The plant mentioned is the variety Blanc double 
de Coubert. 



>mmunications Received.-W. R.-G. t., Versailles. 
W. H. N.-F. W. O.-C. W. D.-G. J. I,_j. A .-C. d e B. 
H. H.-G, W. E.— J. W.— 8. R. C.-D.-Reseder.— N. C, - 
H. F. H.-A. E. A.-M. M. C.-J. B.-A. P.-W. G. B.- 
R.X. H.-A. D.-E. C.-J. A.-E. J. H.-E. M.-G. H.- 
W. H. D.-T. F.-J. O-B.-D. T. F.-D. B. G.-P. F. Le 
Sueur.-A. H.— Harrison Weir.— L. de Smet-Duvivier.— 
F. R. de L., Contich (many thanks ; well known). 

HOTOGRaPHS, SPECIMENS, &C , RECEIVED, WITH THaNM.— 

E. H. J. (out of focus).— R. I. L.— L. L. t Brussels.— F. W. B. 






NTINUED INCREASE in the CIRCULATION 

"GARDENERS' CHRONICLE.' 9 

kjrtaht TO Advebtisers.— The Publisher has 
faction of announcing that the circulation of the " 
Chronicle " has, since the reduction in the price of 



t . 



Increased to tne extent of 80 per cent., and that 

it continues to increase weekly. 

Advertisers are reminded that the" Chronicle " circulates among 

COUKTBT QENTXraimr. AWD ALL CLASSES OF SARDEKKBS 

Am «abi>eh-ioyebs at kme, (hat it ha, a specially large 

fOBZiss An coiojrui otboulathw, and that it u 

preserved for reference in ail (he principal Libraries. 












FOR 



Gardens and Greenhouses. 



NO SKILLED SUPERINTENDENCE, OR BANGER. 



THE 



<f 



RIDER 



jj 



HOT-AIR ENGINE 



high. 



PENNYWORTH 



^. ..... 



Cranston's Nurseries say 
sorry to be without it now." 



We 



ery 



SOLE MAKERS : 



HAY WARD 



TYLER 




CO, 



Address : 39, QUEEN VICTORIA STREET, E.C. 





I" 

Is 

o g 

g i 

O 9 

O €♦ 



R. 



HALLIDAY & 



CO., 



HOTHOUSE BUILDERS and HOT-WATER ENGINEERS, 

ROYAL HORTICULTURAL WORKS, MIDOLETON, MANCHESTER. 

Vineries, Stoves, Greenhouses, Peach Houses, Forcing Houses, &c, constructed on our improved plan, are th« 

perfection of growing houses, and for practical utility, economy, and durability cannot be equalled. We only do one eiaai 
of work, and that the very best. . 

Conservatories and Winter Gardens designed architecturally correct without the assistance of anyone out of out 
firm, from the smallest to the largest. Hot-water Heating Apparatus, with really reliable Boilers, erected, and success 
guaranteed in all cases. Melon Frames, Sasbes, Hot Bed Boxes, &C, always in Stock. 

Plant, Estimates, and Catalogues Fret. Customers waited on in any part of the K ngdom. 

Our Maxim is and always has been— 

MODERATE CHARGES. FIRST-CLASS WORK THE BEST MATERIALS. 




-nLONDONQj 

TRADE 



Ther are used by 
Leading Growers, 
Royal Botanic So- 
ciety, Royal Horti- 
cultural Society, 
Royal Parks, Lon- 
don County Coun- 
cil, throughout the 
United Kingdom, 
and in every quar- 
ter of the globe. 



PA 



FOR 



as* 



YSANTHEMUMS 



VINE 



HOSES 







ANB 



HORTICULTURAL 
PURPOSES. 









v#$s& 



*^Ii«^ 

«*&>* 



*e 






r£& 



^ ^ Sold by 

the trftdf 

in 6d. ^d IB- 

Packets, »»* 
SEALED BAGS :- 

7 lb. 37 Qd. 14 ib. M- jf 
28 lb. 7s. 6d. 5d lb. 1». g' 
1131b.20«. Or direct from the Wort* 



United 



Cash with order 




^.V * 



Crushed Bones, Peruvian Guano 

Sulphate of Ammonia. Nitrate of Soda 

and other Manures. Tobacco Cloth and 

. Best Qualities snly. Prices on, Application 



CLAY 



& 



SON 




Manure Manufacturers, Bone Crttsbers, &c, 
Temple Mill Lane, STRATFORD, LOMDON. E 




TTWDE MAW<» 




THE COTTAGERS CALENDAR 




GARDEN 



OPERATIONS 



Twenty- 



Price 3d., 



free 3£d 



fifty, 10b. ; 



hundred 



mide payable to A. G. MARTIN, at the Post Cfic 



K.c- 



delivered, Carriage Free, in London 



hundred 



GARDENERS' CHRONICLE OFFICE, 41, WELLINGTON STREET, STRAND, 



W. 



Jolt 6, 1895.] 



THE 



GAfiDENEL'S' CJI1WNICL 



*<' 



25 



RICHARDSON 



* 





M A V Y 

1'kjzk Medals. 



HORTICULTURAL 

BUILDINGS, 

Conservatories, Gretmhuu ♦-> 
Vineries, Peach Houses 




Awarded the only 

Gold Medal for 

Horticultural Building* at the 

International Horticultural 
Exhibition, London. 



Sieve and Orchid 

Houses, &c. Also 

boilers. Pipe?*. 

and all 

Fittmg>. 



W. RICHARDSON & CO., 

DARLINGTON. 



HORTICULTURAL 

GLASS. 



A Large Stock 
always on Hand. 



Special quotations for quantities. 

WHITE LEAD, OILS, AND COLOURS 

At lowest possible prices. 

NICHOLLS & CLARKE 

, HICH STREET, SHOREDITCH, 



j 




LONDON, E. 




GREENHOUSE BLINDS 

MADE UP TO ANY SIZE. 

SHADING CANVAS and TICKING. 

BAMBOO CANES. 
GARDEN STICKS and LABELS. 

RUSSIA MATS and RAFFIA. I Qasj ^^ b \ Chronica Tmorami. — Tht 

registered Addreti for Foreign and Inland 
Telegrams it ■ ' Gardchron, London.'* 



THE GARDENERS' CHRONICLE 

PUBLI8HER'8 NOTICE8. 



TANNED GAB-DEN NETTING. 



TISSUE PATER. COCOA-FIBRE REFUSE. 

ORCHID and OTHER PEATS. 

CATALOGUE on application. 



JAMES T. ANDERSON, 

136 & 137, COMMERCIAL ST., LONDON, E. 






OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION 






Br 



HOT WATER, ENGINEERS, 

, "sri ... 

/u ust rated Catalogue free on Appl/cation 



GARDEN REQUISITES. 



COCOA-NUT FIBRE REFUSE. 



60s 



$d. per bushel ; 100 for 30*. ; truck, 

Bags, id. each. 

SPECIALLY SELECTED ORCHID PEAT. 

LIGHT BROWN FIBROUS PRAT, U . W. per tact 5 ft sacks, 
25*. ; sacks, id. each. 

BLACK FIBROUS PEAT, 6*. per sack ; 5 sacks, 22*. ; sacks, 
id. each . 

COARSE SILVER SAND, 1*. 94. per bushel; 1ft*. per half 
ton ; 26*. per ton, in 2- bushel bags, id. each. 

YELLOW FIBROUS LOAM, PEAT-MOULD, and LEAF- 
MOULD, 1*. per bushel. 

SPHAGNUM MOSS, 8*. frf. per sack. 

MANURES, GARDEN STICKS, VIRGIN CORK, TOBACCO 
CLOTH, RUS8IA MATS, Ao. Write for Price LI8T.- 
H. Q. SMYTH, 21. Goldsmith Street. Dmry Lane. W.C. 




• TAJUJS AS FIXE*. 



Thorpe's Patent 
Glazing Staple. 

Broken panes re- 
placed instantly, 
and without top 
putty. Will not 
rust. Practically 

everlasting. Sample 
gross assorted right 
and left hand, sent 
post-free, 1/9. 



OTJB WELL-KNOWlf MATTE 



GREAT REDUCTION in FRAMES I The Marriott cycie co lm 7i Queen ■ *»* ■* ■ 

WHAT Tl M E 

It s time to give over thinking that there is any 
permanent energy to be fieri veil from Alcohol, 
it s time you were turning your attention to a 
more profitable investment by sending 9 stamps to 
NEWBALL & MASON, of Nottingham, 

for a sample bottle of 




PORTABLE PUNT FRAMES. 

'heee Frames are made of the Best Materials, and can be 
together and taken apait in a few minutes by any one. 

Sizes and Prices. Glazed (id Painted. £ t. 

6 feet long, 3 feet wide 



6 feet 

12 feet 

6 feet 
12 feet 

1 2 feet 



» 



4 feet 

4 feet 

5 feet 

5 feet 

6 feet 



» 



CASH 

PRICES, 

CARRIAGE 





5 
4 
2 15 

4 15 

5 12 



d. 










6 



FOR MAKINC 

NON-INTOXICATING 



R. 



Larger 



HALLIDAY 




ROYAL HORTICULTURAL WORKS, 



CO., 



MIDDLETON, MANCHESTER. 

&»i<icrii ^en*,Mr.H.SKEMOH,Se^ 



And thus obtaining 
for yourself the 
eer vices of a perman- 
ent and rational 
in vigors tor. 

That's what o'clock 

it is! 

Of all Chemists and 

Grocers, 6d. and Is. 

per bottle. 

A 6d. bottle makes 
eight gallons. 









■ 






m 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 

SCALE of CHARGES fob ADVERTISING 



HEAD LINE CHARGED AM TWO. 



4 Line* 
6 

e 



7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
13 
13 
14 



ft 
99 

m 
t» 

PS 

m 

99 

tt 



• t 
t • 



M 



ff 



£0 S 16 Linee 

3 6 16 

4 17 

4 6 18 

6 19 

6 6 20 

6 81 

6 6 23 

7 23 

7 6 24 

8 26 ff 



• • 



• • 



• • 



• # 



£0 












8 

9 

9 

10 

10 

11 

11 

12 
12 
IS 



6 


6 



I 


6 

6 




13 6 

AMD SIXPENCE FOB EVERY ADDITIONAL LINK. 

If set across two Columns, the lowest chars;, will be 90s. 
If set acroM three Columns the lowest char*, will be SOf. 

P**e. *&; Half Page. £i 10s.; Column. £3. 

Gardeners and others Wanting Situations. 

26 words, including name and address, Is. 6d. f 
and 6d. for every additional line (about nine 
tvords) or part of a line. These A dvcrtiee- 
ments must be prepaid. This scale dots not 
apply to announcements of Vacant Situations, 
which are charged at the ordinary scale. 

Births, Deaths, and Marriages, 6s. each 
insertion. 

Notice to Advertisers.— In many instances 

Remittances in Payment of Repeat Adver- 
tisements are received without name, address, 
or anything beyond the postmark on envelope 
by which to identify the sender ; this in all 
cases causes a very great deal of trouble, and 
frequently the sender cannot be identified at all. 
Advertisers are requested when Remitting 
to give their Names and A ddr esses, and also 
a Reference to the Advertisements which they 
wish repeated. 

Position. — Advertisers are specially requested 
to note, that under no circumstances what- 
ever can any particular position be guaranteed 
for advertisements occupying less space than 
an entire column. 



Postal Orders 

and Other s.- 



To Advertisers, Subscribers, 
is very important in remit- 
ting by Postal Order that it should be filled 
in payable at GREAT QUEEN STREET, 
London, W.C, to A. G. Martin, as, unless 
the number of a Postal Order is known, and 
it has been made payable at a particular office, 
and to a particular person, it is impossible to 
prevent any person into whose hands it may 
fall from negotiating it. 

N.B. — The best and safest means of Re- 
mitting is by POST-OFFICE MONEY 
ORDER. 

Advertisements for the current week must reach 
the Office by first post, Thursday morning. 

Ill Advertisement! should bo addressed to tut 

PUBLISHER. 

Publishing Office and Office for Advertisement! 
41, Wellington Stbjiw, Stband, W.C. 

SUBSCRIPTIONS. 

All Subscriptions payable in advance. The United 
Kingdom, 12 months, 15s. : 6 months. 7s. 6d. : 



mon 



ions 



including Postage, 17 s. 6d. for 12 months. 
Post-office Orders to be made payable at 
the Post-office, Great Queen Street, London, 

W.C., to A. G. Martin. 

\cribers who experience any difficulty in ob- 
taining their copies regularly, are particu- 
larly requested to communicate with the 
Publisher (in cases of delay in the delivery 

by post, the cover should be forwarded with 
complaint). 



26 






THE 



GARDENERS' CHRONICLE. 



[Jul? G, 1895. 






RICHARDS' NOTED PEAT. 

(Trade supplied on best terms)* 

A large stock of the finest quality ORCHID PEAT. Also for 
Stove and Greenhouse Plants, Ferns, Rhododendrons, &c. By 
the sack, cubic yard, ton, or truck- load. Can be seen in bulk 
at London Wharf. Immediate despatch by any Rail or Steamer. 
Prompt and Special Quotations for delivery to any Station. 

G. H. RICHARDS, Old Shot Tower Wharf, Lambeth, 
London, S.E.; Peat Grounds and Depots, Ringwood and 
Wareham. Address all letters to London Wharf j. 



PEAT. EPPS 




PEAT. 



Specially selected for Orchids, and all kinds of Plants, by 
flack, cask, cubic-yard, ton, or truck-load. Rich fibrous LOAM, 
Coarse and Fine SILVER SAND, superior LEAF-MOULD, 
C. N. FIBRE REFUSE, SPHAGNUM MOSS, CHARCOAL, Ac. 

Special through rates to all parts. 

The Original Peat Depot, BIMGWOOD, HANTS. 



WOOD-WOOL.- WOOD- WOOL, 

The Best Material for Packing every description of Goods. 

CHAPMAN A CO., Iitd., 

CROWN WHARF, DEPTFORD, LONDON, S.E 

The Largest Manufacturers in the Kingdom. 
Large Stock of Standard Qualities. Prompt Delivery. 

Samples and Prices upon application. 



WARE & SONS' FtSSfSSii*. 



FLOWER 




SUSSEX POTTERY 
WORKS, 

UCKFIELD. 



Sstab. 1770 




For Privat* 
Gardens. 

Hundreds of 
Testimonials, 

Lists on application. 



Established 1851. 



BIRKBECK BANK 



Southampton Buildings 



9 



TWO-AND-A-HALF per Cent. INTEREST allowed on 
DEPOSITS, repayable on demand. 

TWO per Cent, on CURRENT ACCOUNTS, on the mini- 
mum monthly balances, when not drawn below £100. 

STOCKS and SHARES purchased and sold. 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT. 

¥or the encouragement of Thrift the Bank receives small 
Hums on deposit, and allows interest at the rate of TWO-AND- 
A-HALF PER CENT, per annum on each completed £1. 

BIRKBECK BUILDING SOCIETY. 

HOW TO PURCHASE A HOUSE FOR TWO GUINEAS 

PER MONTH. 

BIRKBECK FREEHOLD LAND SOCIETY. 

HOW TO PURCHASE A PLOT OF GROUND FOR FIVE 
SHILLINGS PER MONTH. 

The BIRKBECK ALMANACK, with full particulars, post- 
Tree. FRANCIS RAVENSCROFT. Manager. 



CATALOGUE RECEIVED. 

StESSRS. Krees & Labche, Tifiis. Caucasus, Russia 
Wholesale Culture and Export House ; Seeds, Bulbs, a 
Tubers of Caucasian Plant*. 



GARDENING APPOINTMENTS. 

Mr. Chas. Bloyk, as Gardener and Bailiff to Wilton 
Aixhusex, Esq., vice Mr. H. Munro deceased, after a 
service of 41 years. 

Mr. A. Grubb, formerly of Ashgrove, Sevenoaks, as Head 
Gardener to Col. Brocklehurst, Banksboro Hall, Oke- 
ham, Rutland. 

Mr. John Bates, for the last nine years Gardener to J. T. 
Harris, Esq., The Hayes, Stone, Staffordshire, has been 
appointed Gardener to Johjc Toms, Esq., at the same 
place. 




GAKDENEK (Single-handed), REQUIRED 
IMMEDIATELY. — An experienced man, to grow Table 
Plants for use in Hotel, and look after and keep in order 
Hotel Gardens and Lawns (assistance for Mowing); small 
Vinery, Stove, and Greenhouse. Only a steady, aober, indus- 
trious man need apply. No bothy.— Full particulars, and 
wages required, to Mr. LORD, Proprietor, West Cliff Hotel, 
Folkestone. 



Head Working Gardener. 
r>EQUIRED a very trustworthy and respecfc- 

lA able married Man (without encumbrance), as HEAD 
WORKING GARDENER, with three men under him. Must 
^ave an excellent character and thoroughly understand Early 
and Late Forcing and Gardening in all its branches, and Hay- 
making. Age from 30 to 40. Total abstainer preferred. Wages, 
25*. and cottage, but no extras.— Apply, in first instance, by 
letter, to Mr. HOLT, Waratah, Chislehurst, Kent. 



WANTED, thorough good SECOND, where 
Produce is Grown for Market.— Weil up in Tomatos. 
Chrysanthemums, &c. Inside and Out ; total abstainer pre- 
ferred. Capable of taking charge in absence of Gardener.— 
PaTticulars, age, and wages to A. J. BROWN. Gardener, 
School of Handicraft, Cher tsey. 

\\T ANTED, as UNDER GARDENER, a 

V V young Man, about 18 or 20 years, to attend to two 
Cows and usual work in the Garden.— Apply, stating wages 
required, room on the place, to GARDENER, Springwood, 
Dart ford, Kent. _^______ 

WANTED, a GARDENER and WIFE, 
under 40, the latter as Cook, to take charge of small 
Cottage-house. No family. Apply by letter;— R. L., 11, Man- 
chester Square, London, W. 

WANTED, a PROPAGATOR and GROWER 
Expert in Tea Roses, Ferns, and General Stock of 
Soft-wood ed Plants ; two or three assistants.— Apply, stating 
age, experience (not less than twelve years' Nursery practice), 
references, and salary expected, to STORRIE & STORRIE, 
Nurserymen, Dundee. 

WANTED, for a Market Nursery, a PRO- 
PAGATOR and GROWER of general Pot Stuff, 
Tomatos, and Cucumbers. Situation permanent to a man of 
ability. Must produce first-class references. — State age, 
wages required, &c, to TURNER BROS., Nurserymen, 
Garston, Liverpool. 

WANTED, for a small Nursery, a PRO- 
PAGATORand GROWER of General Market Stuff. 
Must be able to keep a good supply of Plants and Flowers all 
the year round. Good Tomato-grower, and well up at 
Wreaths and Bouquets. None but thorough capable men need 
apply, and must not be afraid of work. State age and wages. 
Abstainer preferred.— WM. RATTRAY, Ash Vale Nursery, 
near Aldershot. 

WANTED, a GROWER.— Must be experi- 
enced in Cucumbers, Chrysanthemums, and general 

Market Work. Permanent place, and good wages to a tho- 
roughly trustworthy man.— State age, character, experience, 
and wages expected, to GROWER, Messrs. Thyne &. Paton, 
Seedsmen, Dundee. 

WANTED, a young MAN that understands 
how to Grow Stove Plants, Ferns, and Orchids for 
Sale. Permanent place in large Nursery. Only those who 
understand the above, and of good character, need apply. — 

S. C. H., Gardeners* Chronicle Office, 41, Wellington Street, 
Strand, W.C. 

TX7 ANTED, an OUTDOOR FOREMAN. 

▼ v Must have thorough knowledge of General Nursery 
Work, and be well up in Fruit Trees, Roses, and Rhododen- 
drons. Age not to exceed 45, and the highest references 
required as regards character and capabilities. — Apply to 
WV BARRON and SON, Elvaston Nurseries, Borrowash, 
Derby. 

WANTED, AT ONCE, two experienced 
ROSE BUDDERS. State wages and references to 
TOWNSEND and SONS, Rose Growers, &c, Lower Broad- 
heath, Worcester. 

' ' -^ ^ i^ ^ — — . i ii 

WANTED, good all-round MAN, help given. 
Wages 205. with cottage. Age about 30. Married, 
without children, preferred.— Apply by letter, stating refer- 
ences, W. P., The Arches, Sutton, Surrey. 

WANTED, ONE or TWO young MEN, 
experienced in Budding and Training.— State wages 
required, &c„ to GEO. COOLING AND SONS, Nurserymen. 
Bath. J 



WANTED for the Hardy Florist's Flower 
Department (Carnations, Pansies, Herbaceous, Ac), a 
young MAtf of not less than seven years' Nursery training.— 
Apply, stating age. experience, references, and salaryexpected, 
to STORRIE & STORRIE. Nurservmen. Dundee. 



WANTED, at once, good Budder for Roses 
and Herbaceous vStuff , also good Inside Man for Soft- 
wooded Stuff — M. PAYNE, Weston-in-Gordano, Clevedon. 

ANTED, Young MAN as IMPROVER, 

Indoors, must have been used to growing for Market, 
Wages 15*. per week.— Apply to Messrs. PERKINS & SONS, 
Warwick Road Nurseries. Coventrv. 



WANTED, a smart COUNTER-HAND, 
accustomed to the Bulb Trade. Salary, 21*. per week. 
—Apply by letter to B„ 12, King Street, Covent Garden, 
London. 



WANTED, an INVOICE CLERK and 
BOOK-KEEPER.-Must be neat writer, quick, and 
accustomed to the Bulb and Plant Trade. Salary, 2hs. per 
week.-Apply by letter only, B., 12, King Street, Covent 
Garden, London. 



YY AIM TJbD, a Smart SHOPMAN in a Gen^i 

vLIi t 8 ^' ^I 9 ! 1 " 7 ' and Floral B^ness. Knowledge 
Floral Trade State wages and particulars to E. A. : 
Gardeners Chronicle Office, 41, Wellington St.. Strand. W.< 



WANTED, an ASSISTANT SHOPMAN, 

i™l* f0r Eetai1 ^ and Bulb Tiade.-State full particu- 
tors of experience and salary required, to HEWITT and CO., 
8, Worcester Street, Birmingham. 

WANTED, a good COWMAN, on a Gentle- 

in \ 1 B, J n ' s . E »tate.— Married, without family, from 36 to 

40. to look 



after a small herd 
i week. Good house 
dARTIN, Barcote. Fa 



WANT PLACES. 



F SANDER and CO. can recommend 
• several highly qualified and energetic HEAD and 
UNDER GARDENERS, of excellent character and proved 
ability; men thoroughly fitted for all the various duties o( 
their profession. For all particulars, please apply to— 

F. SANDER and CO., St. Albans. 






D 



Gardeners, farm-Bailiffs, Forester* 
ICKSONS, Royal Nurseries, Chester, are 

always in a position to RECOMMEND MEN of the 
ist respectability, and thoroughly practical at their busi- 
_ AH d articular s on application. 

3 and Postal Address— "DICKS ONS, Chester. n 



Telegraph 



RICHARD SMITH and CO. 
beg to announce that they are constantly receiving 
applications from Gardeners seeking situations, and that 
they will be able to supply any Lady or Gentleman with 
particulars, &c. — St. John's Nurseries, Worcester. 

ARDENER (Head).— Age 29; thoroughly 

practical and experienced in all branches ; good refer- 
ences, including Madresfield and Wentworth. — G. W", HOMES 
Orchard Cottages, Church Road, Malvern Link. 

ARDENER (Head).— Age 40, married; 

thoroughly experienced in ail branches. Fourteen 
years' excellent recommendation from private Gentleman.- 
N., Messrs. B. S. Williams & Sons. Nurseries, Hoiloway, N. 

GARDENER (Head), where two or more are 
kept. — Fourteen and a half years' experience. Good 
testimonials.— H. D.. Park Hill House, Stapenhill, Burton- 
on-Trent. 

GARDENER (He ad).— A Lady who is giving 
up her establishment wishes to recommend a thoroughly 
practical man as above, who has been with her fourteen years. 
—MRS. HILL, The Oaklands, Timperley, Ches hire. 

ARDENER (Bead).— Age 29; good expe- 

rience. Steady and industrious. I should have pleasure 
in reoommeLding my late Foreman (David McLenaghan) as 
above.-ROBT. GRINDROD, Whitfie ld, Hereford. __ 

ARDENER (Head), where three or mo7e 

are kept.— Age 28; highly recommended by late em- 
ployer, Sir Francis Astlej-Corbett, Bart.— H. SILK, Whiteness, 
Rroadstairs, Kent. 

GARDENER (Head of two or three).- 
B. ; Winthrop. Esq., wishes to highly recommend 
L. Lawrence, who has been with him three and a half yean. 
Age 27 ; abstainer ; life-experience. Highest references.- 
LAWRENCE, Barton Court Gardens, Kintbury, Berks 

ARDENER (Head).— Age 397^ married : 

thoroughly practical all-round Gardener, conversant 
in every department, with life thoroughly practical experience 
in Fruits, Flowers, Vegetables, &c. ThorouKbly recommended 
by present and previous employers.— G. NEWTON, 189, Corn- 
wall Road, Notting Hill, W. 

jn ARDENER (Head), where two or three are 

■"•" - V /f -Well-up in all 



GARDENER 



VJ kept, or Second in large Establishment. 

branches; life experience; highest references. 

7, Nursery Road, Turnford, Broxbourne, Herts. 

GARDENER (Head). — Age 31, married; 
thoroughly, practical in all branches. Good character. 
—A., 21, Ravensbury Cottages, Morden Road, Mi tcham, Surrey. 



GARDENER (Head Working).— With g^J 
experience and very industrious; middle age; 9«a^* 
family ; long and good character.— GARDENER, 29, J&* m 
Grove, Anerley. 

p ARDENER (Head WorkingP^^' 

VT three children, youngest age 3* ; good practical e*pe 
ence in all branches ; good characters. Near London preie • 
Please state wages.— W. A., Caryll's Lodge, Fay Gate, »*- 
Horsham* 



who has 
all branches. 



BURLEY, Hatherop, Fairford. 



d ARDENER (Head Working); *g* 32 ; e 7 

Sir Thomas Bazley wishes to recommend W. W* £ 
is been with him five year* ; thoroughly expenenceu 

GARDENER (Head Working).— M^rH 
no family ; thorough practical knowledge in all branc -» 
Inside and Out. Life experience. Good character.—*. 
20, Chestnut Road, Horley, Surrey. 




GARDENER (Head Working). 
married ; thoroughly competent in all branches ; a *^ e 
experience in large establishments. Eight years P revl0l rLj ^ 
years present situation. Can be highly recommend^- 
MERCER, Duke Street, Alderley Edge , Cheshire. 

ARDENER (Head WorkingV^^M 

no family ; thirty years' practical experience, up w 
y branch ; good references.-GARDENER, The Keen 



in every 

Silvermere, Cobham, Surrey. 



C\ ARDENER (Head Working). 

mend 
fession 

Street. High Barnet, Harts 



Xge Sty 

reed*' 




• lit 



good snyj 

character.— *• 






GARDENER (Head, or 
Handed).— Age 29, married; g__ 
19, Garden Cottages, East Street, Epsom, Surrey 

ARDENER (Head, or Single-handbp)^ 

Age 31, unmarried ; good character — aAK " 
Waye Cottage, Ashburton, Devon. 









JtJLT G, 1> ->.] 



THE GARDENERS' CHRONICLE. 



27 



GARDENER (Single-handed, or where help 
is given — Age 28, single; fourteen years' good all- 
round, practical experience. Excellent references.— W. OWEN, 

Mr. Glaze, 3, East Cottages, Queen's Road, Notting Hill, W. 

GARDENER (Single-handed, or with help). 
—Understands Vines. Peaches. Tomatos, Cucumbers, 
Flowers, Ac. Abstainer. Good character.— GARDENER, 
12. Colmer Road, South Streatham. S.W. 

GARDENER (good Single - handed). 
Age 26; thoroughly experienced in all branches of the 
profession. Inside and Out. Can be well recommended by 
present and previous employers. Total abstainer. — G. 
PUXTED, 28, John Street, Tunbridge Wells. 



GARDENER (Single-handed), all 
hand. Age 25 ; single. Life experience. - 
-\ Victoria Grove, Folkestone, Kent. 



round 

F. A., 



GARDENER (Single-handed, or where 
help is given).— Good knowledge of Flowers, Vegetables, 
and Glass. Nearly eight years' good character,— COLBERT, 
38, Histon Road, Cambridge. 

Gi ARDENER (Single-handed, or where 
I help is given) —Age 26; no objection to Horse and 
Trap. Good character. — J. FORDER, Church Passage, 
Farnham, Surrey. 

GARDENER (Single - handed or good 
Second not objected to), understands all branches; 
eigtheen years' experience.— G. S., 12, Brownlow Road, Church 
End, Finchley, N. 

GARDENER (Single-handed or otherwise). 
— Age 35, married ; understands Stove and Greenhorn e 
Plants, Flower and Kitchen Garden, Vines, Tomatos, and 
Cucumbers.— W. TAYLOR, 2, Russell Cottages, Lion Road, 
Bexley Heath, Kent. 

GARDENER (good Single-handed), or 
where help is given.— Thoroughly understands all 
branches, both Indoors and Out. Nineteen months' excellent 
character from last situation. Abstainer.— J. C., Alfred Cot- 
tages, Ewell Road, Tolworth, Surbiton. 

ARDENER — First-class testimonials from 

leading establishments in England and Ireland.— S. 
SCOTT, Rockingham, Boyle, co. Roscommon, Ireland. 

GARDENER, in any capacity. — Age 27, 
married, two in family ; understands Poultry, also 
Growing for Market. Two-and-a-half years' good character 
from present place. Total abstainer.— RENDALL, 4, Thanet 
Gardens, Warren Road, Folkestone. 



GARDENER. — A Gentleman highly recom- 
mends his late Gardener. Life experience in all 
branches, Early and Late Forcing. Age 36. married. Nine 
years in last situation.— H. HOPKINS, Claremont View, 

Camden Road, Bath. 



GARDENER, — Situation wanted by a married 
man, no incumbrances; age 25. Four years' good 
character. Wife bs good general, if required,— F. M., The 
Lodge, Tolworth, Surbiton. 



GARDENER (Market or otherwise).— Five 
and a half years Grower for Market. Good characters. 
—GARDENER, Keeper's Cottage, Yeabridge, South Petherton, 
Somerset. 



GARDENER (Second, Single-handed, or 
otherwise).— Age 26, married; five years' excellent 
character. — H. S., 18, Chatham Road. Wandsworth 
Common, S.W. 



GARDENER (Second, or Single-handed, 
where help is given).— Age 25; nine years' experience 
Inside and Out. Good references. — W. HOWdON, The 
Gardens, Pepper Arden. Northallerton. Ynrks. 



GARDENER (Second, or good Single- 
handed).— Age 27; experienced Inside and Out; good 
character.— GEO. E COLLINS, 10, Sharpens Cottages. Hiffh 
Street, Bromley, Kent. 



GARDENER (Second), in Nobleman'* 
Garden.— Age 24 ; nine years' experience. Good refer- 
ences. Been working the last four years in Mr. P. Vernon's 
Garden, Stanwick.— F. BISHOP, Ventnor House, Ruehden. 
R.S.O. 



C> ARDENER (Second), or JOURNEYMAN 
f (First), Inside. — Seven years in present situation. 
Well up in Fruit, Flowers, and Conservatory.— F. WOOD. 
Two Dales, M atlock, Derbyshire. 

ARDENER (Second), Inside and Out, where 

two or more are kept.— Age 24, single ; eighteen months' 
good character from present situation.— C. FOSTER. Lambs 
Green, Faygate, Sus sex. 

fj ARDENER (Inside).— Age 20 ; good know- 

V-A ledge of Tomato*, Strawberries, and Chrysanthemums ; 
also Ferns and Palms. Four years' experience. -A. COX, 

Mr. Green. Manea. f!«mK a 



O ARDENER (Under).— Age 21; four and 

TmiAw 1 ? years ' ex Peri«nce. Excellent character.— G. 
riLLMAN, Jun., The Woodlands, R owhill. Dartford, Kent. 

fj ARDENER (Undeb). — Strongly reoom- 

V* mended. Young and active.— Major F. BONHAM 
AHUX, Manor House, Harting, near Pet ersfield, Hants. 

fj ARDENER (Undeb), or JOURNEYMAN 

V^ m the Orchid Houses, or ASSISTANT in the Propagating 

A?ffi?Str"T Age ^ ; fiye *****' «*P*rience. Good reference. 
—JOHNSON, Junr., Shipton, Brough. 



GARDENER (Under). 
a half years' good character 



Age 21 ; three and 

Ab.tainer.-G. STEVENS, 



Street, 



GARDENER (Under).- 
experience, Inside and Out. 
abstainer— BATTIN, Woodside Lodge, Plymouth 



Age 21, single ; life 

Good character. Total 



KNIFESMAN .— Age 24, single ; good Budder 
and Grafter. Well up in the general Nursery Stock 
an<i Work. Seven years' experience. — D. O., 41, Wellington 
Street, Str and, W.C. _^ 

' PO MARKET QUO YVEKS.— GROWER, nine 

X years' experience in Grapes, Cucumbers, Tomatos, and 



General Pot Stuff. Near London preferred 
Hlackwater, Hants. 



H. MILLER, 



PROPAGATOR and GROWER.— Age 81 ; 
sixteen years* experience in Trade and Market Nurseries. 
W.. Mr S. Woods, 38, Ormond Yard, Queen Square, Blooms- 
bury, London, W.C. 

GRO W ER, or FOREMAN.— Age 24 ; Grapes, 
Cucumber?, Tomatos, Roses, Chrysanthemums. &c, in 
quantity, for Market. Good experience and reference.— 
W. R., Birchwood Lodge, Caterham Valley, Surrey. 



rpO NURSERYMEN.— Situation as MUSH- 

A ROOM GROWER, Outside and In. Fill up time in 
Nursery. Experienced Man. Age 27.— A. B. C, 41, Welling- 
ton Street, Strand, W.C. 

O NURSERYMEN.— Young man (age 25). 

requires situation as KNIFESMAN. Good Budder and 
Grafter. Life experience in English and Continental Nur- 
series. Excellent references.— H. H., 41, Wellington Street, 
Strand, W.C. 

FOREMAN and GROWER, in a Market "or 
good general Nursery.— Age 26 ; twelve years' expe- 
rience in all branches ; well up in Cucumbers, Tomatos, Chrys- 
anthemums, and general pot stuff. Good references.— H. 
PLUMMER, Curdridge. Botley. 

FOREMAN (Gknkral, or [nside), in a larfe 
establishment. — Age 29 ; highest possible references from 
last two places as Foreman, House and Table Decorations. — 

G. RAYMENT. Poles Park. Ware. Herts. 




■'«:• 



FOREMAN, Outside.— Well acquainted with 
the general routine of Outside Nursery Work, requires 
situation. Good references. Life experience in Foreign and 
English Nurseries.— T. A., 41, Wellington Street, Strand, W.C. 

OREMAN (Inside).— Age 28; twelve years' 

experience in Plant and Fruit Houses, Ac. Twice pre- 
viously as Foreman. Good references, — G. WHITE, Gatehouse, 
West well, Ashford, Kent. 

To Nurserymen. 

FOREMAN or WORKING MANAGER, 
Nineteen years' experience in general nursery work, go 
Propagator, Roses, Fruit Trees, Shrubs. Ac. Good salesman, 
experienced in the execution and despatch of orders ; six years 
in present place.— D. M. M.,9, Stanley Terrace, Havant. 

RADE FOREMAN.— Married, no family; 

good Grower and Propagator. Twenty-five years in 
Growing large Batches of Stuff. Can take charge of Fur- 
nishing, Planting, and Laying-out Abstainer.— HORTUS, 
Messrs. Ivery & Son, Reigate. 

JOURNEYMAN (First, Inside).— Age 26: 
eleven years' experience in good places; excellent refer- 
ences,— W. WOOLLEY, The Gardens. Lilford HalJ, Oundle, 
Northampton. 

JOURNEYMAN, Inside and Out, age 2L 
Knowledge of Orchids. Stove Plants, Ac. Six years' 
good character.— W. DAWSON, Springfield Street, Chelmsford, 
Essex. 



JOURNEYMAN, in the Houses. — Eight 
years' experience; good references. Two years in last 
place. For other particulars, apply to Mr. ALLEN, The 
Gardens, Norman hurst. Battle. 



JOURNEYMAN, Inside, or Inside and Out.— 
Age 24 ; seeks situation in Private Garden. Good 
references. Willing. Abstainer. — B. WICK ENS, South- 
borough Lodge, Bickley, Kent. 

J~~0 UitNE YM AN under Glass.— Mr. Connelly 
would be pleased to recommend Mark Collier, who has 
been with him nearly two years, to anyone requiring an active 
young man, as above. Age 21. Churchman.— Rhode Hill 
Gardens, Lyme Regis. 

JOURNEYMAN (First).— Mr. Brown can 
recommend F. Stickler as above, age 23. Eight years' 
good character ; well up in House- work and Chrysanthemums. 
—J. BROWN, Great Doods. Rebate. 



GARDENER'S IMPROVER, in the Houses, 
in a Gentleman's establishment preferred —Age 19; 
four years' good character.— E. C. M., 60, Laitwood Road, 
Balham, S.W, 



IMPROVER, age 21.— Advertiser would be 
pleased to recommend a young Man who has been with 
him four years as above, Total abstainer.— LBTT, Souldern 
Manor, Banbury. 

piPROVER, or GARDENER (Under). 

A Young man (age 20), seeks situation as above. Four 
years' good character. Private place preferred. — C. B., 
Highwood, Binstead Hill, I.O.W. 



— 



IMPRO V ER.— A youth (age 17$), strong and 
healthy, seeks situation in a good Garden, with or 
without bothy. Three years* experience.— GARDENER, Oak 
Bank Seal, Sevenoaks. 



1 MPROVER, Inside and Out, in a Ontlemart 

-L Garden.— Age 18; four yean* good chars r from preatat 
employer.— W. DEAN, Anlnave, Ba**<-t, Southampton. 

\f 1SS JEYKELL wishes to recommend Young 

iT-l Man, nearly 20, for suitable place ia Large private 
garden where there are Orchid* and Fruits under Glass. Five 
years* experience in PlMMUt Garden and Hon sat. Prop* gat 
Bedding Plants. Ac, knows Melon*, Cucumbers, and Tomato*, 
and has very fair knowledge of Hardy Plants and Hulbs. Tall 
and strong; eaceUent character.— JESS K BROWN, Munatead, 
God aiming. 

OLOMBIAN ORCHIDS ! Odontoglottum 

crispum, purest Pa< hi type, a specialty I EXPE- 
RIENCED COLLECTOR is open to engage with a well estab- 
lished firm and commence work without delay. Small salary 
only. Write (English, German, French, or Spanith) to 
CARLOS H. WALTER, Botanico, HONDA, Repufclfc 
Oolombia, S. America. 






TO NURbERYMKN and OTIIBK -A first- 
class Grower of Tomatos, Cucumbers, Grapes, Peaches, 
Plants, Cut Flowers, Ac, Ac , under Glass, will be ooen to 
an engsgrmont after July 15, aa MANAGER or FOREMAN. 
Near London preferred. Excellent teM imonials — N. J.. f»'i*- 
deners' Chronicle Offioe, 41 , Wellington Street, Strand, W.C. 

To Nurserymen. 

MANAGER, SALESMAN, or TRAVELLER. 
—Seventeen years' experience with good Firms; 
thorough knowledge of the Trade; good grower.— .T. W., 
5, St. John's Road, Clifton, Bristol. 

MANAGER or SALESMAN. — Thirty-five 

ivJL years' experience in Plants, Cut Flowers, and Choice 
Fruit of all kinds as grown for market. Good references.— 
W. G. B., 14, Stanbury Road, Queen's Road, Peckham, S.E. 

MAN, young, age 22, seeks situation, to look 
after Cows and help in Garden. Excellent references. 
In present situation three years.— WOODS, 31, Broomsleigh 
Street, West Hampstead, N. W. 

TO HEAD G ARDENERa— Adwrtker, age 
20, requires situation where he could learn gardening; 
strong and willing. Good references ; life abstainer.— G., 14, 



Kelaey Park Road, Beckeuham. 



TO GARDENERS.— Situation wanted (Trade 
or Private). Age 22. Good general experience Inside, 
especially Orchids; could take charge of small collection.— 
J. R , 41, Wellington Street, Strand, W.C. 

O GARDENERS.— Situation" wanted, in 

Kitchen Garden or Pleasure Ground. Age 39, married ; 
thoroughly experienced. Two years' good character from the 
Royal Gardens. Hampton Court.— W. SIMONS, The Gardens, 
Hampton Court Home, Middlesex. 

TO GARDENEKS. — Lad (age 17), seek* 
situation in the Greenhouses, willing to learn Outdoors. 
Private preferred. Three and a half years' good character 
and experience Strong, willing, obliging. Please state 
wages, with lodging or bothy.— H RANDALL, Police Station, 
Horsham. 



r PO GARDENERS, &c, 

A GROWER of Ferns. Tonuit 



TO GARDENERS — Young Mao, age 23, 
seeks situation as Second or otherwise, or would take 
Single-handed place. Good references, -— J. BARRETT, 
7, Hermitage Villas, Child's Hill, N.W. 

Situation wanted as 

GROWER of Ferns, Tomatoe, and General Pot Plants, 
Ac, eleven years' experience. Good reference. — F. W., 41, 
Wellington Street, Strand, W.C. 

OGARDENERS,— Lady Loiisa Howabd 

will recommend Wm. Auckland, a youth, age 18, who 
requires a situation in a Garden. Three and a half years in 
last situation.— WM. BUCKLAND, East Woodhay, Newbury, 
Berks. 



rpo NUKSEKYMEN.— Young Man seeks 

JL situation. Experienced among Palms, Ferns, and 
other Foliage Plants; also Flowering Plants for Market, 
Cucumbers, and Tomatos.— A., 12, Norwood Road, Reading. 



TO NURSERYMEN.— Situation wanted by 
a young Man; age 26; twelve years' experience in 
growing Pot-stuff and Cut Flowers for Market, Cucumbers, 
Tomatos, Ac. Good references.— E. B., 2, Devonshire Road, 
Bexley Heath, Kent. 

^EEUSMAN, &o.— Young Man wants situa- 
^C? tion ; good experience as above ; would prefer a little 
Florist work as wel£-M. H„ 41, Wellington St., Strand, W.C. 

LORIST.— Young Lady (age 22) requires 

situation as SALESWOMAN, or to Manage Small Shop. 
Experienced. Good references.— M, T., 41, Loudoun Road, 
South Hampstead, N.W. 

TO FLORISTS.— IMPRO \ ER, a Young Lady 
seeks re-engagement. Would prefer Florist and Fruit 
business combined. Good reference from last situation. — 
E. F., 53, Station Road, Harlesden, N. W. 



A GRAND SPECULATION, in these days of 
financial unrest, is a rare thing for people with spare 
capital to come across. It i*, therefore, refreshing to know 
that in purchasing a box of HOLLO WAY'S PILLS, good 
value for money can be obtained. They never fail to give 
instant relief from pain, and no disease can long withstand 
their purifying influence. A few appropriate doses at the 
proper period will prevent many a serious illness. Their 
primary action is upon the blood, stomach, liver, kidneys, and 
bowels. Their secondary action strengthens the nervous centres. 
No drug can be so harmless yet so antagonistic to disorders 
caused by brain worry. The most perfect reliance may be 
placed upon their regulating and renovating virtues. 



28 



THE 



GARDENERS' 



CHRONICLE. 



[July 6, 1895. 



JAMES SENDALL & CO., Limited, CAMBRIDGE 

MANUFAOTUREBS of FIRST-CLASS HOUSES for NURSERYMEN and MARKET GROWERS. 

BOILERS. VALVES. PIPES, and ALL FITTINGS— Best Make, and at the Cheapest Rates. 



) 




• 






ENGRAVED from a PHOTOGRAPH of one of our NURSERYMEN'S HOUSES, 100 feet long x 15 feet wide. 

New LISTS, with oomplete Specifications and Prices on application. HEATING- APPARATUS fixed complete, or materials only supplied. 
OUR BOILERS may be relied on to heat with the same amount of fuel nearly double the quantity of pipinff that most other Boilers will. 

Illustrated CATALOGUE of BOILERS, PIPES, &c, with full particulars of each, post-free on application. 

JAMES SENDALL & CO., Ltd., HEATING ENGINEERS, CAMBRIDGE. 




WALTERS 




CO.'S 



IMPROVED 



LATH ROLLER BLINDS 

The moat Effective 

GREENHOUSE SHADING 

yet introduced, and the cheapest in the end. 

Price on application. 
Can be had in various widths up to 15 feet. 

Sample piece sent on receipt of If. 6d. 



f 



WALTERS & CO., 

ORCHID BASKET MANUFACTURERS, 

BOUEN HOUSE. LEYTONSTONE, LONDON. E. 




THE BALLIKINRAIN 

ANT DESTROYER 



Well known as the cheapest, safest, and best ot ail insecticides 

for Killing Vermin on Plants, Animals, and Bird9. 

Used by every Orchid Grower of any note all over the World. 

A Pamphlet on its use. with full directions for Cleaning Plants, 

&c, sent free on application. 
Half-pints, 1#. 6U ; Pints, 2s. 6d. ; Quarts, 4*. 6U ; Half- 
gallons, Is. 6d. ; Gallons, 12s. 6<*. ; Five Gallon Drums, lOf. 6rf. 
per gallon, carriage paid. Manufacturer :—E. G. HUGHES, 
Victoria Street, Manchester. Sold by all Seedsmen. 



(REGISTERED). 

AN INFALLIBLE REMEDY. 



May 



667). 



In Bottles, 2s. 6d. and 3s. 6d. each. 



To be had of all Nurserymen and Seedsmen ; 



or 



from the Sole Makers, 



ALEX. CROSS 



& 



SONS, 



19, HOPE STREET, GLASGOW. 




No. 2, GLAZED PORCH, 6 ft. by 4 ft.ES 
Price about £10. Carriage paid. 



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Range of Horticultural Buildings now 
In course of erection at Hestercombe. Taunton, for 

The Hon. E W Berkeley Portman. 



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CONSERVATORIES. FERNERIES, VINERIES. 
PEACH. PLANT, ORCHID. TOMATO, & CUCUMBER 



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CHEAP 

No. 47a.— LEAN- 
No. 49a.— SPAN, 

Glazed, Painted, 



GREENHOUSES. 
■TO, 10 ft. by 7 ft. £8 10s. 

10 ft. by 8 ft. £10 10a. 
Packed, and Carriage Paid. 



**«• 



HOUSES. GARDEN FRAMES, 4c. 

BEST MATERIAL AND WORKMANSHIP. 

TM G ATF? E n D n *2 R r H ?- S AN ? T VER AND^i IN ALL STYLES 

IMATES on Application. New ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 

Carnage paid on 40*. Orders to most Goods Stations 



No. 3. GLAZED PORCH. 6ft. bjr*ft- 
Prica about £13. Carriage p«' a 



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No. 77.— LEAN-TO FRAME, 6 ft. of 4 

With Two Lights, 306- ^, 

Fit Llghta, Propagating 01V*** 

FRA.MZ8 IX KTEBY VaBIBT*- 





Editor «—--«-. -pUdta add^ ^-^ - Ad ..^ant. an, B Min « U*« * - n. PabU*e,» at th. o-. « . w^.^ Stw , t , Cogent Oardaa, Load^ „ 



Print* for tha Propriatora b 7 Mam. Bbadbcbt, Asnw, * Co. (S ^Lombart TatoW^J?„^ e S^ J ^2'*** * 4 ^! °F?' *}• ^-"l^tw Straat, Coreat Gard, 

A.BTMUB Gsobsb Mabtib. at tha Offloa, 41, WaUtaftoa Straat . Parish* 8 S Oo^ntflJd^i-^?SM rSL^I?^ ^ ,*, ^^ *» tta °"™* <* HMdls-a, - - ^ n 

mu « t <,u ram a. uorant Oardaa, la ta« laid County.— Saturday, July «. 1886. Agaut (ot Maaohaatar— JoHJf HKTWOOP. 



w.c. 




Established 



^ss^ 



a sjssss 



No. 446.— Vol. XVIII. { 



Third 
Series 




SATUKDAY, JULY 13, 1895. 




[ReRt. 



.New SP aper.f PR>ce 3d. 

I POST FHEK, tyd. 



CONTENTS. 



Bel voir Castle, hardiness 
of plants at 

Benevolent Institution, 
Gardeners' Royal 

Berlin, International 
Fruit, Win*, and Vege- 
table Exhibition at 

Book notice- 
In a Gloucestershire 
Garden 

•• Botanical Magazine "... 

Catssetum tabulare var. 
rhinophorum 

Characters, young gar- 
deners and their 

Coelogyne crista tain hang- 
ing basket 

Coombe Court, Kingston 
on-Thames 

Cotton plant in U. S. A.... 

Edinburgh Botanic Gar- 
dens, plants in flower at 

Egypt* practical garden- 
ing in 

Elmet Hall, Leeds 

Forestry — 

Natural regeneration of 
woods 
Hedysarum multijugum 
Lecture by Mr. F. Darwin 
Nursery note — 

Veitch, J., & Sons 
Obituary — 

Wills, John 
Onions 

Orchid notes and glean- 
ings 



38 
44 



■ • - 






*• t 



• - ■ 



45 



• • • 



• • • 



• • • 



&3 

44 
44 

45 

45 

36 
45 

37 

44 

40 



« ■ - 






tt* 



• • * 



. • ■ 



it* 



• • ■ 



• ■ • 



• ■>• 



• •• 



3D 

41 
60 

50 

45 
46 

34 



Orphan Fund, the Royal 

Gardeners' 
Pansies, too n 
Peach and Nectarine, a 

composite 
Peas, early ... 
Peter Colli nson 
Plants, new or note- 
worthy — 

Dendrobium Imperatrix 

Doryphora Sassafras 
Poppies, hybrid ... 
Poultry, our 

Roaes at Gloucester and 

Crystal Palace 

Rotation of crops 

Societies— 

Chertsey, Walton, and 

Weybridge Horticul- 
tural 

National Rose ... 42, 
People's Palace Horti- 
cultural 
Royal Horticultural 
Wimbledon and Dis- 
trict Horticultural 

Stocktaking 

Tomatos, th 
ease of 

Trees and shrubs — 
Magnolia Watsoni 

Week's wdik, the 
Flower g^den, the 
Fruits under glass 
Hardy fruit garden 
Kit chen garden, the 
Orchid houses, the 



44 

46 

37 
37 
36 



34 
34 
45 
46 

42 

38 



50 
46 



■ « • 



• • ■ 



. ■ a 



» r • 



• •* 



if* 



• •• 



tt* 



• • • 



if* 



48 

50 
44 

45 
46 

41 

41 
41 

40 

40 



ILLU8TRATION8. 

Catasetum tabulare var. rhinophorum 

Doryphora Sassafras 

Peach and Nectarine in one fruit 



... 



. . . 



•• . 



.. • 



... 



43 
35 
37 




NOTICE TO ADVE RTISERS. 

In consequence of the alteration of the hour of 
going to Press, consequent on the large increase 
in the circulation , it is imperative that all Copy 
for Advertisements should be received BY 

FIRST POST THURSDAY MORNING 

at the latest* 



THE GARDEN.— All who desire the greatest 
amount of success and pleasure, certainly should, during 
the season, have a d*y at CAN NELL'S (confirmative of this, 
see the last issue of the Gentleman's Journal). At no other 
Horticultural Establishment can the like number of Novelties, 
practical working, and interesting objects be seen, and so 
easily attained, as at Swanley and Eynsford. We cordially 
invite all to Come and See. 



Tne Best Present for a Gardener. 
V INES AND VINE CULTURE. 

▼ The most complete and exhaustive Treatise on 

Grapes and their Culture ever published. 

Third Edition just out. 
Price It.; post free, 5f. W. 

A. F. BARRON. Roval HVi*+inulti**>oi Q^,«f^ nv;..*.v 



IV ARCISSUS. — Grand Monarque Naroiss, and 

Al the large-flowering Jonquil, Campernelli, exceptionally 
fine home-grown Bulbs, at very low prices. 

T. GELL, Week Farm . Ventnor, Isle of Wight. 

TO FRUIT and TOMATO GROWERS 

t^t™ 8ale§ on Commission. Prompt Settlements. 

.'OHN POUPART. 2u. James Street. f!nv«nt. aawfon w c 



FOR SALE.— Six DICKSONIA ANTARO 

tttwipt A % 2 to 4 feet Stems ; also one CHAM^ROPS FOB- 
*u«ju, 5 feet high in tub, in good condition. 

KEELER, Beckenham. 







w 



OP SPRING 



SUTTON'S FLC 
CABBAGE.— The finest variety in cultivation for spring 
use. Of compact habit, having few outer leaves, firm heads of 
excellent quality. Mr. J. Hounslow, Gardener to the Most 
Hon. the Marquis of Headfort, says :— •' Your Flower of 
Spring is the best Cabbage I have seen. From seed sown 
last July I commenced cucting March 28. The quality is all 
that could be desired. Price of seed, 1*. per oz.. post free. 




SUTTON'S SEEDS GENUINE ONLY DIRECT FROM 

UTTON and SONS, THE ROYAL 

SEEDSMEN. READING. 



DOUBLE WHITE PRIM ULAS. — Strong 
plants, in 60's, 25*. per 100, free on rail for cash with 
order.— G. BENNETT. Florist. HanwelL 



H 



ENKY RIDES, Salesman, Central 

Avenue, Coven t Garden, W.C. 
Highest Market Prices. PromDtcaah. 




To the Trade. 

E R N S . — Finest Stock in the World. 

All the most useful sorts in various sizes. 

Prices, &c, on application. 
H. B. MAY, Dyson's Lane Nurseries, Upper Edmonton, 

DOUBLE WHITE PRIMULAS.— Strong 
plants, in 6V*, 20*. per 100. Strong-rooted Cuttings, 
10*. per 100. Cash with order. 

D. ANDERSON. Teddintrton Nuraerv. 8.W. 



BEGONIAS, Double and Single, for Bedding. 
Extra superb in quality. Selected large tubers. Also for 
Conservatory and Exhibition. Descriptive CATALOGUE free. 
B. R. DAVIS, Yeovil Nurseries, Som erset. 

Peaches, Nectarines, Melons, Strawberries, &a 

JOHN NATHAN, Jun., Long Market, Oovent 
Garden, W.C, is open to receive Consignments of above. 
Best price guaranteed ; 5 °/ C ommission. Bankers references. 

ARE OPPORTUNITY. — Established 

healthy CATTLEYAS, UELIAS, Slc. ; good plants and 
varieties at about a third of dealers prices. Lists. 

Mr. STAMPER, Ulverston. 



C"OR ORCHIDS of every description at 

M. Reasonable Prices, and efficient men to cultivate them, 
apply to— 

W. L. LEWIS Aim CO., 8outhgate, London. N. 

PRICE LIST free. 



Grand New Yellow Raspberry. 

-THE ttiriNKA." 

GEORGE BUNYARD and CO., Maidstone, 
beg to say, in answer to enquiries, that this fine Novelty 
will be sent out by them in 1896. 

Their fine Red Raspberry, Superlative, will be supplied this 
season at reduced prices. * 

CUPERB ORCHIDS, CHEAP.— Thousands 

<J to select from. Write for LIST, free. 

P.McARTHUR,TheLondonNursery,4,Maida Vale. London, W. 

W„ __ _ Cabbage. " . 

HEELER'S IMPERIAL 
A J ~ Earliest and Hardiest Cabbage known, having 
stood the severe winter where all others have failed. Unless 
had direct from the raiser you do not know what this variety 
is like In sealed packets only, &*.. It., and 2*. each, post-free. 

Sole Proprietor H. J. WHEELER, F.R.H.S., Seed Grower, 
Warminster. Wilts. 



OALMS, CORYPH AS and L ATANI AS 

JL Stores, 10*. per 100. Cash or exchange for Cam 
Pelargonium Cuttings, or Bedding Geraniums. 

F. ROSS St CO., Merstham. Surrey. 



VX^ ANTED to Exchange, Two Dozen Crotons 

/J "!j? ^v r , Paln ; 8 ' 9 * me nize - Nice clean stuff.— Apply 
to W. COPE, Whilton Lodge, Rugby. 



WANTED, TEA PLANTS, for tho Empire 

rvTT- ,* £? d I? Kxhlb , i tion.~Apply to FRENCH AND LaNG- 
DALE, 14, St. Dunstan's Hill. Lonrfnn 1? n 









WANTED, CARNATION CUTTINGS 
MissJoliffe. State price. Apply to— 
THOS. SMITH, Poyter's End Farm .near Hitchin. 



NOW is the TIME to PLANT PYRETI1- 
RUM3, OAILLARDIAS, DELPHINIUMS, and CANNAS. 
Catalogue of KELWA Y AND SON, Langport, Somerset. 

FERNS, FUCHSIAS, HELIOTROPES 
Campanulas. Geraniums. Ivies, in 48*s. Trade. Price 
on application.— KING and ELSOM, Comely Bank Nursery 
Waithamstow. 

TPWO LARGE HARDY PALMS, Charme^opi 

-L Fortunei and excelsa, about 10 feet high ; large Musa 
Knsete ; also several Dracaenas and Specimen Plants suitable 
for Sub tropical Gardening, for Sale. Apply— 

GUY, The Grange, Bury 8t. Edmunds. _____ 

RIMULAS! PRIMULAS! PRIMULAS! 

26th year of Distribution. 
Williams' Superb Strain, It. 6d. per dozen ; 10*. per 100. 
CINERARIAS, same price; also DOUBLE WHITE PRIM- 
ULAS, (fcf. each. Package and Carriage free for Cash with 
Order.— JOHN STEVENa. The Nurseries, Coventry. 

Important to Mushroom Growers. 

CUTHBERT'S SPECIALITY MUSHROOM 
SPAWN. Always alike; most productive. Hundreds 
of testimonials. Per bushel, 5*. 

R. and G. CUTHBERT. Seed, Bulb, and Plant Merchants, 
Southgata. N. Established 17 97. 

Paul's Nurseries, waltnam Cross" 

WM. PAUL & SON invite inspection of their 
ROSES, FRUIT TREES, and HARDY ORNAMENTAL 
TREES, now in perfection of Leaf and Bloom. Maoy new 
Roses, not to be seen elsewhere, are now in bloom. South 
entrance four minutes' walk from Waltham Cross Station, 
west entrance three minutes' walk from Theobald's Grove Sta- 
tion, G.E.R., twelve miles from Liverpool Street Station, 
London. Everything for the Garden. 

ARR'S AUTUMN-FLOWERING BULBS. 

—Send for f uU Descriptive LIST of Beautiful Autumn- 
flowering Crocuses, Colchicums (Meadow Saffrons), 
Cyclamen, Scillis, Snowflakes, &c. 

BARR'S SEEDS for present sowing. Catalogue on application. 

BARES DAFFODILS and SPRING- FLOWERING BULBS, 
Catalogues ready in August. 
BARR and SON, 12, King Street, Covent Garden. London. 



FERNS AND DECORATIVE PLANTS! 
(TRADE) .—Ferns, in 2i-inch pots. Stove and Green- 
house, 30 best selling sorts, 12*. 100 ; ditto large, in 48's, 10 best 
selling sorts, 6*. dot.; strong seedlings, 6*. 100, 50*. 1000; Adi- 
antum cuneatum, in 48's, for cutting, 6*. and 8i . doz. ; ditto, 
;°3; ™akmg large plants quickly, 16*. and 20*. 100 ; Aralias, 10*. 
100 ; Cyperus, Aralias, Grevilieas, Geraniums, in 48's, 6*. doz. ; 
Heliotrope, Fuchsias. Double Petunias, Marguerites. DouWa 
Tropaeolums, in bloom, in 48's, 8*. doz. ; Ficus, Palms, Dra- 
caenas, Crassulas, Hydrangeas, Pelargoniums, 12*. doz. Lists 
free. Packed free. Cash with order.— J. &MITH, London Fern 
Nurseries. Louirh borough Jimrtinn r^Hnn q w 



Plants Shipped to all Parts. 

W r ATSON and SCULL, 90, Lower Thames 
Street, London, E.C., give special attention to the 
receptien and forwarding of Plants and Botanical Specimens 
to and from all parts of the World. Be particular, and have 
them consigned to our Care, and save Expense and Delay. 

Dealers in Virgin Cork, Raffia, Bamboo Canes. Garden 
Sticks. Palm Seeds. Ac. 



Petroleum ! Petroleum 1 1 Petroleum ! ! ! 

DRILLIANT ILLUMINANT. 

* L™^ k £\^™ a S e P aid ' **• P* r gallon. Casks free. 
ANDREW POTTER, Melbourne Works, Wolverhampton. 
Maker to the Queen and Prince of Wales. 

By Special Appointment " 

To H.R.H. The Prince of Walks. 

\f ACKENZIE and MONCUR, Limited, 

u \ HOTHOUSE BUILDERS & HEATING ENGINEER*, Edin- 
burgh, London, and Glasgow, Plans and Estimates for all 
kinds of Horticultural Buildings, Pavilions, Summer Houses, 
ana Heating Apparatus free. Splendid Illustrated Catalogue. 

LoNPoy Office :— 50, CAM DEN ROAD, N.W. 

JT WEEKS & CO., Horticultural Builders 

« • to Her Majesty, H.R.H. the Prince of Wales. H.M. 
Wvernment. Admiialty Dept., War Dept., Royal Hort. Soc., 
Royal Botanic Soc., Parks and Public Buildings, Patentees of 
the Duplex Upright Tubular Boilers, King'sBoad, Chelsea.S. W. 



30 



THE 



GARDENERS' CHRONICLE 



[Jolt 13, 1896. 



SALE S by AUC TION . 

Friday Naxt. 

By order of Messrs. W. L. Lewis & Co. 
Marvellous Importation of ONCIDIUM TIOMNTJM, the 

grandest of all the autumn-flowering Oncidiums. 

Also the rare and beautiful 
ONCIDIUM ORISPUM ORANDIFLOEUM, 

in maenificent masses. 
Yellow and white forms of ODONTOGLOSSUM CTTROS- 
MUM, 0. INSLEAYI SPLENDENS, in fine condition ; 
together with fine masses of the somewhat scarce O. 
HASTATUM. 
Also very fine established plants, showing flower of CYPRI- 
PEDIUM CHARLESWORTHII; fine healthy plants* 
showing flower, of C. EVENOR SUPERBUM (extremely 
rare), and C. NIVEUM, beautifully grown. 
T*o healthy plants of CATTMYA REINECKIANA, 

C. HARRISONiE, in sheath, and C. CITKINA. 
CYMBIDIOM LOWIANUM VIRIL^ ^^ ^ 

CYMBIDIUM (Seedling), C. giganteum X C. elegans; 

and others. .. 

MESSRS. PROTHEROE and MORRIS will 
SELL the above by AUCTION, at their Central Sale 
Rooms, 67 and 68, Cheapside, London, B.C., on FRIDAY 
NEXT. July 19, at half-past 12 o'clock. 

On view morning of Sale, a nd Catalogues had. 

Friday Next, July 19. 

MESSRS. PROTHEROE and MORRIS will 
include in their ORCHID SALE on FRIDAY NEXT. 
July 19. Two Plants of CATTLEYA DOWIANA, •' -ROSITA. a 
supposed natural Hybrid between Do wiana and Skinneri, with 
orange petals, suffused with pink, and intense purple lip, with 

g °A toSd^fS CYPRIPEDIUM CAUDATUM WARSCE- 
WICZII, collected on the Chirigui Mountains, on the precise 
spot where Warscewicz discovered this beautiful form. Ihe 
flowers are very large. Sepals yellow with orange veins; 
petals often 30 inches Ion*, rose-purple, the large rounded 

labellum rose-purple on the face. ''_■_■■ ,. 

Also a few Plants of an UNDESCRIBED CYPRIPEDIUM, dis- 
covered with the above; and a fine lot of EPIDE£DRUM 
PRISMATOCARPUM, ONCIDIUM CHEIROPHORUM (the 

Canary Orchid). " '* _ * 

The Rare Scarlet L2ELIA MONOPHYLLA, collected in a 

new locality at 5000 feet. mm m *, . __ 

ODONTOGLOSSUM HALLII LEUCOGLOSSUM and XAN- 
THOGLOSSUM, ODONTOGLOSSUM CIRRHOSUM KLA30- 
CHORUM, EPIDENDRUM BICORNUTUM, and various other 

rare species. 

On view morning of Sale, and Catalogues had . 

Tuesday Next, July 16. 

SPECIAL SALE-HUGH LOW and CO. have pleasure in 

offering by AUCTION, through 

MESSRS. PROTHEROE and MORRIS, at 
their Central Sale Rooms. 67 and 68. Cheapside, E.C., on 
TUESDAY NEXT, 16th inst., at half- past 12 o'clock precisely, a 
superb importation of the lovely and effective DENDROBIUM 
PHAL^ENOPSIS SCHRODERIANUM, without the slightest 
Reserve. This is, without doubt, the finest consignment of 
this indispensable Orchid that has ever yet been imported, and 
we are much pleased to offer such a valuable lot of plants. 
Our Collector has spared neither pains nor expense, only 
selecting the very best plants. 

At the same time will be offered 250 plants of DENDRO- 
BIUM SPECIOSISSIMUM (Rolfe), our recent introduction 
from Mount Kina Balu, and which has not yet bloomed in 
England. The flowers are extremely handsome, being pure 
white, like D. formosum giganteum, but with orange-red 
spots instead of yellow. The flowers are very sweet-scented, 
and leaves and stems are covered with black pubescens. It 
grows on Magnolia bushes, at about 4000 feet elevation, where 
Nepenthe Rajah is also found. 

The Sale will include the lovely and wonderful BULBO- 
PHYLLUM DEAREI, 300 newlv-im ported plants of CATT- 
LEYA GASKELLIANA, CYPRIPEDIUM CHARLES- 
WORTHI, all in bud and sheath; 150 imported C. LA.W- 
RENCEANUM, CCELOGYNE DAY AN A. ODONTOGLOSSUM 
ROEZLI and ALBUM, ONCIDIUM AMPLIATUM, and other 
Choice Orchids. By Order of HUGH LOW and CO. 

Preliminary Notice. 

TWO DA YS' SALE. 

The UNSOLD PORTION of the WILSON COLLECTION 

of ORCHIDS. 

MESSRS. PROTHEROE and MORRIS have 
received instructions to SELL by AUCTION, at their 
Central Sale Rooms, 67 and 68, Cheapside, London, E.C., on 
TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY, August 27 and 28, 1895, 
without Reserve, the Unsold Portion of the WILSON COL- 
'ION of ORCHIDS. 

WITHOUT RESERVE. 
Salo contains, among others : — 
iia Kienastiana (several i Laelia elegans superba 



..ts) 

eya Sehroderse alba 

Reineekiana 

„ Wagneri 

Odontogloseum Vuyistekea- 

num 

Cattleya Gaskelliana alba 

Laelia elegans 

„ Scottiana 
Cjrprtpedium Morgan iee Bur- 

fordiense 
Lselia elegans Blenheimensis 

„ Bluntei 
prasiata 



t» 



Lycaste Skinneri alba superba 

,. „ armeniaca 
Coelogyne cristata alba 
Lycaste Skinneri imperator 
Dendrobium nobile Sanderia- 

num 
Odontogloesum deltoglos9um 
,, coronarium 

Anderson ianum vara. 
Ruckerianum van. 
aspersum 
mulus 

Schomburgkialepidissima, &c. 



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Messrs. SANDER AND CO. will offer m this Sale, Without 
the Least Reserve, a large number of grand plants of the 
very finest ORCHIDS, including the new white M bellatulum.'* 
C. BELLATULUM ALBUM, new hybrid Lselio-Cattleyas, 
a white- flowered Cattleya labiata with crimson labellum. 

I^ELIAS, CATTLEYAS, new HYBRID SOBRALIAS. 

NEW DENDROBES, CATTLEYA GIGAS SANDERS. &c. 



Exiling, Suffolk. 

MESSRS. GRIFFITHS and CHENNELL 
are favoured with instructions from the proprietor, Mr. 
Thos. Jennings, to offer for SALE by AUCTION in one , lot .at 
the Rothsay House Auction Rooms, Newmarket at 6.30 o Uock 
in the evening, on MONDAY, July 15, 1895, a Valuable 
FREEHOLD ESTATE (Tithe free and Land Tax redeemed), 
consisting of 16 a. r. 31 p. (more or less) of J?°A£"™™*»; 
tion Land of good soil, in a good state of cultivation, ano now 
used as a Market Garden and Nursery Ground, being well Planted 
with thriving trees ; also a comfortable Dwelling-house, Barn, 
Potting-Sheds, lofts. Stabling, Pump of good Water, and the 
usual Domestic Offices, and two red brick and slate built 
Cottages with good accommodation, and separated trom tne 

road by a dwarf brick wall. 1 . ,. 

The property, which is well situated, at the junction of the 
Exning and Fordham Roads, is within 2 miles of Newmarket, 
and is let on a lease expiring on September 29, 1896, to Mr. 
Robert Graham, at the low annual rental of £76. 

Particulars and Conditions of Sale may be obtained of 
Messrs. A. H. and A. RUSTON, Solicitors, Newmarket ; and 
of the Auctioneers, Rothsay House, Newmarket. 



Southend-on-Sea, Essex. 

To FLORISTS, NURSERYMEN, MARKET GARDENERS, 

and OTHERS. 

MESSRS. TALBOT and WHITE are 
favoured with instructions to SELL by AUCTION, at 
tbeir Sale Room, Cliff Town Road, Sonthend, on SATURDAY, 
July 20, 1895, commencing at 4 o'Clock precisely m the after- 
noon, the beneficial interest in the LEASE of the old- 
established NURSERY GARDENS, known as the ' BEACH 
NURSERIES," Southchurch Beach (late Heed's)/ having an 
area of about 7± Acres of Land, well stocked with choice 
Fruit Trees in full bearing, and showing well for the present 
season. The Premises include Two capital Dwelling-houses 
(one of which is let off, and produces £20 per annum) ; also, a 
Workman s Cottaare, at present let at 3s. per week ; extensive 
Vineries, 136 feet in length, planted with choice Vines, and 
heated by hot- water pipes; Peach-house, 59 feet by 12 feet; 
Greenhouses and Forcing- houses. Sheds and Out-buildings, 
and numerous useful Erections. The Land is held upon a 
Lease (14 years) direct from the Freeholder, at the very 
moderate rental of £50 per annum. 

This attractive and excellent Nursery Garden has for many 
years been justly celebrated fcr its choice Grapes and other 
Fruit, and being within 1 mile of Southend, the demand for it 
is very great. A considerable business could also be done with 

Teas and Refreshments. 

Printed particulars, with conditions of Sale, can be obtained 
of A. A. TIMBRELL, Esq., Solicitor, 24, Martin's Lane, 
Cannon Street, E.C. ; of Messrs. TIMBRELL and WILKIN- 
SON, Solicitors, Town Hall Chambers, Stratford, E. ; or of the 
Auctioneers, Auctioneers' Office s, High Street, Southend. 

HammerBWlch House, Hammerswich, near Lichfield, 

STAFFORDSHIRE. 

Large and Important UNRESERVED SALE of STOVE and 
GREENHOUSE PLANTS, ORCHIDS, CHRYSANTHE- 
MUMS, &c. 

MESSRS. POPE and SONS have received 
instructions from Job Evans, Esq. (who is removing to 
Torquay), to SELL by AUCTION, without the least reserve, 
on the Premises as above, on TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY, 
July 30 and 31, commencing each day at half-past 11 o'clock 
prompt, the whole of the STOVE and GREENHOUSE 
PLANTS, including fine specimen Lapagerias, Stephanotis, 
Maidenhair Ferns, Hoyas, Begonias, BougainviUeas, Crotons, 
Asparagus, 100 Camellias, 80 fine Azaleas, specimen Alla- 
mandas, Dipladenias, &<s. ; sixteen very fine specimen Palm* 
and Tree Ferns, also Gloxinias, Cyclamen, Euphorbias, Poin- 
settias, Geranioms, Fuchsias. Aloes, Fieus, Dracaenas, Yuccas, 
&c. ; also a very fine Collection of Orchids, 20 very fine Ccelo- 
gynes, 100 Dendrobiums, 70 Odontoglossum Alexandree ; also 
Lseiias, Cattleyas, Lycastes, Cypripediums, Oncidiums, 
Vandas, &c. ; a large quantity of Garden Sundries, including 
Pots and Pans, Tools. Lawn Mowers, Marble and Iron Vases, 

&c. ; two Marble Figures. &c. 

On view day before and mornings of Sale. 
Hammerswich House is only five minutes' walk from Ham- 
merswich Station: L. & N. W. Ry., and about 3 miles from 

Lichfield. 

Catalogues now ready, and may be had free by post from 
the Auctioneers, at their Offices, 6 f Phillips Street,Birmingham. 



ORCHIDS ! ORCHIDS ! 



JOH 



-fc 




COWAN 

(LIMITED), 




CO. 



Have just issued a New, Descriptive, and Priced 
CATALOGUE of their immense and splendid 
Stock of ORCHIDS, which they will be glad to 
send, post-free, to anyone who will send their name 
and address for that purpose to the Company. 

THE VINEYARD and NURSERIES, 

GARSTON, near LIVERPOOL. 












SPECIALITY. 



Our Collection is unrivalled. Over 1400 species and varieties 
of Stove, Greenhouse, Filmy, Hardy Exotic, and British Ferns. 
For prices of these and for specially cheap collections in beau- 
tiful variety, see our Catalogue, free on application. 



»• 



6. 

7- 
8. 
9. 

10. 

12. 



tee 



• ■ ■ 



• it 



• • • 



• •• 



Normandy Manor Estate, adjoining Wanborough 

Station, near Guildford. 
RESULT of SALE at CHEAPSIDE AUCTION MART, 

MESSRS. PROTHEROE and MORRIS 
have Sold Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 11, and 16. 
The following UNSOLD LOTS are for DISPOSAL for 
private Treaty, to wind up the Estate : 
Lot £.— Rich Herb 7 Meadows 

Rich Herby Meadows 
Fertile Arable Land 
■Valuable Fruit Farm 
Very eligible Building Land 
High Productive Farm ... 
Very Valuable Nursery and Fruit Farm, 
2 Dwelling-houses, Glass and other Erec- 
tions, Orchard Land ... 

-The Cleygate Farm (in perfect working 

order) 




• At 



• • • 



• • • 



• •» 



tit 



• •• 



• l ♦ 



I ft 



• ■ • 



• • • 



• * • 



« » < 



5 
5 

10 

5 

17 

51 



2 5 
125 
129 

3 16 
3 15 
317 



41 3 35 



I* 



13. 






■•• 



84 018 



Apply to PROTHEROE AWD MORRIS, 67 and 68, Cheapside. 

Nursery, Florists' or Gardening, 

WANTED, to PURCHASE a BUSINESS, 
within easy reach of good Markets, and not more than 
80 miles from London, plenty of Glass, or room to Build. 
Capital up to £2000.— W. CLARKSON, 5, Durham Place, 
Kensington, London. 

To Nurserymen and Florists commencing buainm 

HAMPTON-ON-THAMES, on The Marling 
Park Estate, free from London fogs, a deep rch 
loam, the favourite neighbourhood for Growers, FREEHOLD 
LAND for SALE, on easy system of payment. Excellent sites 
for residences.— For full particulars apply to Mr. FREDK. Q. 
HUGHES (Surveyor), the Estate Office, Hampton-on-Thamei. 

TO FLORISTS and GROWERS. — 16 Acres 
of FREEHOLD to be SOLD, whole or in part, or part 
could bs rented ; in a rising suburb, 14 miles out, on the 
L. & S. W. R. Produce fetches good prices. The nucleus of 
a nice little business already started. Glass, Pits, and all 
suitable buildings, Stables, and Dwelling-house. 

Apply to Messrs. W. R. HILL and CO., 5, Adelaide Street, 
Charin g Cross, S.W. _ 

FRUITERER, FLORIST, and SEED BUSI- 
NESS for SALE.-Main thoroughfare; favourite health 
resort. South Coast. High-class trade. Partnership would 
be entertained. For further particulars— 

FLORA, 41, Wellington S treet, Strand, W .C. 

To Market Gardeners, Fruit, Cut Flower, Early 

VEGETABLE. SALAD and MUSHROOM GROWfiBS, 

BUILDERS, &c. VP TT?Tn 

Situate in the pretty village of Framfield, near UCKFIELU, 

SUSSEX 

TO BE SOLD, with possession, together or 
separately, Lot 1, The RICH MEADOW, &c , 14a 2r.5p. 
with 9 superior modern Greenhouses, in all about 74,000 1 super- 
ficial feet, and 2 Houses cover J acre of ground, heated wi iu 
10.000 feet of Piping, good Boilers, &c. ; 2 Ctottagw^and otae 
Buildings. The Giass Erections cost nearly £l0 000. ±x» « 
comprises BUILDING ESTATE of upwards of 12 wrj 
having 1500 feet Building Frontage to Parish Roads; taw» 
very low. Upset price-Lot 1, £2500; Lot ^ 2. £!2u0. 

Particulars had of H. M., Messrs. PROTHEBOE **> 
MORRIS, 67, Cheapside, E.G., and Mr. PANNEM, Grocer, 
Framfield, Sussex. 

Heme Bay. Choice Position. Closo to the Railway 

STATION „ nfniTl i 

TO BE SOLD.-FRE EHOLD ESTATt, 
10a. lr. Op., having nearly 1000 feet of Building ^ n ™* 
to Main Road. High and Fertile Ground to*.™**** 
deners, Nurserymen, and Florists; 2 Large Brick Cotwi % ^ 
abundant supply of pure water. Price. »l*w.--aw »j c 
H. M., PROTHEROE & MORRIS, 67, Cheapside. LonOQPjJ^ 




O BE LET or SOLD. 



A capital NURSERY 

Low rent, or wgnW 






with small Cottage, near London. ljOW ^i^ ,v V,JTpifTTT 
sell cheap. First-rate position.— Apply to ROBT. JM^^ 
45, Plumstead Road , PI urn stead. 

Channel Islands. f v m 

COMPACT NURSERY GARDENS to h^ 
— Large Vinery, J-span Hot-house, Fruit Trees, 
Ground for 3000 feet more Glass ; Mushroom- house, 
40 feet. House on premises. Good local trade. 

FISHER, 43, New S treet, J ersey. ^ 

170R SALE, a CHATS WORTH BOILER 

X 1 30 inches long by 14 by 14, and fittings in good conai 

R. J. WOLTON, Newland Toft Nursery, Huu. 





OR ORCHIDS and 



GARDENERJ 



stock of 



to Grow them, apply to SANDER'S, St . Albans. TJH| ^ 
:of Orchids in the World.— 30 minutes from St. ra^_^. 



WANTED, PURCHASER for part or whojj 
of 4 Houees of NURSERY STOCK, ^*?*# 
about 2000 Aralia*. 1000 Lilies, 20 Ferns, var. sp*- 
Ciiveas. 1C0 Aspidistras. Cheap to clear. Tnndoa- 
Cumberland Park Nurseries, Willesden Junctio n^ ^ 

DUTCH BULBS.— We can book the foUjJ 
ing Bulbs, on condition that orders be sent a ^ 
The Bulbs are of the very best quality, and true w 



Cases and packing free on board, Rotterdam. 



Tulip Artus, 12*. per 1000 
Belle Alliance, l8f . do. 
Chrysolore, 24*. do. 
Duchesse de Parma, 13*. do. 
Keizerskroon, 20*. do. 
La Reine, 9*. do. 
Pottebakker,white, 30*. do. 

„ scarlet, 20*. do. 
Verboom, 18*. do. 
Yellow Prince, 25*. do. 



1st ** 



If 



M 

M 
M 

It 



W, & J. BIRKENHEAD, F.R.H.S., cWa^,au ™nd ( £ do! 



Named Hyacinths, 

14*. per 100 ffft # 

Spiffea japonica, «* tra ' 

per 1000 
„ Mtilboides, 70*. do. 
\. oompacta. 90*. do. ^ 

Lily of theValley cro*** 

best quality, 20*. do. ^ 
Tropeeolum tricolor, i* • 
Pseonia chinensis, i» ^ 
ferent sorts, 9*. P^r^.fl. 



FERN NURSERIES, SALE, mar MANCHESTER. 



Apply, by letter, P. V. T., 41, Wellington St., Strand 



Jult 13. 1895.] 



I HE 



GARDENERS CHRONICLE. 



31 



EXHIBITIONS. 



SALTERHEBBLE and DISTRICT ROSE 
SHOW.— THURSDAY, July 18, 1895. Schedules. &c, 
from JNO. E. BROOKS. Sec, 4, Savile Park Street, Halifax. 

"VTEWCASTLE-ON-TYNE GREAT SUM- 

±y MER FLOWER SHOW, 

Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday. July 24, 25, and 26. 1895. 

Entries close July 17. For Schedules apply to— 

Cro» Hose Chamber.. * J " <»LLB8PIB, J™ . 

Trent ham Gardens. 

THE TRENTHAM and HANFORD Hor- 
ticultural SOCIETY will hold their EIGHTH 

ANNUAL EXHIBITION on July J 

£4'K> GIVEN IN PRIZ 
GROUP OF PLANTS, for effect— l*t. £20, find Silver Cup, 

value £10 10*. \ 2nd, £ >0 ; Xr<l, £13 ; 4th, £9. 
48 CtT ROSES— 1st ai <I Special, £13 7s ; 2nd, £5; 3rd, £3. 
3*5 ,, ,, — 1st, £5, and National Rose Society's Gold 

Medal; 2nd, £3; 3rd. £1. 
COLLECTION OF FRUIT (9 dishes)— 1st, £10; 2nd, £6 % 
3rd, £3. 
4 BUNCHES OF GRAPES— 1st, £5 ; 2nd. £3 ; 3rd, £?. 
Schedules on application to Mr. L. T. ALFORD. 
Hanford, Stoke on-Trent. 

CLAY CROSS HORTICULTURAL 
^OCIKTY 

THIRTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SHOW, August 13, 1895. 

PRIZES, £i75. 
Assistant Secretary, GEORGE LAMB, 
Clay Cro's, near Chesterfield. 

BRADFORD AND DISTRICT CHRYS- 
ANTHEMUM SHOW. — FRIDAY and SATURDAY, 
November 15 and 16.— For Schedules, apply to J. COLLIER, 
Hon. Secretary, 51, Midland Hall, Frizinghall. Bradford. 

^ 

SHREWSBURY GREAT FLORAL FETE, 

AUGUST 21 and 22, 1895. 

The Society Offers this year nearly £ $00 In Prizes. 

SPECIAL CLASS FOR DECORATIVE ARRANGEMENT 

OF fruit. £51 In Prizes. 

SCHEDULES are Now Ready, and may be obtained from 
the Hon. Sec*.. Messrs. ADNITT and NAUNTON. Shrewsbury. 



TO THE TRADE. 



* t • 



• #t 



... 



. . • 



• • • 



• - 1 



ti» 



300,000 DOUBLE DAFFODILS, fine ... 
200,0r0 TRUMPET MAJOR, fii 
BOj.000 VON t SIGN, extra fine 

100.000 PAPER WHITE NAB 

100,000 DOUBLE CONSTANTINOPLE, fine... 

60,f00 WHITE ROMAN HYACINTHS, fine . 

50,000 ANEMONE FULGENS 

100,000 ALLIUM NEAPOLITJ! 

200,000 TUBEROSE, true PE^ 

£10 Orders free of freight and packing to London. 

Special LI^T jeady. 
E. FISHER. Bulb Grower and Merchant 



»• t 



• • • 



i • t 



22*. par 1000. 

22.?. 

30*. 

22s. 

22*. 

70*. 

30*. 

15*. 

45*. 



It 






»• 






DA 




FODILS. 



HOME-GROWN BULBS. 

We are now lifting our Home-grown NAR- 
CISSUS. We hold immense stocks of the 
following, amongst other kinds: 



EMPEROR 
EMPRESS 



rRINCEPS 
SIR WATKIN 



POET reus. 



Special Prices on Application, 

DICKSONS NURSERIES, CHESTER. 

WINTER-FLOWERING ZONALS 



Good 



6-inch pots, 4s. per dozen. 



SEEDLING PRIMULAS 

Extra quality. All colours, mixed. 
Is. 6d. per dozen. Free for cash with order. 



H 




JONES 



EYBCROFT NURSERY, HITHER GREEN, LEWISHAM 



EARLY 



BULBS 



Our Special Offer of Early Bulbs is Now Ready, and will be sent 
post-free on application. Prices very low. We are now lifting 

DAFFODILS, 

and can despatch orders in July for Early Planting. The 
Bulbs are really splendid, and thoroughly ripened. 

. R. PEARSONN& SONS, 

CHILWELL NURSERIES, NOTTS. 




To Noblemen and Gentlemen who require 

HIGH -CLASS SEEDS at MODERATE 
PRICKS :— 
CABBAGE— Ellam's Early Dwarf, the best early, Sd. per oz. 
Mein's No. 1, very floe solid hearts. Sd. per oz. 
Stockley's Giant Red. splendid in colour, <kf. per oz. 
LEITUCK— Bath Cos, Black Seeded, &d. per oz. 

,. Hardy Hammersmith, 6d. per oz. 
ONION— Red Italian Tripoli, Sd. per oz. 

All post-free for cash with order. 

Send for LIST, gratis on application. 

THOS. WALUKSLEY, -Tun., The City Seed Stores, Lichfield. 






- 




E E S O N ' S M 

Crushed Bones and all High-cl 

Genuine only from— 
W. H. REESON. Carbrook Bone Mills, Sheffield. 



A JN U 

Fertilisers, 



n E, 



GISIIURST COMPOUND, used since 1859 
for Red Spider, Mildew, Thrip*. Greenfly, and other 
blight ; 2 ounces to the gallon of soft water ; 4 to 1ft ounces as 
a winter dressing for Vines and Orchard-house tree**, in lather 
from cake, for American blight, and as an emulhion when 
paraffin is used. Has outlived many preparations intended to 
supersede it. Boxes, 1*., 3s., and 10s. 6rf. 

GISHURSTINE keeps Hoots dry and soft on 
wet ground. Boxes, $d. and Is., from the Trade. 
Wholesale from PRICE'S PATENT CANDLE COMPANY 
(Limited), London. 



YAPO U R RO LL 



For Greenhouse*. Cheap, safe, ami always effective for Green- 
fly, Thrip, &c. Used in nearly all the large establishments in 
England. 

Price Is., enough for 1,300 cubic feet, carriage paid. Refills 
for 3 tins, 2s. 6rf. Everyone should try them. Held under a 
Gooseberry bush every caterpillar will be on the floor in less 
than a minute. 

Manufacturer— E. G.HUGHE 3, Victoria Street, Manchester. 

Sold by all fceedsmen. 

SAVE HALF THE COST. 




BEDFORDSHIRE 
COARSE AND FINE 




Is admitted by the 
leadingNurserymen 

to be the Best 

Quality obtainable 
in the Trade. 

Consumers should Buy Direct from the Owner of these 
Celebrated and Extensive Pits, which contain a practically in- 
exhaustible supply of Splendid Sand, and thus save half the 
ordinary cost. 

Apply direct to the Proprietor for Samples and Price 

free on Rail or Canal. All Orders executed with the utmost 
promptness and under personal supervision. Special Rail- 
way Rates in force to all parts. All kinds of PBAT supplied 
at lowest possible prices. Sample Bag sent on application to 

GEO. G ARSIDE, Jun., F.R.H.S., Lelghton Buzzard, Beds. 

ORCHID PEAT; Best Quality; BROWN 
FIBROUS PEAT for Stove and Greenhouse use. BHO- 
DODENDRON and AZALEA PEAT. Samples and Prices of — 

WALKER ajcd CO., Farnborough, Hants. 

ORCHID PEAT. 

THE FINEST OBTAINABLE. 

For particulars apply to— 
D. CAMERON, Forester's Lodge, Mount Mascal, Bexley, Kent. 

Special Terms to the Trade. 



* 



WALTERS & CO.'S 



IMPROVED 



LATH ROLLER BLINDS 

The most Effective 

GREENHOUSE SHADING 

yet Introduced, and the cheapest in the end. 

Price on application. 
Can be had in various widths up to 15 feet. 

Sample piece sent on receipt of 1*. &d. 



f 



w 



& CO 



ORCHID BA8KET MANUFACTURERS 

BOURN HOUSE, LEYTONSTONE, LONDON, E. 



TVTETS— NETS.— Tanned, Oiled, Waterproof, 

-L l for protecting Strawberry Beds, Fruit Trees, Ac., from 
Birds. Makes excellent Tennis boundaries. 

20 yards. 8*. ; second quality, 5*. 
SPASHETT AiCD CO.. Net Manufacturers, Lowestoft. 



NATIVE GUANO.— Best and Cheapest 
Manure fok Gahdkh Use. Price £3 10j. per ton, in 
bags. Lots under 10 cwt., 4*. per cwt. ; 1 cwt. sample bag sent 
carriage paid to any station in England, on receipt of P. O. 
for bs. Extracts from 19th Annual Collection of Reports : — 

NATIVE GUANO FOR POTATOS, VEGETABLES, Ac. 

A. Simmons, Nurseryman, Barnet, used for Peas, Celery, 
Onions, Cabbage, Turnips, and Carrots. Results :— •* In etety 
way satisfactory." J. T. YaTKS, Coventry, used for Onions, 
Peas, Beans, and other vegetables, Strawberries, and Tomatosi 
"All crops proved satihfactory : a valuable manure, cheap, 

clean, and portable." F. J. Fletcher, Maidenhead, with 

Onions.—* 4 Results splendid ; very pleased." 

NATIVE GUANO FOR FRUIT. ROSES, TOMATOS, Ac. 

H. Gillktt, Florist. '1 FIMUls " Used for three years for 
Tomatos, Cucumbers, Begonias, Geraniums, Ferns, and Palms, 
with very goad results; prefer it to Peruvian; can highly 
recommend it as good and cheap." E. Parry, Head Gardener, 
Castlemans, says : •• I found it an excellent , cheap manure for 
Vines, Fruit trees, Roses, Carnations, Pot plants, and all 
kit* hen-garden crops/' Orders tot he Native Guano Co., Ltd* 
29, N>w Bridge Street, Blsckfriars, London, where pamphlets 
of testimonials, Ate., may be obtained. AGENTS WANTED. 

THOMSON'S 

VINE AND PUNT MANURE. 



The 



The very best for all purposes. 

result of many years' experience. Largely 
used both at home and abroad. 



Road 



Agent for London : — J. GE( 
Putney, S.W. 

Agent for Channel Islands : - 
Place, Guernsey. 

Sole Makers :— WM. THOMSON and SONS, Ltd., Tweed 
Vineyard, Clovenfords, N.B. 



J. H. PARSONS, Market 



8 



Price Lists and Testimonials on application. 

Analysis sent with orders of J-cwt. and upwards. 

OLD BY ALL SEEDSMEN. 

HUDSON'S MANURESr 

HUDSONXJBE.— The King of Fertilisers. 

Surprises all users. Recommended everywhere. 

Try it upon anything. 
Sample tins, 6d., post-free. (Fjf trial). 

HUDSON'S EQUALI8ED PERUVIAN 

GUANO. — Guaranteed of equal strength and quality 
throughout, and in a fine, dry, friable powder. Far 
superior to any. Sample tins 6rf., post-free. In bags of 
7 lb., 2s. ed.; 14 lb., 4«. ; 281b., 7s. 6d. ; li2 lb, 20s. 

FOOD FOR LILIES.— All Lilies should be 

fed with this Manure when forming buds. Ensures 
immense blooms; prevents disease. Large tins. It. 3d., 
post-free ; and in bsgs, 7 lb., 3*.; 14 lb., bs. ; 28 lb., 8s. 

The Three Finest Manures Offered. 

HUDSON'S FERTILISERS, 

KlLBURN, LONDON, N W. Correspondence invited. 

CS BEESON'S MANURE.— Composed of 
J% Blood and Bone. The best Fertiliser for all purposes. 
Sold in tins, Is., 2s. 6d. t and bs. 6d. ; also in air-tight bags, 
§ cwt., 6s. ; 1 cwt., 10s. Full directions for use sent with each 
tin and bag. 1 cwt. and above sent carriage paid, cash with 
order. C. BEESON, Bone Mills, St. Neot's, Hunts. 

• g 12, Knowle Road, Brixton, Loudon. 
m I have tried this fertiliser on various garden crops, and I 

am able to say that it is an excellent Manure for Vegetables, 
Flowers, Vines, and Fruit Trees. 

" A. B. GRIFFITHS, Ph.D., F.R.S.E., F.C.S." 



it 



EUREKA 



if 



WEED 



KILLER. 



Safe, Effective, and Cheap. 

There is no risk of poisoning Birds or Animals if directions 
are followed when applying this preparation Guaranteed to 
clear all weeds ; mixes at once ; no sediment 
bright and clean, without stains. 

£-gall., Is. 9d. ; 1 gall., 3s. (tins in 

2-gall. drums, 2s. 9d. p*»r gall.; 5-gall. drums 

10- gall, drums, 2s. 3d. per gall. ; 40 gallon* 

Double Strength, Mixes 1 to 

Sample Half Gallon Tin post free fc 

ONLY ADDRESS:— 

TOMLINSON & HAYWARD, 

MINT STREET CHEMICAL WORKS, LINCOLN. 

Wholesale London Agents: — 

OS MAN & CO., 132, Commercial Street, E. 

Ask your Chemist or seedsman for this make. 



PEAT. 




PEAT. 



Specially selected for Orchids, and all kinds of Plants, by 
sack, cask, cubio-yard, ton, or truck-load. Rich fibrous LOAM, 
Coarse and Fine SILVER SAND, superior LEAF-MOULD, 
C. N. FIBRE REFUSE, SPHAGNUM MOSS, CHARCOAL, Ao. 

Special through rates to all parts. 

The Original Peat Depot, RING WOOD, HANTS. 



32 



Th E 



GARDENERS 1 CHRONICLE. 



[Jdly 13. 1895 



THE NEW EARLY STRAWBERRY 



u 

o 



1895, 



STEVENS' WONDER. 

The earliest variety in cultivation, and very prolific, 

Solid fruit, good flavour, high perfume. 

Awarded First-class Certificates, Royal Horticultural Society 

and Royal Botanic Society, 1895. See Gardeners' Chronicle, 

March 2; Journal of Horticulture, March 14; and The Garden, 

March 16. Having purchased the whole of the Stock of this 

grand New Early Strawberry from the Raiser, we have pleasure 

in offering it as follows : — 

Strong Plants in pots ... £5 per 100 ... 1 bs. per dozen. 

Strong Runners £3 per 100 ... 9*. per dozen. 

Ready for delivery early in July. 

Early Orders requested, as Stock is Limited. 

Further particulars upon application. 

Wm. CUTBUSH & SON, Hlghgate Nurseries, London; 

And BARNET, HERTS. _____ 

FERN81-FERNS!! 

Well-grown Stuff, at Moderate Prices, 
A large quantity, in 2^-inoh pots, chiefly Pteris 

cristata ; also Alba lineata, Adiantum fulvum and pubes- 
cens, at 9*. per 100. 

Good bushy stuff in 48's. — Pteris oristata, nobilis, 

and tremula ; also Aralias, at 45. 6d. per dozen. 

The above prices are for Cash with Order only. Packing 
free. AU orders carefully and promptly executed. 



LAXTON 



5 




STRAWBERRIES 



I 



TWO GRAND NEW & DISTINCT VARIETIES FOR 1895. 

Both First-class Certificates Royal Horticultural Society. 



MONARCH. 

To follow Eoyal Sovereign. Brilliant scarlet 
colour, flavour very rioh, enormous size, 
and great cropper. Compaot habit. 



LEADER. 

Handsome main crop, rich crimson colour, of 
the largest size, fruit weighing 2 ozs.- 
Pine-like flavour. 



true 



Both equally as indispensable as Koyal Sovereign to all Growers. 



Price, open ground, £3 per 100, 12s. per dozen ; in pots, £4 per 100, 15s. per dozen. 

These Varieties can only be obtained Direct from us. 






B. PRIMROSE, 



NUR8ER1ES, ST. JOHN'S PARK, BLACKHEATH. 8.E. 



STRAWBERRIES. 

All the leading varieties, new or old, in small 
pots for fruiting first year. Open-air plants, very 
cheap. Speoial low quotations for quantities for 
Market Growing. 



Also ROYAL SOVEREIGN, price 20s. per 100 ; in pots, 27s. 6d. per 100. 

And every other variety worth growing. Lists on Application. 



LAXTON 



BROTHERS 



> 



BEDFORD 



I 




OF EVERY 



J 



DESCRIPTION 






FRUIT 



TREES 



OF ALL SORTS. SEND FOR LISTS. 



JOHN WATKINS, 

POMONA FARM NURSEKIES, WITHISGTON, HEREFORD. 






cw 



HOT WATER ENGINEERS, 



GREENHOUSE BLINDS 

MADE UP TO ANY SIZE. 

SHADING CANVAS and TICKING. 

BAMBOO CANES. 
GARDEN STICKS and LABELS. 

RUSSIA MATS and RAFFIA. 

TANNED GARDEN NETTING. 



JE PAPER 
ORCHID t 



FIBRE 



CATALOGUE on application. 



JAMES T. ANDERSON 

135 & 137, COMMERCIAL ST.. LONDON, B. 



t 







AND 











CHELSEA 



1 



LONDON 



5 



S.W. 




Telegraph—" Hortulanus," London. 



Telephone, No. 8728. 



CONSERVATORIES DESIGNED and BUILT TO SUIT ADJACENT BUILDIHCS. 

ORCHID HOUSES WITH ALL LATEST IMPROVEMENTS. 

PURPOSES. 



PLANT AND FRUIT HOUSES FOR ALL 



All Materials and Workmanship of the Best Quality. 



ALL 



KINDS 



OF 




OIL 




RS 



J 



Our Improved and other Valves, Hot-water Pipes, Castings, 

Connections and Fittings, at Lowest Retail Prices 



The Patent " DUPLEX " Upright Tubular Boilers of all Sizes, 



conditionally Guaranteed for Ten Years. 




WEEKS 




CO 




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F.B.H.S 



1 




H 




L 




E A 



f 



HORTICULTURAL BUILDERS and HOT-WATER 

APPARATUS MANUFACTURERS, 

LONDON. S.W. 



July 13, 1895.] 



THE GARDENERS 9 CHRONICLE. 



33 



i 



KENT, THE CABDEN OF E NGLAND. 

C EO RGE BUNYARD & CO. 

Beg to ask Buyers to consult their 1895 



fl 



TUESDAY NEXT, 

July 16. 



STRAWBERRY 



LIST 



Before Ordering their Supplies. Now Ready. 

Their Plants will be grand, both for Forcing, In 

little pots, and as Banners. 



Send Orders awd Enquiries direct 

THE OLD NURSERIES, MAIDSTONE 



1,000,000 PUNTS. 



SPECIAL SALE 




iii 



Covent Garden Brussels, 2s. 6d. p. 1 

Myatt's Offenham Cabbage, 2*. 6d. 
per 10OO. 

Enfield Market, *Js. 6d. per 1000. 

Drumhead Savoy, 2*. 6d. per 1000. 

Special cheap offer. Veitch's Autumn 
Giant Cauliflower, strong plants, 
3*. 6d. per 1000 ; large orders, 3#. 
Early London, same price. 

Edmond's Superb White Spring Broc- 
coli, 5*. per 1C00. 

W. HORNE, 

CLIFFE, ROCHESTER. 



HUGH 



LOW 




CO. 



Have pleasure in offering by Auction, 

through MESSRS. 



PROTHEROE 




MORRIS 



J 



AT THKIH 



STRAWBERRIES. 



ROYAL SOVEREIGN 



I 



CENTRAL SALE ROOMS, 67 and 6S, 

CHEAPSIDE, E.C., 

On TUESDAY NEXT, 16th inst., at half-past 
12 o'Clook, precisely, a superb importation of 



EMPRESS of INDIA, LORD fiUFFIELD,GUNTON PARK, | tlie lovely and effective 

AND ALL THE BEST NOVELTIES. 

Descriptive ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE Now Ready, 

Post-free on application. 

J. R. PEARSON & SONS, 

CHILWELL NURSERIES, NOTTS. 



DENDROBIUM PHAUENOPSIS 



JAPAN LILY BULBS, 

PLANTS, SEEDS, &c. 

CATALOGUE on application. 




TOKIO NURSERIES 

Komagomi, Tokio, Japan. 
Cable AddreM : M Nubseries, TOKIO." 

F. TAKAGHI. Proprietor. 



SGHRODERIANUM 



i 



LAINCS' BEGONIAS 

NOW IN FULL BLOOM. 

The PremUr House. Awarded A/ine Gold Medals, SfC. 

Unequalled as a Floral Display. Visitors are cordially invited ; 
free admission. Frequent trains from the City and West End 
to Catford and Catford Bridge, also Forest Hill Stations. 

Descriptive CATALOGUE post-free. Telephone 9660. 

JOHN LAINO A SONS, 

Begonia, Caladium, Clivia, and Gloxinia Specialist*, Seed , 

Plant, Bulb Merchants. <fec. 

FOREST HILL, S-E. . also CATFORD, Kent. 



WITHOUT THE SLIGHTEST RESERVE. 

This is without doubt the finest consignment 
of this indispensable Orchid that has ever yet 
been imported, and we are much pleased to offer 
such a valuable lot of plants. 

Our Collector has spared neither pains or 
expense, only selecting the very best plants. 



At the same time will be offered 250 plants of 



DENDROBIUM 



(ROLFE) 



SPECIOSISSIMUM 



JOHNSONS IMPROVED MUSHROOM 

SPAWN. 

BEING one of the largest 
Manufacturers of Mushroom 
Spawn, and keeping over 100 cows, 
from which I obtain a large quantity 
cf pure virgin spawn, I am in a 
position to offer the best obtainable 

at 3f. per bushel. 
Special P/ices for Large Quantities 

and the Trad«. 

HANGER HILL, EALING. 




Our recent introduction from Mount Kina Balu, 
and which has not yet bloomed in England, 

The flowers are extremely handsome, being pure 
white, like D. formosum giganteum, but with 




THE 



(fetors' optnmkk 

SATURDAY, JULY 13, 1895. 



A GLOUCESTERSHIRE GARDEN.* 

O INCE the publication, in these columns, some 
^ twenty years ago, of " A Year in a Lancashire 
Garden," there has been a succession of similar 
books. Some of these have been written with 
literary skill, but little knowledge of plants. 
Some have been more conspicuous for frothiness 
or sentimentality than for the advancement of 
knowledge. Rare, indeed, has been the combi- 
nation of an expert's knowledge and the scholar's 
reading with the fluenoy of a ready writer. 
But this is what the reader will find in the 
present volume, and having found it, he will 
assuredly, in Dickensian phrase, make a note of 
it. The work owes its existence to certain papers 
published from time to time in the Guardian. 
As now collected, they form two series, one 
dealing with the aspects of the garden in each 
month of the year, and the other with various 
categories of plants and miscellaneous cognate 
subjects. The garden is, of course, that favoured 
one in a warm corner of Gloucestershire which 
has been the object of loving attention on the 
part of two generations of plant-lovers. It is 
necessary to bear this in mind, for such a happy 
combination of circumstances is rare. 

Few things afford a better illustration of the 
character and proolivities of a man than does 
his garden. Tastes differ, opinions vary, natural 
intelligence and acquired knowledge are pos- 
sessed in the most diverse degrees, and all these 
diversities become manifest in the garden. In 
some cases the plants exist for the sake of the 
garden, in others it is the garden that is the 
casket or the setting for the plants. No hard- 
and-fast line can be drawn between the two 
categories as they occasionally blend or overlap. 
When this does occur, the result is a combina- 
tion of beauty and interest than which nothing 
more desirable can be imagined. The author of 
the present volume recognises this, for he s ates 
at the outset that "every garden has its own 

and 



special 



separate character, which arises 



FOR PRESENT ANO LATER SOWING, 



THE THREE BEST 



WALLFLOWERS 



DICK80N3 GOLDEN BEAUTY. 
DICKSONS SELECTED DARK RED, 
DICKSONS PRIMROSE DAME. 



5 



Per packet, 

6(1. and is., 

free by Post. 



Choice Mixed DOUBLE WALLFLOWER, MYOSOTIS. 
SILENES, Ac. For Prices and all other particulars, see our 
ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE, free on annlication. 



DICKSONS, 



Seed Growers. 
Nurserymen, &c, 



CHESTER. 



orange-red spots instead of yellow. The flowers part]y f rom the tastes of the owner or his gar . 

are very sweet-scented, and leaves and stems are dener> but still more from the situation, aspect, 

covered with black pubescens. It grows on and M \\ f the garden." As a general statement 

Magnolia bushes, at about 4000 feet elevation, this iSj of cour8 e, true; but it is equally true in 



where Nepenthe Rajah is also found. 



The Sale will include the lovely and woDderf ul 
BULBOPHYLLUM DEAREI, 300 newly im- 
ported plants of CATTLEYA GASKELLIANA, 



special cases, that the tastes and knowledge of 
the gardener cast their impress on the garden, 
even when the natural conditions are not pro- 
pitious. Obstacles do but serve to bring out the 
skill of the gardener. The garden at Bitton is 
known by repute to so many that some account 






CYPRIPEDIUM CHARLES WORTHI, all in of it from the author's pen will be weloome : 



bad and sheath ; 1 50 imported C. LAWRENCE- 



it 



It is not a large garden— the whole extent, 



ANUM, CCKLOGYNE DAYANA, ODONTO- including a good proportion of lawn, being about 

GLOSSUM ROEZLI and ALBUM, ONCID- an acre and a half, and in shape a parallelogram, or 

IUM AMPLIATUM, and other Choice Orchids. | double tqaare. It liei on the wost side of the 

Cotswolds, which rite about half a mile away to the 
height of 750 feet ; and about fifteen miles to the 

* In a Ghvceiterihire Garden, by Henry N. Ellacombe, MA . 
&c. (E iwar<l ArnoH, 37, Bedford Street.) 



BY ORDER OF 



HUGH LOW 




CO. 






34 



THE 



GARDENERS' CHRONICLE. 



[July 13, 1896. 



■outh are the Mendips. These two ranges of hilli 
do much to shelter us from the winds, both from the 
cold north and easterly winds and from the south- 
west winds, which in this part of England are some- 
times very violent. I attach great importance to 
this kindly shelter from the great strength of the 
winds, for plants are like ourselves in many respects, 
and certainly in this, that they can bear a very great 



attract the attention of the observer, and incite him 
to attempt to explain them. The sources of interest 
are indeed endless, and their practical application 
not to be overlooked either. " From another habit 
of many plants I get," says the Canon, "another 
object-lesson, from which I learn that plant-life 
knows no rest." With the requisite limitations, this 
is a true statement of fact, but one generally over- 



amount of frost if only the air is still, far better looked by the gardener. 



Dendrobium Impebatrix, Kbanzlin (Reichenbachit 
"** vol. ii., part xii., p. Ill, t. 95).* ' 

"This new species is very similar to Dendrobium 
Augusta Victoria, Kraozlin, and is one of the most 
stately in growth of all Dendrobiums. The stenu 
reach to a height of 6 or 7 feet. The leavei are 
comparatively small, although in other Dandrobega 
leaf of 6 to 7 inches in length by 2£ or 3 inchei in 
breadth would be considered as a rather conaiderabli 



than they can bear a less cold if accompanied with a 
high wind. The garden, then, has this advantage of 
shelter. It has also the advantage of a good aspect, 
for though the undulations are very slight, the 



The gardener will find in the present volume one. The flower-spikes rise from the axili of the 
numerous hints as to the cultivation of various upper leaves of the previous year, and very often 



plants, whilst the plant-lover, turning over its pages 
will come upon passages which will keenly excite 



exceed 2k feet in length, carrying from thirty to 
forty flowers. 



general slope faces the south ; and it has the further his sympathies. Bead this and judge whether it i t \ n impossible to do full justice to such plants in 

advantage of a rich and deep alluvial soil, which, does not express a great truth. Alluding to an the space at our command, but still the plate iilw. 
however, is so impregnated with lime and magnesia, unweeded garden, wherein "things rank and gross trates the charming delicacy of its blossoms better 
that it is hopeless to attempt Rhododendrons, Azaleas, 
Kalmias, and a host of other things. It has the 
further disadvantage of being only about 70 feet 
above the sea-leveJ, which makes an insuperable 



in Nature possess it merely," the author — a gardener, 
be it remembered, whose competence is above testi- 
mony, says : — " But I have almost an affection for 
weeds, a decided affection for some of them, and I 



than a long description. The affinities may be 
briefly described as follows : — Dendrobium veratri- 
folium, A. Rich, has shorter and broader leavei, it 
is much smaller, and its racemes very seldom exceed 



difficulty in the growth of the higher alpines. On the have not much sympathy with those who say that a 18 inches in length ; the petals are larger, and the 
whole, the garden is favourable for the cultivation of garden is not worth looking at unless it is as clean side-lobes of the labellum smaller. Dendrobium 



as a newly- 8 wept floor; it is a counsel of perfection 
which I have no great wish to reach. A weed is 
This preliminary account is defective ; the scene but a good plant in the wrong place; I say a good 
of operations is brought before us with more or less plant advisedly, having a full faith that where Nature 



flowers, and especially for the cultivation of shrubs, 
except those which dislike the lime. 



Mirbelianum, Gaudich, is also a smaller species, bat 
very closely allied ; it has a larger lip, the middle 
lobe of which is strictly lanceolate and acuminate, 
and the little spur is sharply incurved. Dendrobium 



fidelity, but the warm oolite wall is not mentioned, plants it, it fills a right place." Oh, the lessons to Augusta Victoria, Kraozlin, the most showy of the 



nor is the water supply alluded to, and nothing is be got from weeds, if we would but turn them to 
said as to the history of the garden, although its account ! 
present condition can hardly be fully understood 
without some reference to its gradual progress in 
the past. As to the gardeners, the moving spirits, 
the entire book testifies to their devotion, their 
knowledge, their skill, their thankful apprecia- 
tion. Canon Ellacombe in this volume takes us 



whole section, has petals with amethyst veins; the 

side-lobes of the lip are very blunt, and the three 

The passage above cited furnishes an illustration crests are frilled and denticulated not only in front, 



of the strengthening faith and cheery optimism 
which pervades the book, and renders it so delightful 
to read. The author finds always something in the 
garden to fl lift him higher ; " he owns he is not fond 
of frost and snow, but he recognises that they have 



but on the upper side. The rest of the section is out 

their petals 



as 



round his garden, chatting pleasantly the while on their uses, and that we might be the worse without 

plant, and their way. and apparent caprices, on .oil. them, and with a thankful spirit he make, the be.t ^001^^7^ Wm^M^^^^^^ * 

and seasons, on the endless literary suggestions even of a garden in December. M To have a garden 



of the question for comparison 

exceed the sepals by twice their length, and also by 

other essential characteristics. 

"This fine plant was discovered in German New 
Guinea, at Finchhafen, by Dr. Hollrung, and later on 



afforded by the subject. 



where nature and the climate do everything, and 



As we go on our way with the author, there is no man is called upon to do little more than scratch 

disturbing element, no inclemency of weather, no the ground and gather the flowers and fruit, might be 

hurry, no train to be met ; but there are the lawn very pleasant from one point of view, but it would 

and the noble trees, and the long series of plants of take away all that to me constitutes the real interest 



to use his own words, ' mostly on trees overhanging 
the beach. Inland it is only seldom to be found; 
and, he adds, ( it flowers probably in March— April' 
The rainy season is not sharply defined, but it 
generally rains most from June till October. It 



«^* v*-~ « v *,.~ w.^-, —v. „« v — « e «~.^» v * r*** u "° vx ™*ikc nwoj on mm, uu uit? uuiihuluocb me real interest a K^nl*i k«. «.^™« : u v. * *u ~i A «f W e\f inn« 

never-ending intere.t-there, too, i. the genial and of gardening in its difficult, and even it. die ,? D °° "* 8 ™ w " ,n ' hari * heat « Wl h P ^* t» 

light, ana after flowering receive a long, dry reio. 



appointments. 



scholarly Canon at your elbow, full of garden-lore, 
botanic knowledge, and apt allusion. Hard by is 
the well-stocked library, where is ample means of 

" verifying references." Close at band is the noble NEW OR NOTEWORTHY PLANTS. 

sixteenth-century church, but of this we must not , 

speak further than to say that it adds additional 
beauty and interest to the scene. Citation from such 
a book is a difficult matter, but to show how obser- 



Orchid Notes and Gleanings 



DORYPHORA SASSAFRAS.* 
This is a plant (tig. 6, p. 35) that finds no place in 



vant its author is we may adduce the following Nicholson's Dictionary, nor in any garden- list that we 



Arden 



passage : — 

41 As soon as it (the pistil of the Hazel) is fer- 
tilised a very curious thing happens, of which I 
know no other instance. The little flower is placed 
upon last year's wood, and if it were an Apple, or a 
Peach, or any other fruit tree, the perfect fruit would 
be there also. Bat the nut acts otherwise, it at once 
starts away from the old wood and forms behind 
itself a thin branch 4 or 5 inches long, at the end of acute, remotely -serrate glabrous leaves. The flowers 

which it ripens into a nut; and as it so travels it are shortly-stalked, solitary, or in groups of three, the 
carries with it the bract in which the flower was buds surrounded by deciduous boat-shaped bracts. 



examined 
to be rare in cultivation. It was sent to us with a 
request that we would name it, from Mr. Thompson, 

~ " "" vdegate, Eiq., M.P., Weston- 

Mr. Thomson also obligingly 
furnished us with the specimens from which our 
figure was taken. It forms a highly aromatic shrub, 
with opposite, shortly-stalked, coriaceous, elliptic- 



THE ORCHID HOUSES AT RAMBOUILLET, 

When visiting the fine establishment of M. Aug. 
Dallemagne, we were reminded that at that tim 8 
more than 150 grouDS of Orchids had been trans- 
ferred to the Bordeaux Exhibition, where they 
were very generally admired. The arrangement o 
the houses at Rambouillet comprises a 



winter 

with, 

of 



formed, and which at last becomes the pretty cup in 
which the nut lies." 

This fact must be familiar to many, but we do not 
remember to have seen any record of it. The course 
of proceedings is suiceptible of a different interpre- 
tation, but the fact remains. "Uplifting" and 
'concrescence" are, of common phenomena in 
plants. The fertilisation of the Hazel is in many 
ways precocious. The two red styles are con- 
spicuous enough at the time when the pollen 
is shed, but the observer may look in vain at that 
time for the ovules, or even for the ovary. They are 
not formed till long afterwards. The point is very 
curious, as bearing on the question whether or no 
the pollen does ever exert an influence on the various 
coverings of the seed, as well as on the embryo germ 
enclosed within them. 

The temptation ia great to dilate on other sugges- 
tive passages In Canon Eilacombe's book, on the 
germination cf seeds, the forces called into play 
(*u*\vg growth, the numberless "mysteries" that 



The perianth is about 30 mill, (say, 1£ inch) across, 
spreading, with six leathery, whitish, hirsute, 
oblong-acute segments. The stamens are nine in 
number, each with a short filament, and two small 
rounded glands at the base of the anther. Anther 
two-celled, connective, prolonged into a long slender 
awn. In the flowers we examiued the pistils were 
absent, or very imperfect; but they are described as 
numerous, free at the bottom of a cup-like receptacle. 
Each carpel has a long style, and its single cell 
contains a single ovule. 

The plant, which would require warm-greenhouse 
treatment, is by no means unattractive when in 
flower, but its chief value consists in its very aromatic 
fragrance. It is a native of Eastern Australia, New 
South Wales, and Queensland, closely allied to 
Atherosperma, and belongs to the Monimiacese. 
M. T. M. 



garden in the fore- part, a large central house 
on both sides, and opening into it, four houiei j 
similar size. This, in fact, is the plan of the esta ■ 
lishment started in Brussels by the HorticuOT 
Internationale. In the winter garden a magnince 
Kentia australis springs from a large rock-worM 
which various plants are growing. The central &o 
is full of Cattleya Warocqueana, Lselia purpurata, »» 
fine plants of unusual vigour; Angrsecum ae*<l 

Van da suavis showed equally g° 



pedale, and 
health. 

1st home : Importations of Cattleya, 



* Doiyphora Smifras. — Eodlicher, Ic, t. 10 
Bentham, FL Austral, v. (1870*), 283; Bailey, Cat 
Qutenttani (1890), p. 39. 



(1838) ; 
Plants 



ihowW 

* Dendrobium imperat'ix (§ Anten*ata), KriiazliD.— ^ 
bus aggr* gatis maximia multi-articulatis late viridibus ^ 
altis ad 2 5 cent, diametro; foliis oblongis coriaceis, * iflofis 
longis, 6 m. latis apice obtasis; racemis maxim* 8 nau 
75 cm. longU vel imo longioribua ; bracteis miimtia pe .^ 
multo Jongioribu3 basi incrassatia 5—6 cm. loogis; ^ 

lateralibus e basi paulo latiore triangulis acutis in P .^ f . 
calcar minutum curvulum connatis margine undulati?, ^ 
medio lineari undulato acuto; petalis paulo ■•^25 
r^mitortis linearibus antice paulum dilatatis obtusi* 
lobii lateralibus rhombeis margine laterali et anterior^ ^ 
culatis. intermedio vix expanso fere orbiculari noa ^ in yp 
undulato crispo acuto, disco lamellis 3 a basi ia m* dm ' 
intermedii decurrentibus ibique iu lamina* exectas ^ 
laias subito abruptas ductie, lobis lateralibus P alc ^ tbe rs 
venule* is; gynostemii parte libera brevi tridentata ^ 
plana antice minute piloeula. Nov. Guinea Orient. ^» 
in Reichenbac/iia , vol. it., tab. 95. 



July 13, 1895.] 



THE 



GARDENERS 1 CHRONICLE. 



35 



maiiea of buds. One plant of C. Mendeli had an 
unusually dark lip. 2ad house : C. gigai and aurea, 
growing splendidly. 3rd house: C. Mossise and 
Trianaei adorned the stages, and did admirably. 
Above tbe path, ai in all the other hornet, a triple 
row of hanging baskets and poti of Orchids was 

4th house: Seedlings of Cypripedium 

Phalas- 



arranged. 

and Dendrobium ; also Cypripediums, 

fine Cattleya Mossia alba, a splendid 



nopsis, a 

specimen of Cattleya Rex and Vanda Sanderiana. 

5fch house : Odontoglossums, especially crispum, un- 



magne's horticultural establishment. Another and 
tenth house is full of Cattleyas, and in reserve, in a 
very cool place, are Odontoglossum crispum, Cattleya 
and various other Orchids destined for the approach- 
ing Congress at Bordeaux. 

In a special kiosk is installed a machine worked 
by petroleum intended to draw up water for irri- 
gating. 

The entire buildings are surrounded by a fine fruit 
garden. The property was acquired by M. Dalle- 
magne in 1*92; in less than four years he has formed 



in spite of the absence of the lip, are by no means 
unattractive — indeed, there is an increase of delicacy 
and refinement resulting from the absence of strong 
colour. 

Ljelia olauca, Bent ham and Hooker, Lindenta, 
— t. cdlxv. 

The Braasavola glauca of gardens. Flowers 
5 inches across, fragrant, roundish in outline, stel- 
late, segments oblong, straw-coloured lip projecting, 
white, with a purplish blotch, convolute at the base, 




Wm, 6. — doryphora sassafras, (bee p. 34.) 



usually well cultivated. One Lselia purpurata with 
an extra dark lip ; a very beautiful Odontoglossum 
aureum. Remarkable also were the Masdevalliaa 
and the numerous examples of Cochlioda Noetz- 
liana which, suspended, formed a charming arch 
of bloom. 6th house: Odontoglossums in excel- 



lent health. 



7ch house : Odontoglossums, among 

house: still 



them many excellent varieties. 8th 
more of O. crispum, as well as Deporidium atro- 
purpureum ; a remarkable Cymbidiura eburneum ; 
a graceful Odontoglossum cirrosum, and a flower- 
ing canopy of Cochlioda Noetziiana. la addi- 
tion to these houses grouped together and show- 
ing the cunning of the master's hand, there is a ninth 
house which may ba called the cradle of M. Daile- 



a splendid collection of Orchids, which won him, at anterior lobe broadly orate acute. It is a native of 
Paris last year, the prix d'honneur from the President Mexico, and requires to be grown in a cool house as 



of the Republic. Ch. De B. 

Odontoglossum crispum. 
A correspondent sends a spike of this Orchid bear- 
ing one perfect flower, whilst four others have the 
parts arranged in pairs cross-wise, thus the two sepals 
alternate with two petals and the lip is entirely 

wanting. 

Cattlbta Mendeli. 

Baron Sir H. Schroder sends flowers of this variety 

same condition of affairs as in the 

We believe the 



a basket plant. It flowers in early spring* 

LjKuo-Cattleya varjenevskyana, Liadenia, 



t. cdlxvi. 

A hybrid between Laslia grandis an I Cattleya 

Segments rosy- lilac, anterior lobe 

It is dedicated to a 



labia ta Warneri. 



of lip frilled rich carmine. 
Russian nobleman. 



showing the 

Odontoglossum just mentioned. 

plant throws similar flowers every year. Tbe flowers, Introduced frcm Ecuador by MM. Linden, 



Odontoglossum Halli xanthinumx, Lindema, 

t. cdlxvii. 
A reputed hybrid between the two species named. 



36 



THE 



GARDENERS' CHRONICLE. 



[July 13, 1895, 



Cattleya Habdyana X vah. Lindeni, Lindenia f 

t. cdJxviii. 

A gorgeous variety, with deep rosy-lilac segments, 
lip blotched with golden yellow in the throat, with 
the anterior lobe slightly frilled, rich carmine- 
coloured. 

Cypsipbdium Littlbanum X . 

In the current number of the Orchid Review are 
given a description and an illustration of a sup- 
posed natural hybrid in the collection of Mr. 
H. Little between the Bornean C. Lawrenceanum, 
and perhaps C. Dayanum, alio Bornean, 

Orchids at Faib Oak Lodge. 

Mr. W. A. Gillett, the owner of Fair Oak, near 
Eastleigh Junction, on the London and South- 
Western Railway , is a true connoisseur of Orchids, 
and he has got together an excellent collection of 
species and good varieties of these plants. He finds 
in bis able and energetic gardener, Mr. Carr, an 
excellent cultivator. The gardener when he came 
to him fourteen years ago knew nothing of Orchids 



Iczenge-shaped. M. Loher noticed that no other He himself tells us, under data April 8, 1749, « re . 






Fhaljenopsis grew in the spot whence this new 
species was taken." 



PETER COLLINSON. 

(Continued fl 



LlNtf-B 



and correspondents of Collinson. The great Swedish 
naturalist visited England, and a life-long acquain- 
tance between the two men was formed. The 
British Museum contains copies of two letters which 
the English naturalist addressed to Linnaeus, dated 
respectively 1739 and 1767 (2 Add. MSS., 28,545, 
ff. 140, 140b), the earlier of which runs as follows : 
" Dear Friend, I could not omit so convenient an 
opportunity by my worthy friend, Dr. Dillenius, to 
enquire after your welfare, and give you joy on your 
marriage. May much happiness attend you in that 
state. I am glad of this conveyance to express my 
gratitude for the particular regard shown me iA that 
curious, elaborate work, the Hortus Cliffortianus. 



moved from my house at Feckham, in Surrey; for two 
years was transplanting my garden to my house at Mill 
Hill, called Ridgway House," " ten miles from St, 
Giles's Pound, in Holbourn." The gardens at 
Peckham and Mill Hill had attained such a high 
celebrity that a publication of Collinson'a catalogue 
appears to have been called for by some of the moit 
distinguished naturalists of the time ; and the reason 
for this non-compliance with their wishes is thai 
given in a letter of his, dated May 12, 1756, to Lin- 
naus: — "You must remember I am a merchant^ 
man of great business, with many affairs in my head 
and on my hands. I can never pretend to publish a 
catalogue of my garden unless I had one of your 
ingenious pupils to digest or methodize for me." 

Collinson began early to keep an alphabetical 
register of the plants which he cultivated. At his death 
in 1768 the catalogue,which had by himself been bound 
up with the seventh folio edition of Miller's Die* 
tionary, passed into the possession of his son-in- 
law, John Cater, of Beckenham, Kent, and there it 



ortheir cultivation, and he is at the present time Something. I think, was due to me from the Common- wmain^ 

an instance of a man who by perseverance and a wealth of Botany for the great number of plants and * h * ***** ™lume of the Lmncan Society s Trarmc- 

seeds I have annually procured from abroad, and you t%on8 > Lambert gave some account of it. A quarterof a 

have been I0 Bood as to pay it by giving me a species of century later, Lambert obtained it, with Collinson 1 ! 

find fault with the state of the plants under his care, eternity, botanically speaking ; that is, a name as copies of the sixth and eighth editions of Miller, 

On the occasion of a recent visit to this garden I loD 8 a> men and b <>o kB endure." The plant to which budded with notes and memoranda by Collinson. 



good share of common sense has become proficient 
as an orcbidist, It would be difficult for anyone to 



Collinson refers is, of coarse, the Collinsonia cana- 
densis, which is figured in the above-mentioned 
work of Linnaeus (Amsterdam, 1737). 



found in the cool-house numbers of plants of Odon- 

toglosscm crispum, one of this species having two 

spikes, 1 yard long, and carrying twenty-five 

blooms; of Miltonia vexillaria in noteworthy 

examples, namely, one with three new pseudo-bulbs t*™ man y hundred letters written by and addressed 

and ten flower- spikes, carrying altogether seventy- to Collinson, who appears to have been the guide, 



At Lambert's sale after his death, they passed into 
the possession of L. W. Dillwyn, who privately 
printed, in his Hortus Collinsdnianus , 1843, all these 



The MS. department of the British Museum con- notes, &c, and from which it appears that Collinson 



three flowers of a large size and fine colour; O. cor- 
datum, O. Pescatorei, O. macnlatum, citrosmum, 
O. hastilabium, O. polyxanthum, and Phalsenopsis. 
The display of Odonto^lossum was heightened by 
flowering examples of Epidendrum vitellinum majus, 
E. Godseffianum,Zygopetalum crinitum, Sophronitis 
gTandiflora, and Masdevallias in variety. Plants of 
Oocidium ampliatum majus and C. sphacelatum 
showed, as grown here, their great usefulness as 
decorative subjects. 



philosopher and friend of nearly all the celebrities, 
botanical and horticultural, of the period. There are 
many from the Duke of Richmond, who was living at 
that time at Good wood, and who made extensive altera- 
tions in and additions to the gardens there. The 
subject of the present sketch was a frequent visitor, 
and so was his young son Michael. The letters 



introduced 119 plants. It would be interesting to 
know of the whereabouts of these three editions of 
Miller, annotated by Collinson, although Dillwjn'i 
exceedingly interesting and valuable excerpts doubt- 
less include all of the notes which possess permanent 
va'ue. 

Collinson strongly urged the American colonists 
to cultivate flax, hemp, silk, and wine, which led to 
the cultivation of these industries in several of the 



which passed between them were of the most cordial States. Collinson was a liberal contributor to the 



nature ; one of them, for example, ending thus : 



collections of the British Museum ; and, according 



14 Adieu, my dear Peter, this cruel weather [the letter *° the I** 6 Robert Hunt, it was contemplated to 
There was remarked a capital lot of plants (sixty) was written February 16, 1747-8]. putts me quite out appoint him as curator of the botanical division. 



of Dendrobium Phalaenopsis Scbroderianum, some of °' ■" patience, butt in frost, or snow, wett weather, 



or fine, I am, honest Peter, sincerely thyne, Rich- 
mond." In another letter, his Grace remarks, M The 
small Magnolias are confounded dear, butt I must 
have them, tho' I believe nobody else will be fool leave behind him a 



them with very dark-coloured flowers. Dendrobium 
suavissimum was observed in quantity, also a flower- 
ing plant of the somewhat rare L»lia majalis. Cypri- 
pediums Haynaldianum, concolor, Parishii, Law- 
rencianum, caudate m, Roezlii, calurum, Warneria- enough to buye any at that price.** Collinson was 
num, bellatulum, and a capital form of niveum, form *k° a frequent visitor at Holland House, in the early 
part of the collection. A plant of Calanthe Turneri 
nivalis was making most satisfactory growth, as was 
also one of C. Veitchii. A specimen of Cattleya 
gigas imperialis gave promise of some good flowers 



fifties of the last century. Henry Fox, the cele- 
brated Lord Holland, father of the even more famous 
Charles James Fox, had not yet been elevated to the 
peerage ; whatever may have been his failings as a 
shortly. Robust plants which'had been in fine flower politician — and there can be no question that he was 



this season were remarked of Vanda suavis, Cattleya 
Mossia, C. Mendeli, and Laeiia purpurata. E. Af, 

Phalaenopsis Lindeni. 



From the Journal des Orchidia for June 16, we 
take the following account of Phalamopsis Lindeni, 
Loher.:— "This new species was named in honour 
of M. J. Linden by the traveller who found it, and 
who gives the following description of it: 'Folia 
oblonga, abido-argentea, viridi-maculata; pedunculi 
purpurei, bracteis parvis acutis; perigonii phylla 
exteriora et interiora subaequalia, obovata subclavata, 

obtusa, albida (versus nervum medium subrosea); 

labelli tripartiti lobi laterales tubfalcati, oblongi- country fields. 



an adventurer of a very questionable, and now, 
happily, obsolete type— his friendship for Collinson 
was genuine. Collinson was frequently at his house ; 
an invitation to dine, in 1750, was backed up with 
the plea, " Lady Caroline has a thousand questions 
to ask you about flowers, and I not much fewer about 
plants." Another invitation in 1752 ran, " Will you 
dine here on Saturday? You shall be guarded 
home," is a very curious and interesting illustration 
of the dangers which attended foot-passengers in the 
suburbs of London at that period— for Holland House 
was not then surrounded by bricks and mortar, and 
even Oxford Street and Tottenham Court Road were 



This was not carried into effect, for what reason it 
is not now known. Collinson died while on a viiit 
to Lord Petre in Essex, and enclosed in his will 
was a paper importing "that he hoped he should 

good name, which h* 
valued more than riches ; that he had en- 
deavoured not to live uselessly, and that all 
his days he constantly aimed to be a friend to 
mankind." Dr. Fothergill wrote a privately- printed 
account of his friend in 1770, the British Museum 
copy of which once belonged to Sir Joseph Banks, 
which is reprinted in the collected edition of 
Fothergill's works, 1781. The original issue of this 
biography contains an exceedingly good portrait of 
Collinson, engraved by J. Miller; and this portrait, 
reduced from quarto to octavo size, with the detail* 
slightly altered, was reproduced by Nicholt ia h!l 
Literary Anecdotes, whence the illustration g« ven at 
p. 6 is derived. W. Roberts. 



obtusi 



Peter Collinson's place of business was at the Red 



-- — — — — - — - — — w«M%>av - — — m^m vvvmumvu a ujhvu V/S UUQ I CM will or 

scutello vel callo bilobo aurantiaco maculato ; lobus Lion, in Gracechurch Street. The name 
intermedins cordatus, rotundatus breviter acuminatus 

* * • m ^ _ _ _ _ 



suggests 



of his 



ill 



• qainqae parpnrei.,ba.i albidu., medio wperiori the fa.hion of numbering hot,.*, had JZjZ come 



amethystinus. 

41 The foliage of this species resembles a little that 
of P. Schilleriana. but the leaves of th* forma* **<* 



narrower 



closely 



rosea 



nearly double. Further- 
more, they are remarkable for the colouring of the 
lip. the anterior lobe of which is bright amethyst 
with the base pale rose ; this division is decidedly 
rounded, briefly acuminate, while in P. rosea it is 



into vogue, and, as a consequence, all the principal 
shops were distinguished by signs. From a very 
early age he lived at "Peckham, in Surrey," a very 
different place to what it has since become. It was 
here that he formed a very extensive botanical 
garden. Through his marriage with Mary, daughter 
of Mr. Bushell, of Mill Hil), Hendoo, in 1724, he 
eventually came into possession of this place. The 
removal from Peckham thence, however, did not 
take effect until a quarter of a century aftewards. 



COOMBE COURT, KINGSTON- 

ON-THAMES. 

The grounds here (the residence of W. A. Beran, 
Esq.), are extensive and picturesque. They were 
laid out some years ago by Messrs. J. Veitch & Son* 
From the terrace in front of the fine red-brick 
mansion may be obtained some fine landscape vie* 1 ' 
embracing a wide stretch of the Surrey hilla. G rftnd 
masses of Rhododendrons, Azaleas, and other 
flowering shrubs are features here, and seen fro* 
the terrace when in beauty, they have a wonderfully 
fine effect. Some fine named varieties of Rhodo- 
dendrons are grown, specially noticeable at the ttjo 
these notes were taken being John Waterer, T w 
Queen, Francis Dickson, and Lady Palmer^o* 
Kalmias revel in the peaty soil, and the Rhododen- 
dron beds are edged with them. That handsome 
of the Berberises, B. Darwinii, flourishes here, aJJ 
the plants become covered with a profusion of * 



Jclt 13 1895 ] 



THE 



GAFDENEXS 1 CHBOXICLh. 



37 



orange- coloured blossoms. Some bedi consisting of 
^timmia japonica, golden Laurustinus, and Irish 
Hath, edged with Euonymus radicans, are quite 
remarkable. 

Holliea were remarked at growing luxuriantly, 
some fine specimens in front of the house moved 
two years ago being specially noticeable. Some good 
specimens of Abies Douglaaii shifted three years ago 
hare also done well, making good growth. The 
various forms of Cupressus are attaining good 
dimensions. Rstinosporasdo not seem to take kindly 
to tbe cravelly sub-soil here, and some of the fine 
S veet Bays were much cut during the past severe 
winter. Cedrus Daodara finds a congenial borne 
here, as do the Oaks, Elms, and Piceas. On the lower 
side of the grounds, abutting on to Coombe Lane, a 
long line of closely-trimmed L-mes gives an air of 
rrder and neatness characteristic of the whole place. 
A lake bordered by suitable trees is a very pretty 
and ll restful " feature. 



Apples and Pears, principally as pyramids promise 
good crops, the root-pruning to which the trees 
were subjected two years ago having had a beneficial 
effect. 

Veitch's Extra- early Forcing Cauliflower is ex- 
tremely early, and very dwarf. Sown the middle of 
February, cutting has been going on since May 28. 
Pea Veitch's Early Selected was ready for picking 
on June 3. A fine breadth of some 500 plants of 



Coming to second early Peas, two varieties stand 
out prominently, Gradus and Daisy, the former 
introduced by Lax ton and the latter by Carter. 
For earliness, Gradus excels Daisy, and, when true, 
it is really a grand Pea. It is a good bearer, has 
fine large pods of the Dake of Albany type, and is 
of fine flavour. Daisy (l.J to 2 feet) is one of the 
coming Peas ; a wonderful bearer, the pods coming 
pairs 



that old but good Cabbage, Cattell's Reliance, stood moreover, of compact habit and comes among the 



the winter so well; ready 5rst week in April. 
Amongst Potatos, Myatt's Ashleaf 



first of the second-early section. Dr. Hogg is a pood 



esteemed here, as is that fine- cons titutioned variety, 
of excellent quality, Schoolmaster. 

Peaa are grown in 100- feet rows, as a large family 
has to be supplied, the principal varieties grown 
being the old but finely- flavoured Ne Plus Ultra, 
Veitch's Perfection, William I., Main Crop, Crite- 
rion, and Duchess of Albany. 



is much old second-early Pea, and holds its place pretty well. 

William I. i§ so apt to " sport" that growers are 



getting tired of checking its waywardness, and are 
inclined to drop its cultivation. Gradus is also said 
to have this fault, but I do not think that it deserves 
a bad name. A stock of it sent out this season 
in packets was as full of rogues as it well could be, 
but I have seen another stock which was almost 



A concluding note may be found in recording the free of them. Messrs. Dickson, of Chester, have a 
Some bold mix*d beds of Abutilons, Coleos, Zea fact that the whole place is well-managed by the good early wrinkled Pea in Harbinger, which is 
japonica, Ricinus, Carnations, &c, in proximity to gardener, Mr. Springthorpe. J. B. somewhat after the style of Exonian, but it has not 

the deep colour of that variety, nor is it so early 
by one week. Notwithstanding its pale colour, it 
it a good Pea. 

In a trial of Peas, they must, to arrive at accurate 

results, be all sown on the same day, on the same 

plot, and, from the beginning, be treated alike. 

To sow one variety on a border this year and 

another variety next year, is no trial at all. It 

is worse than useless, for often it is misleading. 
A.H. 







Fig 7. -a composite peach: part peach, pabt nectabine 



VARIATION. 

This fascinating subject receives a curious illus- 
tration in the specimen here shown (fig. 7). Mr. 
Thorne, who kindly sends it, described it as Early 
Dagmar Peach, with a stripe or band which is that 
of a Nectarine. Occasionally we see Peaches and 
Nectarines on the same bough, and an illustration of 
such an occurrence was given in our columns in 1891, 
When this phenomenon waa first observed, the nar- 
rative was received with incredulity. An illustration 
of this is shown in the Kew collection of drawings, 
where is preserved a coloured drawing, accompanied 
by a document formally attested by a number of 
botanical and horticultural celebrities. Since that 
time a similar occurrence has occasionally been 
noticed, not only in Peaches, but in Apples and 



the mansion will constitute attractive features 
a little later. The culture of the useful and beau- 
tiful herbaceous plants is being taken up. In the 
conservatory attached to the residence the usuat 
foliage and dowering plants for decorative purposes 
in such structures were in remarkably good condition. 

In a range of houses 100 feet long in three com- 
partments, Pine-apple Nectarine was carrying a good 
crop. Roses on a back wall of this division do well 
in spring, exceptional top-light being obtained. 

Black Hamburgh and Muscat of Alexandria 
are the favourite Grapes grown, and the crops are 
all that can be desired. 

Two span roofed houtes, 130 feet in length, con- 
tain some well-fruited trees of Dr. Hogg, Royal 
George, and Early Louise Peaches. 

The best forcing Strawberry is found in Auguste 



— w 

Domestication (1868) 
cases of the kind cul 



utuU 



EARLY PEAS. 

Careful, fair, and comparative trials year after 
ypar have convinced me that we have too many 
varieties of Peas in cultivation. Taking the round- 
seeded early Peas, such as Eclipse or Earliest of A 4 
(practically the same Pea). Carter's Lightning, Day's 
Sunrise, and Sangster's No. 1, the two former come 
in together, and the two latter a week later. If I 
had room for only one of those named I would grow 
Eclipse. As regards the first early dwarf Peas, all of 
which, by the way, have wrinkled seed, and are con- p T A N T ^ 



one 



by Peter Coiiinson, whose life forms the subject of a 
notice in the present issue; and Sir James Smith in 
1821 waa the first to record the occurrence of fruit 
partly Peach, partly Nectarine, in character. Similar 
amalgamations are met with in Oranges. We have 
ourselves seen a fruit half Orange, half Lemon ; see 
also Darwin, loc. cit. f p. 336. 



sequently of superior quality, William Hurst, Chelsea 
Gem, and American Wonder come in almost 
together. The two former, however, having longer 
and quite as well- filled pods, are preferable to 
American Wonder. The real difference between 



I N 



FLOWER 



Nicaise, the picking commencing on April 1. White William Hurst and Chelsea Gem is that whereas the 



Itchia and Brown Turkey Figs in pots give promise 
of good fruiting. The favourite Melons are Countess 
and Frogmore Selected ; Tomato*, Him Green, 
Frogmore Selected, and Perfection. 

In the kitchen garden, a fruit-wall some 300 yards 
in length, is quite worthy of note. The Cherry- 
trees on this wall are in the best of health, and 
rf aching to the top of the 9 feet wal), the principal 
varieties grown being May Dake, small, but carrying 

gold crop; Bigarreau Napoleon, Elton, Morello, 
Frogmore Bigarreau, Black Eigle, Old Bigarreau, 
and Euly May, fruits of the latter being gathered 



seed of the former is blue when dry, the latter is 
white. When growing there is no appreciable dif- 
ference, and both are first-rate Peas, particularly 
suitable for early borders or frames. The early Pea 
(wrinkled variety) that I prefer to all others is 
Exonian, and for the reason that it is remarkably 
early, coming in with the earliest section, is a 
good cropper, the pods being tightly packed, 
eight, nine, and ten Peas being a common number 
of seeds in a pod. The Peas are of a dark 
green colour, and the flavour is excellent. 
In flavour, it resembles the varieties Yorkshire 



early in May. On this wall some of the best Hero and G. F. Wilson. To possess, as it does, the 
varieties of Plums, Peaches, and Pears are also three attributes of earliness, productiveness, and 
grown. Pv*ars are, however, a icarce crop this year. flavour, stamps it, in my opinion, one of the best. 



IN THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDEN, 
EDINBURGH. 

Michelia fuscata, perhaps better known under 
the generic name of Magnolia, is now flowering very 
freely in the temperate- house, the delightful fragrance 
of its flowers being detected as soon as the house is 
entered. This fragrance should recommend it to a 
place in every greenhouse. The plant is about 
8 feet high, of a shrub-like habit, with plenty of 
dark evergreen foliage. The axillary dowers are 
of a light purple colour, the fleshy corolla soon 
dropping, but they are produced for a long period of 
time. It is a native of China, and has long been in 
cultivation; it is easily propagated, and grows in rich 
loamy soil. Young plants flower freely. 

Orthoaiphon stamineus is a native of India, Malaya, 
and some other tropical countries. Its flowers are 
very attractive, at the present time the most con- 
spicuous part being the long filaments and style 
that p-oject about 1£ ; nch beyond the bilabiate corolla* 

# 






38 



THE 



GARDENERS' 



CHRONICLE. 



[July 13. 1895. 




The plant ii compact in habit, with herbaceous 
stems some 12 or 18 inches in height, with ovate 
deeply toothed leaves ; the inflorescence forms 
crowded raceme*, at the apex of the branches. 
Plants struck in spring form bushy flowering stuff for 



lost most of its leaves, and some few the tips of the 
shoots. Those plants marked * were growing in the 
Duchess' Garden, which is situated on the aide of a hill 
100 feet in height ; this hill has a curved outline, and 
is open only to the south-east, much of the sun- heat 



stove decoration from May onwards, through the being therefore retained, and the garden rendered 



summer. (See Gardeners' Chronicle, 1869, p. 941 ) 

A plant of Alberta magna is now flowering here 
for the first time. It is of a stiff erect habit, with 
opposite, ovate, coriaceous leaves. The inflorescence, 
which comes in the form of terminal panicles, consists 
*f bright crimson flowers, the tube of the corolla being 
about an inch long, and lasts in a perfect condition 
for several weeks, and if the plant can be flowered freely 



warm during the night. 

The greatest amount of frost registered at the 
kitchen gardens at Belvoir, was —3° on a Glaisher 
screen, —8° on the grass, on February 8 ; the mean 
temperature of February was 27°.26, the mean of 
daily maxima in the sun for the ten days, 
February 5 to 14, during which the frost was 
most severe, was 79°.40, and during that period we 
had 62 hours 30 minutes of sunshine. I have no 



ROTATION OF CROPS. 

(Continued from vol. xvii., p. 792.) 

Plant- food taken up. — At the commencement 
of this subject, see May 4, p. 550, it was pointed out 
that although many different rotations are adopted 
they may for the most part be considered ai little 
more than local adaptations of the system of alter- 
nating root-crops and leguminous crops with the 
cereal grains. Thus there are rotations of five, six, 
seven, or more years. But these variations are, in 
most cases, only adaptations of the principle to 
variations of soil, altitude, aspect, climate, marketi, 
and other local conditions, and they consist chiefly 
in the variation in the description of the root crop, 



it .bonld prove* welcomeadditiontothe greenhouse, had 62 hour- 60 minute, or lunuine. ^ nave no and perhftp8 in the introduction of Potato., in gro*. 
*,*..- *uA ii. h« ^ nnnai l ft .n nf fch« o.nlvx lobea doubt this helped many of the plants considerably; . . - t be more than . 



After the corolla has dropped, two of the calyx lobea 



lengthen and form scarlet wings to the fruit. Although many dwarf plants also derived much benefit from conflecntively> in the growth f some other kgu 
it has for several years been in cultivation, the first t*e 4 inches of snow which covered them during the min(m8 crop thftn cloverj or the intermixture with 
record of its aowering in this country was at Kew in time the frost was most severe-and the advantage ^ clQyer Qf Gragi seed8f and perhap8 in the ^ 



1893. 



derived from this covering was shown by the Let- 



■ion of the period allotted to this element of the rota- 



Tussacia pulchella is a Gesneraceou. plant, long ^J**« *X^ tion to two or more years. 



■^ West 

member of a small genus of four or five species, only 
two of which are said to have been introduced. 
The species under notice is a plant growing to about 
1 foot in height, with a herbaceous stem and large 
opposite-ovate leaves, the margins of which are 



the snow had melted, being killed, whilst those on a 
west aspect, where they were all the time covered 
with snow, survived. The frost penetrated the earth 
to a depth of 8 inches, and a heap of soil which laid 
loose above the surface, 18 inches. The ice on the 
lake was 8k inches thick. This frost was much more 



upi>u.ii«-ut«~ ™., TV7mIm Zr^mYsaZw ^vere than that of the winter 1860-61, when the 
irregularly serrated, and of a light green colour. J CTCIC UUttU " y ' 



The showy flowers are produced upon axillary inflo- 
rescences, which generally bear five flowers. The 

and about half the lenerth of 



length 
light yellow in colour. 



calyx is red, 

the corolla, which is 

When at rest, water should be sparingly afforded, 

but not entirely withheld, or the rhizomes may be 

dried up. They should also be wintered in a warm- 

house. A figure may be seen in the Botanical 

Magazine, t. 1146. 

Cacti in flower. — Several of these interesting 
plants have been during the past few weeks, and are, 
flowering at the present time in the succulent-house. 
Two very pretty yellow-flowering plants are Ecbino- 
cactus Ofctonis , E. tricuspidatus and E. tabularis, these 
are particularly bright, the style and stigma is of a 
dark purple colour. The last continues in flower for 
some time, opening in the morning and closing at 
night. Eehinopsis triumphans has a deeply-ridged 
stem, rather sparsely dotted with spines and large 
pinky-white flower*, which do not possess a very 
agreeable perfume* Large numbers of the Mammil- 
larias are in bloom, and these are also attractive 
when in fruit. There are now in flower, M. Dillenii, 
M. exsudans, M. Stuberi, and M. glauca, all bearing 
numerous dark red flowers; M. Wildiana, with its 
hooked spines is another desirable species [?], and 
bears much lighter flowers than those mentioned 
above, while M. glomerata has quite yellow flowers. 
Although many of these last cannot be called showy 
plants when seen in quantity, they are always in- 
teresting, and deserve more attention than they get 
at the present time; while with the Phyllocactus 
with which so much has been done in their hybri- 
disation, that none can fail to admire their large 
and brilliant flowers. B. L. Harrow. 



lowest temperature recorded here was — 1 on a 
Glaisher screen, and —5° on the grass, this was on 
Dec. 25, 1860. 

Killed. 

*Arundo conspicua (some Miihlenbeckia] complexa 

plants) (killed to the ground) 

*Casuarina tenuifolia *01earia illicifolia (killed to 

Campanula pyramidalis the ground) 

(some plants) Photiuia japonica (killed to 

Calycanthus floridu9 the ground) 

*Dasylirion Bigelowii Phormium tenax (killed to 

*Elaeagnus macrophyliu* the ground) 

Fig on south wall (killed to Piaiacia Lentiscus 

the ground) Rose Noisette W. A. Richard- 

*Gynerium argenteum (some son on south wall (large 

plants) plants killed to the ground) 

•Hypericum repeua Tecoma radicans 



Much Injured. 



*Azara micropbjlla 
*Arundo Donax 
*Arundinaria falcata 

Aibutus rjnedo 

Apricot on touth wall 
*Abelia floribuoda 

* Acacia aealbata 
*Berbeiis Wallicbii 

* „ DarwiDii 
*Bambusa Metake 

Crataegus p> racanthaon north 

walls 

Cedru9 Deodara, where ex- 
posed 

Chimocanthus fragrans, the 
tiowers killed 

Ctanothus Gloire de Ver- 
sailles 

Deutzia scaber 
*Diplopappus chrysophyllus 
*Escal£oma macr^ntha 

Jasminum tfficiuale 



flower 



Lonicera fragrans, 

killed 
,, flexuosa 
Magnolia grandiflora 

*01earia Haastii 
*Ot*manthus illicifolius 
Photinia serrulata on south 
wall 

Pernettya mucronata 
Pseonia Moutan 

Rhododendron fragrans 
*Hhus Cot in us 

Rose, Banksian, yellow on 

south wall 
,. H.P. and Tea in many 
varieties 
*Ruscus aculeatus 

Rubus pboeoicolasius 
Spiraea pruoifolia 

Ul*x europaeus (killed to the 
ground) 

Vitis vinifera on ^est wail 



Slcghtly Injured. 



NOTES ON THE HARDINESS OF 

SOME OUT-OF-DOORS PLANTS AT 
BELVOIR CASTLE. 

In the following lists of plants the names of those 
under the headings "killed " and M seriously injured " 
are given in full, and in the list of survivors only 
those are given which are likely to be of interest to 
readers of the Gardeners 9 Chronicle for that reason. 
Many plants doubtless escaped irjury owing to the 
elevation of the gardens, and the perfect drainage 
consequent on that elevation. The height varies 
from 360 to 460 feet above sea-level. The shelter 
afforded by the wood surrounding the gardens was 
also of great use in protecting the plants, and especi- 
ally noticeable was its effect in preserving Portugal 
Laurels, of which there are large numbers, many of 
the specimens being from 25 to 30 feet high ; and 
where these are situated in the wood itself no injury 
was done— whereas in exposed places this shrub has 



»» 



•» 



Arbutus Andrachne 
*Androsace lanuginosa 
*Andr medaovata 

* ,, flonbunda 

* Acer polymorph um atro-pur- 

purtum 

* „ ,, diasectum 

* ,, Negundo variegata 
Ampelophi9 japonic* 

Veitehii 
hederacea 
*\mygdalus communis 
•Berberis stenophyliax 

„ dulcis 
* „ japonica 
*Cleroaeudron trichotomum 
Clematis montana 
„ graveolens 
*Cameilias in variety (lost a 
few leaves, and some of 
flowers) 
Cerasus lauro-cerasus 

„ iusitanica 
*Cercis siliqua&trum 
Cedrus atlastica 
Choisya ternata (bush on 
bank sloping to south es- 
caped completely) 

ChamaEpuce diacantha 
♦Chamaerops Fortunei 

tected with bracken) 
*Colutea arborescens 
*Cypripedium speetat ile 
•Cryptomeria elegans 

„ japonica 
*Cunnmghamia sinensis 
*DaphniphyUum glaucescens 



*Eremurus robustus 
*Eucr>pha pinnatifida 



(jreiibta hispanica 

* Hydrangea hortensis japonica 

* M paniculata 

*Haiesia tetraptera 
Iris Kaempteri (protected 
with Utter) 

Lavandula officinalis (killed 

at kitchen gardens) 
*Lilium auratum 
Magnolia conspicua 
langeana 

Punica granatum (on south 
wall) 

* Rhododendron Falconeri 

ferrugineum 
h 



Sou- 






• » 



»• 



(pro- 



praecox 

Salisburia aiiantifolia 
*Scyrax jipooica 

*Staph>ieacolchica 

S parti um janceum 

*Spirsea Thunbergii 

* ,, aruncus 

* ,, arieefoiia 
# Skimmia fragrans 

* n japonica 
Taxoaium distichum 

„ sempervirens (injured 

•tnv Wher6 e *P<**d) 
*Viburnum plicatum 

h Tinus 

* Veronica pinguaefolia 

* „ Traversii 
Wallflowers 
Yucca recur va 

stle Gardens. Grrantham. 



It is true, also, that under any specific rotation, 
there may be deviations from the plan of retaining 
the whole of the root-crop, the straw of the 
grain crops, and the leguminous fodder cropi 
on the farm, for the production of meat or milk, 
and, coincidently, for that of manure to be returned 
to the land. But it is also true that, when underthe 
influence of special, local, or other demand— proximity 
to towns, easy railway or other communication, and 
so on — the products which would otherwise be re- 
tained on the farm are exported from it, the import 
of town or other manures is generally an essential 
condition of such practice. Indeed, this system ol 
free sale very frequently involves full compensation 
by purchased manures of some kind. In our osa 
country, such deviations from the practice of merely 
selling grain and meat have been much developed in 
recent years ; and they will doubtless continue to 
increase under the altered conditions of our agri- 
culture, dependent on very large imports of grab- 
increasing imports of meat and other products of 
feeding, and very large imports of cattle-food and 
other agricultural produce. Already much more 
attention is being devoted to dairy products, notonlj 
on grass farms, but on those that are mainly arable, 
and there will doubtless be some, but piobably by do 
means so great an extension as some suppose, in 
production of other smaller articles required by town 
populations. 

It is further true, though the remark appli" * fll 
very limited degree to our own country, that t ' 
are other deviations which have more the charac« 
of exceptions to the general rule of rotations, sue 
as the introduction of Flax, Hemp, Tobacco, ® 
other so-called industrial crops. Bac in these cam 
as with Potatos, the giowih involves special**^ 
diture for manure, instead of conservation o • 
Indeed, the inducement is the high price o\ ^ 
product, rather than the maintenance, or the i 
provement, of the condition of the land for ft 
crops. 



Still, 



.,.,..., as soch deviations from regular rotoj 
practice as have been referred to d^, as has 
said, generally involve more or less compel* 18 , 
manure from external lources, attention is c 
for the purposes of illustration to what nw 
called the self-supporting system, and to the . ll e|t j. 
four-course one which has been selected for "* 

gation at Hothamsted. * $ 

Brief reference only can be given to ' oa * e . fl ^ 

more important mineral constituents found 

different crops of the four- course rotation. -» 

Of phosphoric acid, the cereal crops take j^ 

much as, or more than, any of the other crop 
^_._^__ ^_ ^,1 * a .u* greater P° rt 



rotation, excepting Clover ; and the R re ** e ' P e |g [e 

the grain. The ^ m ^ na ^\^uf 
the straw, as well as that in the roots and to ^ ^ 



of what they take up is lost to the farm » $ 



able product 



minous crops, is supposed to be retain* d ^ ^ 
farm, excepting the small amount exporte 
and milk. _ $t& 

Of potash, each of the crops take up r ^ ^ 
more than of phosphoric acid ; but n 11 



1895 



THE 



GARDENERS' CHRONICLE 



39 



potash than phosphoric acid it exported in the 
cereal grains, much more being retained in the 
■traw; whilst the otbfr products of the rotation — 



carbon from the atmotphere, and produce, besides 
nitrogenous food-products, a very large amount of 
the carbohydrates — sugar, as respiratory and fat- 



the roots and Leguminofx — which are also supposed forming food for the live-stock of the farm. 



to be retained on the farm, contain very much more 



The still more highly nitrogenous leguminous 



potash than the cereal', and comparatively little crops 



of it is exported in meat and milk. 

Of lim*. very little is taken up by the cereal 
crops, and by the roots much less than of potash ; 
more by the Leguroinoiae than by ftie other crops, 
und, by the Clover especially, sometimes much more 
than by all the other crops of the rotation put 
together. Of the lime of the crops, however, very 
little goes in the saleable products of the farm nnder 
the conditions supposed of a self-supporting rota- 
tion. There is, however, frequently a considerable 
loss of lime in land drainage. 

The interpolated crops of rotation — the roots and 
the L«*gumino««— take up scarcely any silica; but 
the cereals take up a very large amount of it. In- 



tically benefited by nitrogenous manures, neverthe- 
less contribute much more nitrogen to the total 
produce o^ the rotation than any of the other crops 
comprised in it. It is also certain that, at any rate, 
a large proportion of the nitrogen of these crops it 
obtained from the soil and sub-soil ; though recent 
investigations have proved that some of their 
nitrogen, and sometimes much of it, may be derived 
indirectly from the free nitrogen of the atmosphere, 
brcu^ht into combination under the Influence of 
micro-organisms within the ncdules on the roots of 
the plants. 

But independently of the benefits arising from the 
difference in the requirements and results of growth 



deed, the large amount of silica taken up by these of th* different crops, of the increased amount of 



manure available, and of the increased sale of highly- 
valuable animal products, there are other elements 
of advantage of considerable importance. For 



therefore more economically performed. 

List, but by no means least, the opportunities 
which alternate cropping affords for the cleaning of 
the land from weeds is a prominent element of 
advantage. J. J. Willis, Harpenden. 



Forestry. 



crops when grown under ordinary conditions, is at 
characteristic a chemical phenomenon of rotation as 
is the very large amount of lime taken np by Clover 
and other Leguminoia. Very little silica, however, 
is lost to the land in the assumed saleable products. 

Although the eventual loss to the land of mineral 
constituents is, in a self-supporting rotation, com- 
paratively so small, the very fact that the different 
crops require for their growth, not only very different 
amounts of individual constituents, but require these 
to be available within the soil in very different con- 
ditions, both of combination and of distribution, 
points to the conclusion that, in any explanation of 
the benefits of an alternation of crops, the position, 
and the tole of the mineral constituents must not be 
overlooked ; and the less can it be so when their 
connection with the very important element — the 
nitrogen of the crops— is considered. 

As to the nitrogen, it has been seen that, 
although very characteristically benefited by nitro- 
genous manures, the cereal crops take up and retain 
much less nitrogen than any of the crops alternated 
with them — in fact, the root crops may contain two 
or more times as much nitrogen as either of the 
cereals ; and the leguminous crop, especially Clover, 
much more than the root- crops. The greater part 
of the nitrogen of the cereals is, however, sold off 
the farm, but perhaps not more than 10 or 15 per cent, 
of that of either the root-crop, or the Clover, or other 
forage leguminous crop, is sold off in animal increase 
or milk. Tons, most of the nitrogen of the straw of 
the cereals, and a very large proportion of that of 
the much more highly nitrogen-yielding crops, 
returns to the land as manure, for the benefit of 
future cereals and other crops. Indeed, it is, as a chiefly lacking in our woods. 



layer, as already mentioned, and the exposure of the 
crowns of the remaining trees to the sun, so as to 
induce and favour the formation of flo*er-buds. and 
thus bring about a plentiful crop of seed. After the 
latter occurs and falls to ths groan 3, a second felling- 
is made in order to further lighten the canopy (or the 
benefit of the seedlings which appear in the following 
spring. Tne extent of this felling depends upon the 
requirements and nature of the seedlings, lu the 
case of shade-bearers, such as Beech or Hornbeam, 
sufficient trees may remain to form a light but 
fairly regular shade, as the former of these species is 
very sensitive to late frosts, and the seedlings are 
easily destroyed during the first year. Where the 
parent trees possess comparatively light crowns, at 
Oik or Ash, the same proportion may remain with- 
out interfering with the seedlings, for this canopy 
prevents the drying-up of the ground and baking of 
the surface, and thus favours the growth of the 
seedlings. A r ter the latter are fully established, the 
remaining trees can be gradually removed, and the 
blanks which occur filled up by transplanting seed- 
lings from the thicker parts. 

In the caie of Conifers of the Pine genus, heavier 



example, with a variety of crops, the mechanical felling at the time of the seed crop is necessary, as 
operations of the farm, involving horse and hand Pine seedlings require plenty of light, and the pre- 
labour, are better distributed over the year, and are paratory felling is also of importance, as unless the 



THE NATURAL REGENERATION OF 

WOODS. 
Few branches of British forestry probably are 



radicles come quickly in contact with the mineral 
soil, a large proportion perish. With the Scot's Pine, 
for instance, fifteen to twenty trees per acre are amply 
sufficient to provide the necessary seed, as the winged 
form of the latter enables it to be carried long 
distances by the wind. Toe development of thia 
wing upon fine seeds furnishes an interesting field of 
speculation for the evolutionist, and those acquainted 
with the peculiarities attending the natural regenera- 
tion of this tree are able to recognise the enormous 
advantages which this wing confers upon the seed 



with regard to its distribution and conveyance to 

suitable localities for its germination. Whatever 

more neglected than the restocking of mature wood- the reason may be, the fact remains, that both the 

land by means of self-sown seedlings. Although it germination of the seed and the growth of the seed- 



- . 



occurs more or less in every seed- bearing wood, yet 
we seldom, if ever, find any systematic methods 



lings occur most readily on sites which have never, 
or at least not recently, borne a crop of timber. On 



adopted to bring it about in a uniform and satis- heathy moors, whether these be wet or dry, peaty or 
factory manner. It requires, of course, a certain gravelly, this species quickly establishes itself, pro- 
amount of skill and judgment on the part of those 



who regulate the management of the wood previous 
to, and at the felling of the old crop ; but beyond 
this, the establishment of a healthy crop of young 
trees by this means is as simple as raisin? a farm 
or garden crop by artificial sowing. Just as a seed- 



viding a Sew seed-beanng trees are within reasonable 
distance, and the heather is not too long and rank to 
prevent the seed reaching the soil. Bat under its 
own shade, or that of other trees, the Scots Pine failt 
to reproduce itself in a satisfactory manner ; hence 
the necessity for means of locomotion other than 






bed is prepared in the case of the latter, so must one those usually provided in the case of most other tree 

exist for the reception of the seed which falls from species. 

Tne real secret of success in all cases of natural 



the parent trees, and this is the requisite which is 



rule, only a comparatively small proportion of the 
very much increased amount of nitrogen obtained in 



A good forest seed-bed prepared by natural causes, 
differs with the species which are to occupy it. Tor 



reproduction is the total suppression of undergrowth. 
Whether this consists of grass, brambles, or coarse 
weeds, a regular crop of any kind of seedling is 



rotation compared with that in continuous cereal the proper development of a seedling into a sapling, impossible, and with some species the germination, . 
cropping (chiefly due to the interpolated crops) that the seed must germinate upon matter which will under such conditions, of a seed becomes a rare 
is lost to the land in the saleable products. 



At to the source of the nitrogen of the so-called 
" restorative crops/' it has been shown that certainly 
in the case of the roots it is not, as has sometimes 
been assumed, that such plants take up nitrogen 
from the air by virtue of their extended leaf- surface. 
Both common experience and direct experiment 
demonstrate that they are as dependent as any crop 
that is grown on available nitrogen within the soil, 
which is generally supplied by the direct applica- 
tion of nitrogenous manures — natural or artificial. 
Under such conditions of supply, however, the 
root crops, gross feeders as they are, and distribu- 
ting a very large amount of fibrous feeding root 
within the soil, avail themselves of a much greater 



support the plant a'ter its stock of reserve material occurrence, Tnis suppression can only be effected 

by maintaining a close and unbroken leaf- canopy for 
several years previous to the preliminary fellings. 
With light-demanding species a dense canopy is 
difficult to obtain, unless a mixture of some shade- 
bearing tree, usually Beech, is introduced either at 
the time the crop is planted or later on, according to 
circumstances. By such means a clear field is left 



(stored np in the cotyledons or endosperm) has given 
out, and it must also be exposed to sufficient 
air and light for its leaves to carry on their work 
properly. In dense woods, especially when 
composed of shade- bearing species, a thick layer 
of raw, or partially-decomposed humas, exists, 
which is not sufficiently compact to retain 



moisture for any length of time, nor has it such an for the seed of the legitimate crop, which are able to 
intimate connection with the soil beneath which germinate and make a fair growth before weeds and 
would set up capillarity. Under these circumstances, coarse grasses get possession of the soil. 

Tne chief obstacle in the way of natural regenera- 
tion, or the adoption of measures for securing it, is 
game cover. We have never been able to understand 



a seed falling upon the forest floor may germinate, 
but invariably perishes from insufficient moisture 
and nutriment in the ccurse of a few days. To 
effect the decomposition of this inert matter, the 



the precise difference between a crop of young trees 
qaantity of the nitrogen supplied than the cereals annual leaf-fall must be checked, and sun and wind from five to twenty years of age and a crop of net- 



would under similar circumstances, this result being 
partly du* to their period of accumulation and 
growth extending even months after the period of it is intended to regenerate naturally, is usually 



allowed to act upon and hasten the decomposing 
process. For this reaion, the felling of a wood which 




collection by the ripening cereals has terminated, 
and at the season when nitrification within the soil 



performed at two distinct periods. Two or three 
years before a seed crop is likely to occur, what is 



is the most active, and the accumulation of nitrates known as a "preparatory felling " is made, which 
in it is the greatest. Lastly, full supply of both removes about one-half, more or less, of the trees, 



mineral constituents and nitrogen being at com- 
mand, these crops assimilate a very large amount of 



and greatly reduces the leaf- canopy. This felling 
has a twofold object— the reduction of the humus- 



tles, brambles, bracken, &c, so far as their value 
game cover for pheasants goes, especially when, as is 
invariably the case, a fair proportion of the latter 
are mixed in with the former. But this is a matter 
of which the layman is not qualified to judge, any 

more than of the character of the hand-reared phea- 
sant. In the eyes of the inexperienced this bird 
appears to resemble a rather shy barn-door fowl, 
with just sufficient fear of man to keep twenty yards 



40 



THE 



GARDENERS' 



CHRONICLE. 



[July 13, 1895, 





or bo out of big way. Bat we are given to under- 
stand that this bird is so painfully shy that the 
cracking of a dry stick, or the occasional sound of 
the axe is sufficient to drive it u out of the cover * 
(whatever destination that may be), a course which 
it seems loth to adopt before an army of beaters. 
A t C. Forbes. 



ELMET HALL, LEEDS. 

A view of the picture? que rockery and other parts 
of the garden at Elmet Hall, the property of J. H. 
Kitson, Esq., was given in the Gardeners' Chronicle, 
April 28, 1894, and the issue of May 5 contained 
some account of the pretty and extensive gardens 
which are managed by Mr. T. Bonsall, the 
remarks on that occasion relating chiefly to 
the gardens outdoors. A recent visit found 
the establishment beautiful as ever, the rockery 
bright with large tufts of pretty alpines and 
other herbaceous perennials. Some large patches 
of the lovely dwarf blue Myosotis rupicola, the yellow 
and purple Arnebia echioides, of blue Gentian, 
species of Edrianthus, Androsace, Lithospermum 
Gaatoni, ,and other plants of similar class 
being specially beautiful, and the herbaceous 
plant - garden for tall and strong growers 
formed on the site of the old kitchen-garden, a 
bewildering mass of varied colours. From the man- 



holders for water in the lower division, the upper 
half on which the plant is placed, and which revolves 
easily, allowing the plant to be readily turned round 
for examination or to alter its position from time 
to time as may be found necessary, in order to cause 
it to grow equally on all sides. The need 
of some such an arrangement has long been felt by 
Orchid-grower*, and some rather heavy revolving iron 
stands are in use ; but these brass ones, invented and 



MI8CELLANEOU8.— A sweet-scented and 



Prett? 



dwarf-growing Orchid now in flower, is Trichccen. 
trum tigrinum, whose cultivation is easy when tht 
plant is suspended in a shallow pan on the shady tid* 
of the hottest house, using a very small quantity q( 
peat and sphagnum-moss, for if the roots are mack 
covered with compost they are apt to quickly decar 
and the leaves to spot in a similar manner to oi 
cidium Lanceanum. The rare Oocidium guttata 
should be grown under exactly the same conditiom 

Btttuuajiiciuuflc, *,**„« both species while at rest requiring bat a smd 

patented by Mr. Kitson, area long way in advance or ntity of water at the root to keep their lean 

former things of the kind, and apparently difficult to plump# 

PACHY8TOMA THOMP80NIANUM. — This i 

another lovely little sptcies that is now is blosj, 

and its flowers, if preserved from damp, will laitt 

considerable time. It is a species that succwi 

admirably in a shallow pan, hung up close toft 

roof- glass; and it requires almost the same kindu 

treatment as the deciduous Calanthes, bat mm 

shade than those. While in flower very litt 

water should be afforded, and when at rest ft 

plants may be exposed to a good deal of innligH 

and only just sufficient water afforded to preyn 

the shrivelling ot the pseudo- bulbs. At all tinw 

judgment is required in watering the plant, the bulk 

being very liable to decay. The rare E aiopkk 

guineenus should be treated in the same way. 



improve on. 

In the next house, the show of flowers was chiefly 
furnished by Dendrobium, Cymbidium, and Masde- 
vallia Harryana. There were in bloom a lot of 
Lycaste Deppei, some L. aromatica, covered with 
yellow flowers; a few handsomely- flowered plants of 
Rodriguezia venusta (often called Barlingtonia 
fragrans), the pretty Phaius Owenianus, Nanodes 
Medusae, Maxillaria Sanderiana, &c. 

Miscellaneous. 

In the large stove, a few Phalsenopsis were sus- 
pended among the Nepenthes ; and of the latter, 
a specimen of Nepenthes Curtisii with two stems, 
displayed a curious dissimilarity in the form and 
colouring of its pitchers. The basal ones are of the 
ordinary form, and profusely blotched with dark red; 
the upper ones more slender, and perfectly green, 



sion beautiful views of hill and dale open up on all without spotting. Some other good specimens of 

•ides, and care is taken to preserve the continuity of Nepenthes were N. x Mastersiana, which is 

the scenery from the very walls of the house to the 

vanishing point, the intervening space of garden and 

pleasure ground being arranged so as to merge into 

the distant landscape, and this object is mainly 

attained by keeping a large unbroken expanse of 

green lawn around the house, and making no provision 

for flower-beds containing Pelargoniums and other Stephanotis floribunda ; at one end being a collection 



un- 
doubtedly the best of the N. sanguinea clasf, and a 
favourite everywhere ; N. Rafflesiana, and N. Mor- 
ganiae. Also in the house were some well- flowered 
specimens of Clerodendron, Eacharis, Musa Para- 
disiaca, fruiting ; and other showy plants ; and on the 
roof Aristolochia elegans, Gloriosa superba, and 



things usually denominated bedding plants, which 

are often allowed to mar what would otherwise be 

pretty views. 

The Ohchids. 

In the glasshouses a collection of Orchids was 
commenced sc me time ago, and under Mr. Bonsall'* 



of Stanhopeas which are very healthy and in good 

condition to flower. 

Passing through one well-cropped vinery we noted 

large bushes of Rogieria gratissima covered with ^omei ^opwlf dtj. 
flowers, and a quantity of Streptocarpus yielding 
a profusion of Gloxinia- like blooms. In the Camellia- 



CATTLEYA 8PECI08I8BIMA, C. LAWRENCEANl 
C bUPERBA, AND C. 8CHILLEKIANA, DOW CO* 

mencing to grow, should be placed in more wans) 
than others of that genus. To be succe«sful a 
growing and flowering them, it is necessary, if * 
specimens are large, to stand them on inverted p* 
thus bringing them up towards the light, mm* 
examples being suepended near the roof. Urn 
speciosissima should not be repotted at thissea** 
but soon after the flowers fade; but any of the oW 
varieties named may be repotted. During reptf* 
or surfacing, care sbould be taken to make tbept 
ting material very porous, so that the material, «w* 
the plants are growing, will dry qwcklji «» 
quently stand in need of frequent application" 
water. When watering any that are in full gr<w 
afford enough even to saturate the entire maw 
compost, and afford no more till each plant ag* 



Gloxinias. This lofty old-fashioned vinery range 
has the upper part enclosed, and fitted with 



preparing the supplies in different stages, such as are 
, in the Elmet Hall Gardens. J. O'B. 



Thb Week's Work 



skilful management the venture being successful, house some Lilies were flowering, and in another 
and the flowers found specially adapted for cutting vinery were Ferns, Palmp, &c, and a nice display of 

for use indoors, additions have been made, until 
now a large number of plants of showy species are 
remarkably well grown, and occupy places in most staging and walk, the upper part being now used 
of the plant-he uses, as well as in those devoted for growing decorative flower and foliage plants, 
entirely to Orchids. Perhaps the greatest success Another range had a quantity of Tea Roses in pots 
has been attained with the cool Orchids, the range and planted out ; and other houses were filled with 
used for their culture being at the present time small Crotons, Dracaenas, Ferns, &c, such quantities 
filled with some hundreds of strong plants of a good of which are continually in demand that Mr. Bonsall 
strain of Odontoglossum crispum, chiefly established m &*fc exercise considerable skill and forethought in 
plants, though there was a batch of importations of 
the present year, which are making satisfactory pro- 
gress. Some few other species of Odontoglossum 
were in flower ; but O. crispum, in its various forms, 
is the favourite here as in most other gardens. 

The Melon-house, with its good crop of fruits, is 

utilised for growing Dendrobium Phalsenopsis Schro- 

derianum, of which there are many plants, and other 
species n quiring a high temperature, and some of 
them were in bloom. Here, too, Calanthe Veitchii 
and others were being grown in quantity. 

In the next, an intermediate- house, there was 

remarked a fine plant of Coryanthes maculata sus- 
pended at the entrance, the two pendent spikes 

bearing each three of the large fleshy and singularly- 
formed, light orange -coloured flowers; the plant, 

which is in a basket, was growing luxuriantly. In the 

same house in flower were fine plants of the bright On- 

cidium ampliatum majus,the rose and purple 0. Lance- 
anum, O. Cebolletp, 0. flexuosum, Peristeria elata— 

the Dove Orchid, Cypripedium caudatum, C. phiiip- 

pinense, C. Lawrenceanum, and other Cypripediums ; 

and Ucricularia montana. In the span-roofed range 
as a fine show of Laelia purpurata and L. tenebrosa, 

with a plant or so of the true L. grandis, some 

Cypripedium bellatulum, well- flowered plants of 

Dendrobium Bensonse, D. Pierardi, and several 

handsome Odontoglossum citrosmum. Here some 

of the plants were noticed to be standing on small 

brass turn-tables, which have the merit of possessing 



qabden 



THB KITCHEN 

By John Lambert. Gardener, Powii CatiU t Wei* •* 

MUSHROOM BED8 .— Horse-droppingi ma? J 
again be collected for making Mastaroom-bejiu 
cover. The produce from these beds will folio* 
from the last beds out-of-doors. If Mushrooji 
plentiful, and likely to be so, there is no^ 
for haste in the matter of preparing ^ateriaiB. 
stable-litter should have most of the long 
shaken oat of it, and what remains should db 
together and turned over every fourth day, «P 
it out in a layer about 1 foot in thickne", w ft 
dissipate some of its moisture and rankne» 
litter from horses fed with grass, Vetcws,^ 
Clover, Furze, &c, in considerable quantity 
of any use in Mushroom culture. . 

Another planting o 



BRU88EL8 8PROUTS. 

useful vegetable should now be made. 



Thei* p 



ott* 




THB OBCHID HOU8B8. 

By W. H. White, Orchid Gr*wer % Burford, Dorking. 
PLATYCLINI8 FILIFORME AND OTHER8.— 

Amongst plants now in flower, Platjclinis filiforme 
may be considered a gem, its slender drooping 
racemes of small golden-yellow flowers being espe- 
cially attractive. The flower-spikes are produced 
from the centre of the young breaks, which at this 
particular time are only partly developed ; it is, 
therefore, necessary that the plant should have 
copious supplies of water afforded it until the pseudo- 
bulbs are matured. Overhead syringing is not 
advisable while the plant is in flower, but the leaves 
should be sponged instead. After the flowers fade, 
the plant should be placed in a hot, moist house, and be 
shaded from bright sunshine! The spring- flowering 
P. glumacea, and its variety, vallida, flourish under 
similar treatment, but now that growth is completed, 
they should be taken out of the warmest house, in 
which they had been hitherto, and placed in a shady 
part of the intermediate-house, there to remain till 
growth recommences. While at rest sufficient water 
should be afforded to preserve the bulbs and 
leaves in a plump condition, frequent syringing of 
the undersides of the foliage to ward off the attacks 
of insect pests, being carried out. 



will not grow so tall as earlier V^^L^t 

te * 
A still later planting may be put out m » ° 



contrary they will be sturdy and ihor *;:T' w j# 
calculated to withstand the severity ot *» UAi|t ^ 



* 



BROAD BEAN8. 



weeks ; these will give the latest pi«u>8 
spring, and produce .mall, very solid sprout 

._. The last sowing for thj 
may be made about this date, preference oe ^ 
to early podders, as Mazagan and aee ^ 
Green Gem. All of the earlier tom * e ' m * 
consist of tall growers, should be topped g ^ 
ficient pods are set to form a crop. j D »«< 

Beans for exhibition should be thinned, wj^ ^ 
the more promising ones; and * yrinB * {e r, a^ 
occasionally in the evening with eo0 . ( * h Jii»* 
ing the stems some kind of support it 
weak to stand erect. .^ 

QARLIC AND 8HALLOT8 may be llf«J JJj|g 

tops show signs of decaying, •preadmK *» ^ 
thinly in the sun to dry ; and when «w . ^ f 
clean off the soil that adheres to tneni, 
them in store. ^ 

LEE K8.— The present is a good time i to ?i 
main crop of Leeks. I always P ,8D * tW0 V 
trenches, like those made for Celery. ^ j 
in a trench. So cultivated, they 8 ffe? er 
tecttd in hard weather. Leeks win. 



- 



I 



Jclt 13. 1895. J 



THE 



GARDENEBS' CHEOXICLE, 



41 



ai fine if dropped into holes made on the flat, partly 
filling up the holei when planting the L?eki with 
fine soil. Afford the plants a good watering, to 
settle the soil about the roots. The holes will be 
quite filled np as time goes on by the hoeing that 
the land will receive. Those in trenches will be 
moulded up on the approach of winter. 

PEA8. — The last sowing of dwarf late and early 
IV as should be made at this date ; and then, if no 
early frosts come to cat them off, a few dishes of 
green Peas may be obtained at a very acceptable 
time. Affjrd the sowings a sheltered, warm 
situation. 




FLOWER garden. 

By Bailey Wjldds. Gardener, Birdtall Gardens, York. 

FLOWER BED8 should be kept neat and clean by 
removing decayed leaves, and the old flowering trusses 
of Pelargoniums, &c. Edgings of Cerastium tomen- 
tosum, Ivy-leaved and Manglesi Pelargoniums, &c, 
should be neatly pegged out as soon as they require 
it, so that they may quickly form a goad edging. 
Tne flower-spikes of these and other variegated 
varieties used for edging should be kept pinched off. 
Calceolarias and Lobelias should be kept thoroughly 
watered as long as the drought continues ; and con- 
siderable care will be required in watering, staking, 
and tying tall-growing sub-tropical plants that are 
used as backgrounds to clumps. The show varieties 
of Dahlias should have the lateral shoots taken out, 
and the principal shoots thoroughly secured to sticks. 
Mulch the beds well with manure, and give liberal 
■applies of water. Earwigs are very troublesome, 
and quickly destroy the young growth and foliage if 
not carefully looked after. A small pot with a bit of 
dry hay or moss in it makes a good trap for earwigs, 
and it should be examined every day. Bedding Dahlias 
should be pegged down as soon as they req lire it. 

PROPAGATION. &0 —The layering of Carnations 
and Picotees should now be proceeded with, especially 
of varieties that are scarce, and where the blooms are 
not required for cutting purposes. If large fleers 
are required, take out the lateral buds, and leave 
only the end bud on each spike, and when the pods 
■tart to burst, some protection should be affjrded 
against rain in the way of hand-lights or canvas on 
tripods. Cuttings of Carnations and Pinks may now 
be taken and put in, six in a 48 -pot, plunging them 
in a pit where there is some amount of bottom heat; 
orthe cuttings may be pricked out under hand-lights 
or in frames, and kept close and shaded till rooted. 
Cuttings strike best in sandy loam and leaf-soil of 
about equal proportions. Cuttings or slips of 
Auriculas, Sveet Williams, Pentstemons, Autirrhi- 
niums, Poloxes, herbaceous Pansies, Violas, and 
Wallflowers, may also be struck in this manner. 

ZONAL PELARGONIUMS— Scarce varieties which 
may have been kept for propagating uses should now 
be increased as fast as cuttings can be obtained. 
Place the cutting-bed on a sunny border. When well- 
rooted and not before, place them thickly in boxes for 
storing under glass when the time comes for so doing. 
Cuttings may be taken as late as September. 

8EED GATHERING AND 80WING.— S?ed-pods of 

Auriculas, Primroses, Polyanthuses, and Pinks 
should be gathered as soon as ripe, sowing the seed 
without delay in beds or in drills 1 foot apart. Old 
plants of the above may now be divided, the roots 
being shortened somewhat planting them afresh in 
som* rich garden mould. They soon make fine plants, 
flowering well the next year. Early-raised seedlings 
should be planted out, taking care that tbey do 
not lack water in dry weather. Old plants of Pansy, 
Viola, Arabis, Alyssum, Ajuga, Aubrietia, &c, may 
now be divided and replanted in soil enriched with 
decayed short manure, shading and watering them 
for a time. Afford attention to the planting out of 
seedling Anemones, Aubrietias, and Wallflowers, 
that will b* required for planting in the autumn in 
the spring garden. Sow hardy annuals for spring 
flowering, viz , Silene pendula, EicholtzTa, Myosotis, 
&c, pricking the seedlings out as soon as they are 
large enough to be handled. 



FRUITS PNDEH GLASS. 

By Richard Parker, Gardener, Goodwood, Chichester. 
8TRAWBERRIE8 IN POTS— One of the chief 

matters connected with successful culture in pots is 
the securing of early runners, so that the plants 
may become completely established in the fruiting- 
pots before the autumn. It is a saving of labour 
to layer the runner on the fruiting pot, and 
many gardeners do so with good results, but it 



needs much care in affording water, as the soil is 
apt to become sour before the season is over, and 
then the plant is sure to suffer in health. I have 
commenced layering different varieties in smill 60 's, 
and several thousands are required to cover our 
wants. The more promising plants will be selected 
soon as they are rooted, potting them at once 
into 32'*; those which remain being planted in a 
well-manured border, and by keeping the flowers 
picked off thess plants, they will supply strong early 
runners another year. Where plants for furnishing 
runners for forcing have not been so treated, and 
the gardener has to resort to the fruiting beds, it 
is desirable to assist the old stools with several 
applications of manure-water, freeing the bed from 
weeds, and the plants of weakly and cramped growth. 
The most promising runners should be selected for 
layering, the pots being stood in each alternate space. 
Water should be afforded with a rose watering-can 
morning and evening until the runners are well- 
rooted, when they may be placed as soon as possible 
in the fruiting- pots. It is not a wise course to starve 
the young plant in a small 60 pot. The filling of the 
small pots should contain a small quantity of decayed 
manure as an aid to root action, and to prevent the 
soil becoming hard. If the layering has to be done 
on the fruiting-pots, these should be quite clean, and 
drainage good, a small quantity of soot being placed 
on the tops of crocks to prev >nt the ingress of worms. 
A compost of a retentive nature is best for the 
Strawberry, and very firm potting should be the 
rule. If the loam used is of a very heavy nature, 
one-eighth of its balk in spent Mushroom-bed dung 
may be added, together with a sprinkling of wood- 
ashes, bone-meal and soot. Keen's S edling is still 
one of the best as a first early fruiter, and may be 
followed by Vicomtesse He>icart de Thury, which, 
though small, is one of the richest-flavoured Straw- 
berries grown. La Grosie forces well, and produces 
fine fruit, but the flavour is not first-class. Rjyal 
Sovereign, a new variety, is an excellent forcer, and 
will become a favourite in time. President is not 
grown to such an extent in pots as formerly — it is, 
however, a useful variety, to follow the earlier ones. 
Where there is accommodation, a few hundreds of 
British Qieen should be grown in pots, as these 
brought on slowly produce as fine fruit of the richest 
flavour about the same date as, and are preferred to, the 
first earlies growing on warm borders out of doors. 
James Veitch and Aaguste Nicaise are varieties 
which produce fruit of large siz* when grown in 
pots, if not forced too early, and they receive plenty 
of ventilation. 



PLANTS UNDER GLASS. 

By W. H. Smits, Gardener, West Dean Park, Chichester. 

TABLE PLANTS. — Small plants of various species 
for the decoration of the dinner-table, where this kind 
of thing is largely carried out, must not be neglected 
at this season, for it is now more easy to find 
suitable houses for them than at some other seasons. 
Tne present is also a suitable season for propagating 
and preparing some of them for next winter. Palms 
deservedly rank high as table plants, and some of the 
best are Geonoma gracilis, Co cm Weddelliana, and 
Areca Verschaffelti. These should be kept in pairs 
in pots o* variius siz a s, especially 60's. Tney do 
well in sandy loam in well-drained deepish pots. 
Crotons of telling candle-light colour may have the 
tips of well-coloured shoots cut off and struck 
singly in small pots. Suckers of Pandanus Veitchii 
may be detached and potted in sandy loam and peat. 
Ferns, in variety from spores, wh«n potted up, are 
always useful decorative stuff. Dracaena Cooperi, 
D. Guilfoylei, D. angustifolia, D. terminalis, and D. 
hybrida ; Aralia Veitchi, A. V. gracillima, A. 
elegantissima, Casuarina ericoides, a particularly 
light and graceful plant, will also be found of service. 
Of flowering plants that may be grown on to the 
floweriug stage in 60'j are Begonias Gloire de 
Sceaux, Gloire de Lorraine, John II ml, Winter Gem, 
and Adonis. Gesneras in variety should not be 
forgotten. 

LILIUM3.— These plants will require to be top- 
dressed with rich loam, or loam, leaf soil, and dry 
cow-dung, placing this well up and about the stem. 
They will also require to be plentifully supplied with 
root- moisture, and occasionally with manure- water, 
say, twice a week. Place a stoot stick to each stem, 
and on the first appearance of "fly " fumigate the 
plants. If a few of these are placed out-of-doors, the 
flowering season will be much lengthened. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS.— In case the final potting 
has not been done, no time should now be lost in 
getting the plants potted. Those which were cut 



down early in June will have now grown sufficiently 
for the gardener to distinguish which of the shoots 
may be left, and which rubbed off; about six shoots 
should be reserved ; pot these last plants in *.♦ inch 
pots, and stand them on a bed of coal-ashes in full 
sunshine. Plants intended for the production of 
large flowers should be secured to stout stakes, or 
horizontally stretched lengths of wire placed a good 
distance apart. If posts or iron rods are driven into 
the ground about 15 feet apart, with a wire strand 
along the top, the Chrysanthemum stakes can be 
tied to this, and injury by the wind effectually 
prevented. 

80UVENIR DE LA MALMAI80N CARNATION.— 

The young plants of this variety, if they were 
layered as advised on p. 6 of the last volume, will 
now be ready for potting into 60 pots. Much care 
will be required in separating the layers from the 
mother plants, or many of the roots will be broken 
off. Pot them rather firmly in a compost of loam, 
peat, leaf soil, and sand, place them in a cold frame, 
and keep rather close and lightly shaded till they 
have pushed roots into the new soil. Continue to 
layer shoots as the plants finish flowering, but reserve 
as many as may be required for potting on into large 
pots for early work. 



THE HARDY FRUIT GARDEN. 

By W.Popk. Gardener, Highclere Castle, Newbury. 

PEACHES AND NECTARINE8 — Tne thinning o 
Peaches and Nectarines should now be completed. 
Continue to stop sub-lateral shoots at one leaf, and 
secure the young wood by tying or nailing it as growth 
advances, so as to affjrd the fruit the full benefit 
of air and sunshine. Syringe the tre«s frequently, to 
prevent red-spider finding a lodgment; an insect apt 
to be very troublesome under fixed glass copings, 
especially if the trees do not get a sufli :iency of water 
at the roots. Occasional soakings of sewage or 
other liquid-manure will be of great benefit now 
that the fruit is swelling, but it must not be applied 
too strong, nor yet in driblets. 

8TRAWBERRY PLANTATIONS.— As soon as the 

fruit is gathered from Strawberry plantations, cut 
off all runners not wanted for increase, together 
with old leaves, &c, and clear away all straw and 
other mulching material at the same time. The 
surface- soil should be loosened by hoeing, and if a 
mulching of rotten manure can be applied afterwards, 
it will be of great benefit to the plants, in strengthen- 
ing and plumping up the crowns for another 
season. If the beds are to be destroyed, do this 
without delay, so that the ground may be 
utilise* for winter crops of Broccoli, for which 
it is generally suitable without any special 
preparation. Three years, or at most four, is a 
sufficiently long time to allow Strawberries to remain 
on the same ground. After the third year, 
as a rule, the fruits deteriorate very much in 
siz a , and consequently in weight. If runners sire 
to be layered in pots for new plantations, they 
should be layered at once, or if not convenient to do 
this on the ground, very good results may be ob- 
tained by taking runners that may have slightly 
rooted info the ground, potting into large thumbs 
or small 60 siz a d pots, and putting them at once 
into a frame ; when by keeping them close after 
watering, and slightly shading for a few days, they 
will soon begin rooting freely, and may ba gradually 
hardened off and planted as required ; such plants 
answer perfectly for mid-season and late forcing 
if taken in good time. When rooted runners are 
received by post or otherwise from a distance, they 
should be treated in the same manner, for if ever so 
well- rooted they rarely make a satisfactory start when 
planted out without preparation. I f any plants are to 
remain in the nursery beds throughout the winter 
to be planted out in the spring, they may be allowed 
to root into the soil between the rows. Take them up 
with a trowel when rooted, and plant in rows a foot 
apart, and 6 inches from plant to plant. Water 
well, and shade slightly for a day or two after 
planting. 



HEDY8ARUM MULTIJUGUM — Numerous cor- 
respondents have written to confirm our doubt as to 
the identity of the plant sent from the Cambridge 
Botanic Garden under the above name, and figured 



in our last issue. 



Barbies 



send specimens corresponding with the figure in the 
Gartenfiora. We will endeavour in a subsequent 
issue to ascertain the true state of the case. 



42 



THE 



GARDE NEBS' 



CHRONICLE. 



[July 13 1895. 



EDITORIAL NOTICE8. 

Advertisements should be sent to the PUBLISHER. 

Newspapers.— Correspondents sending newspapers should bt 
careful to mark the paragraphs they wish the Editor to see. 




%i*> 



__ News.— Correspondents will greatly oblige by sending 
to the Editor early intelligence of local events likely to be 
of interest to our readers, or of any matters which it is 
desirable to bring under the notice of horticulturists. 

Letters for Publication. — AU communications intended 
for publication, as well as specimens and plants for naming, 
should be addressed to the Editor, 41. Wellington 
Street, Covent Garden, London. Communications 

Should be WRITTEN ON ONE SIDE ONLY OF THE PAPER, 

tent as early in the week as possible, and duly signed by 
the writer. If desired, the signature will not be printed, but 
kept as a guarantee of good faith. The Editor does not under- 
take to pay for any contributions, or to return unused com- 
munications or illustrations, unless by special arrangement. 



years; they^may be at timesTexacting, as when 
someone says^that is the finest bloom of Horace 
Vernet that ever was seen, they quietly add 
"but don't you think the color r is a leetle 
gone ? " Beautiful and bright aa the Roses were 
on this occasion, they were perhaps somewhat 
wanting in size and solidity. There were no 
exceptionally grand blooms, and when one con- 
siders the terrible winter through which Rose 
growers have passed, and the long drought of 
the last two months which has so disappointed 
the hopes of gardeners and farmers, it is mar- 
vellous that on such a day blooms of such 
freshness could have been shown, more especially 

when 



Everyone must have been struck by the im- 
mense improvements which have taken place in 
the arrangement of the show under the direction 
of the Garden Superintendent, Mr. W. G. Head. 
Instead of the long formal line of boxes stretch- 
ing from end to end of the transept, the 
exhibition was broken up into groups containing 
a few classes, and this, as the boxes were mingled 
with growing plants, no", only gave a pleasauter 
aspect to the exhibition, but also enabled visitors 
to move about m^re freely, so that it wu 
possible at any time during the afternoon to get 
a sight of the flowers. 

Conjectures, anticipations, and opinions have 
been freely indulged in, and as usual some of 




make a night journey on such a close and sultry these were jight and some wrong ; thus, it was 

night as that which preceded the show. generally thought that it would not be aft* 

ti-rrl/ There has seldom been a more close contest rate exhibition and I this, we think, notmth. 

APPOINTMENTS FOR THE ENSUING WEEK. thaa that which took place for the 5-guinea landing the £ M .^ ™ 

- cup presented by the High Sheriff of Gloucester ; growers was the true state of the caw. The 

and when ultimately the prize fell to Rev. J. H. flowers in most instances lacked substance, ad, 



MEETING. 

SATURDAY, JULY 13— Royal Botanic Society. 



SATURDAY, 
WEDNESDAY 



THURSDAY 



TUESDAY, 



FRIDAY, 



SHOWS. 

T - Q CWood Green Horticultural, Gala- 
j uly 16 j 8hield8 Horticultural. 

t^^.,^ (National Rose Society, at Derby; 
J uly 17 ^ waterford Horticultural. 

7t , Twlfl ) Halifax Rose, Canterbury (Kent) 
JULY 18 -£ Hospital Fete. 

SALES. 

(Imported Orchids, fiOm Messrs. 
July 16 < Hugh Low & Co., at Protheroe & 

( Morris* Rooms. 

, 1Q f Imported and Established Orchids, 
JULY AV-j at p ro theroe & Morris' Rooms. 



Pemberton, no doubt could exist but that it was 
a hard fought and well won victory. The de- 
tails of the fight were given in our last issue. 



consequently, staying powers, those that were 
grown on heavy soils standing best. It was ak 
expected that, owing to tha character of the 
season, the northern growers would stand the 



In such a season it was not at all likely that ^ ^^ ^ ^ be 8eea thafc tWs was not 
blooms of surpassing excellence should be seen, ^ ^ ^ ohief prizeg both in fte nursery . 

men and amateur classes going to southern 
growers. In comparing it with the exhibi- 
tion held at Gloucester, the verdict we think 
would be that the Teas and Noisettes were 



none concerning which you would say to a 
brother rosanan, " Have you seen Smith's 



bloom 



Jones' 



RREOTED AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR THE ENS 
ING WEEK, DEDUCED FROM THE OBSERVATIO 
OF FORTY-THREE YEARS. AT CHISWICK.- 63°.4. 



grand Catherine Mermet?" and hence it happens 
that peculiar interest attaohed to the selection 
that would be made for the best bloom in the 
respective classes. Now, it very often happens 
that in the great race of the Derby the favourites 
on whom long odds have been laid are nowhere, 



better at the provincial ex 



hibition, and the 
hybrid perpetuals at the metropolitan. Ai 
happens most times at a great show, the 
amateurs are fully abreast of the nursery- 
men in the excellence of their exhibits 



. The first of the three exhibitions 

society's ExM- of the National Rose Society 
wt ion, held at was an unqualified success. For 

Gloucester. ^ ., XT ,. , , . , 

many years the National held 
two 



while an outsider carries off the coveted prize. fa ^ the stand of Mr LindsB li/s, in the 

Last year at the Crystal Palace for instance, Q ^^ . f there faad beea such ■ 

Marguerite Bodet carried off the silver medal m * ^ been awarded that for tha begt to 

the amateur s class for Dr. Budd and this year * the show; it contained some grand blooms 



5 



an equally little-known rose did the same for the colour ^ ffeihneM of which a t suoh • 
Messrs. Harkness in the nurseryman s class, 



season 



prcruudal. A few years ago%owever, an attempt tion, Comtease Liidre; this is a bright carmine Medal of the National Rose Society for the be 



wa* 



connection 



cultural Society at the Drill Hall, as it was f " M ™ *™ W > been f h * ited before and yet 

* 7 AithAiinrh tnnra nrava Tint* Y< rwaa /at iral I_lrn/\ tvti 



urged that the best blooms of these classes 
past before the Crystal Palace show came 



red Rose, which was sent out by EuofcuK hybrid pe r p etaal in t he amUeur classes w» 
Vebdieb fifteen years ago, but has never, so awarded . and it 1B somewhat remark* 

that the award for the same prize m* 
nurseryman's class was given to the 
flower in Mr. B. R. Cast's stand. No outsit 



although there were fine Roses of well-known 

coveted Drize was awarded to it. 



The attempt was not a very successful one, and The curiosit y which is alw *y s active M to new this time oame in to carry off the honours, » 

Roses was not destined to be gratified at Glou- it is tolerably clear from the number of b loom 

exhibited and their excellence wherever show 



and 



persede 



Metro- 



hibited 



politan, Northern, and Southern. Previous to 
this, Gloucester had asked for the provincial 
show to be held there, and the request had been 
acceded to. But then came the tempting 
request from Windsor to hold the first sonthftm 



yeat. 



competition for the gold medal for the best i t must be regarded as " Her Majesty's 
seedling, and amongst new Eoses already in 0ne could have anticipated that it would h»« 

commerce there was hardly anything that merited been j ast the year foE Comtesse de ^^ 
special notice. 

A beautiful yellow Rose was exhibited by 



show there ; and the fact that the show was to Messrs. Jefferibs & Sons, of Cirencester. It Tea Rose which seems to have come 



bat it ' was not "bo ; very few good bloomS d ° tl | g 
were staged as far as we could see, an ^ 



induced 



is a 



another year. 



its claims 
advantag 



seedling between Cloth of Gold and conspicuously was Madame Cusin ; for when 



Marechal Kiel, a beautifnl soft yellow with 
good 



time 



dm 



concerned resembling Cloth of Gold than MarSchal Niel. 
The place Tlle severe winter of last year tried it very 



the courtesy and kindness of the secretary, and 
the hospitality of the Mayor and officers of the 



made 



harmony 



much, but it is to be hoped that the raiser may 
be able to bring it forward at some later show ; 
it is of rampant habit, and should it fulfil its 
present promise will be a valuable addition to 
what are called our climbing Roses. 



shown, it had a richness of colour quit 
ceptional, and indeed, in one instance, ^ J 
one of our most experienced growers * 
a grand bloom of it for his box, he won 
allow it to be staged, because he oonsi 



it out of character. 

ticipated 



►aid I* 



persons 



be 



exhibitions of this kind, those who are cap- Whatever interest may be taken in'other ex- 

tivated by the brilliancy of the show who are hibitions of Rose Societies throughout the 
perhaps ignorant of its real character, and 
therefore view it with an uncritical eye; to 
them the Roses are perfection, and they cannot 
understand how any fault can be found with 
them. There are those, on the other hand, who 
are hardened, so to speak, by the exhibiting of 



are all eclipsed by that taken in the great Met- 
ropolitan show held by the National Society at , 

the Crystal Palace. Whatever doubts may have merce, and were 
existed as to the suggestions by which amateur 



number 



twenty years or more, and whose judgment is grown, it is unquestionable that though it may 
not influenced by what first meets the eye, but not have realized what some expected it has 
by a comparison with the results of former given a stimulus to Rose exhibitions ' 



somewhat deficient, and this proved to 
case. A most beautiful collection which w ^ 
first prize, came from Bath, and * nofche er0 n0 t 
Dundee. In the same way, new Roses we 
plentiful, and of these none of those fr 001 fce 
seemed to attract any attention ; neither w ^ 
anything very striking in the absolu ^ 
Roses, namely, those which are no ^ 

Rose Society s Gold Med#l. None* ^ 
was adjudged worthy of the Gold Med . ^ 
two exhibited by Messrs. Dickso* (« 
similar to The Bride and another a P!^,^ 
were highly commended; Messrs. 



ted for 



Juit 13, 1895.] 



THE 



GARDENERS' CHRONICLE. 



43 



Bladna is a large Rose, very fall, somewhat in and East Anglia has claimed the palm in the Mr. F. B. Lindskll carried off the Challenge 
the style of Merveille de Lyon, but higher in contest; rarely has greater pleasure been dij- Trophy with a box of blooms, which, as hat 
the centre, but the texture of the petals was 
somewhat thin ; this may have been owing in 



played among all classes of Rose growers and 
Rose exhibitors than when it was announced 



already been said, might be justly termed th 
best in the exhibition. Mr. O. G. Ohpkn. 



some measure to the season. Mr. Will Tay- that the old warrior, Mr. Ben Cant had again from Colchester, carried off the Tea Trophy 







TABULABK 



(see p. 44.) 



lob s was a high-coloured Rose, very sweet and carried off the Trophy, together with the Gold as well as other pieces of plate. There were up- 
promising, but unfortunately he had not com- Medal that accompanied it; while, as we have wards of 100 exhibitors from all parts of the 



plied with the schedule, thus the two exhibitions 
of the National Rose Society have passed 



already said, the best blooms of H.P. was found kingdom, and this it must be remembered is a very 

different thing from an exhibition of Chrysanthe- 



box 



without any additions to our Gold Medal Roses. Mr. Frank Cants flowers were also exceedingly mums or Dahlias— you may stage both of these 
With regard to the chief honours of the day, good, while Messrs. Prior & Son showed that the day before in the stands in which they are to 
they have followed, as far as nurserymen are they were determined to hold the place they had be exhibited, and the probability is, that unless 



concerned, the course of the last couple of years, 



pi red 



In the amateur classes, some extraordinary mishap overtakes them, they 



44 



THE GARDENERS' CHRONICLE. 



[July 13, 1895. 



"DlCTIONNAIRE PRATIQUE D'HORTICULTURE 

ET DE Jardinage.— The French translation by 
M. Mottbt. of what has com9 to be known as 



was done with some 14,000 packages of fruit, and we 
are informed that a new line of steamers — the 
Gaelph — will be placed on the Australasian line, for 
the carriage of agricultural produce to Manchester, 

The Exports 



will be exhibited as they left their owners' garden; given a donation of £10 10s. to the funds of the 
but not so the Rose, the long railway journey, or Gardeners' Royal Benevolent Institution, 
hot nights, may shatter half his blooms, and conse- 
quently he must bring with him-a box of what he 
calls " spares/' often containing twice the number 

that he actually requires, and with which he can Nicholson's Dictionary, has now reached its 39 Ji part, foot up at £17,800,100 — a decrease of £109,055, 
replenish his boxe3 on the morning of the show. which brings the work up to the letters Met. The Uader the head of " manufactured articles," there is 

translator has added to the original text, and a gain of £485,000, of which £333,000 is due to 

arms and ammunition. Metals went down £245,721, 
telegraph-wire figuring for nearly all this amount. 



It is this enthusiasm which tends to keep the 

National Rose Society alive, and every year to enhanced its value. Additional illustrations are also 



extend 



supplied. 



STOCK-TAKING: JUNE.— Every day's experience 

Catasetum tabulare, Lindl., VAR. RHINO- in fcbe matfcer of atock-taking tends to convince us 
~" that Pope, in his "Essay on Man," hit the mark 

when he wrote "Man never it t but always to be 

blest," for have we not been looking forward, not 

to a rush, but to a gradual rise in the values of 

both imports and exports — and have we not been 

doomed to a partial disappointment ? 

the Whitsun 



PHORUM, Rchb.f. — Tbe species is one of the most 
interesting of the curious genus Catasetum, and the 
interest in its curiously- constructed flowers is still 
further heightened by their extreme variability both 
in form and colour. The type was described by 
Lindlev in 1840, and since that several dis- 
tinct varieties have been recorded by the late 
Professor Retchenbach in the columns of the 
Gardeners* Chronicle, three of the most distinct 
beirg one with greenish flowers, slightly blotched 
with light purple-brown ; C. t. bracbyglossum, which 
has a shorter lip and much broader callus than the 
type; and C. t. rhinophorum (described in the 
Gardeners' Chronicle, p. 358, Sept. 18, 1880), of which 
the author says, " the whole surface of the callus is 
broken in innumerable, irregular, transverse- toothed 
lamellae, of white colour, with spots of ■ burnt sienna,' 
thus making one think of a file— hence the name." 
The striking feature in Catasetum tabulare is the 
broad, fleshy table-like callus which occupies the 
greater part of the lip, the toothed or bristled margin 
of which is turned up around the raised table, thus 
forming a gallery which traverse how he may lead 
the insect promenader to the seta, which spring and 
release the pollinia. The colour of the large raised 
callus is usually white, and its surface is generally 
smooth, but in the instance illustrated it is 
rough and like the other parts of the flowers 

with red - brown of 



All was 
going on nicely,* when on came 

holidays and a parliamentary dislocation, and over 
go our calculations. But the fall this month is 
not a very large one, £345,095, or about 1 per 
cent, as compared with the Returns for June, 1894. 
Here is our uaual extract from the Summary of 
Imports : 



Imports, 



Total value of imports 

(A.) Articles of food 
and drink — duty 
free 



1894. 



1895. 



Difference. 



£ \ £ 

34,229,679 33,884,584 



£ 

345,095 



• •• 



* • • 



(B.) Articles of food 
and drink— dutiable 

Riw materials for 
textile manufac- 



tures ... 



• •• 



Raw materials for 
sundry industries 
and manufactures ... 

(A.) Miscellaneous 
articles 



13,414,987 



1,439,023 



12,585,318 
1,551,788 



4,390.045 



• • • 



t f • 



spotted 

The Catasetum* 



are fast 



various shades, (B } PaTCel Po8t 



increasing in favour 
in Orchid collection*, and as a consequence their 



4,362,931 



1,110,635 

96.805 



5,219,880 



829,669 



+112,765 



+829,835 



3,676,176 



1,213.218 
70,371 



686,755 



+102,583 
—26,435 



Wheat has increased by 334 240 cwt. over June 



Cotton goods fell off considerably, but linens went up 
America also buying largely in the woollen and 
worsted department. Coals fell off to the amount of 
£123,729. Manure fell away to the value of nearly 
£75,106. The exports for the six months show a loss 
of £106,117,516— the decrease being £765,959. We 
can only hope for improvement in our next report. 

11 The Botanical Magazine " for the present 

month contains descriptions and coloured figures of 
the following plants : 

Senecio Hualtata, Bertero, t. 7422. — A noble 
Senecio from temperate Chili and Argentaria. It is 
a tall herbaceous plant, with bold cordate-oblong 
leaves, somewhat woolly and a branching inflorescence, 
bearing numerous cream-coloured flower-heads, each 
about 1 inch in diameter. It is hardy at Kew, and 
flowered in that establishment in June last. It is 
allied to S. sagittifolius, already figured ; the specific 
name is an adaptation of the appellation generally 
given to the plant by the Chilians. 

Pyrus Cratcsgifolia Targioni, Tozzetti, t. 7423 — 
An Italian species, having morf* the appearance of a 
Crataegus than of a Pyrus. Tne leaves are like 
those of P. torminalis, but the inflorescence is lax, 
and the pedicels long and slender. Kew. 

Aristolochia unguHfolia, Masters, t. 7424. —A 
curious Bjrnean species, figured in these pages, 
1880, vol. ii., p. 116 fig. 28. 

Neuwkdia Griffithii, R-Mchenbach, t. 7425 -A 
highly interesting plant, linking Orchids to Irids. 
The leaves are plicate, and the numerous white 
flowers borne in long erect dense spikes. 

Ruhus lasiostylus. Foeke, t. 7426. A Chinese 



habits and requirements are more closely observed last vear ' bat this has bad no effect on the price of mpm*. with niL^ i.„ u-f kl M «ti, 

than formerly, and their culture is now'onsidered the loaf other than to raise it : the price of Wheat h ^ Z^JZ"^ 

simple, if they be treated like other Orchids which on the market has gone up some 6.. in about as * P COl ° ar - 



lose their leaves and require a drier and cooler situa- 
tion 



wW ,r ek K* aDd ? 7 U ! d b6 x intere ' tiD & t0 note Parpluh. Hard; at Kew. 



The flowers are 
ia looie cymes, each about 1 inch in diameter 



during the resting season. The plant from wnat tne changes (and charge.) have been during 
which our illustration (fig. 8) was taken was exhibited the P a,t hundred years, but space will not permit. MESSRS. W. P. LaiRD & SINCLAIR —The annual 

by Messrs. J. Veitch & Sons, Riyal Exotic Nursery, Tea » how 8 » rise of £79,000. and £95,000 in coffee ; onting of the emploj e . of this well-known firm of 
Chelsea, on June 25 last, at a meeting of the Royal 
Horticultural Society. 



Blanchinq. 



The announcement that \Tr. 



Fbancis Daewin was to lecture at the Royal Horti- 
cultural Society aroused much interest. Mr. Dah- 
win was associated with his father in carrying out 
many of those experiments which have proved so 
stimulating and suggestive. " 



chose for his subject the 



On this occasion he 



t . changes in form and 

structure connected with blanching or etiolation, and 
he showed that these changes are not to be con- 
sidered of a pathological nature, but are the result 
of adaptation to adverse circumstances. The lecture 
was very clear and conclusive, but more fitted for 
the Scientific C jmra'tSee than for the miscellaneous 
groups that constitute the " 3 o'clock meeting " The 
publication of the lecture in the Journal will be 
awaited with interest. 

The Royal Gardeners' Orphan Fund- 

The usual Rose Fair in aid of the Rayal Gardeners 
Orphan Fund, was held in connection with the 
Croydon Horticultural Society's show on Wednesday 
July 3. and the amount taken for the sale of flowers 
was ej m Qd Among the contributors of blooms 
were Messrs. F. Savdbh & Co, Hcoh Low & Co 
Laiv, & sow. B. Cant. T. B. Hatwood, H. V 

Macaw M. Hodgson. E M. B ETHUNE , W . Measb. 

O. J. Salteu 3 Slateh. C. Lane and R.y. J H 
P,mb E b T oN ( Mrs. W. QmnmM again kindly nnde^ 
tiok the sale of the flowers. 

GARDENERS' ROYAL BENEVOLENT INST.TU- 



spirits have gone down by £60,000. 
supplies fell off some £830,000. Oats gained 
£144 000 from Russia ; cheese shows a reduction— 
though the arrivals from Australia have nearly 
doubled. Batter from Australasia has gone down 
in qiantity — also from France and Denmark. 
Timber shows a reduction of £780 000-last year's 
imports for the same period tning exceptionally 
heavy. Textile materials were £<30 000 over June 
1894; cotton went up £293 490 ; while flax increased 



Other food nurserymen at Dundee, was held at Glamis Castle, 

on Wednetday, 3rd inst., a very enjoyable day being 
spent. 



Ealing. Horticultural Society. 



The 



— - — — - mm vwm wwm WWW'U ■ ■ ft — 

annual show of this Society took place on the 3ri 
inst., in the beautiful grounds of Gannersbury P*rk. 
The number of exhibits was not so large as usual 
in fact, the shows of this Society do not compare 

_ v> _„„*„„ IireTOWe favourably for some reason with its earlier exhi- 

by £266,405; wool went up £170,000. Manufae- bition8 - In the principal class for a g r00 p of plants 

arran K p d for effect, the successful exhibitors were 
Mr. W. Roberts, gardener to J. Harris, E«q., 
Braemar ; and Mr. Long, gardener to E. P. Oakshott, 

distinct 



tured articles, mainly silk stuff* from France, show 
an increase of £233.153-but leather and woollen 
manufactures foot up for abou'; a third. Fruits, &c 

now claim attention, and here is our usual excerpt— q '' 0fchard Dene. W<* twenty-four 

varieties of cut Rises, the lit priza (only entry) was 



Im pouts. 



Fruits, raw ; 
Apples 

Cherries 



Plums 

Pears 

Grapes 

Unenumerated 



1894. 



1895. 



Difference. 



...bush. 



••• 



• • 



••• 



Onions 
Potatos 

Vegetables, raw, 
merated 



»•• 



• • • 



••• 



... 



••• 



»» 



»» 



>» 



»♦ 



>t 



•• • 



... cwt. 

unemi 
... value 



38,196 

193,231 

3,731 

157 

4,036 

245,697 
328,5 i% 

£ 
170,550 






50,556 +12.360 



115,670 

4,660 

13 

3,035 

155 451 

318,021 

954.735 

£ 

199,746 



77,561 

+929 

—144 

—1,001 

-90,246 
— 10,527 
-301,528 

£ 

+29,196 



awarded to Mr. C. Turner, Slough. A good compe- 
tition resulted in the prizes offered for eighteen 
Roses (not fewer than twelve varieties); 1st, Gold 
Medal of the National Rose Society, Mr. El wards, 

" r ~ Medal, 



gr. to W 



Silver-gilt 



National Rose Society, Mr. C. Long; 3*d, Silver 
Medal, National Rue Society, Mrs. B>osey; 4* 
Bronze Medal of National Roae Society, Mr. S. Lowe. 
An excellent display of garden produce was made by 
the cottagers of the district. 



Practical Gardening 



in Egypt. 



Mr. 



Som. of these figures are well worth^ot^TrTDass^t 
may now be agreed that the new Manchester marked is 



\Valtf 

"— «.u giving a course 01 iet»>" — 

at Ramleh on thu subject. The lecturei treated of 
the following mattere : Botanical cla.iification of 
plant*, climate and .oil, treet and Palnw, arrange- 
ment of a garden, the planting of ahrabberiea and 
bordera, lawna and flower-bed., climbing plant*, 
plants for windj and aheltered position., Bate*, 



July 13, 1895] 



THE 



GARDENERS' CHRONICLE. 



45 



annuals, hedges, conservatories, specimen isolated organised agency, whereby producer, and seller, and 



plant*, water-gardening and aquatics, potting, bulbs, 
Chrysanthemums, Cactus and succulents, garden 
economic plants, Vines, fruit-trees, pruning, graft- 
ing, and propagating. Mr. Draper, who is an old 



the wholesale buyer will be brought together to their 
mutual benefit, and that of the German people. 
An addition is made to Rale 13, which will make it 
possible for a visitor to the exhibition to take out 



Kewite, has been appointed director of the govern- the value of his entrance money in exhibited articler, 
ment gardens at the Barrage, near Cairo. A book by which it is hoped that the number of visitors may 

be increased at the same time that the exhibitor 
will be enabled to sell his goods more freely. 
Articles which are perishable, and which have not 
been sold by the exhibitor, will be sold regularly at 
public auction, for the bent fit of the latter. The 
exhibition will serve, not only as a means of dis- 
posing of goods according to sample, but also as a 
market where the finer sorts of vegetables, Grapes, 
and conserved good?, wine, &c, can be ordered 
from the producers, and the carriage of the same by 
railway or post arranged for. Prospectuses and 
forms of application will be sent, post-free, from the 
office of the International Hygienic Exhibition, 



on Gardening in Egypt may shortly be expected 
from Mr. Draper's pen. 

ORCHID HYBRIDS. — We learn that Mr. Hansen's 
complete list of Orchid hybrids is in the press, and 
will shortly be issued. 

The Cotton Plant is losing its popularity as 

a u safe investment * in the very heart of the cotton- 
growing States of America. Time was — some forty 
years since — such an assertion would have been 
laughed at. fl You cannot do without American 
-cotton" was the article of faith set up by growers 
and brokers on the other side of the Atlantic ; 
starvation in Lancashire during the cotton famine 
shook the belief in many minds, and alterations in 
spinning and weaving machinery brought under 
subjection cottons of short staple; planters and 
capitalists took up the cultivation of the plant; and 
to-day, Lancashire is no longer dominated by New 
Orleans or New York. But planters in the Southern 
States kept on; and in the face of a steady fall in 
prices, opened up all over the world a market for 
cotton seed, cotton oil, and cotton cake. Of course, 
the same products can be placed on the market 
wherever cotton is grown, and capital can be 
utilised. Should it be desired to learn where c otton 
is grown at the present time, the intelligence can be 
had from the * l market " columns recording sales in 
Any daily paper any morning in the week. And it 
has come to past, that it has been determined to re- 
duce considerably the growth of cotton in America. 
The result of the special investigation set on foot by 
the Federal Government's Agricultural Department 
in 720 Cotton-growing counties in the United 



Berlin, W. Leipzigerstrasse, 4, upon application. 

Oxford University: Mathematical 

HONOURS. — Many of our readers will be pleased 
to hear that Mr. J. Hudson's son has just passed the 
final public examination (Greats), taking: first-class 
honours, thus repeating his success of 1893, when he 
took first-class honours in the first public examina- 
tion (Mods). He proceeded to his B.A. degree on 
Saturday last. He holds a scholarship at Jesus 
College, the said scholarship being renewed for 
another year, in order that he may take science as 
an additional subject. 

JOHN WlLL8. — As we go to press, we hear with 
great regret of the death of this prominent horticul- 
turist on the 9th inst. Mr. Wills was in bis 64th 
year, and had been suffering from illness for a long 
period. In our next issue we shall allude more at 
length to his work in horticulture. 

CAUTION.— The following letter tells its own 



States shows that in eighty-eight there will be little tale .—Dear Mr. Cannell, There is a rascal going 
or no change in acreage as compared with 1894 ; aboat representing that he travels for you, and is 

selling to the unsuspecting people awful rubbish. 

He called here, of course after I had gone to town, 
and persuaded my wife to buy some wonderful 
Carnations, &c. The enclosed is the result, and 
they are all the same. It is rather clever to get 
a lot of labels printed, and then state that he 
represents a man so well known as yourself. 
H. P. B M Solicitor," One of the labels reads 
" Malmation, silvery edge Clove," the other 
11 Turner's Masterpiece." The specimen enclosed 
was valueless. 



five report an increase up to 10 per cent. ; two, an 
increase of from 11 to 20 per cent ; three an increase 
of from 21 to 30 per cent. ; and three an increase of 
over 30 per cent. ; 127 show a decrease of 10 per 
cent, and less ; 250 a decrease of from 11 to 20 per 
cent. ; 158 a decrease of from 21 to 30 per cent. ; 
forty- four a decrease of from 31 to 40 per cent. ; 
seven a decrease of from 41 to 50 ; and thirty- 
three a decrease of more than half. This decrease 
in acreage is not confined to any particular locality, 
but covers a widespread territory, embracing almost 
the entire area devoted to Cotton culture. The ex- 
traordinary low price of the staple gave rise to the 
agitation as to the necessity for reducing the acre- 
age in lt95 ; this resulted in a con\ention this year, 
and a rise in prices is hoped for. Doubtless, much 
may be done in improving the varieties now grown, 
and so placing on the market the highest class of 
raw material. Meanwhile, the above noted facts are 
surely well worth record. 

Pelargonium Sport.— Mr. Walkeb, of Well- 
field, Leyland, sends us a truss of a very pretty 
flesh-coloured or rosy-pink variety of Pelargonium, 
which originated as a sport from " Mr. Povis." The 
flowers are very double, so that the sport sterns well 
deserving of propagation. 

The International Fruit, Wine and Vege- 
table Exhibition at Berlin.— This exhibition, 

we learn from an official announcement, which 
is to form a part of the more permanent one of the 
National Hygienic Society, will remain open to the 
public from July 1 to some date in September. It 
will be held in the old Reichstag buildings, which 
have been lent by the Prussian State Government 
for the purpose. The exhibition has created very 
general interest both in Germany and other countries. 
It will not be of the usual kind, as may be gathered 
from the programme, which furthers neither the 
interests of the producer nor of the consumer. On 
*he contrary, it is intended to establish a well- 



PLANT POKTKAITS. 

AmoRpha. CANESCENs, Aftekans* Monthly, June. 

Caxnas.— 1, Sarah Hill, red self; 2, Maurice Mussey, 

orange-pink self, Garden, June 22. 

Dmxdrobium xobile nobilius, Illustration Horticole, 
June 30. 

Dipladema atro-purpurea. Illustration Horticole, t. 33, 

Huerma marocarpa, Schwernfurth, Gartenflora, July l, 
t. 141t*. 

Lotus peliorhyxcus, Btvue Horticole, July. 
Lupinus arboreus, Garden, June 8. 
Rudbeckia maxima, R. PiNNATA, Garden, June 15. 
Syringa vulgaris Madam* Lemoine, double white, 
Bevu? de I Horticulture Beige, July 1. 
Thuxberoia grandiflora, Illustration Horticole, t. 32. 



Home 



Correspondence. 



THE 8LEEPY DISEASE OF TOMAT08.— Dae pro- 

mineoce has been given in your leading columns to 
the prevalence of the so-called * sleepy disease " in 
Tomatos, and to the cause thereof. I am a grower of 
this fruit for market of near upon a quarter of a 
century's experience, and my daily occupation from 
early morn till darkness sets in is amongst the plants ; 
I therefore claim to have some little practical know- 
ledge of that particular crop. Moreover, I have been 
sorely troubled and annoyed with the "sleepy dis- 
ease " in question, hence the article anent the same 
interested me greatly. For the past eighteen months 
I have visited many gardens, collected information 



by meant of the local press, and experimented with 
a view of finding out the cause of thii mysterious 
disease, and at last I \enture to think I have solved 
the problem — at least in my particular case — though 
I may say not in the direction of that set forth by 
ycur correspondent in the article on the m v ject in 
question. I have no hesitation in saying that this 
disease is not in all cases due to the fungus Fusarium 
ljcopersic, or any other of that nature. I certainly 
do believe that if such did really exist in the soil 
the plants would go sleepy, but in my case 
after several minute examinations last year of every 
pait of the roots, as also the toil, I came to the 
conclusion that fungus was not at the bottom of it. 
Moreover, there is no dhcoloration of the leaves or 
seem, no M delicate white bloom ; n after a time, in 
fact, with the exception of the drooping of the 
leave*, the characteristics are dissimilar to that 
described in the said article. With a ^iew of show- 
ing that fungi were not present in the instances 
which have come under my notice, I will juit state 
that, say two plants planted in a box or pot, one will 
go off, and the other remain healthy and Iruitful to 
the last. As recently as last week a large plant in a 
box with fruit of half size showed signs of drooping ; 
it was at once pulled up. The soil was worked up, 
no fresh soil being added, and two young healthy 
plants put in. A few days after, the lurface was 
covered with white rootlets. This is but one instance, 
as I have had many such, though I generally use 
fresh soil; but after reading your article, I thought 
I would test it, and prove conclusively whether 
the soil was at fault or not. Well, I really and 
fully believe that no more of this sleepy diseaae 
will ever trouble me, and to prove the same, I 
have with my own hands, and on tho system 
which I will a little later on make public, planted a 
a late 90- feet house wiih 300 plants as an experiment. 
They are now swelling their first trusses, and if no 
plants flag or droop by September 1, I shall have the 
satisfaction of knowing that the investigations I have 
made have not been in vain. I should say that the 
house that I have planted had many cases of this 
"sleepy disease "last year, and the soil is the spuh\ 
so this will be a sure test of th* fungus theory. P. F. 
Le Sueur, Grand Vale t Jersey, June 23. 

HYBRID POPPIE8. — In the Gardeners' Chronicle 
for June 15, Mr. W. Wilks sajs he does not believe 
there has been a true hybrid between a perennial 
and an annual Poppy. Like him, I have been trying 
to cross Poppies, and I have succeeded in crossing 
the double- flowered annual Poppy with the orange 
. nudicaule Poppy, which is a perennial. The double- 
flowered annual variety was the seed-bearing plant, 
and I have about twenty seedlings, but only one has 
come with foliage and habit yery much like nudi- 
caule, and that only has flowered; the flower is the 
same shape as nudicaule, but a brick-dust red, quite 
distinct from nudicaule. The foliage has the glau- 
cous shade, but not so much as the annual Poppy. 
The other seedlings which resemble the annual are 
not yet in flower, but they will open in a few days ; 
they are only about D inches high, and I do not think 
that they will grow any higher, although they might 
do so another season, as they have only received two 
waterings this season, and no rain has fallen here 
since the end of March. As I have been crossing 
flowers and vegetables for several years, I have a fair 
idea of what a true cross should be. J, LansdelL 

CCELOGYNE CRI8TATA IN A WIRE BASKET.— I 

enclose herewith a photograph of Coelogyne cristata 
grown in the conservatory of E. Wells, Esq., Wal- 
lingford, which will serve to show how admirably 
adapted this popular Orchid is for cultivation in wire 
baskets, and as a hanging plant generally. This 
specimen has been two years in a 7- inch basket, and 
has borne over 300 blooms this year. Its ivory- 
white blossoms were most acceptable early in April 
and May, and as its cultivation presents no diffi- 
culties, the Coelogyne is a most useful and attractive 
plant for suspending from the roof of a cool 
conservatory. Arthur Cooper, [An evidence of very 

successful culture. Ed ] 

YOUNQ GAROENER3 AND WRITTEN CHARAC- 
TERS.—! think young men have one great grievance 

to contend with, and that is being compelled to leave 
a place without a character, when no reason can be 
given for refuting to give one, I do not think I can 
do better than state mv own case, which will help to 
show what I mean. For the past fifteen months I 
have been employed as a journeyman at a certain 
place, and I have done my utmost to uphold the 
good testimonials which I have received from pre- 
vious employers. This spring I ieciJed on making 



46 



THE 



GARDENERS' CHRONICLE. 



[Jclv 13 1895. 



a move, and asked the ha I gardener if he would 
ltd me into a nursery. His answer was M No." 
Liter on, upon my leaving the place, I asked him 
for a character, w&ich ne alio refuted to give me, 
with the result that I had to turn out, and 
I am now fifteen months to the bad. Now, 
what I with to know is, if such a thing 
ought to be? I think it is scandalous that young 
gardeners should be so treated; and wha f , is more 
trying to anyone than to knov that after having 
done his duty, a "character " is denied him ? If gar- 
deners would only act up to the motto, U D) unto 
others as you would have them do unto you," it 
would save a great deal of neediest misery, besides 
giving young men much needed encouragement. 
H. M. C. 

TOO MANY PAN3IE8. -It has baen said with some 
truth, that we have too many Pausiet , and too few 
really good ones. I have jutt opened the catalogue 
of a noted Scotch florist, and I find is contains 344 
show varieties, self*, yellow grounds, and white 
grounds ; and including ten new varieties offered 
this season for the first time, enumerates the enormous 
number of 431 fancy varieties. Really this is ample 
proi f chat there are too many Pansiea . An examination 
of other catalogues would no doub' show that it 
would be possible to make up a lilt of 1000 assumed 
distinct varieties of Panties. As to how many really 
good ones could be selected from the lists I cannot 
venture to say, and I think it is doubtful if any sub- 
stantial advance has been made in Eaglith show 
Pansies during the last twenty years. Tne far* is, 
the show Panty is so closely restricted to a few types 
that repetition is inevitable. In the caie of the self, 
the colour should be at uniform at pnsible, whether 
dark yellow or primrose, or in the case of the white 
■ei r , excepting the central blotch, the absence of 
colour. Tne dark selfs admit of considerable variation 
from the deepest velvety maroon and velvety black, 
through bright claret, crimton, pale claret, mulberry, 

{>urple, and shades of violet to the palest tint ; the yel- 
ow selfs vary a little in colour, the primrose selfs less, 
the whites differ in purity. Of cours°, those who are 
intimate with the varieties see smill differences 
which escape the eye of the casual observer ; still, in 
snch numbers there must be contiderable resem- 
blance. Tnicknest of texture, circularity, flatness, 
smoothnest on the edge, and the density and sym- 
metry of the blotch, are the leading qualities. In 
the case of the dark selfs where the olotch is not 
clearly defined, there is yet a small eye just above it, 
and the clearness and vividness of the eye imparts 
life and light to the flower. Taere is great refine- 
ment in a staid of twelve or twenty-four show 
Pansies when the blooms are approximately perfect, 
fresh, bright, even in siz?, displayed well on the 
stand, and arranged— se If s, yellow grounds and white 
grouudt — jo as to afford the most effdc&iva contrasts. 
Much art and cultivated taste can be displayed in 
setting up a stand of show Pansies in the best 
manner, more, perhaps, than in the case of any 
other exhibition florists' flower I am acquainted 
with. Toat the English aho* Pansy has greatly 
declined as a cultivated flower in the southern parts 
of the country is abundantly shovn at the exhibition 
of the Pansy and Violet S jciety, for very few are 
seen there, and those exhibited are brought up by 
the northern and especially by the Scotch florists. 
Yean ago Hammersmith and other suburbs had 
their Pansy show*, and many grew for competition. 
There were no fancy Pansies in those days, and the 
Viola, as we now know it as a bedding plant, was 
undreamed of. Then came that baleful time— more 
than a generation ago— when a kind of disease 
infested the show Pansy, and made it in southern 
parts extremely difficult to cultivate the show Pansy 
for any purpose, and the area of cultivation became 
greatly circumscribed, till it has become largely a 
midland and northern flower. We want a revival 
of the show Pansy ; whether the Pansy and Viola 
Society will bring it about remains to be seen. The 
advent of the fancy Pansy came at an opportune 
time. Having more tenacity of life, being more 
vigorous m growth, and hardier in constitution, it 
soon won its way into popularity. Untrammelled by 
the di visions of type which fetter th* show varieties 
it admits of great variation in colour and com- 
binations of colour ; but sizs of flower, stoutness 
of texture, smoothness, circularity, harmony in 
and brilliancy of colours, are all utilities for 
which the raisers strive. Bat there 
a great amount of similarity in 
twenty blooms of distinct 



is yet 

a stand of 
varieties, though 



and self evident as in the caie of the show 
varieties. But a list of 500 so-called distinct 
varieties is somewhat appalling. Oae-fonrth of 
this number would be more than ample, and yet 
addition is much more certain than reduction. 
It is now a good time to sow some seeds of 
Pansies for summer and autumn ditplay. Though 
seed of fine strains of the show varietiet is not 
plentiful, still, with dae care, it can be procured. 
Strains of file types of fancy varieties are more 
plentiful. S*ad so*n in pans or shallow boxes in 
light friable soil, soon germinate in a gentle warmth 
or when kept clote in a cold frame. If pricked off 
into other boxes, the seedlings so in grow into sizs 
for planting ou% and if care 'ally moved with soma 
soil adhering to their roots, qaicklv establish them- 
selves. Oje secret in snccassful Pansy aad Viola 
growing during summer, is to have a layer of good 
manure a little way below the roots, and given 
appropriate soil and an open spot, the Panty will 
stand a chance of being seen at its besD. R. D. 

ONIONS. — The growing of O .lions to a larg* s'z* is 
considered bysom* gardeners as a great achievement, 
although they are unanimous in stating that big bulbs 
are neither economical in the using, or long keepers. 
An Oaion that raeasuret 9 inches to 12 inches in 
circumference will remain longer in good condition 
than one of 15 to 16 inches, and the former will be 
less ready to start into growth in the spring. At the 
middle of May this year I had a floe lot of Onions 
hanging in a cool-house, which had ba*n hard 
frozen for a period of two months. The Ooions of 
globular form, viz. Ailsa Craig, Cranston's Eccel- 
sior, and Brown Glob*», were good till the present 
month. To meet all wants, it is my practice to grow 
Potato- Oaions and Shallots, and to plant a quantity 
of bulbs which are Jeass likely to keep late, early in 
the spring, on land that is in the shade. Br 
this means the supply of green Oaioas is k*pt 
up all through the early part of the summer, 
a matter of some importance when the autumn-sown 
Oaions are injured or destroyed. I made a new 
departure this season in Oaion sowing, when 
about the middle of March I found the ground 
frozen to a depth of 2 feet, except about 9 inch s 
from the surfac •. I pricked up the land, and sowed 
the Onion seed in drills. It came up in first-rate 
fashion, the drills having been covered with spent 
Muthroom-bed manure, but not trodden at first. 
M. Temple \ Catron, N.B. 

NEW U3E8 FOR J4D0O FlEHE.— Ferns of many 
kinds have proved to do so well in this soil, that its 
great lightness in weight points to iti uie as verv 
desirable in covering the walls of ferneries behind 
wire-netting, aid also to much lighter netting being 
then necassary. The rapidity with which seedling 
plants throw out their roots into this material sug- 
gests the expediency of wrapping a small qiantitv o* 
it round such plants when th*y are beiug pricked 
oat, especially in *uch very dry weather at we hava 
had lately. W. T. t Bishopsteijnton. 



there is enough of variation to admit of sharplv- 
defiied distinctive lines, but yet not so aisertive 



OUR POULTRY. 

By Harrison Weir. 

(Copyright.) 
(Continued from vol a»a., p. 764 ) 

The Indian Game, as a coloured fowl, comes next, 

as of much excellence for "table purposes." It is of 

the Malay type, but with much shorter legs, and of a 

more sturdy appearance, and is apt, like the Malay, to 

be rather inclined to rest on the hocks or heel, thus 

showing in some degree its past ancestry. The flesh 

is firm, short in fibre and in quantity, that on the 

breast being somewhat dry by comparison with the 

old Eaglish Game, and in some cases is somewhat 

hard, owing probably to the almost entire lack of fat 

on that portion of the body ; which defect, for defect 

it is, is somewhat atoned by the excess on the 

back and the abdomen. The feathers are short, hard, 

and close, and of varied colouring, some being very 

dark, while others are of a bright intense red, ipangled 

with black, with black and golden hackle ; others 

are of a rich bay colour, each feather being what is 

termed doubly laced with black. This is considered 

by some to be the proper « exhibition " marking 

thongh many, like myself, much prefer the old style 

of " pheasant spangle," which gives a far brighter 

appearance. As to length of limb, there is also a 

growing tendency towards the Malay type which is 



much to be regretted, the short legs and thighs being 
far preferable as a quality for a table fowl. As 
layers they are very inferior to most other fowls, and 
incorrigible " sitters." As n fighters " in the poultry- 
yard, they are only surpassed by the Game and 

Malays. 
The Lingsban as a table-fowl has high claims for 

recognition as one of the best of our table fowls ; in 

fact, for an "all-roand" variety, it is scarcely 

cqialled, with the exception of its black legs. 

Otherwise it is good, and is gaining steadily in the 

estimation of the public. lam not alluding to the 

long-legged, gawky, flamingo-type of birds that is 

nowaffdcted — what are termed Langshan fanciers— 

but the shorter-legged and far more compact sort. 

Toese iquare-made birds are more hardy, less liable 

to leg weakness, are more fleshy, and arrive at 

maturity much earlier than their " storky " brethren, 

and are in every way more desirable. 

The breast meat of the Langihan is of the whiteit 
description, and of a rich aad excellent flavour. 
When well selected, and compactness of form sought 
for and obtained, it is often preferred by some to the 
coarser kinds of Dorking. 

Tney are excellent layers, of fair iis* f and of 
high colour, varying from a deep brown- chocalate to 
red, and red-tinted pink, and spotted with deep 
chocolate. Though not large, the number is often 
surprising, laying often, as they do, twenty or more 
consecutive days. Tney are good mothers, and the 
chickens are hardy and easily reared, the early 
hatches withstanding the cold far better than most 

fowls. 

Tne black-coloured variety is tin moit common, 
though now there are whites and blues claiming 
public notice and favour. 

(To be continued.) 



Trees and Shrubs. 



MAGNOLIA WATSONf. 

This comparatively new hardy Magnolia has lately 
been in bloom at Gunnersbury. The leaves are 
glabrous, obovate-oblanceolate, tapering at the has* 
into a longish petiole. The flowers, which are pro- 
duced with the leaves, are 5 inches across, of a delicate 
cream colour, the three outermost segments obovate, 
spoon-shaped, somewhat fleshy, and of dull rosy-pink 
colour. A figure is given in the Gardeners' Chronicle, 

vol. xvi. 1894 p. 189. 



Societies. 



NATIONAL ROSE. 

July 6. — The great annual exhibition of tbe 
National Rose Society at the Crystal Palace wai 
held on the above date. There have been many 
despondent forecasts this season as to the inferior 
quality likely to be exhibited at this show, owing ^ 
the exceptionally inclement season with which 
growers have had to contend. If the worst of thess 
forecasts were not fulfilled— and we think they were 
not — at the same time, there was no doubt a fa»* 
ing off in the quality as compared with last year. 
The extreme trosts in February, abont which we 
have talked so long, had a killing effect in many dis- 
tricts, and it was particularly unfortunate that sn<* 
an abnormal visitation should be succeeded by a hot 
season and Ion* drought. Nevertheless, there were 
many stands of excellent Rises at the Palace on 
Saturday last, and individual blooms qnite woiw 
the Society's Silver Medals were easily fonod, hoc 
unlike the exhibition in the previous week at Glou- 
cester, there were many indifferent collections M 
well. 

NURSERY MKK'S CLASSES. 

S#>eriy-two distinct Single Trusses .—There were fire J**! 
petitors for the coveted Trophy and Gold Medal which *<**** 
panythe 1st prize in this mo <t important class. &\?zL 
petitor had placed a t tand of blooms of the greatest etc AW 
possible in such a season, and, albeit, there were &*«* 
specimens in every collection; there nevertheless *~ 
numerous instances of good quality, and the two W^ 



July 13, 1895.] 



THE 



GARDENERS' CHRONICLE 



47 



judged worthy of the Silver Meda's were each found in this 
class, one of them in Mr. B. R. Cant's collection, and the 
other in that from Mr. Frank Cant. First -place was 
awarded to Mr. B. R. Cant, Colchester; and 2nd to Mr. 
Frank Cant, also of Colchester, who held the trophy 
during the year just ended. The blooms in the 1st prize 
exhibit were - Bac k row: Her Majesty (Silver Medal), Suzanne- 
M. Rodocanachi, Lady Mary Fitzwilliam, Marie Baumann, 
Caroline Testout, Duke of Fife, Marchioness of Dufferin, 
Uliich BruDner, Alfred Colomb, White Lady, Boildieu, 
E. Y. Teas, Souvenir d'un Ami, Maurice Bernardin, Marie 
Ficger, Madame Crapelet, Mrs. Jno. Laing, Countess of 
Oxford, Madame de Watteville, Xavier Olibo, Heinrich 
Schultheiss, Earl of Dufferin, Duchesse de Morny, Gustave 
Piganneau. Centre row: Marquise de Litta, Beauty of 
Waltham, Luciole (a pretty bloom, with attractive bronze 
shading, but difficult to obtain in such condition), Mrs. Sharman 
Crawford, La Bouled'Or, Madame Henri Periere, Chas. Lefebvre, 
Marchioness of Londonderry, Marie Verdier, Marchioness of 
Downshire, Dupuy Jamain, Innocente Pirola, Duke of Edin- 
burgh, Sultan of Zanzibar, Madame G. Luizet, Victor Hugo, 
Jeannie Dickson, A. K. Williams, Marechal Niel, Dr. Sewell, 
Catherine Mermet, Horace Vernet. Souvenir de S. A. Prince, 
Dr. Andry. Front row: Ethel Brownlow, Reynolds Hole, 
Merveille de Lyon, Etienne Lever, La France, Captain Hay- 
ward, La Fraicheur, Duke of Wellington, Madame Cusin, 
Jean Sou pert. The Bride, Alfred Dumesnil, Marie Van Houtte, 
Fisher Holmes, Ernest Metz, Crown Prince, Comtesse de 
Vadaillac, Camille Bernardin, Margaret Boudet, Duke of 
Connaught, Counters of Boj-ebery, Comte de Raimbaud, 
Marguerite de St, Amand, and Prince Arthur. 

Mr. Frank Cant was only a few points behind. In his 
stand were good blooms of Comtesse de Nadaillac (Medal), 
Her Mh jesty, Gustave Piganneau, Marie Baumann, Madame 
de Watteville, Corinna, Victor Hugo, Captain Hay ward, Duke 
of Connaught, Mrs. Jno. Laing, Horace Vernet, Charles Gater, 

Duke of Albany, Alfred Colomb, Ethel Brownlow, and Earl of 
Dufferin ; 3rd, Messrs. Harkness 8l Sons, Bedale, Yorks. 

Forty distinct varieties, three trusses of each.— The exhibits 
in this class made a capital display, and the blooms in the 1st 
prize stand from Mr. Frank Cant were very bright and effec- 
tive. Those which appeared specially good for grouping in 
trebles were Victor Hugo (excellent colour), Pride of Waltham, 
Suzanne-Marie Rodocanachi, Duke of Fife, Ulrich Brunner, 
Marie Verdier, Duke of Connaught, Marguerite de St. Amand, 
Innocente Pirola, Comte de Raimbaud, Baroness Rothschild, 
Salamander, and Mrs. John Lairg. Mr. B. R. Cant was 
2nd, and we noticed in his collection very good trebles of 
Prince Arthur, Mrs. Sharman Crawford, Heinrich Schultheiss, 
Duchess de Morny, Chas, k Lefebvre, Marchioness of Dufferin, A. 
K. Williams, Her Majesty, Mrs. Jno. Laing, and Merveille de 
Lyon. The 3rd position was secured by Messrt. Harkness & 

Sons. 

Forty-e ght, d.Uinct, single trusses.— Messrs. Prior & 
Sons, Co Chester, were 1st, and their best blooms were Su- 
zanne-Marie Rodocanachi, Duchess de Morny, Abel Carriere, 
Star of Waltham, Marie Baumann, Marie Verdier, Gustave 
Piganneau, Horace Vernet, Marechal Niel, Mrs. John Laing, 
Count ess of Oxford, Bruce Findlay, Francois Michelon, Annie 
Wood, Oonstantin Petriaktff, and Ernest Metz. Mr. Henry 
Merry weather, Southwell, who was 2nd, showed good 
specimens of Gustave Piganneau, Comtesse de ludre, Fisher 
Holmes, Chas. Darwin, Mrs. Jno. Laing, General Jacqueminot. 
Messrs. J. Burrell Sk Co., Howe House Nurseries, Cambridge, 
were 3rd. 

Twentj -Jour distinct single trusses. — The quality in thi« class 
for twenty- four blooms reigned very high, especially in the 
exhibit from Mr. Jno. Mattock, New Headington, Oxford. 
Capital were the following: — Dupuy Jamain. Duke of 
Connaught, A. K. Williams (very pretty and bright), Gustave 
Piganneau, Her Mr jesty, Horace Vernet, Charles Lefebvre, 
Comtesse de Nadaillac, Duke of Bedford, and Mrs. J. Laing. 
The 2nd prize lot came from Wales, and were exhibited by 
Me. Stephen Treseder. Pwllcoch Nursery, Cardiff. The 
blooms were rather tmal', but pretty and bright nevertheless; 
those most attractive were Duchesse de Morny, Alfred Colomb, 
Lady Helen Stewart. Countess of Ko^ebery, Duke of 
Connaught, and Exposition de Brie. 3rd, Messrs. Townsend 
8l Sons, Lower Broadheath, Worcester. 

Twenty- fovr di>titoct varieties three trusses of each.— Messrs, 
D. Prior & Sons, who were 1st, showed excellent trebles of 
Constantin Petriakoff, Mrs. J. Laing, Heinrich Schultheiss, 
Alfred Colomb, Fisher Holmes, Duchess de Morny, A. K, 
Williams, Marie Verdier, Xavier Olibo, Jeannie Dickson, M*rie 
Baumann, and Her Majesty. Messrs. Townsend 9l Sons, 
Worcester, were 2nd ; and Messrs. Geo. Cooling & Sons, 
Bath, 3rd. 

Eiyhteen bunches, distinct, exhibits to be staged in vases or 
othtr receptac^es, instetd of boxes.— This was an interesting 
class, because it afforded a little variation from the usual 
boxes and flat method of showing, and gave a little opportu- 
nity to growers to exhibit in a more tasteful manner. 
Exhibitors were not limited in their choice of varieties, 
but the space for each collection was not to exceed 6 feet by 
3 feet. Messrs. Paul & Sows, Cheshunt, who were 1st, had a 
pretty group, the s-prays of flowers bearing good healthy 
foliage, shown in vases. The varieties chosen were General 
Jacqueminot (H. P.). Etienne Levet (H.P.), Jeannie Dickson 
(H.P ), La France (H.T.), Francois Levet (H.P ), Mrs. Paul 
(Bourbon), Paul's Cheshunt Scarlet (H.P.), Abel Carndre 
< H. P ), Heinrich Schultheiss ( H.P. ), Bacchus (a new H.P ),Caro- 
line Testout (H.T.), Reynolds Hole (H.P.), Merveille de Lyon 
(H.P.), Alfred Colomb (HP), Suzanne -Marie Rodocanachi 
(H.P.), Countess of Oxford (H.P.), Captain Christy (H.P.), 
and Duke of Edinburgh (H.P.). Mr. Geo. Mount, of Canter- 



bury, was 2nd in this class; his best were Fisher Holmes, 
Marie Baumann, Gabrielle Luizet, and Niphetos. 

Tea and Noisette Skction. 

Twenty-four dutinct single trusses.— The principal prize 
in this section was well won by Mr. Fran k Cant, who has 
exhibited Teas very successfully this season. His collection 
in this class was of excellent quality, judged by the average 
merit of the exhibition. The blooms staged were the follow- 
ing -.—Back row: Ernest Metz, Madame de Watteville, The 
Bride, Niphetos, Madame Cusin, Souvenir d'Elise Vardon, 
Comtesse de Nadaillac, and Innocente Pirola; Centre row: 
Catherine Mermet, Souvenir de S. A. Prince, Ethel Brownlow, 
Marechal Niel, Souvenir d'un Ami, Hon. Edith Gifford, 
Maman Cochet, and Souvenir de Paul Neyron ; Front row : 
Cleopatra, Francisca Kruger, Bridesmaid, Marie Van Houtte, 
Madame Jacquier, Rubens, Corinna, and Jean Ducher. Mr. 
B. R. Cant had blooms of smaller size, but otherwise they 
were good, being bright and fresh-looking. Madame Cusin 
was splendid ; Devoniensis, Madame de Watteville, Ernest 
Metz, Innocente Pirola, Bridesmaid, Corinna, and Catherine 
Mermet were also noticeable. 3rd, Messrs. D. Prior 8l Sons. 

Eighteen distinct single trusses. — There were nine entries for 
this class, and consequently the quality of the prize collections 
run very close. The 1st position was taken by Mr. Jno. 
Mattock, New Headington, Oxford. In his stand we noticed 
as the best specimens, Souvenir d'un Ami, Hon. Ed. Gifford, 
Adam, The Bride, Ernpst Metz, and Catherine Mermet. Mr. 
Henry Merryweather took 2nd, and he had good Catherine 
Mermet, Cleopatra, and Ernest Metz, &c„ smaller in size than 
the first exhibit; 3rd, J. Burrell 8l Co , Howe House Nur- 
series, Cambridge. 

Eighteen distinct , three trusses of each. — There were five col- 
lections shown in this class, and of these the best was one 
from Mr. Frank Cant. The stand contained several very 
fine trebles, but was nevertheless much marred by a few infe- 
rior specimens, such as those of Francisca Kruger. The best 
were Madame Cusin (very good), Catherine Mermet, Madame 
de Watteville, Souvenir d'un Ami, Rubens, Innocente Pirola, 
The Bride, Ethel Brownlow, Comtesse de Nadaillac, &c; Messrs. 
D. Prior & Sons were 2nd with a fresh collection, bright and 
clean, but small, Marechal Niel, Madame Cusin, Ernest Metz, 
and Corinna, were good ; Mr. B. R. Cant was 3rd. 

OPEN CLASSES. 

Twelve trusses of hybrid Teas, not fewer than nine varieties. 
— The hybrid Teas are now fully recognised by the Society, and 
have a special class to themselves. The class is a popular one, 
and there were eight or more entries. The 1st prize was won 
by Mr. Frank Cant, and the names of his varieties were 
Augustine Guinoisseau, La France, Viscountess Folkestone, 
Lady Mary Fitzwilliam, Caroline Testout, Kaiserin Augusta 
Victoria, Duchess of Albany, Grace Darling, Danmarck, Ger- 
maine Caillott, and La Fraicheur ; Mr. B. R. Cant was a close 
2nd ; his La Fraicheur was excellent ; Captain Christy and 
Kaiserin Augusta Victoria were also good. Mr. Geo. Prince, 
Oxford, who was 3rd, included a very fine bloom of Kaiserin 
Augusta Victoria. 

Twelve trusses of any yellow Rose except Marechal Niel. — 
This class was won by Mr. Geo. Prince, Oxford, with a stand 
of moderatel y- good Comtesse de Nadaillac; Mr John Mattock, 
who was 2nd. showed the same variety ; and Mr Frank Cant, 
with Marie Van Houtte, was 3rd. 

Twelve single trusses of any white Rose. — Mr. Geo. Mount 
won with good specimens of Merveille de Lyon ; 2nd, Mr. 

Geo. Prince ; 3rd, Mr. B. R. Cant. 

Twelve single trusses of any crimson Rose.— With very 
bright, but slightly damaged blooms of A. K. Williams, 
Messrs. Townsend & Sons were 1st, being followed by Mr. 
B. R. Cant, who had Gustave Piganneau, ana Mr. Geo. 
Mount, who had good Ulrich Brunner. 

Twelve single t> usses of any dark velvety crimson vat iety. — 
Mr. B. R. Cant and Mr. Geo. Mount were awarded equal 
lsts for two fairly commend* ble stands of Fibher Holmes. 
3rd, Messrs. G. and W. H. Burch, Peterborough, with Horace 
Vernet. 

Jweve single truists of any light Rose.— The 1st prize ex- 
hibit in this class was a stand of twelve blooms of Mrs. 
Sharman Crawford, and was perhaps the prettiest dozen 
Roses in the exhibition. Certainly the brightest of all the 
light varieties, it is at the same time pretty and attractive in 
tone. The blooms torn shown by Messrs. Alex. Dickson & 
Sons, Newtownards, Ireland. 2nd, Messrs D. and W. Croll, 
Dundee, who had extra nice Mrs. Jno. Laing, and the same 
variety was shown by Mr. Frank Cant, who was 3rd. 

Twelve single t'usses of any Rose except a Tea or Noisette. — 
There was considerable competition in this as in a few other 
of the*e single variety classes. Mr. Frank Cant, who was 
placed 1st, had extra good blooms of Her Majesty, very full and 
bright; and Messrs. Paul & Son, Chesnunt. were 2nd with 
the bame variety ; while Mr. B. R. Cant, who had Marchioness 
of Dufferin, was 3rd. 

Twelve single trusses of any Taa or NoisM'.—Mi. B. R. 
Cant was 1st, with a dozen nice blooms of the lovely Madame 



Cusin ; Mr. Frank Cant was 2nd, trusting to Madame de 
Watteville ; and Mr. J as. Mattock obtained 3rd with Ernest 

Metz. 

Twelve single trusses of Marechal Niel.— This class was only 

poorly sustained. Messrs. Prior & Sons, were 1st, and 

Messrs. Townsend h Sons. 2nd. 

New Roses. 

The classes here were of more interest than last season, 
Messrs. A. Dickson & Sons, of Newtownards, staging a good 
twelve of Mrs. Sharman Crawford, a Rose of great merit and 



useful colour. Mr. F. Cant, Colchester, was Jnri, with 
Marchioness of Londonderry ; and Messrs. Paul 8l Sox, 
Cheshunt, 3rd, with Jeannie Dickson. Similar to hut season, 
all three winning stands were raised by the Irish firm. 

Twelve varieties, distinct.— Messrs. A. Dickson Be 8ons were 
also 1st in this competition, showing Mrs. S. Crawford, Sham- 
rock, Avoca (a Tea like Ernest Metz, but brighter). Captain 
Hay ward. Marchioness of Downshire, Tom Wood (a pretty Rose, 
between Madame Cusin and Souvenir de David in colour, but 
brighter and more full), Lady Moyra Beauclerc, La Fraicheur 
(good), Marchioness of Londonderry, Helen Keller, Mavour- 
neen, and Muriel Qrahame ; the last is a good and promising 
Tea, with habit and form midway between Madame Bravy 
and Catherine Mermet. The colour is almost white, with 
creamy shading — an undoubtedly promising Rose. Muriel 
Grahame was also staged for the Gold Medal, as was Countess 
of Caledon. Mr. W. Taylor, Hampton, showed a new Rose 
called Robin Lyth, which we consider is too near to Fisher 
Holmes and Harrison Weir. The new Tea, Muriel Grahame, 
was decidedly the best of those now staged for the first time. 

Garden Roses. 

These were not so good as usual, and, as at Gloucetter, the 
hot season has evidently been too much for them. 

Nurserymen: Thirty-six bunches, distinct. — Messrs. G. 
Cooling &. Sons, Bath, 1st, having LTceale, W. A. Richard- 
son, Cooling's Scarlet Perpetual, G, Regie, and Pepita being 
among the best. Messrs. Paul & Son, Cheshunt, and F. 

Cant, Colchester, were 2nd and 3rd with much the same 
vari-ties. 

Eighteen bunches, distijict.—'b&est'TS. TOWVBXBBD & SON, 
Worcester, and Messrs. D. & W. Croll, Dundee, weie suc- 
cessful. The first-named had Madame Falcot, Madame Charles 
(good), Celine Forestier, and Isabella Spiunt; *hile Messrs. 

Croll had a pretty bunch of Madame C. Brunners vPoly- 
antha). 

Amateurs:— A iilver cup presented by the Rt Hon. Lo>d 
Penzance for eighteen bunches of Garden Roses, was non by 
H. V. Machin, Esq., vVorksop, who had very good bunches, 
but rather too cramped in arrangement. The 2nd prize 
stand from Mr. A. Tate, Leatherhead, was certainly the most 
admired and best set up stand ; O. G. Orpen, Esq., Colchetter, 
was a good 3rd. 

In an open class for twelve bunches of Roses suitable for 
button-hole flowers, Mr. J. Mattock, Oxford ; Messrs. W. 
Townshknd & Son, Worcester; and Mr. A. Evans, Oxford, 
were successful; W. A. Richardson, Madame Falcot, Ma 
Capucine, L'Ideaie. and Madame de Watteville, being the 
varieties most bhown. 

Nim bunches of Single -flowered Roses. —Messrs. G. Paul 
& Son, Cheshunt, met with no oppoMtion; Motchata alba, 
Lucida, Rugosa, and Pissardi were the best. 

Mr. Mattock, Oxford, had a very pretty lot in the N di*-play 
of Roses ° (open), and was followed by Messrs. Townsend & 
Son, Worcester. 

Medal Roses. 

Bennett s Rose, Her Majesty, won the H. P. medals in both 

Nurserymen and Amateur Classes, and were exceptionally g 

throughout the show. Mr. B. B. Cant and E. B. Lind&ell, 

Esq., were the winners. A large, but rather loose, Comtesee 

de Nadaillac was successful among Tea and Noisettes, for 

Mr. F. Cant; and Maiechal Niel for the Rev. A. Foster- 

Melliar, The latter flower was also loose, but had once betn 

magnificent. 

AMATEURS. 

The Champion Tophy Class, thirty-six booms, distinct. — 
This class was open to all emateurs, and the coveted Trophy 
and Gold Medal went to Mr. E. B. Lintsull, Hitchin. who 
staged tome good flowers. His back row consisted of Her 
Majesty. S.-M. RodocaLachi, Mrs. Faui, Earl of Dufferin, 
Marchioness of Londonderry, Ulrich Brunner, Mrs. J. L*ing, 
A. K. Williams, Merveille de Lyon, Charles Leftbvre, Madame 
E. Verdier, and Gustave Piganneau; midale row. Duchess of 
Bedford, Souvenir d'Elise, Dupuy Jamain, Caroline Kuster, 
Alfred Colomb. Gabrielle Luizet, Duke of Wellington, Duchesse 
de Morny, Fisher Holmes, Comtesse de Nadaillac, Madame 
Hnusmann, aud Mrs. Sharman Crawford ; the front row being 
Catherine Mermet, Louis Van Houtte, Innocente Pirola. Prince 
Arthur, Abel Carrier*, Dr. Andry, Franco's Michelon, Duke of 
Connaught, Etoile de Lyon, Maurice Bernardin, Marie Ver- 
dier, and Dr. Sewell. Perhaps the worst flower here was 
Comtesse de Nadaillac, all of the rest being even better than 
those in the professional classes. The Rev. J. H. Pemberton, 
Hdvermg-atte-Bower, was 2nd, his best being Her Majesty, 
Horace Vernet, Xavier Olibo, Duchess of Bedford, and a 
peculiarly-striped Marie Verdier. T. B. Haywood, Esq., 
Woodhatch, Reigate, was 3rd, with a very young and bright 
collection. 

A piece of plate, given by Mr. Frank Cant fo" forty-eight 

singles, also went to Mr. E. B. Lind&ell. who put up much 
the same varieties as in the trophy class. Alfred Colomb, 
Louis Van Houtte, and March ioi ess of Londonderry were 
extra good. Mr. Walter Drew. Ledbury, made a close 2nd, 
and was followed by Mr. A. Tate. L-atherhead. 

For twenty-four singles, J. Gursev Fowler Esq , South 
Woodford, Easex, was 1st, staging good ex mples of The 
Bride, Dr. Andry, Reynolds Hole, Harrison Weir, and A K. 
Williams among others ; Mr. W. Botes, Derby, beating the 
Rev. A. FosTER-Mf'LLlAR, Ipswch, for 2nd honours. There 
was a particularly good Horace Vernet and Prince Arthur in 

Mr. Botes' s a ad, and a very full Merveille de Lyon in the 
Rev. A. F. Melliar's. 

For twen*y-/our t distinct, ting'e t usses.— This division wa9 
open only to growers of fewer than 2000 plants of exhibition 
variety, and here W. C. Romaine, Efq., The Priory, Windsor, 



(II 



48 



THE 



GARDENERS' 



CHRONICLE. 



[July 13 1895. 



_, 1st. the blooms of Mm*. G. Luizet. A. K. Williams, The 
Bride. Horace Vernet, and A. Colomb, being very good ; Mr. A. 
Slaughter. Steyninjr, was 2nd, but had rather ov*r-dressed 
his blooms ; without this, we think it probable the 1st would 
h*ve been awarded to him. The stand contained good blooms 
of Madame Alfred Vy, Prince Arthur, and Madame Cusin ; Rev. 
H BERN BBS, Harkstead Rectory. Ipswich, was a close 3rd, his 
best fbwern being Camille Bernardin and Mdlle, Gabrielle 

Luizet. . -, t» 

F*t eighteen, distinct, s'njle trusses, J. PiRKFR, E*q , 

oakfield. Hitchio, waa in front of Mr. E. Mawley, Berk- 
hamsterf, Herta; E. M. Bethune, Eeq„ Horsham, follow- 
ing. Innocente Pirola, Charles Darwin, Grand Mogul, 
Haronaae Rothschild, Her Majesty, and Louis Van Houtte. 
were the best six in the 1st prize ttand. 

For nine Uusses cf any Rose not a Tea or Noisette, the Rev. 
H. Bkrxrrs, Tpswich, was 1st, with Mrs. John Laing; Mr. A. 
Slai <*HTER coming close with Charles Lefebvre ; and E. M. 
Brthunk. Esq., was 3rd, with some good blooms of Captain 

Chiiity. 

fn an extra dm of e'qht distinct vzritties three trmseiof 
each. E. B. Li^DSRLL. Esq.. Hitchin. was again well in front, 
the varietieebeing Her Majesty, Sou venir d» Elise, La France, Earl 
iif Dufferin, Ulrica Brunner, Mrs. J. Laing. Caroline Kuster, 
and Alfred Colomb; Mr. A. Tate. Leatherhead, was 2nd, and 
had rery clean trebles of Charles Lefebvre and A. K. Williams. 
The Rev. J. H. Femberton, Havering atte-Bower, being 3rd 
in a very strongly contested class. 

Twlve Bunches, not more than sev n trusses to a bunch.— 
Rev. J. H. Pembertos waa 1st. with a pretty lot, which con- 
tainel a good bunch of Gloire de Bordeaux, an old Rose not 
met with elsewhere in the show. H. V. Machin, Esq., Gate- 
ford Hall, Workup, was 2ud, Viscountess Folkestone, and 
M. de Lyon being worthy of epecial notice. 

fn the division open to growrrs 0/ fewer than 1C00 plants, the 
class for nine distnct single trusses, waa ttroog. Mr. J. 
Bateman, Rose Vale, Archway Road, N.. taking 1st, with 
Charles Lefebvre, Her Majesty, Countess of Rosebery, S.-M. 
Rodocanachi, and Beauty of Walthcim, very good. The Rev. 
H. B. Biro.v, The Vicarage, Ljmpne, had a tplendid Marie 
Baumann in his 2nd prize stand ; M'. Parker, Uld Heading- 
ton, Oxford, was 3rd. 

Six dut net. three trus es of each.— la this class, P. G. C. 
Burnard, Esq.. Reigate, won with Duke of Edinburgh, M. 
de Lyon, U. Brunner, General Jacqueminot, G. Luizet, and 
Raroneta Rothschild. M. Whittle, Esq , Leicester, and J. 
Parkfh. Esq.. Oxford, followed. In the 4th prize stand. 
from 0. G. Orpex, Esq.. Colchester, there were extra good 
trebles of M. de Lyon and Innocente Pirola. 

Nine distinct single trusses, — A division for growers of less 
than 500 plants of exhibition varieties was one of the strongest 
in the show. H. Foster, Esq , Ashford, was 1st, having good 
flowers of Abel Carr See and Duke of Connaught; 2nd. H. P. 
Langdon, Rkj , Brentwood; 3rd, Mr. G. MOULES, Hitchin, 
with grod stands. 

For six Sing'es in the same division, E. R. Smith, Eeq , 
Muswell Hill. S., won with a very clean and bright box ; the 
Rev. G. E. Jeans. We of Wight, and W. D. Freshfield, 
Esq., Reigate, following in the order of their names. 

Four distinct varieties, thnt of each. — A. Evans, Esq , 
Marston, Oxfo-d; W. D. Freshfield, Esq.. Reigate; and 
Miss E. B. Denton, Windsor, won in like order, Mr. Evans 
having Horace Vernet and Marie Banmann very g 

An extra c'ass of twelvi singles wa«made for the Challenge 

Cup, offered by Messrs. Bareness & Son*. Bedale, Yorkshire. 

Ten competitors staged here, the winner being 0. G. Orpen, 

Esq., Colchester, who stag<*i Merveille de Lyon, Ulrich 

Brunner, Innocente Pirola, Dr. Sewell. A. Colomb, The Bride, 

Ernest Metz, Catherine Mermet, Souvenir d'un Ami, A. K. 

William*, Comtesse de Panisse, and K. Augusta Victoria, the 

Itst two being exceptionally good. P. G. C. Bltrnard. Esq., 

Reigate; M. Whittle. E«q., Leicester; and Conway Jones, 

E*q , Hucclecot>, Gloucester, following in the older of their 

names. There was a good flower of the new H. T. Rainbow in 

Mr. Conway Jones* box. / 




I ill 



General Jacqueminot, and Duke of Corinaught in "** fo ™ '• 
A. Beyius Esq , Norwood, and Mr. H. W. DEWS, Becken- 
ham, were 2nd and 3rd respectively. 

Six distinct New Roses, single trusses .-The Rev. J. H. Pem- 
berton won with La Fraicheur, M. of Londonderry, and 
M. of Downshire as the best; E. Mawley, Esq , Berkham- 
ted, 2nd; Mrs. Sharman Crawfjrd and Marquise Litta 
being the best vaiieties in this stand. 



Tea and Noisette Section. 



The 



For six trusses 0/ any Rose except Tea or Noisette, 
J. Parker, Esq., Oxford, won in this class with Her Majesty ; 
Mr. S. fRlCE, Heanor, Derby, following, with Mrs. J. Laing; 
and Dr. Tucker. Swanley, taking 3rd, with Her Majesty. 

Six distinct trusses, oven on'y to those who have never won 
a N, R. S piizu— First prize a piece of plate, given by the 
Rev. J. W. Mellor, was secured by C. E. Shea, Esq., Foot's 
Cray, Kent, who put up Senateur Vaisee, G. Piganneau, Dr. 
Andry, Duehee*e de Moray, H. Schultheiss, a^d Marie Baumann 
in good form; but waa cltwely run by F. W. Campion. Esq , 
Colley Manor, Reigat*, whose box had a particularly good 
Prince Arthur; F. Dexnisox, Eeq., Handsworth Wood, Bir- 
mingham, was 3rd. 

Six tingles, open on 'y to members who have joined the National 
Rose Society since the Uut Atttr-politan show, found R. W. 
Bowyer, Eeq., Haiieybury College. Herts, and L. Price. Esq., 
Derby, very close competitors; Mr. R. F. Hobbs, Worcester, 
being 3rd. 

Sx dutinct Rises, to ft; {row within e-'ght miles of Charing 
Cross, for a piece of plate given by E. Mawley, Esq , was 
wjn by K. H. Gxfford, E^q , Streatham, with Pride of 
Waltham, Q. Piganneau. Mrs. J, Laing, A. K. William*, 
Fisher Holmes, and Charles Lefebvre, the last three being 
extra bright and good. E. K. Smith, K*q., Muswell Hill, 
was a close 2nd ; and R. H. Langton, Esq., Hendon, 3rd. 

Twelve distinct, single trusses, to be grown within eleven 
miles of Charing Cross,— The stands shown were also good 
W. Hodgson, Esq., Shirley Cottage, Croydon, being lit, and 
having Victor Hugo, Prince Camille de Rohan, Fisher Holmes 



Eighteen distinct, single trussts. open to all amateurs.' 
Tea and Noisette Trophy, also the Gold Medal, were won by 
O G. Orpen, Esq., Colchester ; E. Metz. Ionocsnte Pirola, ine 
Bride. Souvenir d'un Ami. Souvenir de S. A. Prince, Catherine 
Mermet, Anna Olivier, Madame Hoste, Marechal Niel, and 
Marie van Houtte, were very clean and good blooms. A capital 
2nd w s found in the Rev. A. Foster-Melliar's stand, whose 
bsst were Mire-hal Niel, LaBoule d'Or, Etoile de Lyon, and 
Madame Hoste; the Rev. H. Berners, Ipswich, a close 3ta, 
had May Rivers, Souvenir d'Elise, F. Kiiijer, and The Bride. 

good. 

Twelve distinct singles, open.— O.G. Orpen, Esq., was again 
to the front with a clean lot of blooms ; E, M. Bethune, Esq., 
Denne Park. Horsham, had good blooms of Madame Cu*in and 
Innocente Pirola, in his 2nd prize stand ; 3rd, Rev. H. 
Berbers. A good Madame de Watteville in Mr. A. Tate's 
stand is deserving of me it ion. 

Eight trebles, distinct.— k. piece of plate given as a memorial 
of the late Rev. the Hon. J. Townshend Boscawen, was in this 
class won by O. G. Obpen, Esq., Innocente Pirola, C. Mer- 
met, Rubens, Souvenir d'un Ami, Alba rosea, Marie van Houtte, 
The Bride, and Comtesse de Panisse, being the varieties that 
he showed. The Rev A. Foster- Melliar and H. V. Machin, 
Eeq., Worksop, were respectively 2nd and 3rd. 

Nine single trusses of any Tea or Noisette Rose.—O. G. 
Orpen. Esq., the Rev. A. Foster-Melliar, and the Rev. H, 
Berners were successful in the order of their names, F. Ki iiger, 
C. de Nadaiilac, and Madame Hoate being the varieties. 

Twelve singlet, distinct, open only to those who grow ftwsr 
than 500 plants.— 1st, Conway Jones, Esq., who had very 
good blooms ot Niphetos and Ethel Brownlow. Mr. J. 
Moules, Hitchin, and Mr. J. Parker, Old Headington, 
Oxford, were placed 2nd and 3rd as named. 

Nine singles, distinct. — In the same division, R. H. Lang- 
TON, Esq , Riymead, Hendon, wis 1st, the blooms of K. 
Brownlow an I Madame Cusin being good; Mr. A. Evans, 
Marston, Oxford, and W. C. Romaine, Esq., Windsor, were 
2nd and 3rd respectively. 

Nine distinct single trusses, same division, for growers of 

ftwer thin 200 plants.— tor. J. Parker, Old Headington, 

Oxford, had the best lot here. Mr. T. A. Washbourne, 

Gloucester, and W. D. Freshfield, Esq., Reigate, following. 

This was a gooJ class throughout. 

Six singles, sime conditions.— G. W. Cook, Esq., Torrington 
Park, North Finchley, was awarded an equal 1st with the 
Rev. F R. Burnside, Sutton-on-the-Hili, Derby. Mr. Cooks 
best flower was Tne Bride; Mr. Burnside's F. Kruger, 
Midame Hoste, and I. Pirola were very gx>d ; the 2nd was with- 
held, and Mr. J. Moules, Hitchin, was 3rd. 

In an extra class for four varitties, three of each, Conway 
Jones, Esq., won with E. MeU, I. Pirola, Niphetos, and Com- 
tesse de Nadaiilac; R. H. LANGTON, Esq., HenJou, and W. 
Botes, Eeq., Derby, being 2nd and 3rd. 

Six of any Tea or Noisette Ro%e.— Mr. A. Evans. Oxford, 
was 1st with Marie Van Houtte, Mr. W. D. Freshfield % 
Reigate, 2nd with the same variety, and Mr. E. Mawley 3rd 
with Souvenir de S. A. Prince. 

Nine bunches, distinct. — There was only one exhibit for 
Messrs. Paul & Son's prize, Mr. J. Parker, Old Headington, 
Oxford, being awarded 1st. 

Six single trusses, distinct — This was open only to amateurs 
who have never won a prize at tne National Rose Society's 
exhibition. 1st, R. C. Boyer, Esq., Hailebury College, Herts, 
with a pretty lot; Mr. K. M. Gifford, Streatham, and Mr. 
J. Pegge, Bteston, Notts, following. 



Dumeroui, and many of botanical interest were 
ihown. Competitive classei for Roses occupied 
rather more space than one of the large tables afford, 
PJanti and floweri in season were shown by several 
exhibitors, and the Frnit Committee had numeroui 
exhibits before them. On the whole, however, the 
Hall was less full than at several of the preceding 



meetings 



Floral Committee, 



MI3CELIANE0U3 EXHIBITS. 
Messrs. Wm. Paul & Son, Waltham Cro«, Herts, staged a 
large collection of Roses in baskets, including about twenty 
Tarieties raised in the nursery at Waltham Gross. Amongst 
the latter we noticed the excellent flesh-coloured Clio (H.P.)» 
and Spenser (H.P.). Polyamha varieties, Teas, Hybrid Teas, 
H.P.V, and others were well represented. 

Mr. W. Rumsey, Joyning's Nuraery, Waltham Cross, was 
also an exhibitor of a g>od collection of Roses, amongst which 
we noticed nice baskets of L'ldeale. Wm. Allan Richardson, 
Reynolds Hole, he. Mr. Chas. Turner, Royal Nursery,' 
Slough, had a large Uble containing profusely-flowered 
branches of Turner's Crimson Rambler, S3me of which were 
6 and 8 feet hi gh . 

Messrs. Wallace 4 Co , Colchester, had filled a Uble with 
sprays of Lilies and Calochorti. 

Mr. W. E. Tidy, Brockhampton Nurseries, made a larjre 
exhibit of Sweet Peas and other thing*. 

Two excellent groups were made by Messrs. Jno. Laing & 

r° m i l° T T &ilr ^ n<!0 , n ' S ' E - M ** 8r '' CHE " * Sons. 
Lowfield Nursery Crawley, exhibited a nice collection of 

hardy herbaceous flowers; and Messrs Jackhm & Sons had 
a similar exhibit. 

BOTAL HORTICULTURAL, 

July 9-The n.ual fortnightly meeting of ihe 

T^! t7 ^ M J w ° n # T . aeida y ta*in the Drill Hdl, 
Jamei Street, Westmmiter. Orchidi were fairly 



Present : W. Marshal), Etq , Chairman ; and 
Messrs. Jno. Fiaser, H. Herbsf, Geo. Stevens, H. B. 
May, J. Jennings, J. Barr, E. Beckett, C. Blick, 
Rev. G. H. Engleheart, J. T. Bennett Pee, C. J. 
Salter, and J. Liing. 

Messrs. Daniels Bros., of Norwich, exhibited some very 
strong sprays of a variety of Godetia, named Marchioness of 
Salisbury, a very free and large fl owerer, being nearly 4 inches 
across, colour sc irlet, margined with white, and white centre 

(Award of Merit). 

Messrs. E. F. Fairbiirn & Sons, Bdentown, Carlisle, exhi- 
bited plants ef a Godetia named E. F. Fairbairn, colour scarlet- 
crimson, with lilac centre. 

Sprays of a good Ivy-leaved Pelargonium, named Queen of 
Boses, was shown by Mr. G. Daniells, Lime Tree Road, 

Norwich. 

Messrs. Sutton & Sons. Reading, exhibited in a large box, 
plants of the South African annual Nemesia strumosa. Various 
shades of colour, including yellow, orange- crimson, and white, 

were noticed. 
Mr. Henry Fckford, Wem, Shropshire, exhibited spray* 

of varieties of Sweec Peas, shown in about fifty glasses, and 
in extraordinary variety of colour— Oaptivation, purple; 
Countess of Aberdeen, flesh colour, very pretty ; Queen Vic- 
toria, cream; and Lady Gii*el Hamilton, pale blue, are 
among th* best and most distinct of the newer varieties 

(Silver Banksian Medal). 

Messrs W. Cutbush & Sows, Highgate, London, N., exhi- 
bited two plants in flower of Carnation La Villette, flowers 
rose and yellow; and Mr. H.Becker Jersey, sent p T ants and 
blooms of a border Carnation named Jersey Maid ; the flowers 
are blush-pink, changing to white, very large, and abundantly 

free. 
Mr. Cha.3. Turxer, Royal Nurseries, Slough, exhibited 

flowers of Carnations and Picotees in variety; tha flowers 
were good in quality, bright, and fresh (Silver Banksian 

Medal). 

A double Petunia named Laura Minnie Beldam cams from 
Mr. A. Beldam. The Lodge, Acton ; and Mr. H. Middle- 
hurst, Manchester Street, Liverpool, showed blooms of 
Chrysanthemum maximum. 

Messrs. Jno. Laing & Sons, Forest Hill, London, S.E., 
staged a few tut ere unrooted Begonias, and were recommended 
an Award of Merit for the variety Mr. F. Bostock, a neat well- 
formed double flower of excellent crimson-scarlet. Also tor 
Streptocarpus Laiog's muitiflora. The flowers are lar*e, 
bluish-purple, with purple-lined throat. There were thirty 
open flowers borne on the plant in a 5 inch pot. 

Messrs. Dobbie 8l Co , Rothesay and Orpington, **re 
recommended a First-claae Certificate for Arnebia cornuta. 
The plant is an annual of rather straggling habit, and grows 
apparently about 12 inches high. The flowers are tmall. 
yellow in colour, but each petal marked on most of its surface 
with yel vety- purple. The plants bloom very freely, but not 
many open at one time. 

Mr. Anthony Watkrer, Knap Hill Nursery, near Woking, 
exhibited sprays of the dark-coloured variety of S. Bumalda, 
known as Anthony Waterer, and also spTays of a very delicate 
light variety named Margaret. 

Messrs. P. Barr & Soxs, King Street. Covent Garden. 
London, itaged a brillianc collection of hardy perennial her- 
baceous flowers. Bunches of Anthem is tinctoria, Eryngiums, 
Malva moschata alba, Lilium Browni, L. candidum, L. teato- 
ceum. L. Krameri, varieties of Poppies, Ac, were noticea 
(Silver Banksian Medal). . . 

G. A. Farini, Esq.. Perry Vale, Forest Hill, showed a double 
Begonia named Farini's Striped, the centre petals striped wit» 

yellow, rest of the flower scarlet. . 

Messrs F. Sakder & Co., 8t. Albans, again showed plan" 
of Dipiadenia atro-pnrpurea in flower, also D. boliviensis, a 
excellent lot of plants of Eriocnema Sanderoe, acd a numW 
of hybrid varieties of Sonerilas. beside a dozen pla Dta * 
Dionea Muscipula. 

Me srs. Jas. Veitch & Sons. Royal Exotic Nursery, che |**' 
showed sprays of Eremurua Bungei, a species growing aW 
■ H feet high ; the colour of the flowers is light bright ?dto*' 
It is one of the prettiest of the genus. An Award of Men 
was recommended to an excellent plant of Begonia X c* ' 
minata, a hybrid from B. coccinea? and B. DregeicJ- T 
plant is robust, very free flowering, and the Woeeoms are corr* 
red in colour, and very much larger in size than either P* re * 

MesarP. Paul & Sons, Cheshunt, exhibited blooms of 
new Roses Bacchus and Alan Cheat v noticed on a P' eVl 
occasion ; and also a new H P. Rose named Hayleabury,^ 
bright roee-coloured bloom, compact, and of good si**, WI 
petals of melium length (Award of Merit). ^ 

Miss Mc Ronald. Northgate Nursery, Chichester, wftSTe0 ^ f 
mended an Award for Carnation, Mrs. W. Bright, 001 ^ 
bright yellow, flower of good form, and calyx nott-spli tu °* 
most cases. j 

A collection of Delphinium sprays wa* s*a;ei by *• 
Fobbe«, Hawick. , 

A very interesting exhibit of Li'ies and *Hi«i fi ° we l ur 
made b/ Messrs. Wallace & Co., CMcheVe-. \ if 
bergianum in variety, L. dalmaticum, L. pardaiin im W™ IU 
Iris Kffmp'eri in variety, &c. Calochorti vas shown 




July 13, 1896.] 



THE 



GABDENEBS' CITJWNTCL r 



49 



mt of them of the Jar? e-flowered section. Awards of Merit 
»re recommended to Cslochortus luteus concolor, a Yery 
delicate and pretty yellow rariety; aDd to C. macrocarpuB, 
a rery large flower of mauve purple with yellow haira 
at base. The greatest novelty, however, waa a apray 
of flowera of a apecies of HemerooalHs, at present 
under the name of H. aurantiaca. Apparently the plant 
grows about 2f feet high, and bears numerous bloaeoma of 
beautiful yellow— almost orange yellow. The petals are about 
1J inch wide, and the flower probably 8 inches across. A First- 
class Certificate waa recommended to this acquisition, and a 
Silver Flora Medal for the group. 

Mr. Jas Douglas. Edenside Nursery, Great Bookham. had 
a few blooma of Carnations : Miss Andry, primrose yellow ; 
Hayea Scarlet, Lady Ridley, white; and Grace Darling. 

KOSES. 

Competitive classes for Rosea were r^^nrded as the principal 
feature of Tuesday's meeting, but the National Society's Crystal 
Palace exhibition baring previously be«n held there waa not 
the amount of interest exhibited as at earlier shows. The 
blooma must be described in similar terms to those we have 
already used in regard to those shown at the Palace, Many of 
them were worthy all praise, but a good number were inferior, 
and on the whole they were not remarkable for high quality, 
though it may be added, they are far better than we could have 
expected in the face of difficultiea such as exhibitors have had 
to overcome this season. 

The 1st class for twenty-four single trusses (amateurs\ not 
more than two of any one varietv, was won by E. B. Lihdskix, 
Esq., Peartcn, Hitchin, he had first-class blooms of Earl Duf- 
ferin. Marie Baumann, TTlrich Brunner, Duke of Wellington, 
and E. Y. Teas. T. B. Haywood, Esq., Woodhatch, Beigate 
(gr., Mr. C. J. Salter), was 2nd, with Fmaller, younger, and 
pretty blooms. 

Twenty-four single trusses, distinct (op n).—Mr. Fra>k 
Ca*t, Braiswick Nursery. Colchester, wss 1st in this class, 
and his stand contained some very good blooms, notably 
Suzanne-M. Rodocanachi, Mrs. J. Laing, Marchioness of Lon- 
donderry, and Victor Hugo; 2nd, Mr. B. R. CkXT. Colchester. 

Twelve single trusses, distinct (amateurs). — J. GURNKY 
Fowler. Esq., Glebelands, South Woodford (ftr., Mr. J. 
Davis), was the winner here, and of the blooms shown we 
may mention Horace Vernet and Duchess of Bedford. O G. 
Orpen. Esq.. Hill Side, West Bergholt, Colchester, was 2nd. 

Twelve single trusses, distinct (open).— Mr. B. R. Cant was 
the best exhibitor, and had noticeable blooms of Gustave 
Piganneau. Duke of Fife, and Comte de Rainnaud. The 
2nd prize was taken by Mr. Geo. Mount, Canterbury, who 
had a very equal Jot of fair quality. 

Six single trusses, distinct {amateur*) , was won by R. H. 
Langton, Esq., Baymead, Hendon, N.W. His blooms were 
fairly good. They were TJlrich Brunner, Her Majesty, La 
France, Gustave Piganneau, Merveille de Lyon, and A. K. 
Williams. 2nd, R. H. Gifford. Eeq , Holy rood, Streatham. 

Six single trusses e/ one variety.— A. K. Williams was 
shown in good cordition by T. B. Haywood, Esq., who was 
1st ; and also by the Rev. J. H. Pemberton. 

Twelve distinct, three trusses of each.— This class, for twelve 
trebles, waa awarded to Mr. B. R, Cast, who had blooms of con- 
siderable quality ; but Mr. Geo. Mount's Canterbury exhibit 
was very fine, and the blooms exceedingly even. In our 
opinion Mr. Mount's was the better collection. 

Twelve single trusses of any one variety (op*n).—Mr. B. R. 
Cant showed well here, having Gustave Piganneau ; and Mr. 
Geo. Mount, with Fisher Holmes, was 2nd. 

Teas and Noisettes. 

Twenty four single trusses, not fewer than twlve varieties, 
or more than three trusses of any one variety (amateurs).— 
O. (i. Orpen, Esq., was 1st, but his blooms were not extra 
good ; H. V. Machin. Esq., Gateford Hill, Worksop, was 2nd, 

Si j tingle trustes, not less than four varieties.— This class 
was won by R. H. Langton, Esq , with nice blooms; Com- 
tes-c de Nadaiilac and Princess of Wales were noticeable. 

Six single blooms of one variety (amateurs). — R. H. Langton, 
Esq., was the winner in this class, with blooms of Iunocente 
Pirola; O. G. Orpen, Esq., being 2nd, with indifferent 
Souvenir d'un Ami. 

Twenty-four distinct single trusses (open),— Mr. Frank 
Cant's 1st prize exhibit was of fair quality. The collection 
contained a large but not particularly pretty bloom of Brides- 
maid. Mr. B. R. Cant was 2nd. 

Twelve distinct, three trusses of each. —Mr. Frank Cant 
was the winner for twelve trebles, and Mr. B. R. Cant 2nd ; 
and Mr. F. Cant also won for twelve distinct single trusses, 
including in this collection good blooms of The Bride and 
Ernest Met*. 

Orchid Committee. 

Present; Henry J. Veitch, Etq , in the chair; and 
Meter*. Jat. O'Brien (aeeretar?), T. B. Haywood, 
Dr. M. T. Mastort, Sydney Courtauid, Dr. B. Craw- 
•bay, E. Hill, H. J # Chapman, W. Cobb, W. H. 
White, J. Douglai, C. Pilcber, and H. Williams. 

A number of Orchids of exceptional botanical interest 
appeared at this meeting, the showy species being in the 
minority, as witnebd the fact that not one was selected for a 
First-class Certificate, while only four, three of which were 
well-known old plants, received Awards of Merit. 

Rich in interesting and beautiful botanical plants was the 
*n*li group staged by Sir Tb&vor Lawrence, Bart., the Pre- 
sident of the Society (gr., Mr. W. H. White). Among these 
was a plant of Luddemauoia Pe&catorei, with two of the 



pendent inflorescences thickly clad with orange-coloured 
flowers of singular structure. The flower-spikes are said 
to attain at times a length of 3 feet. When thoroughly 
established, it will form a rery handsome plant (Botanical 
Certificate). Trichocentrum hymenanthum, the pretty little 
Masdevaliia guttata, and the rose and purple Oneidium olive- 
ceum Lawrenceanum, Schm., also each received a Botanical 
Certificate ; and in the group were the pretty Zambesian 
Polystachya. P. Lawrenceana. which has an ascending spray 
of whitish flowers with pink lip ; the singular-looking Aoridee 
Roeblingianum, Pleurothallis Grobyii and P. macroblepharis 
covered with pretty flowers of small size; large plants of 
Masdevaliia Reichenbachiana, M. Peristeria, and M. x Stella ; 
and some pretty specimens of the dark purple- flowered M. 
Bol f eana and M. calura, the handsome Miltonia vexillaria 
superb*, a fine specimen of Epidendrum (Nanodes) Medusa?, a 
singular hybrid Cypripedium (Selligerum majus 9, Sanderi- 
anum <£)» which wiU develop into a distinct novelty, and a 
pretty bright yellow Oneidium, and curious small- flowered 
Msxillaria, both unknown. 

No less interesting were some plants sent by the Hon. 
Walter Rothschild, from his collection of rare botanical 
Orchids in Lord Rothschild s gardens at Tring Park. Tring 
(gr., Mr. E. Hill). Of these, the singular Polycycnis mus- 
cifera, which bore three stout *pik*»s, one of which had 
numerous large insect-like blooms fully expanded. The 
curious flowers were of pale*yellow colour, with r*>d-brown 
spots; ihe arched column very slender, and the lip furnished 
with hairs (Botanical Certificate). Anothpr pretty species 
was Zygopetalum stapelioides (known formerly as Maxillaria 
and also as Promensea), which had flowers of a rich purplish- 
crimson colour, and a purple lip of a velvety texture (Bota- 
nical Certificate) ; and Oneidium olivscenm Lawrenceanum, 
Lehm , also received a Botanical Certificate. 

Messrs. F. 8ander A Co., St. Albans, were awarded a Silver 
Banksian Medal for a fine group of Orchids, in which plants 
of Cattleya Fex, C. Gaskelliana, the C -G. variety virjnnalis, 
and the handsome C.-G. Madouxiana; C. KIdora«*o Wallisii, 
and other fine Cattl eyas mads a great display. Among them 
appeared Cattleya X Miss Measures (Luddemanniana X vein- 
tina), a remarkable hybrid, with yellowish-salmon flowers 
veined with rose, and a lip in which the side lobes form, as it 
were, a narrow tube over the column, and the front lobe is 
broadly expanded. The lip is of a red-brown tint at the base, 
yellow-tinted beneath the column, and the front lobe is lilac 
with purp'e veins. Another still more handsome hybrid 
is ' Lselio - Cattleya D. S. Brown (C. Triamei x Leelio- 
Cattleya Schilleriana), which in richness of its purplish- 
crimson colour, bore a resemblance to L. - C. Arnoldiana, 
but the flowers were rather pmaller than in that variety. 
Some of the pseudo-bulbs bore a striking resemblance to those 
of L.-C. Schilleriana, and possessed two leaves (Award of 
Merit). Also, for the first time. Messrs. Sato^r showed the 
new Bornean Dendrobium speciosissimum, white, with rose 
base and orange central line to the lip (Botanical Certificate) ; 
Lycaste Dyeriana, a singular Peruvian species, with the habit 
of Cattleya citrina, but with angular pseudo-bulbs and droop- 
ing green flowers (Botanical Certificate) ; Dendrobium brac- 
teosum, with bunches of dull rose flowers (Botanical Certifi- 
cate) ; and D. b. album ; the handsome Laelio-Cattleya 
Schilleriana Schroderee ; Laelia Amanda, Dendrobium Pha- 
laenopsis Schroderianum, Aganisia ionoptera, the aingulir- 
looking Catasetum Christyanum ; a pretty series of varieties 
of Miltonia vexillaria, Cirropetalum picturatum. Cattleya 
Brymeriana, Cypripedium X nobilius, C. X Cahuzac, Odonto- 
glossum Harryanum, &c. 

Sir Frederick Wigan, Clare Lawn, East Sheen (err., Mr. 
W. H. Young\ showed Miltonia vexillaria Constance Wigan, 
a very large and beautiful variety with blush-white sepals and 
petals, and broad pure white labellum (Award of Merit). 

Messrs. Ja9. Veitch & Son. Royal Exotic Nursery. King'e 
Road, Chelsea, showed their singular hybrid Dendrobium 
porphyrogastrum (auperbum fiuttonii 9» Dalhousieanum <£), 
whose flowers were in size equal to D. X Ainsworthii, but of a 
pale pink hue, the flat, shovel-shaped labellum bearing a few 
dull rose lines at the base; also Cypripedium X Dominianum 
albicans (carieinum 9 • caudatum Wallisii 6 ). which differed 
from the original in its larger, more ivory-white flowers, 
marked with green. 

R. I. Measures, Esq., Cambridge Lodge, Camberwell (gr., 
Mr, H. J. Chapman), showed fine forma of Vanda tricolor (Award 
of Merit), and V. t. suavia ; Masdevallia coriacea (Botanical 
Certificate), Miltonia vexillaria albescens, Vanda Parish ii, 
varieties of Cattleya Mendeli, and C. Gaskelliana, C. Eldorado 

Wallisii, Odontoglossum Harryanum, Aerides multifloium 
Lobbii, and Pleurothallis longissima (^ote of Thanks). 

Geo. Marshall, Esq., Claremont House, Great Grimsby 
(gr., Mr. Jas. Johnson), was awarded a Silver Banksian Menal 
for a neat and well- arranged group in which excellently well- 
grown and prof use- flowered varieties of Cattleya Warftcewiozu 
(gigas), which exhibited remarkable variation, were the prin- 
cipal features. With them were other Cattleyas; a grand 
specimen of Epidendrum vitellinum majus; varioui Odonto- 
glossums, Periateria asperse, Ac. 

De B. Crawshay, Esq.. Rosefield, Serenoaks (gr., Mr. 
Cooke), showed the noble white Odontoglossum crispum, Mrs. 
De B. Crawshay, and a grand plant of Braasia verrucosa 
(Award of Merit). 

Messrs. Hugh Low * Co. staged a pretty group of Orchida, 
in which were Grammatophyllum Feozlianum, many varieties 
of Miltonia Roezlii, some fine Oneidium varicosum and. O. 
macranthum, the pretty Dendrobium Lowii. some excellent 
plants of Oneidium Lanceanum, the lips ranging in colour 
from nearly white to dark rose ; Cattleya superba, C. Eldorado 
Wallisii, Cyprtpedium Curtisii, C. superbiens, Ac. (Bronze 

Banksian Medal). 
Messrs. W. L. Lewis & Co. staged a group of Orchids in 



which a pan of the handsome Madagasoan terrestrial Cynor- 
chia grandiflora, illuatrated In the Gmrd**ert* Chronicle, 
February 18, 1893, p. 197, was an interesting feature, and all 
the more welcome that Messrs. Lewis prove it amenable to 
culture. Also in the group were the singular Habenaria 
cinnabarina, Kria Clarkei, with curious small greenish-whin* 
fiowera ( Botanical Certificate) ; Leslie tenebroaa bella, a dis- 
tinct and handsome form of the L. t. Walton Grange ver. 
class, with yellowish sepala and petala, and blush-white and 
dark purple lip, a curious feature in which was its elongated 
acuminate front lobe ; a singular tiny orange- flowered Vanda, 
previously named V. Lewisii ; Bifrenaria vitelline, Cypripe- 
dium leucorrhodum, and other Cypripediuma, Oneidium 
Schlimii, Odontoglossum haati labium, and various Cattleyas, 
Ieeliaa, Ac. (Vote of Thanks). Malcolm S. Cookk. Esq., 
Kingston Hill (gr., Mr. Buckell), showed forms of Cattleya 
Warscewiczii, &c. 

F. A, Browic, Esq., Lawn Bank, Teddington (gr , Mr. 
Slatter), showed Schomburgkia tibicinis ; Walter C. Clark, 
Esq., Sefton Park, Liverpool, sent Cattleya Warscewiczii ; J* 
Gurney Fowler, Bsq., South Woodford, and R. Fobsteb 
Alcock, Esq., Berkhamsted, sent forma of Laelia ten ebrosa ; 
and Aricold Witt, Esq., Maida Vale, showed Sarcanthut 
filiformis. 

Fruit Committee. 

Present : Dr. Robt. Hopg (chairman), and Meisra. 
A. H. Pearson, W. Popp, Alex Dean, W. Batet, T. 
Glen, Geo. R*ynold§, G*o. Wjthei, F. Q. Lane, 
J. Smith, J. Hadson, and R. Fife. 

An excellent collection of fruit was exhibited by Messrs. 
Jas. Veitch 8l Sows, Chelsea, including a representatiTe 
number of vsrietiea of Cherriea, some thirty in all. The 
following were noticeable as being very good in colour or in 
size: Bigarreau Cleveland, B. Napoleon, B. de Schreken, 
Black Hawk, Black Tartarian, Black Eagle, Empress Eugenie, 
Frogmore, Early Bigarreau. Governor Wood, May Duke, and 
Reins Hortense. Raspberries Yellow Antwerp and Superlative 
were shown in very well-fruited sprays, and sprays of different 
varieties of Currants were remarkable for the heavy crops 
they bore. In a collection of Gooseberries, the following were 
remarked : Golden Drop, Green Overall. Bright Venus, Early 
Bed Hairy, Hedgehog. Forester, and Early Sulphur, &c. 
(Silver-gilt Knightian Medal). Messrs. Vkitch also exhibited 
a fine collection of Peas (Silver Banksian Medal). 

Mr. W. E. Bbckxtt, Aldenham House Gardens, Elstree, 
had a collection of vegetables remarkable for their quality. 
We noticed Cauliflowers Walcheren and VeitcVs Early 
Forcing; Tomatos, Polegate and Sutton's Perfection; Peas, 
Duke of Albany, Carter's Telegraph, and Prodigy ; Carrots, 
Early Gem and Sutton's New Intermediate ; Cucumbers, TJp- 
to-Date and Victory; French Beans, Canadian Wonder and 
Ne Plus Ultra ; Potatos, Puritan, Early Regent, and Sharpe's 
Victor; Broad Bean, Carter's Leviathan; Marrow, Moore's 
Cream, a pretty little Marrow called Pen-y-Byd. &c. (Silver- 
gilt Knightian Medal). 

Mrs. Wl5GFiKLi>, Ampthill House, Ampthill, Beds (gr., 
Mr. Empson), exhibited a collection of fruita and vegetables. 
Fruits included Waterloo Strawberriea, Superlative Rasp- 
berries, Brown Turkey Figs, Golden Drop Gooseberries, Foster's 
Seedling and Black Hamburgh Grapes (Silver Banksian 

Medal). 
From Mr. Becker, Jersey, was exhibited a red Grape 

Currant, named Comet, shown with very large berries, and 
bearing about twenty in a bunch ; and a white Grape Cjut- 
rant, named Eclipse ; also Granville Giant Gooseberries. 

The Messrs. Rothschild, Gunnersbury House, Acton, W. 
(gr., Mr. Jas. Hudson), showed remarkable Black Tartarian 
Cherries from a west wall. The tree* were planted in 1850, 
subsoil gTavelly ; also. Cherries Bigarreau Napoleon from 
south wall, trees planted in 1850, A note which accompanied 
the fruit said that some yeara since the trees commenced gum- 
ming, and showed signs of dying, but this had been quite 
remedied by allowing the trees to extend (Silver Banksian 

Medal). 
There were numerous Melons shown for Certificates, but 

Awards were given to two only, both of which were shown by 
Mr. S. Mortimer, Rowledge Nursery, Farnham. Six fruits 
of each variety were thown. Epicure is a medium- aized fruit, 
yellow, with close white netting, and green flesh ; and Nug- 
get is rather smaller, straw-coloured, with coarse, less close 
netting, and rose coloured flesh. This latter was much over- 
ripe, but it is probably the better of the two. 

Several Melons were shown from Mr. A. J. Slmpson, gr* 
at the Horticultural College at Swanley, Kent, including Her 
Majesty, Gilbert's Golden Queen, Empret- a, &c. Also Peaches 
Noblesse and Royal George. Other Melons exhibited were 
from Mr. A.Guy, Hertingfordbury Park Gardens, Hertford; 
Earl Percy, Syon House, Brentford (gr., Mr. G. Wjthee) ; Mr. 
WM, Sm*the, Basing Park Gardens, Alton ; J. E. Platt, Esq., 
Bruntwood, Cheadle, Cheshire (gr., Mr. Richardson); and 
from the Marquis of BlTTE, Cardiff Castle (gr., Mr. A. Petti 
grew). The three Melons grown by Mr. Pettigrew were ex- 
ceptionally large yellow fruits. The name did not transpire, 
but tbey were generally considered too large. 

G. A. Fariiu, Esq., Dartmouth Lodge, Forest Hill, 
exhibited a basketful of black Raspberries. The fruits were 
small, and the parentage or origin was not apparent. 

Wilberforce Bryant. Esq , Stoka Park, Slough (gr., 
Mr. David Ktmp), exhibited excellent dishes of Nectarines 
Humboldt and Pine-apple. 

Mr. Ward, gr. to the Earl of RAD50B, Longford Castle, 
Salisbury, exhibited a Pea named Longpod Queen ; the pods 
were long, and well tilled with good-sized Peas, about ten in 
each. Mr. A. Guy had bine and pods of a Pea, McMullens 
Pariah Councillor, the produce of field culture, Mr*. B. 
Gilbekt. Burehley Gardens, showed some pretty little Cauli- 



** 



Mo. Bot Garden, 



50 



THE 



GARDENERS' 



CHRONICLE. 



[July 13, 1895. 



Oa.rmicha.el 

exhibited some seedling Strawbenies. 

tablet. including Peas, Beana, Lettucsa, aad Cabbages, 

exhibited by Messrs. BaRR A: Suss, King Street, Covent 



A collection of vege- 

waa 



Garden 






Mr 



Darwin 



takes place 



The lecture by Mr. Darwin was on "The Effect of 
Darkness on the Form of Plants," and in commencing 
the aabject Mr. Darwin said that before the pheno- 
mena of etiolation or blanching coald be satisfac- 
torilj and conclusively explained more facts were 
required, and these fact* were such as could be fur- 
nished by horticulturists. This was one reason that 
suggested the subject of the present lecture, that 
those engaged in horticulture might be induced to 
take an interest in the question and communicate the 
remits of their experiments to the scientific world. 

Mr. Darwiw then proceeded to say, that it a plant waB sub- 
jected to continual darknees, the moat striking effect produced 
was one of colour, the stem becomes white and the leaves 
yellow, but it was more particularly to the difference in shape 
a plant awumes under such conditions that he w18 ^.^ 
speak on the present occasion, with * " ~ "" 

that the abnormal growth which 
a pathological condition, but rather the result of adaptation 
to environment or circumstances. If a Potato or seedling 
Bean be kept in darkneaa. an elongated stem will be produced, 
and but minute ieavea formed. In the case of cereals, the 
leaves were elongated, not dwarfed. Light is eaeential to the 
nutrition of plants. So true was this that Stephen Halea and 
others in hia day thought that light was a material food for 
plants, whereas it is now recognised as a neceaaity to assimi- 
lation only. In the absence of light the plant can abstract 
no carbon from the atmoephere. It had been held that etiola- 
tion was a purely pathological state in the plant, but this 
view is probably dead, except that Sachs still holda it. From 
such a view, Mr. Darwin wiahed to exprees his dissent, and to 
put forth a different one altogether. Mr. Darwin had worked 
at this question a good deal, and when about to publish the 
result of his research, he found that a Polish botanist, 
Godlewski, had also taken the same view. 
The view of the phenomena which the lecturer favoured 

i. that it waa merely adaptation, or response to a stimulus 
to overcome, or get the better of an accidental environment. 
The difference of the two theories was explained thus, rickets 
in a scrofulous child is produced by injudicious feeding 
[and hereditary endowment], but the symptoms do not 
in the least assist the child to escape from its malady, 
the condition is purely a pathological one. On the other 
hand, a Potato set, if deprived of light, will continue to 
grow as if it were under tne soil, the energies of the whole 
plant will be thrown into producing a long stem, and this to 
the neglect of the Ieavea. A seedling Bean would do the same 
thing, viz., continue to grow as if it were seeking light through 
thetoil, and not until thelight— which in this case isthe" signal 
of illumination " to the plant— h obtained will the growth be 
altered. The plant is deceived in the absence of this signal. 
The Scarlet Runner grows with a hooked plumule while 
under the surface, but on entry into an illuminated area, 
the point is soon straightened, but if light be withheld when 
the shoot is through the soil, the point remains hooked. The 
signal of light is necessary to remove this condition, which in 
itself, ia an adaptation to circumatances, the hooked plumule 
being better able to pierce the soil without injury, than if it 
were straight. Mr. Darwin then spoke of the sensitiveness 
existing in the petals of the Crocus to changes of temperature, 
so much so, that if the temperature fell 1° Centigrade, a move- 
ment in the petalg may be observed. By this means the pollen 
waa protected against the effect of rain. A species of f angus 
called Coprinns, normally developed a stalk and a cap of con- 
siderable sire, but if it be subjected to darkneaa, the plant will 
throw all its energies into making a long stalk at the expense of 
the cap. whieh will be very small. The stalk in this caseis much 
lengthened in order to reach the daylight, where the spores 
may be disseminated. The gemmae or buds of Liverworts 
germinate only in the light; the gemmee remain inactive 
if covered with a few dead leaves. It waa clearly adaptation 
that caused these gemmae to remain inactive for a Jrhort 
time, during which the temporary darkness may be removed, 
whereas did they germinate, they would do so, with the result 
that they would die. 

In rvgard to flowering plants, if a Narcissus be deprived 
of light, the long seape it produces is another effort to get out 
of the darkness, where alone the pollen it carries can be made 
useful. If a plant has only radical leaves, the only chaDce is 
to extend these, the distribution of growth is altered in every 
respect, and in all plants. Mr. Darwin, referring to Sachs' 
classic paper of 1863, in which he refers to the Hop or Sweet 
Potato as cases of natural etiolation, said that from Sachs' 
standpoint this was not a happy word; but viewing all 
etiolation as adaptation, then these cases were clearly natural. 
A climbing plant, in order to escape from the earth line into 
the air, throws most of its energy ints producing a long stem, 
and usually makes a small amount of other material only, 
which is exactly what occurs in all cases of etiolation. Facts 
wens the food of all hypothesis, and for these he hoped he 
might look to horticulture. 



WIMBLEDON AND DISTRICT 

HOBTXCULTUJEtAX. 

_ 

July 3. — The twenty- third annual exhibition wae 
held on the ab*ve date in the grounds G f Draxmont, 



Wimbledon Hill, kindly lent for the occasion oy tne 
President of the Society, T. E. Crocker, E*q. The 
entries were more nnmerous than in previous years. 

Division I.— Open to all Comers. 

For a group of miscellaneous foliage and flowering Plants, a 
very creditable arrangement gained 1st honours to Mr. A. 
Luff. *r. to J. F. Schwann, Esq., J. P. ...... n * 

In the class for four stove and greenhouse plants, in or out 
of flower, the leading prizes were secured by Mr. G. Hutto 
sr. to - Frere, Esq,, and M. A. Methven, gr to W. Keilek, 
Is,., Fernwood. Whilst for six foliage or flowering plants, 
creditable specimens gained the prizes for Messrs. Methven, 

Hutton, and Luff. I***** 

There was a keen competition in the class for four exotic 

Ferns, distinct, the prize-takers being Mr. J. Bentley, gr. to 

Capt. Bos worth, Boehampton ; Mr. A. Luff, and Mr. <*. 

Hutton. ; * . 2 

In the class for four Fuchsias, distinct, open to all members, 
creditably flowered examples were staged by Messrs. Mills 
and Law, who took the prizes in the order named. Zonal 
Pelargoniums gave an effective bit of colouring to the show. 

For twelve plants in pots not exceeding 6 inches in diameter, 
Messrs. Law, Bentley, and Chandler were the leading 

exhibitors. . 

Weli-bioomed Gloxinias were staged by Messrs. Mills, 

Hutton, and Bentley. 

Six well-flowered examples of Begoaias were shown by Mr. 
A. Skeggs, gr. to Mrs. Daun, Copse Hill. Mr. Skeggs again 
secured the premier position for four excellent Caladiums. 
Well-coloured Coleuses were exhibited by Mr. C. Bentley. 

The class for twelve plants, suitable for table decoration, 
was a good one, the prizes going to Mr. McGregor, Mr. H. 
Alderman, gr. to — Hatfield, Esq., Morden Hall; and Mr. 

J. Bentley. 

The successful exhibitors in the classes devoted to specimen 
foliage and flowering plants were Messrs. Mew, Thornton, 
Chandler, McGregor, Methven, and Bentley. 

The best twelve cut blooms of Boses were contributed by 

Mr. J. Bentley. 

Well-finished examples of black Grapes (three bunches) were 
shown by Messrs. Bentley and Methven. Mr. A. Methven 
was 1st for three bunches of white Grapes. In the class for 
six Peaches, well-coloured fruits were s aged by Messrs. Luff, 
Alderman, and Bentley, the last-named exhibitor securing 
the first position for six good fruits of Nectarines. 

For thirty-six fruits of Strawberries, the leading exhibitors 
were Messrs. Alderman, Hat ton, and Methven. Mr. Alderman 
again had 1st honours for four distinct kinds of fruit, followed 
by Messrs. Bentley and Luff. 
A collection of vegetables, in six kinds, was excellent from 

Mr. Thornton. 

In Division 2, for "single-handed" gardeners residing within 
the district, a group of miscellaneous foliage and flowering 
plants waa creditably exhibited by Mr. T. Chandler. 

In the division for amateurs not employing a gardener 
regularly, the 1st prize for six miscellaneous plants was taken 
by Mr. J. BROWN, Norman Road, Wimbledon. 

The cottagers of the district made a very good display of 

vegetables, flowers, and fruit. 
Messrs. Thomson & Son, The Nurseries, Wimbledon, sent 

a beautiful collection of hardy flowers. 



THE PEOPLES PALACE HORTI- 
CULTURAL. 

July 4, 5, and 6. — The third summer show took 
place in the Queen's Hall of the People's Palace, on 
the above daces, and, both in extent and quality, 

was a considerable advance on the two previously 
held. 

Not only was the spacious hall quite filled with exhibits, but 
the large winter-garden also. How heartily the East End 
Londoners have entered into the spirit of the thing was 
*hown by the large number of groups of plants entered for a 
36 feet, and also an 18 feet ground space, and aho for 18 feet 
and 9 feet table-spaces ; while collections of six and three 
plants, as well as many single specimens, were numerous ; 
and there were Fern-cases, model gardens, fruit, cut flowers, 
and vegetables also. In the small greenhouses, mainly of 
homely construction, put up at the backs of their residences 
by the East End gardeners, capital specimens of Plumbago 
capensis, India-rubber plants, green Dracaenas, show and zonal 
Pelargoniums, Begonias (foliage and flowering), Gloxinias, 
Succulents, Lilies, and many other things are grown remark- 
ably well, ani they speak volumes for the care and attention 
given to them, not a few of the East End gardeners being 
engiged in the City all day. The favourite window-plants 
are Fuchsias, trained to woolen-trellises, very large, flaely- 
grown, and flowered ; Pelargoniums, Creeping Jennies, Aspi- 
distra, Aralia Sieboldi, Ac In some ot their back gardens 
can be seen planted out subjects that astonish one that they 
cm be found to grown and bloom there. The favourite hardy 
annual of the East Ender appears to be Virginian Stock. 

Prizes are offered for the best kept gardens, and also for 
window-boxes, and it was necessary for the jadges to spend 
the best part of two days in visiting them, as they laid 
bitween Aldgate, Limehouse, the East India Docks, Stratford, 
Hackney, and Homerton, It ia not too much to say eome of 
the best kept gardens were found in the most unlikely pUces, 
and in order to equalize the competition, the gardens visited 
are divided into two sections: those in open and somewhat 
airy localities, and those in which they are more crowdei, and 
the conditions of culture less favourable. It is to with the 
window-ooxea. 



Certain honorary collections of plants, Ac, greatly helped 
the effect* From the Frogmore Gardens, Mr. Thomas sent a 
very fine and imposing table of plants ; from His Graoe The 
Duke of Fife, arranged by Mr. Osborn, the gardener at 
East Sheen Lodge, came another similar group ; and also from 
F. A. Bevan, Esq., Trent Park, Barnet (gr., Mr. W. H. Lees); 
Messrs. W. CrjTBUSH & SONS, Highgate Nurseries ; Messrs.' 
W. Paul & Sews, Waltham Cross (mainly Roses) ; also from 
Mr. Holmes, Frampton Park Nursery, Hackney, a fine group 
on the floor ; and some charming table decorations from Mr. 
J. R. Chard. Round the sides of the hall was a very handsome 
group of plants from S. B. Boulton, Esq., Copped Ball 
(gr„ Mr. W. M. Wright); from the Duke of Norfolk, and 
others ; and so some very fine features were secured. 

Late in the afternoon, their R.H. The Duke and Duchees 
of York visited the show, accompanied by the Duke of Fife, 
the President, when an address was presented to Their Royal 
Highnesses, and the Duke of York declared the exhibition 
open. The members of the committee were then individually 
presented to Their Royal Highnesses, and they made a tow of 
the show, being much interested in what they saw. Thers is 
every reason to believe the exhibition proved a financial 
success. ' 

CHERTSET, WALTON, AND 

WEYBBIDGE. 

July 6.— The thirtieth annnal summer exhibition 
was held this year in the grounds attached to Oat- 
lands Lodge. Stove and greenhouse plants formed 
a leading feature of the exhibition, and they were 
generally well grown. 

For a group of 14 by 7 feet, five competed, and Mr. Ridge, 
gr. to C. Swinfen Eady, Etq., Oatlands Lodge, was an easy 
winner. The 2nd place being taken by Mr. G. J. Cook, gr, to 
J. S. SASSOOX.Esq., Walton, with a creditably arranged group, 
Mr. F. Hopkins, gr. to Mrs. WoDDERSPOON, The Chestnuts, 
Walton-on- Thames, was 1st for a smaller group, with a 
capital arrangement ; and 2nd, Mr. W. C. Pagram, gr. to J. 
Courtney, Esq., The Whim, Weybridge. 

For six flowering plants, Mr. Jacques was the most suc- 
cessful. Fine foliage epecimens were best represented by Mr, 
Osman in six varieties, Mr. Gardener winning a similar 
position for four. Exotic Ferns are usually seen in excellent 
condition here, this year proving no exception. 

Caladiums, Achimenes. tuberous Begonias, Gloxinias, and 
Pelargoniums are well shown, the principal prizes being 

awarded to Messrs. Prothero, Jacques, Stedman, and Osmax. 

For six table plants, 1st, Mr. Hopkins, with bright- coloured 
examples of middle size. 

Cut flowers made an effective display; especially Roses. 
Stove and greenhouse flowers were shown, the best by IMeegrs. 
Jacques and Osman. Herbaceous flowers by Mr. G. Viger*, 
Mole House, Horsham, in twelve varieties. 

Fruit was contributed in quantity, Mr. Osm&x had the best 
collection of six kinds ; the best two bunches of Black Grapei, 
and dish of Cherries. Mr. Gardener was 1st in the class for 
two bunches of white varieties, showing ripe Buckland Sweet- 
water. Mr. J. Buxton, gr. to J. A. Foster, Esq.. Ferniands, 
Chertsey, took 1st prize for one dish of Waterloo Strawberries. 

Mr. J. Osman was, as usual, invincible in the principal 
vegetable class, that for eight kinds, and he showed extremely 
well. 

Messrs. Barr & Son, sent from their Long Ditton grounds, 
a charming collection of cot blooms of herbaceous plants, 
including many choice subjects. 









IPSWICH AND WOLVERHAMPTON 

HORTICULTURAL EXHIBITIONS. 

have received report! of these important 
horticultural exhibitions jnst ai we are going to 
press, we mast, therefore, postpone their publication 
till our next issue. 



We 



Nursery Notes, 



CARNATIONS AT THE ROYAL EXOTIC 

NURSERY, CHELSEA. 

Strenuous efforts have been made to overcom* 
the difficulties created by a great demand for plant* 
and by the unusual heat of the season, and to furniin 
a creditable display of sample beds of Picotees and 
Carnations at this nursery. The results as regard 
the whole display reflect much credit on thoae re* 
sponsible for this department, and we found on 
Wednesday a pretty show if not a M blaze of colour* 
The planti are dwarfer than in most years we r «* 
member to have seen them, and the " grata " l$ l 
the older varieties rather sparse, but fairly aband* a 
in the newer ones, and especially is this remarked 
those of Mr. Martin Smith ■ raising. ha 

We will take these first, as they overtop w J ^ 
others in height, and beat them generally i fl rZ ' 
floriferousness, and freedom from burst calycef. 

Cardinal Wolsey, a yellow ground flower oft 
Victory type, but superior in colour and form ; ^ fl rf 
of Orleans, also yellow, but differing fiomtbe^ 

nomad - ♦>*» f^AmAM Ia.^a <+w+A fs%«m &Yi>**llf'Otr "' 



- 



July 13, 1895.] : 



THE 



GARDENERS 1 CHRONICLE. 



51 



ft vigorous grower. Hayes* Scarlet is a splendid 
self of vigorous habit; thus far the finest self of 
scarlet colour raised. King Arthur is likewise scar- 
let with a crimson tinge in it, the flower is large and 
the form very good; the grass is vigorous and broad, 
and habit good. Mephisto is a crimson self, 
resembling the old Clove, but deeper in the tint; the 
form of the flower leaves nothing to be desired. 
Miss Andrey Campbell is a vigorous yellow self, 

large and distinct. Miss Ellen Terry is one of the 
best of the white Carnations. 

Of other raisers 9 varieties we remarked Cantab 
(Gifford),a very free border variety, with the fragrance 
of the old Clove ; Gerfnania, in large numbers : this is 
still one of the finest Carnations of its colour — yellow; 
Caro Roma, a beautiful purple self; Martin Cahuzac, 
a Continental variety — deep velvety crimson flower 
— most floriferous, of dwarf habit: a very nice 
variety ; Mrs. Gifford, a fine white, very free, either 
as a pot or border variety ; King of Scarlets, King 
of Crimsons (Douglas, 1892), a neat flower, of fine 
quality ; Alma Newman, of a shade of red, a free 
bloomer, and strong compact habit, height 2£ feet; 
Duchess of Fife, a tender shade of pink, large, 
pleasing flower ; Lady Nina Balfour, pink tinted with 

chamoise, erect petals, flowers of middle size, and well 
formed ; Dachess of York — a flower in colour re- 
sembling Souvenir de la Malmaison, very full, and of 
more than the usual size (Gifford, 1894) ; Duchess of 

Portland, one of the best of the fancies ; Rose Celes- 
tial ; Joe Willet, a bright dwarf, very hardy scarlet 
self. 

Many of the old favourite varieties were found in 
quantity, and there are colours and forms of flower, 
and habit of growth, to suit everyone's taste to be 
found in this very select collection. The Carnation 
is essentially a townsman's plant, and in this town 
nursery it may be seen grown in something very near 
perfection* A numerous collection of varieties of 
Picotees are likewise cultivated, but these pretty 
flowers always lose by being planted near Carnations, 
with their more exacting claims on the beholder's 
attention. 



The Weather. 



[The term '•accumulated temperature" indicates the aggre- 
gate amount, as well as the duration, oE degrees of 
temperature above or below 43° Fahr. for the period 
named : and this combined result is expressed in Day* 
degrees — a ** Day-degree w signifying 1° continued for 
twenty-four hours, or any other number of degrees for 
an inversely proportional number of hours,! 



Temperature. 



Q 



ft 2~ 



ACCUMULATED, 



9 



> 





8 
58*8 



RAINFALL. 



Bright 

Stjn. 




S 

2 e • 

a 'St 00 

9 d 




9 *x 2 * * 



M 



I 



s 






s 

•I 






QO 



±3 

r 



as 



a 



s 



3 




s 

°* 

© O 

3 B 
a .2 

§ 



» GO 




4 

3 '3 

*4 







1 -T 



2 
3 

4 
5 
6 

7 

8 

9 
10 



1 + 

aver 

1 — 



1 — 

I) aver 

1 — 



aver 
1 — 



Oaver 126 



Day 
deg, 

104 
113 
119 
112 
123 
104 
111 
111 
102 
107 



Day- 
deg. 























Day- 
deg. 

+ 120 

+ 11 

+ 59 

+ 12 

+ 40 
— 24 

+ 61 

+ 13 

+ » 

- 6 



Day- 
deg. 

+ 262 

-r- 415 

+ 277JOaver 



lOths 
Inch. 

2 — 

3 + 



+ 283 
+ 372 

+ m 



1 + 

1 + 

aver 



Ins. 



Ill 19 5 
90 123 
94 122 



+ 364 4 
+ 303j 2 



+ 337 
+ 275 
-h 195 



2 + 

?< + 

3 + 



82 
74 
70 
91 



91 



16 
30 
26 
40 



10 2j 34 
8*3' 38 

12 0; 43 



+ 248, 1 



81 ll-a 35 

75 13 3| 54 

101 131 23 

84 15-2 25 

88 11 3! 68 



31 
37 
34 

39 
37 
39 
35 

36 
45 
35 

37 
50 



The districts indicated by number in the first column 
the following ; — 

0, Scotland, N. Principal Wheat-producing Distric 
l f Scotland, E. ; 2, EnKland, NJB. ; 3, England, 
4, Midland Counties; 5, England, including London, 

Principal Grazing, #c.. District*—*, Scotland, W. 
England, N.W, ; 8, England, S.W.; 9, Ireland. 
10. Ireland, S. ; *Channel Islands. 



THE PAST WEEK, 

The following summary record of the weather throughout 
the British Islands for the week ending July 6, is furnished 
from the Meteorological Office :— 

"The wather was very unsettled and showery during the 
early part of the week, with thunderstorms in many places. 
After the middle of the period, however, a gradual improve- 
ment took place, and by the end of the week fair dry weather 
had again become general. 

•* The temper ature differed very little from the mean, but 
was slightly above it in the north and east of Scotland, and 
below it in most of the English districts, as well as in the 
south of Ireland. The highest reading* was observed as a rule 
on the 6th of July, and ranged from 71° in ' Scotland, W. and 
England, N.W./ to 76° in the ■ Midland Counties and Ireland, 
N..' and to 77° in 'Scotland. E. and England, S.W/ The 
lowest readings, which occurred mostly on the 5th or6th, were 
rather low for the time of year, the thermometer falling to 45° 
or less, in nearly ail districts, and to 40° or less in ' Scotland, 
W,, England, S.W., and Ireland. N/ 

•'The rainfall was less than the mean in the extreme 
northern and north-western parts of the Kingdom, as well as in 
the ■ Channel Islands/ but in most other districts there was a 
slight excess. 

M The bright sunshine varied greatly in amount in different 
localities. In 'Ireland, Scotland, N„ and England, N.E. and 
S./ the number of hours recorded was below the average, but 
in most other districts there was an excess, slight in many 
cases, but large in * England, S.W. and the Channel Islands.' 
The percentage of the possible duration ranged from 16 in 
* Scotland, N./ and 23 in ■ Ireland, N./ to 43 in ' Scotland, W./ 
54 in ' England, S.W./ and 67 in the ■ Channel Islands. 



t »» 



MARKET8. 



CO VENT GARDEN, July 11. 

> cannot accept any responsibility for the subjoined 
reports. They are furnished to ut regularly every 
Thursday, by the kindness of several of the principal 
salesmen, who revise the list, and who are responsible 
for the quotations. It must be remembered that these 
quotations do not represent the prices on any particular 
day, but only the general averages for the week preceding 
the date of our report. The prices depend upon the 
quality of the samples, the supply in the market, and the 
demand; and they may fluctuate, not only from day to 
day, but often several times in one day. Ed.1 

Out Fi*>wer8.— average Wholesale Prices. 






Arums, per dozen 
blooms ••• £t «•• 

Asters, per bunch... 

Bouvardias, p. bun. 

Carnations, 12 blms. 

Eucharis, per dozen 

Gardenias, per doz. 

Lapageria, 12 blms. 

Lilac (French), per 
bunch ... ... 

Lilium Harrisii, per 
dozen 

Lilium Lancifolium, 

per dozen 

Maidenhair Fern, 

per 12 bunches ... 
Marguerites, 12 bun. 
Mignonette, 12 bun. 



t . d. s.d. 



4 0- 

1 6- 

&- 

1 6- 
4 0- 

3 0- 

1 0- 



6 

1 9 

1 

2 6 

6 

4 

2 



4 6-50 
.. 2 0-40 



3 0-40 



6 0- 

1 0- 

2 0- 



8 

3 

4 



Pelargoniums, scar- 

_ let, per 12 bunches 

— 12 sprays ... 

Orchids :— 

Cattleya, 12 blms. 

Odontoglossum 

crispum,12blm. 

Pyrethrums, 12 bun. 

Roses, Tea, per doz. 

— coloured, p.dz. 

— yellow (Mare- 
chals), per dozen 

— red, per dozen 

— red, per dozen 
bunches ..» ... 

Stephanotis, dozen 

sprays 

Tuberoses, 12 blms. 



ft d. *. rf. 

4 0-60 
4-06 



3 0-60 
2 0-40 
10-20 
2 0-40 

4 0-60 
10-16 

4 0-90 

16-20 
4-06 



Obchld-bloom in variety 



Pulhts or Pots.— Average Wholesale Prices. 



Adiantum, per doc 
Aspidistra, per doz. 

— specimen, each 
Calceolaria, per doz. 
Carnations, per doz. 

bunches ... ... 

Coleus, per dozen... 
Cyperus, per dozen 
Dracaena, each 

— various, doz. 
Evergreen Shrubs, 

in variety, per 

dozen 

Ferns, small. 

Ferns, various, doz. 



f. 

4 

12 

5 

4 

4 
3 
4 
1 
12 



d, $. d. 

0-12 
O-30 
0-15 
0-6 

0-8 
0-6 
0-10 
0-7 6 
24 



#. d. s.d, 

10-76 
9 0-24 
6 0-86 
4 0-60 
9 0-24 
4 0-60 



• #* 



• •# 



• • •• 



6 
1 



0-24 
6-3 
0-12 



Ficus elastica, each 
Foliage plants, doz. 
Fuchsias, per doz. . . 
Heliotrope, per doz. 
Hydrangeas, p. doz. 
Ivy Geraniums, doz. 
Lilium Candidum, 

per doz. bun. 
Lobelia, per doz ... 
Marguerites, p. doz. 
Mignonette, p. doz. 
Palms, various, ea. 

— specimens, ea. 10 6-84 
Pelargoniums, doz. 8 0-12 
Bhodanthe, per doz. 



9 0-12 

3 0-4 
6 0-90 

4 0-60 
2 O-10 



4 0-60 



Fbtjit,— Average Wholesale Prices. 



• •♦ 



* • • 



Cherries, Black 

— White 
Figs, per dozen 
Grapes, 1st quality, 

black, English, lb. 

— 2nd quality... 

— Muscats 

— Guernsey ... 

Melons, each 

Pine-apples, St. Mi- 
chael, each 



i. d. s.d. 

3 0-40 
2 0-40 
2 0-40 

16-20 
9-10 
2 6-40 
10-16 
16-20 



.. 2 0-60 



»» 



•t 



Peaches, 1st size, doz 

— 2nd size 

— 3rd size 
Raspberries, per lb. 
Red Currants, per 

half -si eve 

— black, per 
half-sieve 

Strawberries, morn- 
ing gathered, lb. 

— per peck 



• - ■ 



s.d. s.d. 

6 0-10 

2 0-40 
10-16 
3- 3J 

2 0-26 

3 6-40 

8- 10 
2 0-26 



Vegetables.— Average Wholesale Prices- 



s.d. s.d. 
Beans, Broad, per 

Bieve .»♦ ... 1 0- 1 
Beans, French, p. lb 4 
Cauliflowers, p. doz. 2 6-3 
Cucumbers, per doz. 2 0-3 

Marrows, veg. , doz. 10-1 
Mushrooms, cter ib. 6-0 



Peas, blue, p. bash. 
Tomatos, Home- 
grown, per doz. lb. 

— Smooth ,♦ 

— ordinary ,, 

Cruemaev. do. 



s.d. 
2 6- 



s.d. 

3 



4 6-50 

4 0-- 
3 0-36 
30 - 



Home-grown 

rally are sooaiL 
Channel Iufarids, 



New Potatos. 
now coming to hand freely. Samples gene- 
Price from 5j. to 8s. pier cwt. Frendh and 
5s. per cwt. J. B. TtomaM, 



FRUITS AND VEGETABLES. 

Borough ; July 9. — Quotations :— Pea*. 2*. to 2s. 6i per 
bushel; Horseradish, if. to U. 3d. per bundle; Apples, 
Tasmanian, 6*. to 8s. per case ; Gooseberries, li. 6d*. to 2«. per 
half-sieve; Strawberries, 1*. 6d. to 2*. per peck ; Currants, 2s. 
to 4i. ; Cherries, Is, 9c£. to 2s. 94. per half-sieve. 

Spitalfiklds : July 9. — Quotations : — Cherries, 3*. to 
3*. 6vf. per hilf-sieve ; Currants, black, Zs. 6d. to 4s. per half- 
sieve ; Broad Beans, Is. 6d. to 2s. per bushel ; Peas, 2*. 6<*. to 
&t. per bushel ; Cabbages, is. to 5i. per tally; Carrots, 2s. to 
2s. Qd. psr dozen bunches ; Turnipi, 2s. to 3f . do. 

StbaTford : July 9.— The trade at this market during the 
past week has been brisk, there being plenty of buyers, and an 
abundance of all kinds of produce. Quotations: Cabbages, 
1*. 64. to 4f. per tally ; Cauliflowers, Is. to 2s. per dozen; 
ditto, 4*. to 8s. 6d. per tally ; Turnips, If, to If. 6d. per dozen 
bunches ; Carrots, li. to 1*. 6d. per dozen bunches ; Mangolds, 
10j. to 17*. 6rf. per ton; Cherries, 3*. to 4f. per half-sieve; 
Black Currants, 4t . to 4*. 64. per half-sieve ; red ditto, 2s. 6<f. 
to 4*. 9d. per half-sieve ; Qooseberries, ripe, 2e % to 2* . 64. per 
half-sieve ; ditto, green, 3*. to 3t. 64. per flat ; Strawberries, 
s. 6d. to 2s. 64. per peck ; Raspberries. 3i. to 4t. per dozen 
punnets; Tomatos, English, 4s. to It. per dozen pounds; 
Green Pea*, 3f . 94. to 5s. 64. per bag ; Windsor Beans, 3s. to 
Ss. 64. per bag. 

Farrixgdox: Ju'v 11. -Quotations:— Cabbage. Is. 34. per 
dozen ; Turnips. 3s. to 4s. per dozen bunches ; Carrots, Is. 64. 
to 4s. 64. do. ; Marrows, 3s. per dozen ; Spring Onions, 3s. per 
dozen bunches; Cucumbers, Is. 34. to 2s. M. per dozen; 
Cherries, white-flesh, 4s. per half-sieve ; do., black, 2s. t4. to 
3s. 64. do. ; Gooseberries, ripe, 2#. 64. to 3s. do.; Currants, 
red, 2s. 64. to 3s. 6d % do. ; do., black, 4s. to 4s. 64. do.; Pine- 
apples, It. 6d. to 2$. 64. each. 









CORN-. 



Averages.— Official statement of the average prices of 
British Corn, imperial measure (qr.), for the week ending 
July 6, and for the corresponding period last year :— 1895 : 
Wheat, 25s. 74. ; Barley, 19s. 94. ; Oate, 16s. 44. ; 1894 : 
Wheat, 24f . 6d. ; Barley, 25s. 74. ; OaU, 19s. 64. 



ENQUIRY. 



• • 



He that questioneth much shall Uarn much, 1 ' ~Bi.oo*. 



Tomato Fbuits not Swelling. — A correspondent 

sends the following : — " I should esteem it a great 

favour if you would kindly tell me the reaaon why 

9 0-15 o the fint two or three trutse* of my Tomatos bear 

such very small fruit, no larger than Cherries, and 

quite ripe. The fruit seems to be swelling all right 
enough half-way up the plant, and making fine large 

fruit. Should I have stopped the leader, say, when 
it had got 4 feet high, to cause the lower trusses to 
swell off, and then let it grow again ? My plants 
are 8 or 9 feet high now. In a later house I have 
950 plants in, the bottom trusses are swelling off all 
right, and I never stopped them. My three earliest 
houses I planted got a check from some salt or 
something that had been in the manure nnknown to 
me, and all turned black soon after they were planted. 
Would that be the cause ? They have never suffered 
for want of water. Nurseryman. " 




Qmnm 

Mr 



orrtepordentA 




• • 



Owing to the large increase in our circulation, we are 
reluctantly under the necessity of going to press some hours 
earlier. Our contributors, who well know what this implies, wiU 
kindly aid tcs by sending their communications as early in the 
week as possible. Communications should reach us not later than 
Wednesday. 

%• Plants, Fruits, etc., to be Named. — Correspondents 
sending plants or fruits to be named, or asking questions 
demanding time and research for their solution, must not expect 
to obtain an answer to their enquiries in the current week. 
Specimens should be good ones, carefully packed and numbered, 
and not more than six should be sent at one time. Leaves only, or 
Florists varieties cannot, as a rule, be named. 

Asparagus tenuissimus: J. A. F, It does not 
reckon as a "flowering plant" in the ordinary 
sense of the word, as uaed by schedule- makers, 
and we think that your collection would be dis- 
qualified if this plant formed a part of it. Among 
foliage plants this species of Asparagus would be 
admissible. 

Books : A. B. Index Kewemi8 % Frowde, Amen Corner, 
London, E.C. Four vols., at 2 guineas each.— 
Foreman, Ther$ is no one book which treats 
directly of nursery gardening. Any good garden- 



w 



52 



THE 



GARDENERS' CHRONICLE, 



[July 13, 1895. 



ing Manual tuch ai My Gardener, by Mr. H. W. 
Ward, Longford Cattle Gardens; Hardy Flowers, 
by W. Robinson (Macmillan & Co., London) ; 
Stove and Greenhouse Plants, by B. S. Willianu & 
Son, Victoria and Paradise Narseries, Upper 
Holloway ; The Nursery Book, bv L. H. Bailey, 
The Rural Publishing Co., New York, or through 
' a foreign bookieller in London. If yon intend to 
grow only certain plants as Carnations, Chrysan- 
themums, Clematis, Dutch Bulbs, Tomatos, &c, 
manuals on these and others may be obtained at 
the Bazaar Office, 170, Strand, W.C. 

Carnations: G. F. The plants are apparently 
affected with eel-worms. Nothing can be done 
except to turn out the soil and get fresh. 

Catebpiixabs of thb Sawfly on Goosebmby: 
P. B. S. To guard against the recurrence of this 
pest, jou should shovel away the whole of the soil 
beneath the bushes as far as the branches extend 
at the very least, and to a depth of 4 inches, 
charring it, or burying it deeply in the soil in some 
distant part of the garden, replacing it with fresh 
garden soil, or loamy soil from outside the garden. 
This may be done at any time from the present till 
the end of January. If it be done in frosty weather, 
there should be no haste in replacing the soil 
taken away, as exposure to hard frost is likely to 
do good by destroying any chance grubs that may 
have been left behind. A slight dressing of gas- 
lime at that time might also be beneficial in the 
same way. As you say, the quassia-water clears 
the bushes of the caterpillars, but it does not clear 
the soil of tbem. 

Cobbection.— For "tusan chikee," p. 799, in rol. 
xri'u of Gardeners' Chronicle, read (< taisan chiku." 

Hollies : W. C. The leaves are attacked by a 
saw- fly. Encourage the birds. We do not think 
any permanent injury will ensue* 

Lawn Dressing : M. 3. Lawrence. At this season a 
mild kind of liquid manure may be used. In the 
autumn and winter a dressing of sifted clayey 
loam, with wood* ashes and sifted charred garden 
refuse, charcoal- dust should be applied regularly 
all over the surface, laying it on so that the tips of 
the grass can be just seen through it. The wood- 
ashes may be used in the proportion of one-tenth 
of the whole. Well-rotted farmyard or stable 
dung does good, but the effects are less laiting. 

Names of Pjlant s: N. C. Veronica spicata. — 
A. J. B. 1, Peach -leaf rotten ; 2, Cherry, Late Duke ; 

3. Lychnis chalcedonica ; 4, Galega officinalis 
alba; 5, Veronica spicata.— Kintore> Gentiana 
lutes, Lilium Hansoni.— H. C. W. Spurrey, Sym- 
phytum asperrimum, — A. B. 1 and 2, forms of 
Dianthus carthusianorum ; 3, Dianthus superbus ; 

4, Campanula grandis; 5, Campanula Hostii. 
D. T. F. The so-called crown or mummy Pea, 
figured in Gardeners' Chronicle, p. 44. January 11, 
1873, a fasciated variety. 1, Achillea Millefolium ; 2, 
Orobanche minor ; 3, Salvia verbenaca ; 4, Myrio- 
phyllum verticillatum ; 5, Prunella vulgaris; 6, 
Chenopodium bonus Henricus, — F. W. W. 1, 
Sedum album; 2, Sedum rupestre; 3, Sedum 
rupestre ; 4* Campanula pulla ; 6, Lysimachia 
nummularia; 6, Astrantia major. — Constant 
Reader. 1, Abutilon Megapotamicum, better 
known as A. vexillarium ; 2, Ulmus campettris, 
variegated form ; 3, Ccelogyne ocellata ; 4, Den- 
drobium crumenatum; 5, Deudrobium meso- 
chlorum ; 6 f Dendrobium chrysanthum. — Judy. 
Carnation W. Toby.— J. R. B. Lilium Martagon. 
— F. Y. 1, Colutea arborescens; 2, Euphorbia 
cyparitsias.— J. T m The green form of Zebrina 
pendula, syn. Tradescantia zebrina.— T. B. Rosa 
lucida.— J. Heath. 1, Pteris longifolia ; 2, Adian- 
tuzn hispidulum ; 3, Cyrtomium falcatum ; 4, As- 
plenium bulbifernm ; 5, Pteris cretica albo- 
lineata ; 6, Aspleninm trichomanes. — Germany 
(no letter) Dendrobium gratiosissimum ; the other 
probably Phlox maculata var. Candida. — S. H. W. 
The large Cattleya is C. Warscewiczii, commonly 
catled C. gigas in gardens ; the others, C. Mendeli 
and C. Mossiw ; No. 4 is also a good C. Mendeli ; 
No. 6, Odontoglossum pulchellum, not Oncidium* 
The photograph duly came to hand. Many 
thanks. 

Nabcissus : J. AT. T. The bulbs were subjected to bad 
treatment after they had flowered in January, 
1893,the frost doubtless destroying the tender leaves 
grown in heat. They were weakened thereby, and 
failed to give strong offsets. The early forced 
bulbf should not be placed out-of-doors, and 
receiVe •• rib attention " till they are again planted. 
It is better practice to keep them in cold frames* 



protecting them from frost, affording them water 
in moderation till the leaves mature, when 
they may be dried off, and the bulbs shaken out of 
the soil, and fully exposed for a week or two to the 
sun. A period of from one to two years should 
elapse before Narcissus are forced a second time. 
Your soil appears to be of a most unpromising 
nature, needing much amelioration by mixing it 
with garden refuie, burned earth, fine coal- ashes, 
strawy stable-dung, sand, &c. Cow-manure, 
either decayed or not, is of small value in 
such land, and to place it at the base of the 
bulbs in that or any other soil is a dangerous 
practice with Narcissus, which are plants that are 
injured by contact with manures. You would 
find decayed vegetable substances, leaf-soil, 
&c. t much more suitable. Qaick-lime would do 
your clayey loam some amount of good by its 
mechanical action if dug in before allowing 
it to slake. We do not think that the drought 
of 1893 caused any id jury to the bulbs, the land 
being of too retentive a nature to be affected by 
it; or that the late severe winter was injurious. 
As you suppose, soot makes a good sort of top- 
dressing, containing, as it does, considerable 
quantities of sulphate of ammonia. 

Nabcissus, &c. : T. Bros, and W. W. The bulbs are 
affected both with mites and fungus, but the bulbs 
look so healthy that they mav outgrow it with less 
manure. 

Pinks : S. B. Your seedling white Pink is a little 
larger than "Her Majesty," and the habit you 
describe is an improvement. 

Sbwagb Distbibution : D. W. C. Mel. A broad 
feeding-canal should be made with puddled sides 
and bottom at the higher part of the field, to hold 
sufficient sewage to irrigate a large portion of the 
land. This should be made with a slight fall — 
say, half an inch in cO feet. From this canal 
other smaller canals should proceed, at 12 to 
15 feet apart at right angles, each being fitted with 
a sluice or penstock of an ordinary description in 
wood. It would be better to divide the field 
transversely with one or more feeding- canals, and 
make the intervening land quite level and true ; 
then by allowing the sewage to run into the minor 
channels from the main feeder until it reached the 
top or the sides of these, or half an inch above 
them, the sewage would spread over the surface 
gradually and without any rush. By this system 
of shallow drains any part of the land could be 
■aturated at will ; and when sufficient moisture 
had been afforded, the supply must be cut off by 
closing the sluices. If the land is level, or nearly 
so, it will not be a difficult matter to irrigate it in 
the manner described. Very irregular or hilly 
land, which would cost heavily to level it and lay- 
out drains, could be irrigated by means of a col- 
lecting-tank and an underground system of iron 
pipes, the sewage being distributed from stand- 
pipes by means of a hose or a water- barrow. 

Tomatos: Tresederand W. W. Your fruits are attacked 
by a fungus known as " black spot." Remove each 
fruit as soon as the disease is noticed. Save seed 
only from healthy plants. — T. G. Your plants are 
affected with fungus. Burn all the affected plants 
at once, and spray the leaves with weak Bordeaux 
Mixture, taking care not to use it on any of the 
berries that are near the ripening stage. 

Tomatos not Swellinq: Nurseryman. Will you 
kindly send up samples of fruit from one plant 
that exhibits the undesirable peculiarity that you 
mention. We print your letter in another column, 
in the hope of eliciting the opinions of our 
readers. 

Tomatos Splitting: W. J. Excessive watering 

probably following on a period of drought. The 

same thing occurs in stone fruit, Melons, &c, We 

do not know anything of the peculiarity ot Chemin 
Rouge. 

Truffles : G. E. E. There is a book in the French 
language by M. Chatin, which treats of the 
culture of Truffles. We would, however, advise 
you to make enquiries of the secretary of tbe 
Soci£<5 d'Horticulture de France, Rue de Grenelle 
84, Paris, who would be pleased to afford you 
information on the subject. 



COMMUNICATIONS ^CFAVET >.-£. O Wyatt.-E. C.-W. E. G. 

M «.. Ort«». -A. B. F. M^F. 1. T -T H M -I"l t' 
-J. T.. H<^ Ita,.-,. p._ E . B »j. °; £»,£*£.«• 





LL 



& 



SMITH 



BRIERLEY HILL, near DUDLEY, 



J 



And at 118, QUEEN VICTORIA STREET, LONDOK, He 

IKON FENCING, HURDLES, GATES 

IRON ROOFING and BAY BARNS. 




Special Estimates given for Large Contracts in Fencing 
Roofing, &c. Personal Surveys of Estates made, and practicsi 
advice given as to the best and most economical Fences to put 
down. Illustrated Catalogues Free by Post. 




Of The Pioneer of cheap, simple, and effective heating for $maU 

Greenhouset, 
The immense sale of this Boiler, and the numerous imitations 
of it sent out in recent years, afford abundant testimony to its 
undoubted success. 

Secure the Original Fattern only from the inventors. 
No. 1, £2 lbs. ; No. 2, £4 55. ; No. 3, £5 15s. ; also larger 6ize«. 
Estimates for complete apparatus. Also illustrated lists and 

copies of testimonials on application. 
MESSENGER & CO., Loughborough, Leicestershire. 
London Office : 163. Falmerston tfuildinflrs. Old Broad St., E.C. 



BOULTON 




PAUL, 



Manufacturers, 
NOBWICH. 



GARDEN REQUISITES in Great Variety. 



No. 6. — Wrought -Iron 
Ashes or Offal Barrow, 

Garden Barrow and Cinder 
Sifter combined. 
The top can be taken off, 
making an excellent Leaf 
and Garden BarroMr. 

Cash Price, 

Painted 30/- 

Body galvanized, extra 6/- 

If fitted with Kegistered Cinder Sifter, 4/6 extn. 





No. 7.- Wrought-Iron 

Barrow. 

Tot ASHES, 00*^. 

STABLE, &c 



•B->1 rt» » p^T 



• MvP'iii ■■••» I 



Cash Price ... •♦ 



. *h 



No. 87. The Hamburg Prize 
Watering Machine, 

With Powerful Garden Engine. 

Cash Price, Carr. Paid. 

To hold 36 gallons £b 

If without pump UK 

Suction pipe at 1/3 per ft. 
If fitted with extra powerful 
pump, two delivery hos« jets 
and sprayers, for spraying fruit 
trees, &c. ; also dtuhers, for 
keeping the solution mixed 
whilst in use. £8. 




CATALOGUE 



Railway 



BOU LTON~4TpAui7NORWtf H 





flower p yJ 

CONWAY a WABinS <!*"• 

ROTA* FOTTEMBS, g 

WK8TON-SUPER-M* 1BBE , 

The Largest Ma^factub^ 

Pottery in th ^ *°£ctoJ« w 

MlLIJOire IN STOCK. CfK^r 

30 Gold and d^rer * ed *X*^ 

Price Ltits free *» A ^ W 



JotY 13 1895.] 



THE 



GAltDENEKS CHBOtilOLE, 



53 



GREAT REDUCTION in FRAMES 

OXTS WELL-KNOWN MASS. 




PORTABLE CUCUMBER FRAMES. 

That* Frame* are made of the Best Material?, and can be 
together and taken apart in a few minutes by any one. 

Sizes and Prices, Glazed and Painted. 



Might, 
2 
3 
4 



» 
» 



CASH 
PRICES 
IAB.B1AC 



R. 



4 ft. by 6 ft. . 

8 ft. by 6 ft. . 
12 ft. by 6 ft. . 
16 ft. by (i ft.. 
_>0 ft. by 6 ft. . 
l'4 ft. by 6 f t. . 

Larger tizet at proportionate prices. 

HALLIDAY 

ROYAL HORTICULTURAL WORKS, 





CO. 



I 



MIDDLETON, MANCHESTER. 

London jfcCTtf.Mr.H.SKKLTON.Seedsman. Ac. ,2, Hollo way Rd.,N. 





12X10 
14X10 



14X12 I 18X12 
16X12 20X12 



SIZES 

16X14 
18X14 



20X14 I 20X16(24X16 ?2Xl8 

20X15 I 22X161*0X18 24X18 
" 200 " 



21-OZ. Foreign, of abo? 

and 4t hs qualities, always in stock. 15-OZ. Foreign similar 
current sizea in 200 feet boxes. 

English Glass, cut to buyer's sizes at lowest prices, deliver** 

free and sound in the country in quantity. 
™««t P J 10 J^ OaTINO and CUCUMBER GLASSES, &c. 

put Jt£ XE£S£ lkad » paints, OILS, BRUSHES, fto. 

PIT LIGHTO. cheap line of 21 -OX. 200 feet, 9 inches by 
7 inches, and 10 inches by 8 inches. 

GEORGE FABMILOE & SONS, 
34, St. John Street. West Smithileld. London, E.C. 

8tock Lists and Priceson application. Please quote Gard. Chron. 




£ t. 


d. 


(2 





3 





J 4 2 


6 


16 5 





6 7 


6 


J 10 








ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 




W. Jones' Treatise, " Heating by Hot-water/' 

Second Edition, 216 pages and 9* Engravings, 

2s. 6d. nett, per post, 2s. lOd. 



STOURBR IOGE1 



ORCHID BASKETS, 



RAFTS, 



BOATS, and CYLINDERS, 

AND ALL GARDEN SUNDRIES. 



SEND FOR A PRICE LIST 

From the Largest Manufacturer in the Trade, 



H. 



G. 



SMYTH 



i 



21. GOLDSMITH ST., DRURY LANE, W.C, 



WARE & SONS' wJSHSU 



FLOWER 



POTS 





9HOWWK STAPLES AS FIXED. 



Thorpe's Patent 
r Glazing Staple. 

Broken pane* re- 
placed instantly, 
and without top 
putty. Will not 
rust. Practically 
everlasting. Sample 
gross assorted right 
and left hand, sent 

post-free, 1/9. 



The Marriott Cycle Co., Ltd., 71, Queen Street, B.C. 






CHAS. P. KINNELL 




GO. 




Largest and best Stook of HOT- 
BOILERS, PIPES, VALVES, and HORTI- 
CULTURAL SUNDRIES in the United 
Kingdom. HEATING APPARATUS erected 
\>y specially. trained staff of skilled Engineers. 
Estimates free. New Illustrated Catalogue 

s»-nt oq rtotipt of pott-oard Contractors to 

H.M. Government, &c. f &<% 

80UTHWABK ST., LONDOH, SI. 



WOOD-WOOL.- WOOD- WOOL, 

The Best Material for Packing every description of Good*. 

CHAPMAN & CO., Ltd., 

CROWN WHARF. DEFTFORD, LONDON. IE 

The Largeft Manufacturers in the Kingdom. 
Large Stock of Standard Qualities. Prompt Delivery. 

Samples and Prices upon application. 



I 



Established 1861. 

BIRKBECK BANK 

SOUTHAMPTON BUILDINGS, CHANCERY LANE, W.C. 

TWO-AND-A-HALF par Cent. INTEREST allowed on 
DEPOSITS, repayable on demand. 

TWO per Cant, on CURRENT ACCOUNTS, on the mini- 
mum monthly balanoee, when not drawn below £100. 

STOCKS and SHARES purchased and sold. 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT. 

For the encouragement of Thrift the Bank receives small 
sums on deposit, and allows interest at the rate of TWO-AND- 
A-HALF PER CENT, per annum on each completed £1. 

BIRKBECK BUILDING SOCIETY. 

HOW TO PURCHASE A HOUSE FOR TWO GUINEAS 
PER MONTH. 

BIRKBECK FREEHOLD LAND SOCIETY. 

HOW TO PURCHASE A PLOT OF GROUND FOR FIVE 
SHILLINGS PER MONTH. 

The BIRKBECK ALMANACK, with full particulars, 
free. FRANCIS RAVENSCROFT. Manager. 




DEAD! 



Nonsense, man ! If 
you were dead you 
wouldn't feel any- 
thing about it ! Just 

feel amongst your 
loose change for 9d., 
send it in stamps to 

NEW BALL & MASON Nottingham. 

and you will receiv r^r return a sample bottle of 



• 




EXTRACT or i 

FOR MAKING 

NON-INTOXICATING 



which will quench your thirst, cool your stomach 

and refresh your system I 

NEVER SAY DIE! SEND STRAIGHT ON! 

Of all Chemist* and Grocers, 6d. and la. per bottle. 

A Sixpenny bottle makes 8 gallons. 




COOPER 



I 



Ltd 



HORTICULTURAL PROVIDERS, 



■i 



The Original Inventors of Cheap Greenhouses, ■ wwj 

The Largest Steam Horticultural Works in the World. 



755, OLD KENT ROAD, LONDON, S.E 



I 

Inspection Invited. 



1000 Houses in Stock to Select from. 

Works cover 5 acres. 
Nurseries— Hanwortli & Feltham. 



IMPORTANT. 

We beg to inform all readers of 
this Paper that the Fourth Edition 
(100 000 copies) of our Revised 
PRICE LIST, consisting of 400 pp. 
and about 1200 Illustrations, 
bound in cloth, is Now Ready. 
we shall have much pleasure in 
forwarding to every person one 
post-free on application. This 
W«t is the moat complete in the 
Trade, and has cost several thou- 
sand pounds to Tjrodnce. 








Amateur Span-roof Greenhouse. 
Complete, from £2 16* 



Rustic Summer 
Houses from £4. 





See No. 19 in List 



IRON 
BUILDINGS 

of every 

description. 

Estimates 
free. 




CONTENTS OF SECTIONS. 



Cooper's " Bamtell." 



Neat Boxes, 3/9 each. 






... 



• •» 



- . . 



• •• 



section. 

I.— Conservatories, Greenhouses, Vineries, 
Orchid Houses, Plant and Forcing 
Houses, Frames, Pi ts.Hand-Lighta. Ac. 

IT.— Poultry, Kennel, Rabbit, and Pigeon 

Appliances, &c, 

III.— Rustic Work 

IV.— Iron Buildings and Roofing 

Furniture. Ac. ... 

V.— Heating Apparatus, Cooking Stores, aVc. 

VI.— Horticultural Manures, Fertilisers, In- 
secticides. Worm and Weed Destroyers, 
Sunshades, Soils, &c. 

VII.— Lawn Mowers and Edge Cutters. Term 

Markers, Garden Boll 

VIII.— Horticultural Timber 

IX,— Horticultural Sundries, Wirework, 

Fountains, Vases, Statuary, eVc. 

X.— Vegetable and Flower Seeds, Plants, 
Dutch Bulba, *c. 



pages. 



17- 64 



• •• 






«• « 



«•• 



66- 


- 9S 


99- 


-134 


135- 


-178 


m~ 


-228 


229- 


-346 


347- 


-368 


Sctny— 


~3£0 


381- 


-343 



• •• 



... 343-383 



54 



THE 



GARDENERS 



I 



CHRONICLE, 



[July 13, 1895. 



THE GARDENERS' CHRONICLE 



PUBLISHER'S NOTICE8. 

G ardento*' Chronicle Telegrams. — The 

Registered Address for Foreign and Inland 
Teltgrams is " Oardchron, London" 

ADVERTISEMENTS. 
SCALE of CHARGES for ADVERTISING 



HEAD LINE CHARGED A3 TWO. 



4 
6 
6 

7 

8 



10 

11 
12 

13 
14 



Lines 



n 

M 

ft 
ft 

ft 
99 



• • 



• • 



• • 



• • 



• • 



t • 



• • 



• • 



• • 



£0 
















3 
8 

4 
5 
5 
6 
I 

7 
7 
8 




6 



6 

6 


6 




15 Lines 
16 

17 : 

18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 



If 

» 
99 

99 

91 
99 
»f 

- J 

99 
ft 



■ • 



£0 




• t 

• • 
t ■ 

• t 



8 
9 
9 
10 
10 
11 
11 
12 
12 
13 
13 



6 



6 


6 



6 


6 


6 



AHD SIXPENCE FOB EVERY ADDITIONAL LINE. 



If set across two Columns, the lowest charge will be 20*. 
If let across three Columns the lowest charge will be 30#. 

Page. £8; Half Page, £4, 10 1.; Column. £3. 

Gardeners and others Wanting Situations. 

26 words, including name and address, ls.6d. 9 
and 6d. for every additional line (about nine 
words) or part of a line. These Advertise- 
mmts must be prepaid. This scale does not 
apply to announcements of Vacant Situations , 
which are charged at the ordinary scale. 

Births, Deaths, and Marriages, 5s. each 
insertion. 

411 Advertisement! should be addressed to the 

PUBLISHER. 

Pub&ibln*; Office and Office for Advertisements 
41, Wmlunotqn Street, Strand, W.C. 



GARDENING APPOINTMENTS. 

Mr. W. Saver, for the last four and a half years Foreman 
under Mr. W. Bardxev, Osmaston Manor Gardens. 
Derby, as Head Gardener to A. Barclay "Walker, Esq , 
Rockingham. Boyle. Roscommon, Ireland; and he will 
shortly enter upon his duties. 

Mr. Geo. Malcolm, for the past fifteen \ears Gardener at 
Wellington Hall, Tarporley, as Gardener and Bailiff to 
S. H. WoODH0USE,E*q., Norley Hall, Frodsham. Cheshire. 

Mr. A. W. SMITH. Foreman at Great Gearies Gardens, Ilford, 
Essex, as Head Gardener to A. Bird, Esq., The Grange, 
Great Bookbam, Surrey. 



ROOFING FELT. 




THE 'POTTER" ROOFING FELT. 



Specially prepared. In Rolls, 25 yards by 33 in. 

No, 1, 6b. per Roll ; No. 2, 6s. 6d. per Roll ; 

No. 3, 88. per RolL 



1000 



Carriage Paid.] [5000 



WOLV 



W POTTER, 



GLASS I 



CHEAP GLASS I 

In Stock Sizes. 



15-0*., per 100 ft, 7s. Bd 
21-oz., ,, io*. <& 






12X10, 18X12, 18X14, 24X14 
14X12, 20X12, 18X16. 24X16 
„ ^ 16X12, 16X14.20X46, 24x18. &o, 

1}X8 Prepared Sash Bar at 5s. per 100 feet. 
Flooring, 5/9 per square; Matching 4/9; 2 x 4, at Jd. per 
loot run. Garden Utensils. Trellis, Ironmongery, Paints, Sm. 

Catalogues free. 




:■: 



CHEAP WOOD COMPANY, 

Bt8H0P8€rATB STREET WlTBLIN. LONDOW 



n 



1 1 



% 



u 




ARDS 



J 



NOTED PEAT 



(Trade supplied on best terms), 

▲ large stock of the finest quality ORCHID PEAT. Also for 
Store and Greenhouse Plants, Ferns, Rhododendrons, &c Bv 
the sack, cnbic yard, ton, or truck-load. Can be seen in bulk 
at Loudon Wharf. Immediate despatch by any Rail or Steamei 
Prompt and Special Quotations for delivery to any Station # 

G. H. RICHARDS, Old Shot Tower Wharf, Lambeth. 
London, S.E.; Peat Grounds and Depots, Ringwood and 
Wareham. Address all letters to London Wharf. 




PARTNERSHIP WANTED, m a FLORISTS 
or moderate-sized NURSERY BUSINESS where a 
genuine profitable trade is being done -Full particulars to 
C. DURRAN T AND CO., Stationers, Chelmsford. 

AN any Gentlbman recommend for Kent, a 

thoroughly competent and careful WORKING .GAR- 
DENER, two under him ? Must understand \ me», Fruit, ana 
Early Forcing. It is most essential that he is experienced in 
Herbaceous Gardening. Wife to attend Poetry. Wages 2os., 
all f ound. -N. W„ Western's Library, Kmghtsbridge. 

A A 7 ANTED, a thoroughly honest, respectable, 

W steady, HEAD-WORKING GARDENER, with three 
under him. Must understand Vines, Tomatos, Melons, Cuoum- 
bers, Herbaceous Border. Vegetables of all kinds. Wall* ruit, 
&c. Wages, £1 per week, cottage, milk, vegetables, and fuel. 
—Apply by letter, stating full particulars as to experience, 
age, number of children. &c, to Mr. MARTIN, West Leigh, 
Havant, Hants. ... __ _____ 

WANTED, an Outdoor Gardener, single, who 
can attend to Cows. Good character indispensable. 
—Apply, OWNER, Wra ysbury House, Wraysbury: 

ANTED, a GARDENER (good SINGLE- 
HANDED). Wife to do washing. Cottage found. Age 
not under thirty.— Apply, F. L. BRADLEY, Esq., Tharp Lodge, 
Hornchurch. Eesex. • ___ 

WANTED, an UNDER GARDENER, to 
look after cow, pig, and poultry, and make himself 
generally useful. Abstainer preferred— Apply by letter, full 
particulars wages required. ALPH A, Heronfield, PotWsBar. 

ANTED, good UNDER GARDENER. 

Chiefly Outside work ; must be strong and obliging, 
with good character. — Address GARDENER, Dalby Road, 
Melton Mowbra y . 

ANTED, UJSDER-GARDENER,forP»lm- 

house and Pleasure Grounds. Married, without family. 
—Apply to Mr. STEWART, Bray ton Gardens, Carlisle. 

ANTED, a GARDENER and WIFE, 

under 40, the latter as Cook, to take charge of small 
Country-house. No family. Apply by letter to R. L., 11, Man- 
chester Square, London, W. 

ANTED.— Messrs. JOHN LAING and 

SONS, Forest Bill and Catford (Kent) Nurseries, 
have now a VACANCT in their Nurseries for a good 
PROPAGATOR. Must be well versed in Propagating and 
Growing Soft and Hard-wooded Stuff. Character will have 
to be excellent for sobriety and experience. — Apply by letter 
only, stating wages required and full particulars, to The 
Nurseries. Forest Hill, S.ri. 

ANTED, as PROPAGATOR and 

GROWER. — An experienced, active MaN to work a 
batch of Houses ; must be well up in Soft- wooded Plants and 
Early Forcing, good cultivator of Roses Indoors. Carnations, 
Cyclamens. Ferns, Ac — State age, wages, references, with 
full particulars, to EDWIN HILLIER, The Nurseries, Win- 
chester. 



WANTED, an industrious young MAN 
(under Foreman), with good knowledge, as a GROWER 
of Palms, Dracaenas, Crotons, Ferns, and other Foliage Plants, 
State age, references, and wages expected, — S. W., Gardeners' 
Chronicle Office, 41, Wellingtou Street. Strand, W.C. 

ANTED, FOREMAN (single).- Good 

Grower of Grapes, Cucumbers, Mushroom*, &c, for 
Trade. Reference required; bothy and vegetables; state 
wages.— WILKINSON, Lambley, Nottingham. 

WANTED, an OUTDOOR FOREMAN. 

▼ ▼ Must have thorough knowledge of General Nursery 
Work, and be well up in Fruit Trees, Roses, and Rhododen- 
drons. Age not to exceed 45, and the highest references 
required as regards character and capabilities.— Apply to 

WM. BARRON AND SON, Elvaston Nurseries, Borrowash, 
Derby. ' 

ANTED, JOURNEYMAN in Houses under 

Foreman.— Must be active, industrious, and have 
good experience in Plants and Fruit. Not under 24 years 
of age. Wages 21$. per week ; no bothy. Preference given to 
one who has been accustomed to Tubular Boilers.— Full par- 
ticulars to J. ANDERSON, Streatham Grove, Norwood 
London, S.E. ' 



\*7 ANTED, a LAD, on a Gentleman's place, 

V ^.^y^ 11 15 an , d 16 » "> l0 °* after Pony and Cart, and 
make himself generally useful. Must have had experience 
with pony. Wages 95. per week, bothy and milk -Annlv bv 

A e i£ns° nly to G ' BURR1SS ' The ^** 8 > HouUwrd, 7 11 



WANTED, TWO Smart YOUTHS as 
IMPROVERS, one for the Glass, and one for General 
Outside Nursery. Place permanent and progressive to ^ 
youths. Bothy. Apply, with full particGla^ of "^eS 

S^WT d a ereQce to TUENER BR0S - hSTSS 

WANTED, a good active single MAN fnr 
Pleasure Grounds. Wages 17, «er wppV _ \ * 
F. JORDAN, Gardener, Tilgate, jm wggjg^ ~ Apply to 

ANTED, at Onc^a~~S^ 

Ferns, must be quick at nottin* ■«,« I' * 

Gardens, Tunbiidge Wells. ' «*MOUR, Nevill Courts 



WANTED, a young MAN, well up in Carna- 
tion Layering and Propagating.— State age, salarv 
references, to R. H. BATH, The Floral Farms, W isbech. ' ' 

OEED TRADE.— WANTED, a DAY-BOOK 

O and LEDGER CLERK, bv one of the leading Retail Firms. 
Must have experience in the business, quick at accounts, and 
have first-class references.— Apply, with all particulars, T. B 
Gardeners' Chro nicle Office, 41, Wellington Street, Stra nd, W.c! 

ANTED, a smart COUNTER-HAND^ell 

up in Seeds, Bulbs, Plants, with knowledge of Floral 
Business —State salary and full particulars to J. HENDERSON 
and SONS, 3, Lincoln Place, Dublin. 

ANTED^an experienced PACKER. Would 

be required to fill up spare time in the Houses. Must 
have good references.— Apply, stating wages required, to 
W. E. TIDY, Brockhampton Nurseries, Havant. 

ANTED, an INVOICE CLERK ^d 

BOOK-KEEPER.— Must be neat writer, quick, and 
accustomed to the Bulb and Plant Trade. Salary, 25s. per 
week.— Apply by letter only, B., 12, King Street, Covent 
Garden, London. 





WANT PLACES. 

TO GARDENERS AND OTHERS 

SEEKING SITUATIONS. 

Advertisers are cautioned against having letter* 
addressed to initials at Post-offices, as all 
Letters so addressed are opened ly tk 
authorities and returned to the sender. 



Gardeners, Farm- Bailiff i 

DICKSONS, Royal Nurseries, Chester, are 
always in a position to RECOMMEND MEN of the 
highest respectability, and thoroughly practical at their busi- 
ness. All particulars on application. 
Telegraphic and Postal Address— 1 * DICKSO NS, CHESTEB." 

RICHARD SMITH and CO. 
beg to announce that they are constantly receiving 
applications from Gardeners seeking situations, and thati 
they will be able to supply any Lady or Gentleman with 
particulars, &c.— St. John's Nurseries, Worcester. _^_ 

S. WILLIAMS and SON beg to intimate 

• that they have at present in their Nursery and npotj 
their Register some excellent Men, competent either to ml 
the situation of HEAD GARDENER, BAILIFF, FOREMAN 
or JOURNEYMAN. Ladies and Gentlemen requiring any of 
the above will please send full particulars, when the best 
selections for the different capacities will be made.— Victoria 
and Paradise Nurseries, Upper Holloway, N. 

■■ — -.— ■■—-- — -■ ■ I, - — . - — ^ ^— — ^— 

F SANDER and CO. can recommend 
• several highly qualified and energetic HEAD and 
UNDER GARDENERS, of excellent character and proved 
ability ; men thoroughly fitted for all the various duties or 
their profession. For all particulars, please apply to— 

F. SANDER AJT D CO., St. Albans. 

GARDENER (Bead).— Age 29; good expe- 
rience. Steady and industrious. I should have pleasure 
in recommeLding my late Foreman (David McLenaghan) as 
above.-ROftT. GRINDRQD. Whitfield, Hereford. 

GARDENER (Head), where two or moreaw 
kept.- 
testimonials. 
on-Trent. 



Fourteen and a half years* experience. Good 
-H. D. f Park Hill House, Stapenhill, Burton- 



end 



GARDENER (Head of two or 
B. 'Winthrop, Esq., wishes to highly recomm 
L. Lawrence, who has been with him three and a nan ye ■ 
Age 27 ; abstainer ; life-experience. Highest reference*. 
LAWRENCE, Bart on Court Gardens, Kintbury^jBerjra 

Ft ARDENER (Head).— A G^ntusman c*J 



strongly recommend his Head Gardener ; fo *£ e f/YuM 
is tervice; leaving by his own desire,— wi*^ 



V. 

in his tervice ; leaving by 

SHARP, Achnacarry Garden*, Fortwilliam 

OARDENERTHea^, ^herTt^o "or three** 

VI kept. Good all-round man. Energetic. Liie^ e* ^ 



ence. Good reference from late employers 
Portland Road, Notting Hill. W. 




t> ARDENER (Head Working). -M* 
I age, married, no children; life ^^ en l e araC t ? r. 
branches of Gardening. Over seven years good con 

Further particulars will be g.ven. Death of em P£>^ r s g. 
of leaving.— W. B., 89, Webber Street, Black^ narsKoaa^^ 

GARDENER (Head Working); *§? ®£ % 
Sir Thomas Bazley wishes to recomoeodW. ifl 
who has been with him five year* ; thoroughly expen 
all branches.— BURLEY, Hatherop, Fairford. 

ARDENER (Bead Working)? a*« % 

H. S. Bower, E*q , wishe3 to recommend F. J. ^ ^ 



leaving through reduction. Practical experience 
branches.— Gardens, Fontmell Parva, Blandford. 

Age 



36, 



GARDENER (Head Working). ~ reCOffi . 
married, no family.— A Gentleman can nign y pr0 . 
mend a thoroughly practical man in all branC Jj? 8 « 77, Hig & 
fession. Leaving through place being sold.— J. w - ^" 
• Street. High Barne t, Herta. ^-T7 

GARDENER (Head Working)-^ c U 
no family; thorough practical knowledge in au f< 3., 
Inside and Out. Life experience. Good characi* . 
30, Chestnut Road, Horley, Surrey- 



' 



three).- 












Jut* 13, 1895.] 



THE 



GARDENERS* CHRONICLE. 



55 



• •:• 



GARDENER (Head Working).— Age 35, 
married; thoroughly practical in all b-anches. Well 
recommended by present employer.— GARDENER, Birchw 
Grange, Pen-y-lan, Cardiff. 

GARDENER (Head Working) where three 
or four are kept.— Aged 59 ; married ; no family. Well 
up in the general routine, inside and out ; understands forcing ; 
good references.— W. MITCHELL, Kirkby Mallory, Hinckley, 
Leicestershire. 

GARDENER (Head Working).— Age 29; 
life experience in the cultiva'ion of high class fruits, 
Flowers, Vegetables; House and Table Decorations, &c. 
Served as Foreman in large establishments; highest refe- 
rences.— WM. DALTON, Speldhurat, Tunbridge Wells. 

GARDENER (Head Working).— A Gentle- 
MAX can recommend a competent honest and indus- 
trious Gardener, age 35, married, two children. — Address at 
first, GARDENER, 41, Station Street, Stoke, Ipswich. 

GARDENER (Working).— Age 31, married, 
one child (wife a good laundress) ; good Vegetable 
Grower ; understands land ; can ride and drive ; has been 
12 years in last situation.— GROVES, Coberley, Cheltenham. 

GARDENER (Head, or good Single- 
handed).— Age 28 ; practical experience Inside and 

Out. Good character. Disengaged when suited. — H. 
CARRIER, The Court, Worcester Park, Surrey. 

GARDENER (Single-handed, or otherwise). 
—Age 30, married ; experienced Inside and Out. Three 
years' good character. Left through a death. — F., 4, 
Piccadilly, Lower Mitcham. Surrey. 

GARDENER (good Single-handed, or where 
help is given). — A Gentleman can thoroughly recom- 
mend a young Man, unmarried, age 27. — A. H. BOWLES, 
Esq , Estate Office, Clandon Park, Guildford, Surrey. 



GARDENER (Single-handed, or Second 
of three). — Situation required as above by young Man, 
aj?e 23. Four years in present place. — W. S. H., 41, Welling- 
ton Street, Strand, W.C. 

GARDENER (Single-handed, or in a large 
establishment). — Age 27, single; fourteen years' good 
all-round experience; excellent references. — W. E.,97,Eardley 
Road, Streatham, S.W. 

GARDENER (Single-handed or otherwise). 
—Age 27, married; good all-round hand. Fourteen 
years' practical experience. Excellent character.— F. WELLS, 
55, Jarvis Road, South Croydon. 

GARDENER (Single-handed, or where 
help is given).— Good knowledge of Flowers, Vegetables, 
and Glass. Nearly eight years' good character,— COLBERT. 
38. Hieton Road. Cambrid™. 



GARDENER ( Single - handed or 
Second),— Age 25; married; good character. 
5, Oxford Terrace, Cram worth Road, Worthing. 



good 

A. P., 



GARDENER, age 29.— The advertiser having 
gamed experience in first-class gardens, is thoroughly 
conversant with the requirements of a good establishment. 
Can be well recommended by last and previous employers.— 
H. FEATH ERS TUNE, 19. Wycliffe Road. Wimbledon. 

GARDENER, at present on the Continent, 
who duiing the last two years has been carrying out ex- 
tensive Alterations and Improvements in Large Garden, would 
be pleased to treat with any Lady or Gentleman requiring the 
services of a first-class man.— Mr. CASTLE, F.R.H.S., The 
Nurseries, Bottesford, Nottingham. 

GARDENER (Second, or Single-handed, 
where help is given).— Age 25; nine years* experience 
Inside and Out. Good references. — W. HOWSON, The 
Gardens, Pe pper Arden, Northallerton, Yorks. 

GARDENER (Second, or Single-handed). 
—Age 27; ten years* experience. Inside and Out 
Good character.— E. WILSON, Rhydd Green, Fanley Castle 
Worcestershire. 

GARDENER (Second), or JOURNEYMAN 
(First), Inside, or Inside and Out.— Over seven years 
m present situation. Can be well recommended.- F. WOOD, 
Two Hales, Matlock, Derbyshire. 



GARDENER (Under).— Nice Lad, 
desires situation. Abstainer. Willing to 
Weil recommended. Near London preferred. - 
HQLLIS, 157, Warwick Road, K ensington, W. 

QARDENER (Under, or 

V* — Young Man, age 21, single. 
■Huation. Good reference. — JOHN 



age 16, 

be useful. 
- THOMAS 




Single-handed). 

Four years in present 
SMITH, Bathampton, 



Age 21 ; three and 

Abstainer.— G. STEVENS, 



fJARDENER (Under). 

V-A a half years' good character. 
*<*, Archway St reet, Barnes, S.W. 

rj ARDEN ER (Under).— Age 23, aingle; 

Two _tf peri . enced In and Outdoor. Excellent references. 
WrTTF?J?ci ■*** «tuation. Three years previous one.— 
^LlAMS^, Great Earl Street. St. Martin's Lane, W.C. 

^ 

O.ROWER.— Situation wanted as Grower of 

Av* 6a 0r ^S 9 ?****»• Cucumbers, and general Pot Stuff. 
*/!?kS-- a ?? d «*«*»cei.-T. EDWABDS, 27, Garden Eoad. 



GARDENER (Under). — Age 16£; four 
years' experience. Good character. — REV. CANON 
ST. JOHN, Kempsford, Fairford. 

GARDENER (Under).— Age 21; four and 
a half years' experience. Excellent character.— G. 
TILLMAN, Jun., The Woodlands, Rowhill, Dartford, Kent. 

GROWER of Palms, Ferns, Roses, and general 
Market Stuff.— Age 24; life experience in leading 
London Nurseries.— G. W.,Mr. Warner, 3, Aberdeen Cottages, 
High Street, Sou'hgate, Middlesex. » 

GROWER, or FOREMAN.— Age 24 ; Grapes, 
Cucumbers, Tomatos, Roses, Chrysanthemums. &c, in 
quantity, for Market. Good experience and reference. — 
W. R., Birchwood Lodge, Caterham Valley, Surrey. 

PROPAGATOR and GROWER, Soft and 
Hard-wooded Flowering Stuff. &c. — Age 26; ten years' 
experience in Germany and England. Well recommended.— 
E. H., 3, ABhby Terrace, Gordon Road. Enfield, Middlesex. 

TO NURSERYMEN.— Situation wanted as 
GROWER (age 24). Ten years' experience in leading 
London Nurseries. References. — W. CHAPMAN, Mrs. Heath, 
Barnes Cottage, Sunbury, Middlesex. 

TO MARKET GROWERS.— GROWER, nine 
years' experience in Giapes, Cucumbers, Tomatos. and 
General Pot Stuff. Near London preferred. — B. MILLER, 
Black water, Hants. 

PROPAGATOR and GROWER— Ferns in 
quantity. Carnations, Stove, Softwood, general Market 
flowering and Pot Stuff, Tomatos, and Cucumbers. Thirteen 
years' experience; good references. — C. B., 18, Spencer Road, 
Common Side East, Mitcham, Surrey. 

PROPAGATOR and GROWER seeks situa- 
tion. — Age 28. Good references ; life experience. Also 
making up Wreaths, Bouquets, &c— Z., 41, Wellington 
Street, Strand. 

MANAGER (General), wishes change. 
Thoroughly practical in all branches. Inside and Out 
experience in turning out staff in large quantities for English 
and Scotch Markets. At present with one of the largest 
growers for Lon J on markets.— G. L., Gardeners' Chronicle 
Office, 41, Wellington Street, Strand, W.C. 

To Nurserymen. 

MANAGER, FOREMAN, or TRAVELLER. 
— Seventeen years' experience with good Firms ; tho- 
rough knowledge of the trade; good grower.— J, WINSER, 
5. St. John's Road, Clifton, Bristol. 

To Seedsmen and others. 

MANAGER, jar otherwise. — Thorough know- 
ledge of Horticulture, Agriculture, and Wholesale and 
Retail Seed Trade. Good descriptive writer, Ac. — KO, 33, 
Cross Cheaping, Coventry. 

FOREMAN. — Age 24 ; seven years' experience 
in Private Gardens and Nurseries. Good knowledge of 
the routine under Glass. Excellent reference from present 
and previous employers. — C. ROBERTS, 9, Tubb's Road, 
Harlesden, N.W. 

FOREMAN (Inside).— Age 28 ; twelve yean' 
experience in Plant and Fruit Houses. &c. Twice pre- 
viously as Foreman. Good references.— G. WHITE, Gatehouse, 
West well. Ashford, Kent. 

To Nurserymen ana Florists. 

FOREMAN and PROPAGATOR.— Used to 
good General Trade, Rose Grafting, &c. Wreaths, 
Crosses, and Sprays. Highest References.— zT, 120, Willingdon 
Road, Eastbourne. 

FOREMAN, Inside, in a small Nursery, age 
28. — Well acquainted with the general routine. alsD 
Wreaths and Bouquets. Good references. Life experience. — 
W. O., 41, Wellington Street, Strand, W.C. 

FOREMAN and GROWER.— Well up in 
Grapes, Cucumbers, Tomatos. Palm?, Ferns, Cut 
Flowers in quantity for Market.— J. H., 9, Loch invar Street, 
Balham, S.W. 

FOREMAN, in the Houses.— Mr. Galb, Place 
Gardens, Fowey, Cornwall, will be pleased to recommend 
F. Westcoit, as above; been with him two years as Second. 



FOREMAN, Inside, in good establishment. 
Life experience, also House and Table Decorations. 
WHEELER, Biackmore End, Kimpton, Welwyu, Herts. 



FOREMAN.— John Crook, Forde Abbey, 
Chard, cm with confidence recommend a man, age 24, 
who has lived with him two years, and given every satisfaction. 

FOREMAN in a Market or good General Nur- 
eery.— Age 26 ; twelve years' experience in all branches ; 
well acquainted with Fruit, Hardy Flowers, Stove and Green- 
house Plants, Cucumbers, Tomatos, Chrysanthemums, Ac; 
good references.— H. PLTJMMER, Curdridge, Botley. 

FOREMAN (Inside).— Age 27 ; well up in 
Stove and Greenhouse Plants, Orchids, Orchard- houses. 
Vines, Peaches, &c, and Chrysanthemums for Exhibition. 
Good references. Previously Foreman. — T. WALLER, 
Laburnham Cottage, Beehive, Hford, Essex. 

FOREMAN, Outdoors.— Age 28, married ; life 
experience in the general routine of Gardening in good 
establishments. Well recommended.— G. H., Alpha Cottage, 

Stoke Poges, Slough, "*" nV « nnm» w ■ 



FOREMAN, PROPAGATOR, and GROWER. 
— A ge 31, married; life experience. Well up in Grow- 
ing Cucumbers, Tomatos. Carnations, Roses, and all Soft- 
wooded Stuff. Good character.— J., 5, Oxford Terrace, Cram- 
worth Road, Worthing. 

._ _ 

FOREMAN (Gknkral, or Inside), in a large 
establishment.— Age 29 ; highest possible r«-fer*nces from 
last two places as Foreman, House ami Table Decorations.— 
G. RAYMENT, Poles Park. Ware, Herts. 

JOURNEYMAN, or GARDENER (Second). 
—Four years' experience amongst Asparagus, Ferns, 
Smilax, Chrysanthemums, Azaleas. Tomatos, and saner«l Pot 
Stuff. Abstainer.-J. HAY, Park View Nursery, Hanwell. 



JOURNEYMAN, or GARDENER (Second), 
in good establishment.— Age 23 ; eight years' experience. 
Good character. Bothy preferred.— W. LttVRTT, Norwich 
Road, Coddenham, near Ipswich, Suffolk. 

JOURNEYMAN (First, Inside).— Age 26; 
eleven years' experience in good places ; excellent 
references.— W. WOOLLKY. Aldgate, Ketton, near Stamford. 

JOURNEYMAN (First, Inside).— Age 2~4~; 
eight years' experience. Three years in last situation. 
Good references.— O. GROVES, 17,Cranworth Road, Worthing. 










GARDENER'S IMPROVER, in the Houses. 
—Age 19 ; four years' present place. Highest reference. 
Disengaged when suited. Abstainer.— DOLMAN, Clematis 
Cottage, Alrewas, Burton-on-Trent. 

IMPROVER. — Age 20; requires situation 
Inside or Out. Four years' experience ; good character ; 
abstainer.— T. BALDWIN. Newton Park, Burton-on Trent. 

TM PROVE R, or GARDENER (Under). 

-i- Young man (age 21), seeks situation as above. Six years' 
experience. Life abstainer.— W. P., 89, Oval Ro id, Croydon. 

MPROVER, in Nursery.— A young man, 

anxious to gain experience, desires a situation as above. 
Highest references. Good Penman.— T. i*. WARREN, Stoke- 
under- Ham, Somerset. 

GARDENERS.— A Youth, 18, wishes to 

APPRENTICE himself in Gentleman's large gardens; 
bothy preferred; state premium, if required.— L. BALDWIN, 
Eastnor, Leobury, Herefordshire. 

GARDENERS.— A Gardener wishes to 

place his Son, age 19, of good character, under a 
Gardener who would give him an insight to all-round work. 
A Premium given for a two years' engagement ; 4 years ex- 
perience.— A. KING, Deanery Gardens, Weils, Somerset. 

TO NURSERYMEN.— Situation wanted, by 
a man (age 27), with thirteen years' experience. Well 
up in Pot Work, Cut Blooms, Fruit. Quick at Potting and 
Tying, and Bunching. Good references.— W. H., I, Roman 
Villas, Standard Road, Bezley Heath. 

NURSERYMEN.— Situation wanted by 

a young Man as GROWER. Used to General Nursery 
Stuff, uiider Glass, Chrysanthemums, Ac. ; also Florist's Work. 
—A. B„ 41, Wellington Street, Strand, W.C. 

NURSERYMEN.— Situation wanted by a 

Young Man, well-up in Pot-work, Cut Blooms, quick at 
tying; good reference. — A. OLIVEB, Welling, Kent. 

T~ NURSERYMEN or GAJIDENERS~~ 
Situation wanted by a young Man; has been u*ed to 
private and nursery work. Good references. — GARUE.VKR, 
Keeper's Cottage, Yeabridge, South Petherton, Somerset. 

O NURSERYMEN and OTHERS.— Situa- 

tion wanted by a young man (age 20), as JOURNEY- 
MAN. Has had some experience among Grapes. Cucumbers, 
Tomatos, and general Pot Stuff. Three years* food character. 
— W. C. T., Mr. Barnard's, Turnford, Broxbourne, Herts. 

COLOMBIAN ORCHIDS! Ociontoglossum 
crispum, purest Pacho type, a specialty I EXPE- 
RIENCED COLLECTOR is open to engage with a well-estab- 
lished firm and commence work without delay. Small salary 
only. Write (English, German, French, or Spanish) to 
CARLOS H. WALTER, Botanico, HONDA, Republic 
Colombia, S. America. 

R A VELLER.— Wanted to representT good 

Nursery Firm, West and Midlands preferred. Of good 
address, and thoroughly understands the trade. Would not 
object to commission only. — M. B., 41, Wellington Street, 
Strand, W.C. 

TO FLORISTS.— Young manage 21, wittTsix 
years' experience, desires situation as HtiAD ASSISTANT, 
or MANAGER. Highest references.— S. BIRCH. 75. Terminus 
Road, Eastbourne. 

SHOPMAN (Hrad), or MANAGER (age 32), 
life experience in first-class Houses, Seeds, Bulbs, Plants, 
Floral Work. Highly recommended.— ZINNIA, Gardeners' 
Chronicle Office, 41, Wellington Street, Strand, W.C. 

SEED TRADE.— Advertiser, age 26, good 
practical experience, requires a situation in a Shop 
or Warehouse.— D. W., Gardeners' Chronicle Office, 41, 
Wellington Street, Strand, W.C. 

S~EED TRADE^-Sitaation wanted~SHOP^ 
MAN, TRAVELLER, or MANAGER of Branch. Twelve 
years' experience (three and a half years in London House).— 
SEEDS. 41, Wellington Street. 8trand. W.C. 

COWMAN, Gentleman's Estate or otherwise. 
—Young Man. single ; age 23 ; wants situation as above. 
Ten years* experience ; six years' good reference. State wages. 
K, R., 1, Wlngmore Road, Tottenham. 









THE 



GARDENERS 1 



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««» PimtMjtorlthe Frophaton by Uvuml^S? 1 * !! Wltor; •» AdvertUemeaU AiidH^ i^ — i: 



* ia ^^tT.-aATOEDAT, July 13, Iff*. A*«at to MAIlca«^^- J0 * , 



)aaty al Middlai^ g^ft^ 





Established i84i 



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No. 447.-Vol. XVIII. \ £S 




SATURDAY, JULY 20, 1895. p 



[Rcgt. as a Newspaper 




Price 3d. 

1'OST FRKR,3|<t. 



CONTENTS. 



• •• 



■ • • 



• • • 



• • • 



. t ■ 



• f « 



Anthracite coal a9 a ma- 
nure ... ••■ 

Araucaria imbricata 

Azaleas at Walton Lea, 
Warrington 

Book Notices- 
Handlist of herbaceous 

plants at Kew 
Pflanzen Krankheiten 
Durch Kryptogamische 
Parasiten veruraacht 

Carnation diseases 

Carnation, Duke of York 
and others ... 

Colonial notes 

Duchartre, the late M. 

Epping Forest 

Examination in horticul- 
ture •■■ »•• ••• 

Florists' flowers — 
Chrysanthemum, taking 

the buds of 
Gladiolus from offsets 
Hedysarum multijugum... 

Herbaceous border 
Pyrethrums 

Heuchera sanguinea 

Horticultural Club 

Market growers and sales- 
men ... ••• ••• 

North- west prairie,flowers 
of the 

Nursery notes— 
Bunyard & Co., Geo. 

Obituary — 
Stratford, J. 
Wills, Jno. 

Orchid notes and glean- 
ings ••• ... 

Paulownia imperialis 

Peas, early 

Plains in Ghent ... 

Pc ly podium, a proliferous 



73 

74 

65 



70 



66 

72 

74 
68 
72 

71 
70 



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72 
68 
66 
66 

67 
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64 

67 
67 

78 
78 

62 
75 

74 
63 
75 



or note- 



1 1 1 



■ • • 



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Plants, new 
worthy — 
Cupressus macrocarpa 
var. Guadeloupensis • 
Enterosora Fawcettii ... 
Hemerocallis aurantiaca 
rar. major 

Potato, Mona's Pride 

Raspberry, the black 

Rhododendrons, choice 
hardy ... 

JKoaary, trie... ... •■■ 

Societies- 
Bat k Begonia and Rose 
Edinburgh Botanical ... 
Ip9wich Horticultural... 

London Pansy and Viola 

National Rose, Derby ... 

Tottenham Chrysanthe- 
mum ... ••• ••• 

Tunbridge Weils Horti- 
cultural ... 

Wolverhampton Floral 

F&te 

Spye Park 

Strawberry gardens at 
iknole ••■ ••• ••• 

Summer School of Horti- 
culture in Essex 

Sundew, the round-leaved 

Tobacco factory, a primi- 

WlVC «ai ••• ••• 

Tomato fruits not swell- 
ing ... ••• ... 63, 74 

Vine mildew 74 

Weather and the crops of 

1894 

Week's work, the 

Flower garden, th 

Fruits under glass 

Hardy fruit gardei 

Orchid houses, the 

Plants under glass 



••• 



. . . 



(•• 



... 



• • • 



««• 



62 
62 

62 
74 

72 

74 

67 

77 
76 
75 
75 

77 
72 
76 

76 

65 

73 

73 
74 

61 



*• • 



• • • 



tit 



• •• 



• •• 



72 

69 
69 
68 
68 
68 



ILLU8TRATION8. 



• • ■ 



• •• 



Anthurium t bracteateform of 
Azalea-house at Walton Lea f Warrington 
Oypresa macrocarpa var. Guadeloupensis 
Hemerocallis aurantiaca var. major 
Polypodium, a proliferous 



••• 
• • • 



• •• 



••• 



••• 

ttt 
t • • 
• •• 



tt« 



• • « 



62, 



• • • 



73 
65 
63 
71 
75 




NOTICE TO ADVE RTISERS. 

In consequence of the alteration of the hour of 
going to Press, consequent on the large increase 
in the circulation, it is imperative that all Copy 
for Advertisements should be received BY 
FIRST POST THURSDAY MORNING 

at the latest. 



THE GARDEN.— All who desire the greatest 
amount of success and pleasure, certainly should, during 
the season, hare a d*y at CAN NELL'S (confirmative of this, 
•ee the last issue of the Gentleman's Journal). At no other 
Horticultural Establishment can the like number of Novelties, 
practical working, and interesting objects be teen, and so 
easily attained, as at Swanley and Eynsford. We cordially 
invite all to Come and See. 

The Best Present for a Gardener. 

VINES AND VINE CULTURE. 
The most complete and exhaustive Treatise on 
Grapes and their Culture ever published . 

Third Edition just out. 

Price 5s.; post free, 6s. 6rf. 
A. F. BARRON, Royal Horticultural Society, Chiswiok. 

BEGONIAS, Double and Single, for Bedding. 
Extra superb in quality. Selected large tubers. Also for 
Conservatory and Exhibition. Descriptive CATALOGUE free. 

B. R. DAVIS. Yeovil Nurseries. Somerset. 



SUPERB ORCHIDS, CHEAP.— Thousands 
_ to select from. Write for LIST, free. 

P.McARTHUB.The London Nurserv. 4. Maida Vale. London, W. 



SUTTON'S FLOWER OF SPRING 
CABBAGE. — The finest variety in cultivation for spring 
use. Of compact habit, having few outer leaves, firm heads of 
excellent quality. Mr. J. Hounslow, Gardener to the Most 
Hon. the Marquis of Headfort, says 1— •• Your Flower of 
Spring is the best Cabbage I have seen. From seed sown 
last July I commenced cutting March 28. The quality is all 
that could be desired. .Price of seed. It. per oz., post free. 

SUTTON'S SEEDS GENUINE ONLY DIRECT FROM 

SUTTON and SONS, THE ROYAL 
SEEDSMEN, READING. 

Carnations t Carnations ! t 

JAMES DOUGLAS, F.R.H.S., begs to 
announce that his CATALOGUE for Autumn 1895, and 
Spring, 1896, is ready. All the New and Certificated Varieties 
now in flower. Inspection respectfully invited. 

CATALOGUES post-free on application. 
JAMES DOUGLAS, Edenside, Great Bookham, Surrey. 



Paul's Nurseries, Waltham Cross. 

WM. PAUL & bON invite inspection of their 
ROSEd, FRUIT TREES, and HARDY ORNAMENTAL 
TREES, now in perfection of Leaf and Bloom. Many new 
Roses, not to be seen elsewhere, are now in bloom. South 
entrance four minutes* walk from Waltham Cross Station, 
west entrance three minutes' walk from Theobald's Grove Sta- 
tion, G.E.R., twelve miles from Liverpool Street Station, 
London. Everything for the Garden. 

OUBLE WHITE PRIMULAS.— Strong 

plants, in 60's, 20m. per 100. Strong-rooted Cuttings, 
105. per 100. Cash with order. 
D. AH PERSON, Teddington Nursery, S.W. 

OW is the TIME to PLANT PYRETH- 

RUMS, GAILLARDIAS, DELPHINIUMS, and CANNAS. 
Catalogue of K EL WAY and SON, Langport, Somerset. 

Peaches, Nectarines, Melons, Strawberries, &c. 

JOHN NATHAN, Jun , Long Market, Covent 
Garden, W.C., is open to receive Consignments of above. 
Best price guaranteed ; 5 °/ Q Commission. Bankers references. 

O FRUIT and TOMATO GROWERS. 

Sales on Commission. Prompt Settlements. 
JOHN POUPART, 20, James Street, Covent Garden, W.C. 




FOR ORCHIDS of every description at 
Reasonable Prices, and efficient men to cultivate them, 
apply to— 

W. L. LEWIS Ain> CO., Southgate, London, N. 

PRICE LIST free. 



H 



ENRY RIDES, Salesman, Central 

Avenue, Covent Garden, W.C. 
Highest Market Prices. Prompt cash. 



DOUBLE WHITE PRIMULAS. — Strong 
plants, in 60*s, 25t. per 100, free on rail for cash with 
order.- G. BENNETT, Florist, Han well. 

OVELb' YORKSHIRE STRAWBERRIES. 

Runners, strong, healthy, and well- rooted. 

Sample pacaet, post-free, 1*. Descriptive LIST. 

W. LOVEL and SON, Strawberry Growers, Driffield. 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS.— Now is the time to 
read DROVER'S BOOK. Winners of the Highest Prize 
ever offered {vide Gardeners' Chronicle), Pronounced by 
Professionals and Amateurs the most practical work ever 
published. Post-fiee, 1*. 2d. — Nurseries, Fareham. 

TAYLOR, Fruit Salesman, Stanwix 

and New Market, Carlisle. 
TOMATOS in demand. Cash prompt. 





Noble, Latest of 



STRAWBERRY PLANTS.- 

All, Jubilee, 4s. per 100, carriage free. 
W. CAVTLL, Strawberry Gardens, Penally, Pembrokeshire. 



w 



w 



ANTED, a large quantity of DOUBLE 

DAFFODILS. Planting rfulbs. Sample, with price, to 
TODDINGTON ORCHARD CO., Winchco mbe, Glos. 

ANTED, end of July, 250 Trasses of HO YA 

BELLA. Kindly send offers to— 
CYPHER, Nurseryman, Cheltenham, 



Petroleum ! Petroleum 1 1 Petroleum 1 1 ! 

BRILLIANT I L L U M I N A N T, 
In casks, carriage paid, 8<4. per gallon. Casks free. 
ANDREW POTTER, Melbourne Works, Wolverhampton. 

Maker to the Queen and Prince of Wales. 

ALMS, CORYPHAS and LATA N IAS from 

Stores, 10s. per 100. Cash or exchange for Carnations, 

Pelargonium Cuttings, or Bedding Geraniums. 

F. ROSS & CO., Merstham, Surrey. 

PRIMULAS! PRIMULAS! PRIMULAS! 
36th year of Distribution. 
Williams' Superb Strain, It. 6d. per dozen ; 10*. per 100. 
CINERARIAS, same price; al»o DOUBLK WHITE PRIM- 
ULAS, fid. each. Package and Carriage free for Cash with 
Order.— JOHN STEVEN&, The Nurseries, Coventry. 

Grand New Yellow Raspberry. 

** THB ii I T I N E A M 

GEORGE BUN YARD and CO., Maidstone, 
beg to fray, in answer to enquiries, that this fine Novelty 
will be sent out by them in 1896 
Their flue Red Raspberry, Superlative, will be supplied this 

season at reduced prices. 

Important to Mushroom Growers. 

C UTHBERT'S SPECIALITY MUSHROOM 
SPAWN. Always alike; most productive. Hundreds 
of testimonials. Per bushel, 5s. 
R. AND G. CUTHBERT, Seed, Bulb, and Plant Merchants, 

Southgate, N. Established 1797. 

Cabbage. 

WHEELE R'S IMPERIAL 
— Earliest and Hardiest Cabbage known, having 
stood the severe winter where all others have failed. Unless 
had direct from the raiser you do not know what this variety 
is like In sealed packets only, 6d. t If., and 2s. each, post-free. 
Sole Proprietor, H. J. WHEELER, F.R H.S., Seed Urower, 
Warminster, Wilts. 

ARR'S AUTUMN-FLOWERING BULBS. 

—Send for full Descriptive LIST of Beautiful Autumn- 
flowering Crocuses, Colchicums (Meadow Saffrons), 
Cyclamen, Scill;is, Snowflakes, &c. 

BARR'S SEEDS for present sowing, Catalogue on application. 

BARB'S DAFFODILS and SPRING-FLOWERING BULBS, 
Catalogues ready in August. 
BARB A2fl> SON, 12, King Street, Covent Garden. London. 

Hyacinths, Tulips, Crocus, Lilies, &c. 

CG. VAN TU BERGEN, Jun., Haarlem, 
• Holland. Wholesale CATALOGUE now ready, and 
may be had free on application to— 

Messrs. R. SILBERRAD aicd SON, 25, Savage Gardens, 
Crutched Friars. E.C. • 

N.B.— Many new, rare, and interesting plants and bulbs 
will be found in this Catalogue. 

FERNS AND DECORATIVE PLANTS 1 
(TRADE) :— Ferns, in 2J-inch pots. Stove and Green- 
house, 30 best selling sorts, 12s. 100 ; ditto large, in 48's, 10 best 
selling sorts, 6s. dor. ; strong seedlings, 6f. 100, 60s. 1000; Adi- 
antum cuneatum, in 48's, for cutting, 6s. and 8s. doz. ; ditto, 
for making large plants quickly, 16s. and 20s. 100 ; Aralias, 10s. 
100 ; Cyperus, Aralias, Grevilleaa, Geraniums, in 48*s, 6s. doz. ; 
Heliotrope, Fuchsias, Double Petunias, Marguerites, Double 
Tropseolums, in bloom, in 48's, 8s. doz. ; Ficus, Palms, Dra- 
caenas, Crassuias, Hydrangeas, Pelargoniums, 12s. doz. Lists 
free. Packed free. Cash with order.— J. SMITH, London Fern 
Nurseries, Loughborough Junction, London, S.W. 

ISHURST COMPOUND, used iinoe 1859 

for Red Spider, Mildew, Thrips, Greenfly, and other 
blight ; 2 ounces to the gallon of soft water ; 4 to 16 ounces as 
a winter dressing for Vines and Orchard-house trees, in lather 
from cake, for American blight, and as an emulsion when 
paraffin is used. Has outlived many preparations intended to 
supersede it. Boxes, Is., 3f., and 10s. 6tf. 

GISHURSTINE keeps Boots dry and soft on 
wet ground. Boxes, 6rf. and If., from the Trade. 
Wholesale from PRICE'S PATENT CANDLE COMPANY 
(Limited), London. 

WEEKS & CO., Horticultural Builders 

• to Her Majesty. H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, H.M, 
Government, Admnalty Dept., War Dept., Royal Hort. Soc., 
Royal Botanic Soc., Parks and Public Buildings, Patentees of 
the Duplex Upright Tubular Boilers, King's Road, Cheleea.S. W . 



58 



THE 



GARDENERS' 



CHRONICLE. 



[July 20, 1895. 



SALE S by A UCTION. 

Tuesday Next. 

L/ELIA TENEBROSA 
80PHRONITI3 GRANDIFLORA 
CATTLEYA HARRI90NIJE VIOLACEA 
ONCIDIUM CONCOLOR 
CATTLKYA SCHOFIELDIANA, &c. 

KTery plant offered, is in fine condition. 

MESSRS. PROTHEROE and MORRIS will 
SELL the above, at their Central Pale Rooms, 67 and 
6a, Cheapside. London, on TUESDAY NEXT. July 2S t at half- 
past 12 o'clock, by order of Messrs. F. Horsman & Co. 

On view morning of Sale, and Catalogue s had. 

Tuesday Next. Without Reserve. 

118 000 CORY PH A A17STRALIS SEEDS received direct. These 
Seeds have arrived in really splendid condition and will 
be sold at Four o'Clock precisely ; also 4 fiae TREE FfcKN 
Steins, Cyathea dealbata ; and 33 trunks of Cycas revoluta. 
On the same day will be sold, also without reserve, a direct 

importation from Bermuda of— 

6,0'M) FREESIA REFRACTA ALBA. 
30,000 FREESIA, MIXED. 
111020 CANNA ROOTS. 
10 LARGE CRINUMS. 

MESSRS. PROTHEROE and MORRIS will 
include the above in the ORCHID SALE at their Rooms, 
«7 and 68, Cheapside, London, E.C., on TUESDAY NEXT, 

July i3. 

On view morning of Sale, and Catalogues had. 

Without any Reserve. 

IMPORTANT SALE of ORCHIDS. 

MESSRS. PROTHEROE and MORRIS have 
received instructions from Messrs. F. Sander & Co., 
St. Albans, to SELL by AUCTION, in their Central Auction 
Rooms, 67 fc 68. Cheapside, London, E.C., on FRIDAY, July 26. 
1895, at half-paat 12 o'clock, without the least Reserve— 

FINE SELECTIONS of ORCHIDS, 
including a grand importation of 

CATTLEYA GIGAS SANDERS and 

SANDERIANA. 

The most wonderful and beautiful of all, in splendid condi- 
tion, simply perfect, dormant eyes, and plump, fully deve- 
loped bulba. Our collector wrote, "Among the plants now 
sent you, growing, were some of the finest type of Cattleya 
aurea (chrysotoxa) I have ever seen." It is a fact that from 
the same locality we imported the Due de Ma^sa's white- 
sepaled and petaled chrysotoxa. and we fully expect among 
the plants now to hand some similar to those of which Countess 
of Derby may be considered a variety. From the proximity of 
this free- flowering and wonderful form of gigas and aurea 
chrysotoxa, Hardyana, Franconvillensis, Rochellensis, Hamar 
Bass's, Clarke's, and most^of the other really wonderful natural 
hybrids must, as a matter of course, be reproduced. Tne 
aureas our man collected in Flower are all offered in this 
Sale. A fine consignment of— - 

SANDERS TRUE PACBO ODONTOGLOSSUM CRISPUM, 

collected from Mountains we have rented for the past eleven 
years, and which have yielded so many wonderful varieties ; also 

DENDROBIUM STATKRIANUM, D. SUMNERII. 

The True DENDROBIUM PHALJENOPSIS of Fitzgerald. 

This is the oiiginal Moth Orchid. It is one of the most 
brilliantly beautiful of all the New Guinea Dendrobes, 

Also CATTiEYA CITRItfA, LYCASIE SKINNERI, a 
DENDaOBIUM SPECIES in the way of Jamesianum. with 
enormous white tlowerg; fine masses cf CYPRIPEDIUM 
ROTKSCHILDIANUM, LISSOCHILUS GLOXINIFLORUS ; 
a huge plant of ONCIDIUM AMPLIATUM (in basket), fine 
plants of BPIDENDRUM PARKINSONIANUM, DENDRO- 
BIUM BOWMANII, CATTLEYA LABIATA, &c. ; also a 
CATASETUM or MORMODES SPECIES, and 

DENDROBIUM MOOREANA, 

now offered for the first time; flowers pink and white: and 
DENDROBIUM NOBILE, our famous Lang Tang type. 

Also other Properties : Six Hybrid CYPRIPEDIUMS, Fifty 
Lots of ESTABLISHED ORCHIDS; also ORCHIDS in 
Flower and Bud. 

On view morning of Sale, and Catalogues had. 

Preliminary Notice. 

TWO DA YS' SALE. 

The UNSOLD PORTION of the WILSON COLLECTION 

of ORCHIDS. 

MESSRS. PROTHEROE and MORRIS have 
received instructions to SELL by AUCTION, at their 
Central Sale Rooms, 67 and 68, Cheapside, London. E C. on 
TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY, August 27 and 28, 1895 
without Reserve, the Unsold Portion of the WILSON COL- 
LECTION of ORCHIDS. 

WITHOUT RESERVE. 
The Sale'contains, among others :— 
Sobralia Kienastiana (several i Leelia 



t* 



plants) 

ittleya Schroderre alba 

Reineckiana 
Wagneri 

Oaontoglossum Vuylstexea- 
num 

Cattleya Gaskelliana alba 
Lnelia elegans 

n Scottiana 

Cypripedium Morganite Bur- 

fordiense 
Lffilia eleirans BlfmhAimandd 



Lycaste Skinneri alba superba 

,. u armeniaca 

Caelogyne cristata alba 

Lycaste Skinneri imperator 

Dendrobium nobile Sanderia- 
num 

Odontogloasum deltoglossum 
it coronarium 
,, Andersonianum vara. 

„ Ruckerianum vara. 
h aspersuin 
m multts 

Schomburgkiaiepidissima, Ac. 



„ }* Biuntei 
m .. prasiata 

Messrs. SANDER and CO. will offer in this Sale Wttkoit^. 
ve H ry &K"d? ineh T *%*"* " ^3^°t2I 

LiELIAS. CATTLEYAS. new HYBRID SOBRAL^ 
NEW DENDROBES, CATTLEYA GIGaS *££££ ^ 



A a^^SS^^fei f^a^|% LOTS. 

have emanated so many grand and distinct forms, in 
eluding C. Hardyana^. Massaina, and others. 

MESSRS. PROTHEROE and MORRIS will 
SELL the above by AUCTION 'at their Rooms 6 a nd 
63. Cheapside, London, E.C., on TUESDAY NEXT July 23, 
at half-past 12 o'Clock, by order of Messrs. Hugh Low * Co. 

On view mo rning of Sale, and Catalogues had. 

TllPSdcLV N6Xt 

THREE DIRECT IMPORTATIONS OF OR3HIDS FOR UN- 
RESERVED SALE. COMPRISING :- 

650 CYPRIPEDIUM PHILIPENSE 
1150 „ BARBATUM 

380 ., EXUL 

.35 ANGR^OUM SPECIES 

30 BULBOPHYLLUM SPECIES n ^ a „ TT%M 

Also a few CYPRIPEDIUM CAUDATUM ROSEUM, 
CATTLEYA DOWIANA, CATTLEYA SKINNERI PARVI"- 

VT ORA &.C 

MESSRS. PROTHEROE and MORRIS will 
SELL the above by AUCTION at their Central Sale 
Rooms, 67 and 68, Cheapside, London, E.C., on TUESDAY. 
NEXT, July 23, at half past 12 o'Clock. 

On view moraine of Sale, and Catalogues had. 



HammerBWlch House, Hammerswicli, near Lichfiel d f 

STAFFORDSHIRE. 

Large and Important UNRESERVED SALE of STOVE and 
GREENHOUSE PLANTS, ORCHIDS, CHRYSANTHE- 
MUMS, &c. 

MESSRS. POPE and SONS have reoeived 
instructions from Job Evans, Esq. (who is removing to 
Torquay), to SELL by AUCTION, without the least reserve, 
on the Premises as above, on TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY, 
July 30 and 31, commencing each day at half-past 11 o'Clock 
prompt, the whole of the STOVE and GREENHOUSE 
PLANTS, including fine specimen Lapagerias, Stephanotis, 
Maidenhair Ferns, Hoyas, Begonias, Bougainvilleas, Crotona, 
Asparagus, 100 Camellias, 80 fine Azaleas, specimen Alla- 
mandas, Dipladenias, &c. ; sixteen very fine specimen Palmi 
and Tree Ferns, also Gloxinias, Cyclamen, Euphorbias, Poin- 
settias. Geraniums, Fuchsias. Aloes, Ficus, Dracaenas, Yuccas, 
&e. ; also a very fine Collection of Orchids, 20 very fine Coelo- 
gynes, 100 Dendrobium 8, 70 Odontoglossum Alexandras; also 
Laelias, Cattleyas, Lycastes, Cypripediums, Oncidiums, 
Vandas, &c. ; a large quantity of Garden Sundries, including 
Pots and Pans, Tools, Lawn Mowers, Marble and Iron Vases, 
&o. ; two Marble Figures, &c. 

On view day before and mornings of Sale. 

Hammerswich House is only five minutes' walk from Ham- 
mers wich Station, L. & N. W. Ry., and about 3 miles from 
Lichfield. 

Catalogues now ready, and may be had free by post from 
the Auctioneers, at their Offices, 6,Phillip8 Street.Birmingham. 



WANTED to RENT, near good town, 
PRIVATE GARDENS or SMALL NURSERY, with 
good Glass and Dwelling-house. Little or no Stock required. 
—SMITH, Laurel Cottage, Ch irleton, Kingsbridge, S. Devon. 

Kent, Farningham, close to L. C. & D. Railway Station. 
HPO BE SOLD, a FREEHOLD NURSERY, 

A with good frontage to parish road. The Soil is well 
adapted for Tomato or Flower growing ; water is laid on from 
water- works. No valuation of Stock. Price, freehold, to effect 
an immediate sale, JBU75. 

Apply, Messrs. PR ALL, Estate Agents, Dartford. 

To Nurserymen and Florists commencing bual 

HAMPTON-ON-THAMES, on The Marling 
Park Estate, free from London fogs, a deep r ch 

loam, the favourite neighbourhood for Growers, FREEHOLD 
LAND for SALE, on easy system of payment. Excellent sites 
for residences.— For full particulars apply to Mr. FREDK. G 
HUGHES (Surveyor), the E state Office, Hampton-on-Thamet! 

FOR SALE, as a Going Concern, MARKET 
NURSERY and FLORIST'S BUSINESS, on Main Lines, 
within easy reach of several of the largest Cities in the King- 
dom, 25,000 feet of Modern Glass, efficiently heated, comprising 
Vmenes, Cucumber, Tomato, Plant, and Forcing Houses- 
nearly 10 acres rich land , planted with fruit trees and other" 
crops. Good water supply and dwelling-house, with necessary 
out-houses, &c. Immediate possession can be arranged 

Addres», N. B Gardeners' Chronicle Office, 41, Wellington 
Street, Strand, Lon don, W.C. * 

T Poultry ana Bee Farms, Orchards and Nurseries - 
HE REMAINING TEN FREEHOLD LOTS 

Contact* vi?f- STREET FARM afe F ° R SALE b * Wfite 

Five lots of about J acre each, from JEW to £50 
Three lots of about 2£ acres, at £120 to £\ 25 

t A !f° "^tiful » ite for * house, 4a. Or. 30n of old T„rf 
Land, ™th Cottage, Bam, Timber Trees, &c.,£m 

All the lots are within a mile of the Mhi-w't . 

Midland Station of Hemel Hemostead »nH ««Z„ KI^ n ?. nd 
Situation about 400 feet aboXa level andT^" 1 * miIe i 
Water will very shortly be laid ^JS^SS^J^T^ * 

Apply to N.W. ROBINSON, L andAeJ, Heme^lp^ 

T° LET ' » NURSERY^n~«^=Aborrt 

X 600 feet run of glass, heated with Jt? T , * 

stocked with CucumbefsTnd T^matoT n f,m Jr atCr - W,U 
low. Incoming about £200 -C H v J? ™ , 1 ?? ann B- **at 
Strand. W.C. ' H> *" il > Wellington Street. 




?JS. L S8^,?SL D jJ?«» immediate pos- 



-a. session, FREEHOLD NURSFPV n ** 1 , ^ I " 

Glaaahouses with all nece^^K^ tford I. «»««* length 



necessary 



I 



Hill, S.E. 



h.™. u~ ^ivTssTB'srs 



T ^^ 1 T l| ^^o.p ; e.TNURSERV 






36 



EX HIBITIO NS, 

Trentham Gardens, 

THE TRENTHAM and HANF0RI) irn* 
TICULTURAL SOCIETY wiU hold their ^ 
ANNUAL EXHIBITION on July 25. H0B » 

£400 GIVEN IN PRIZES, 
GROUP OF PLANTS, for effect-lst, £20, and Silvan 
value £10 lOf . ; 2nd, £20 ; 3rd, £13 ; 4th, £9 et ^ 
48 CUT ROSES— 1st and Special, £13 7s.; 2nd £.v ^ » 

„ -lst f £b, and National Rose Wet^S, 
Medal ; 2nd, £3 ; 3rd, £2. ° ociet ^ 8 *H 

COLLECTION OF" FRUIT (9 dishes)-lst, £io ; 2nd 
3rd, £3. ' * l 

4 BUNCHES OF GRAPES— 1st, £5 ; 2nd, £3; 3rd £] 
Schedules on application to Mr. L. T. ALFORD 
Hanford, Stoke on-Trent. 

OKING and DISTRICT HORTICULtF 

RAL, COTTAGE GARDENERS' and FANOTP 
ASSOCIATION. Anu *" r » 

SHOW of PLANTS, FRUITS, FLOWERS, &VE0BTABr 
WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY, July 31 and Aug l m 

,^ At the Horsell Cricket Ground, Woking Station 
Numeroas MONEY PRIZES offered for Competition u 

SILVER CUP for Grand Aggregate. ' 

Entries close Saturday, July 27. 

Somerset Villa. Woking. H ' W ' ROBERTSON, Hon.S*. 

INGSWOOD, ST. GEORGE, an<MVE 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE HORTICULTURAL SOCIKT 
ANNUAL SHOW, at Kingswood, on WEDNESDAY, 

August 21, 1895. PRIZES, over £200. 
Applications foi Spaces for Sale of Implements, Articles, k 
to be made to the Secretaries. 
Schedules may be had on application to— 

F. H. JULLION l WAn o floa v . . 
A. W COTTLE s ' Km 8 8w00| l' 



WESTON-SUPER-MARE FLOWERM 



AUGUST 15th. 



£200 IN PRIZES. 



Schedules from the HON. SECS., 

•Ji, West Street, Weston-Super-Mare, 







PROTHEROE and MORRIS, Hobtic 
tural Market Garden and Estate AucnoyEEWiij 

Valuers, 67 and 68, Cheapside, London, B.C., and at 1*0 
stone. E. Monthly Horticultural Register had on appboW 




FOR ORCHIDS and QARDENEEi 
toGrow them, apply to SANDER'S. St. Albans. Tbefi* 
stock of Orchids in the World.— 30 minutes from St. rW* 



500 




Maidenhair Ferns 

ADIAXTUM CUNEATUM, s L 

stuff, nearly 2 feet over the top, in 24-pota, »» 

sold cheap. „..«,.. 

W. H. PAGE, Tangley Nursery, Hanworth^M^i. 



vv 



Budding Season. -New Rosea 

M. PAUL and SON beg to offer « 

plants in pots, with buds of their new !«»*• 

follow : — 

SYLPH (Tea), a ;d ZEPITYR (Tea), 1». ^ each. . 

CLIO (H.P.), DUKK of YORK (China), and LORWA w 

(Bourbon), 3i . Qd. each. * »j & 

The new American and Continental Roses of 18S»»*° ' 

3df. per dozen, . ^ ]» 

The new English, American, and Continental iwsea m 

2m. to 3*. 64. each, 21*. to .365. per dozen. ^ 

Lord Penzance's Hybrid Sweet Briars, 5*. eacft.i* 

nine varieties, 42i . 
Crimson Rambler, 1*. 6d. to 3#. 6rf. each. ufi:R xS. 

PAULS NURSERIES. WALTHAM CROS. 








I.OOO.OOOJWIII 

per If 00. 10 oo. 

Knfield Market. W.W-P*' 1Cl v 

Specml cheap • -Bjr. W £ 



3,. W. per 1000 ; M- 
coli. 8s. per lC00 - r% ., t . 



W 



CLIl FE, RO 



extrSi 



P 



, ir the fo" *' 

DUTCH BULBS.— We can booK ^ ^ 
- log Bulbs, on condition that orden id* ^ ^ *r 
The Bulbs ate of the very best quf^-T & 

Cases and packing free on board. Rotte wj^^ m * 

145. per 100 
Trop«o»« m *«% in $ 



Tulip Artus. 12f. per 1000 
,. Belle Alliance, 18# . do. 
,, Chrysochlora, 24 J. do. 
♦♦ Ducheeeede Parma, 13# 

,. Keizerskroon, 20*. do. 

,, La Rein*. 9s* do. 

n Pottebakker,white,30* 

„ scarlet, 20f . do. 



M Verboom. 18t. do. 

.. Yellow Prinee, 35' 
Crocueee. all round. 8i 



Pseon 



Wellinf* 



July 20, 1895.] 



THE GARDENERS' CHRONICLE. 



59 



To Fruiterers and Others. 

TENDERS are invited for the PURCHASE 
of the undermentioned FRUIT, 

Growing at Thrift Hall. Waltbam Abbey :— 
GRAPES, 500 bunches; PEACHES, 1100; NECTARINES, 350. 
Tender forma and all further particulars may be obtained 
upon application, at 1 he Building Work8 Department Office, 
Wait ham Abbey, on or before July 29, 1CQ * 

(Signed) 
July 16. 1895. 




M. T. SALE, Colonel. 
Superintendent Building Works. 



Grand New Fern-Pteris Wimsettli. 

HB. MAY has much confidence in offering 
• the above, which is undoubtedly one of the most 
distinct and beautiful Novelties ever offered, and will be sure 
to become one of the most popular for market work, as it ia of 
free growth, of good substance, and most elegant in appear- 
ance. Certificates of Merit from the Royal Horticultural Society 
and Royal Botanical Society. 

Well developed plants, in 5-inch pota, bs. each. 

Trade Terms on application. 

H. B. MAY, Dyson's Lane Nursery, Upper Edmonton. 



LAINCS' BECONIAS 

NOW IN FULL BLOOM. 

The Premier Bouse, Awarded Nine Gold Medals, $c* 

Unequalled as a Floral Display. Visitors are cordially invited ; 
free admission. Frequent trains from the City and West End 
to Catford and Catford Bridge, also Forest Hill Stations. 

Descriptive CATALOGUE post-free. Telephone 9660. 

JOHN LAINO A SONS, 

Begonia, Caladium, Olivia, and Gloxinia Specialists, Seed, 

Plant, Bulb Merchants, &c. 

FOREST HILL, S.E. ; also CATFORD, Kent. 



FOR PRESENT AND LATER SOWINC, 



THE TBREE BEST 



WALLFLOWERS 



J 



DICKSONS 
DICKSONS 
DICKSONS 



GOLDEN BEAUTY, 
SELECTED DARK RED, 
PRIMROSE DAME. 



Per packet, 

6d. and la., 

free by Post. 



Choice Mixed DOUBLE WALLFLOWER, MYOSOTIS 
SILENES, &c. For Prices and all other particulars, Bee ouj 
ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE, free on application. 



DICKSONS, 



Seed Growers. 
Nurserymen, &c, 



CHESTER. 



If 



KENT, THE CARDEN OF E NCLANP." 

GEORGE BUNYARD & GO. 

Beg to ask Buyers to consult their 1895 



STRAWBERRY 



LIST 



Before Ordering their Supplies. Now Ready. 

Their Plants will be grand, both for Forcing, In 

little pots, and as Runners. 



Send Orders and Enquiries direct to — 

THE OLD NURSERIES, MAIDSTONE 



w 

S 



NEW EARLY STRAWBERRY 

FOB 1895. 

STEVENS' WONDER. 

KOW READY FOR DISTRIBUTION. 

Everyone should secure this grand early variety. 

In P0ts 

Strong Runners 



... £5 per 100 
... £3 per 100 



1 bs. per dozen. 
9*. per dozen. 



All other leading varieties now ready for delivery. 
See Special LIST free on application. 



Nurseries, 
N. 

_i 



W M. CUTDUSH & SON, "" Bag 

WINTER-FLOWERING ZONALS 

Good plants, ready for shifting into 5 and 

6-inch pots, 4$. per dozen. 

SEEDLING PRIMULAS. 

Extra quality. All colours, mixed. 
1*. 6d. per dozen. Free for cash with order. 



H 




JONES, 



RYECROFT NURSERY, Hft'flER GREEN, LEWISHABT. 






of 



i:ik?« 



CBEESON'S MANURE.— Composed 
• Blood and Bone. The best Fertiliser for all pu 
Sold in tins, \s.,2s. 6d., and 5i . 6d. ; also in air-tight bags, 
i cwt., 6s. ; 1 cwt., 10i. Full directions for use sent with each 
tin and bag. 1 cwt. and above sent carriage paid, cash with 
order. O. BEESON. Bone Mills, St. Neot'B, Hunts. 

"12, Knowle Road, Brixton, London. 
" I have tried this fertiliser on various garden crops, and I 
am able to say that it is an excellent Manure for Vegetables, 
Flowers, Vines, and Fruit Trees. 

" A. B. GRIFFITHS, Ph.D.. F.R.S.E., F.C.S." 

HUDSON'S MANURES. 

HUDSONTJRE.— The King of Fertilisers. 

Surprises all users. Recommended everywhere. 

Try it upon anything. 
Sample tins, 6d., post-free. (For trial). 

HUDSON'S EQUALISED PERUVIAN 

GUANO. — Guaranteed of equal strength and quality 
throughout, and in a fine, dry, friable powder. Far 
superior to any. Sample tins lid., post-free. In bags of 
7 lb., 2s. 6rf. ; 14 lb., 45. ; 28 lb., 7s. 6d. ; 112 lb , 20s. 

FOOD FOR LILIES.— All Lilies should be 

fed with this Manure when forming buds. Ensures 
immense blooms; prevents disease. Large tins, Is. 3d., 
post-free ; and in bags, 7 lb., 3s.; 14 lb., bs. ; 28 lb., 8s. 

Tne Three Finest Manures Offered. 



HUDSON'S FERTILISERS, 

KlLBURN, LONDON, N.W. Correspondence invited. 

THOMSON'S 

VINE AND PLANT MANURE 



The 



The very best for all purposes. 

result of many years' experience. Largely 
used both at home and abroad. 



Agent for London : — J. GEORGE, 14, Redgrave Road, 
Putney, 8.W. 

Agent for Channel Islands : — J. H. PARSONS, Market 
Place, Guernsey. 

Sole Majors :— WM. THOMSON and SONS, Ltd., Tweed 
Vineyard, Clovenfords, N.B. 



Price Lists and Testimonials on application. 

Analysis sent with orders of J-cwt. and upwards. 

SOLD BY ALL SEEDSMEN. 



a 



EUREKA 



>> 



WEED 



KILLER. 



Safe, Effective, and Cheap. 

There is no risk of poisoning Birds or Animals if directions 
are followed when applying this preparation. Guaranteed to 
clear all weeds ; mixes at once ; no sediment ; leaves the paths 
bright and clean, without stains. 

f -gall., Is. 9d. ; 1 gall., 3f . (tins included). 
2-gall. drums, 2s. Qd. per gall. ; 6-gall. drums, 2s. 6rf. per gall. 
10-gall. drums, 2s. 3d. per gall. ; 40 gallons at 2s. per gall. 

Double Strength, Mixes 1 to 50. 

Sample Half Gallon Tin, post-free for stamps, 2s. 6d. 

ONLY ADDRESS: — 

TOMLINSON & HAYWARD, 

MINT STREET CHEMICAL WORKS, LINCOLN. 

Wholesale London Agents: — 

OSMAN & CO., 132, Commercial Street, E. 

Ask your Chemist or Seedsman for this make. 




Well known as the cheapest, safest, and best of all Insecticides 

for K lling Vermin on Plants, Animal?, and Birds. 

Used by every Orchid Grower of any note ail over the World. 

A Pamphlet on its use, with full directions for Cleaning Plants, 

Ac, sent free on application. 
Half-pints, Is. 6rf. ; Pints, 2s. 6d. ; Quarts, 4s. 6rf. ; Half- 
gallons, 7s. 6d. ; Gallons, 12s. 6rf. ; Five Gallon Drums, 10s. 6i. 
per gallon, carriage paid. Manufacturer :~E. G. HUGHES, 
Victoria Street, Manchester. Sold by all Seedsmen. 



PEAT. 





PEAT. 



Specially selected for Orchids, and all kinds of Plants, by 
sack, cask, cubic-yard, ton, or truck-load. Rich fibrous LOAM, 
Coarse and Fine SILVER SAND, superior LEAF-MOULD, 
C. N. FIBRE REFUSE, SPHAGNUM MOSS, CHARCOAL, Ac. 

Special through rates to all parts. 

THe Original Peat Depot, RING WOOD, HANTS. 



HILL 



SMITH'S 



BLACK VARNISH 

For Presenring Ironwork, Wood, or Stone. 



w 



4 



m 



I 









i 









<••:; 



*M»MKtf 






* 



m 



* i. 









.•• 



An Excellent Substitute for Oil Paint, 

at one -third the cost. 

This unrivalled varnish has for forty years given un- 
bounded satisfaction, obtained a large consumption, and 
earned a high refutation throughout the kingdom. It 
requires no mixing, can be applied cold by any ordinary 
labourer, and dries in Un minutes with a perfect glots. 
Fences periodically coated with it are effectually preserved 
from deterioration for an indefinite period. 

Price, Is. 6rf. per gallon at the manufactory, or Is. $d. 
per gallon, carriage paid to any railway station, in casks 
of 36, 18, or 9 gallons. 

Testimonial from Chas. Patrick, Esq., Cloughfold, 
Manchester (Numerous others) j— " I have used your Black 
Varnish for upwards of twenty years, and find none to 
equal it in economy and quality." 

n A rrm ts\ at i Every Cask bears the above 

UA U 11 (US. < REGISTERED TRADE MARK. 

I Beware of Cheap Imitations. 



HILL 



SMITH 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

IRON FENCING, STRAINED WIRE 
FENCING, HURDLES, GATES, &c. 

Illustrated CATALOGUE and Price LIST on application. 

Biierley Ironwork's. Dudley ; 
Queen Victoria Street, London, R.C ; 

47, Dawson Street, Dublin. 



— - . - 



. 



^^■H 



■ 









V • 









v 



I 



«-ar 






!^PB 



'Swr 



r* 



HOT WATER ENGINEERS, 









a rco Catalogs r, 



onAppucpji 



GREAT REDUCTION in FRAMES 

OTJR WELL-KNOWN MAKE. 




PORTABLE PLANT FRAMES. 

These Frames are made of the Best Materials, and can be 
together and taken apart in a few minutes by any one. 

Sizes and Prices. Glazed and Painted. £ i. 

6 feet long, 3 feet wide ( --- * Q 



put 



d 



6 feet 
1 2 feet 

6 feet 
12 feet 
1 2 feet 



99 
99 



4 feet 

4 feet 

5 feet 

5 feet 

6 feet 



CASH \ 



99 

99 
91 





2 



J PBICES, 4 










2 15 



CARRIAGE k j 5 
PAID, j 5 12 6 








R 



Larger sizes at proportionate prices. 



HALLIDAY 




CO 



ROYAL HORTICULTURAL WORKS, 

MIDDLETON, MANCHESTER 

London ^y«ni,Mr.H.SM:ELTON,Seedsman,*c. t 2.Holloway Rd. t 



60 



TEE 



GARDENERS 1 



CHRONICLE. 



[ J <** 20, 1895. 














I 



EMPEROR 

CABBAGE. 




THB EARLIEST AND BEST. 

6d. and Is. per packet, 

18. 6d. per ounce. 

From Mr. W. J. CHASNEY. » M Hendred. 
" I had the best bed of Cabbage this year from Webbs 1 
Emperor Seed that I e?er saw ; not one of the 5000 plants 
which I put out vrent to seed." p er oun ce, 

EARLY NONPAREIL CABBAGE „. ... ... Bd. 

FIELD MARKET do. 6(1. 

EARLY RAIN HAM do. SQ. 

RED DUTCH ... do. »Q. 



ROSES ON THEIR OWN ROOTS, 

FOR PRESENT PLANTING. 

WM PAUL and SON" respectfully invite attention to their magnificent 

VV Stock of the above, established in 5-inoh (48-sized) pots. The Collection comprises the leading 
varieties of the Hybrid Perpetual, Tea Scented, Noisette, Bourbon, China, and Polyantha classes. 

Price, 10s. 6d. to 18s. per dozen ; 75s. to 120s. per 100. 
* • The present is a most favourable time for planting, as it allows of the plants establishing 
themselves in the ground before winter. 






»/ 



t ■ • 



ONION 



Per pkt. Per ounce. 

WEBBS' RED GLOBE TRIPOLI ... 6d, Is. 6<L 

LARGS FLAT RED TRIPOLI ... 6<t ... 10O. 

GIANT ROCCA 6<L ... 10d. 

WHITE LISHON OCL 

All Garden Seeds Free by Post or Rail. 



Seedsmen by Royal Warrants to H.M. the Queen 

and H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, 

WORDSLEY, STOURBRIDGE 









SPECIALITY. 



PAUL'S NUBSEEIES, WALTHAM CROSS, HERTS 




YOU 



WISH 



TO 



CLEAR 



OUT 



Our Collection is nnri Tailed. Over 1400 species and varieties 
of Store, Greenhouse, Filmy, Hardy Exotic, and British Ferns. 
For prices of these and for specially cheap collections in beau- 
tiful variety, see our Catalogue, free on application. 

W. & J. BIRKENHEAD, F.R.H.S., 

FKRN IflTlS KMB8. SALS, near MANCHESTER. 



MEALY BUG, SCALE, & RED SPIDER, 

XL ALL LIQUID INSECTICIDE WASH 

(PATENT). 

POWERFUL BUT SAFE, THEREFORE CHEAPEST. ^ ^ 

One Gallon 10s.; Half-gal., 5s.; One Cluart, 3s. 6d. ; One Pint, 2s. Registered Trade m. 

To be had {like all the other XL ALL Specialties), from all Nurserymen, Seedsmen, Florists, and 

Sundriesmen ; or, direct from the Patentee and Sole Proprietor, 

C. H. RICHARDS, OLD SHOT TOWER WHARF, LAMBETH, LONDON, Si 

None is genuine without the above Trade Mark. Please observe this. 







HEATING 

THAMES 



HEATING 

BANK 




HEATING !!! 






Undertake the complete ereotion of HEATING APPARATUS for GREENHOUSES, OFFICES, PUBLIC BUILDINGS, Ac. Have the 

largest stock of BOILERS, PIPES, and CONNECTIONS in the Trade to select from, and invite inspection of same. 

BOILERS of the latest and most approved class, including the 

Patent HORIZONTAL TUBULAR, with WATER BARS; CAST-IRON SADDLE, *ta WATERWAY-END, to; 

VENTILATING GEAR AND VALVES. 

AWARDED THE OHLY COLD MEDAL & INTERNATIONAL HORTICULTURAL EXHIBITION, 1892, a. HOT-WATER APPUflB 



UPPER 




ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE, 1$. PRICE LIST FREE. 

GROUND STREET, BLACKFRIARS, LONDON, S.E. 

Telegraphic Address-" HOT-WATER, London." Telephone. No. 4763. 






COOPER 



5 



Ltd 



HORTICULTURAL PROVIDERS, 



i 



The Original Investors of Cheap Greenhouses, 



The Largest Steam Horticultural Works in the World. 



755, OLD KENT ROAD, LONDON 



Inspection Invited. 



» 




1000 Houses in Stock to Select from. 

Works cover 5 acres. 
Nnrseries-Hanworth & Feltham. 



IMPORTANT. 

We beg to Inform all readers of 

this Paper that the Fourth Edition 
(100 000 copies) of our Revised 

PRICE LIST, consisting of 400 pp. 

and about 1200 Illustrations, 
bound In cloth, is Now Ready. 
We shall have much pleasure in 
forwarding to every person one 
post-free on application. This 
List Is the moat complete In the 
Trade, and has cost several thou- 
sand pounds to produce. 




Amateur Span-roof Greenhouse. 
Complete, from £216*. 



i 




Rustfc Summer 
Houses from £4 




Cooper's " BeataU," 



IRON 
BUILDINGS 

of every 
description. 

Estimate* 



m^r 




CONTENTS OF 



SECTIONS 




Houses 

Frames 



n. 

m. 



Nest Boxes, 2/9 each. 



SECTION. ' ■ T7;«ATies, 

I.— Conservatories. Greenhouses, 

Orchid 

Houses,-..——, vtataa 

Poultry, Kennel, Babbit, and P>g» 
Appliances, &c. ... — '" gH* 

Rustic Work • "Ihiircl. ,i 

Iron Buildings and Roofing, Chi* ^ 
Furniture. &c. ... — „,"*_ ** \fr^ 

Heating Apparatus Oorf*jg£ % 

•Horticultural Manures. J"**^,** ^ 
■ecticides. Worm and Weed V*™ _, jjH" 
Sunshades, Soils. *c. ~ "' Tenn i, - 

Lawn Mower, and Edge Cu< tert. Ten*" tfJJ 
Markers, Garden Boilers, *c. ^M 

Horticultural Timber ... j^fc * 

Horticultural SundnM, w ... JS 

Fountains. Vases, Statuary, * c 

Vegetable and Flower Seeos. _ ■&- 

Dutch Bulbs. Ac. 



VI 



VII. 

VIII. 
EC. 



Jpit 20, 1895.] 



THE' GA It DENE US' CHRONICLE 



61 



EARLY 



BULBS 



Oor Special Offer of Early Bulbs is N<rw Ready, and -will be sent 
post-free on application. Prices very low. We are now lifting 

DAFFODILS, 

and can despatch orders in July for Early Planting. The 
Bulbs are really splendid, and thoroughly ripened. 



J. R. PEARSON & SONS, 

CHILWELL NURSERIES. NOTTS. 



FERNS!— FERNS!! 

Well-grown Staff, at Moderate Prices. 
A large quantity, in 2£-inoh pots, ohiefly Pteris 

cristata ; also Alba lineata, Adiantum fulrum and pubes- 
cent, at 9r . per 100. 

Good bushy stuff in 48'i. — Pteris cristata, nobilis, 

and tremula ; also Aralias, at 4s. 6d. per dozen. 

The above prices are for Cash with Order only. Packing 
free. All orders carefully and promptly executed. 



B. PRIMROSE, 

NURSERIES. ST. JOHN'S PARK. BLACKHEATH. SB. 



DA 




FODILS. 



HOME-GROWN BULBS. 

We are now lifting our Home-grown NAR- 
CISSUS. We hold immense stocks of the 
following, amongst other kinds: — 

EMPEROR I FR1NCEPS 

EMPRESS J SIR WATKIN 

POETICUS. 

. Special Prices on Application. 

DICKSONS NURSERIES, CHESTER, 

JOHNSONS IMPROVED MUSHROOM 

SPAWN. 

BEING one of the largest 
Manufacturers of Mushroom 
Spawn, and keeping over HO cows, 
from which I obtain a large quantity 
of pure virgin spawn, I am in a 

position to offer the best obtainable 

at 3*. per bushel. 
Special Plices for Large Quantities 

and the Trad«. 

HANGER HILL. EALING. 




STRAWBERRIES. 

All the leading varieties, new or old, in small 
pots for fruiting first year. Open-air plants, very 
cheap. Speoial low quotations for quantities for 
Market Growing. 



FRUIT 



TREES 



OP ALL SORTS. SEND FOR LISTS 



JOHN WATKINS, 

P OMONA FARM NURSERIES, WITHINQTO N. HEREFORD. 

STRAWBERRIES. 



ROYAL SOVEREIGN 



^1 



) 



EMPRESS of INDIA, LORD 8UFPIELD, GUNTON PARK, 

AND ALL THE BEST NOVELTIES. 

- 

Descriptive ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE Now Ready, 

Post-free on application. 

. R. PEARSON & SONS, 

CHILWELL NURSERIES, NOTTS. 




9 



JAPAN LILY BULBS 

PLANTS, SEEDS, &c. 

CATALOGUE on application. 




TOKIO NURSERIES 

Komagomi, Tokio, Japan. 
Cable Address : •• Nurseries, Tokio." 

F. TAKAGHI, Proprietor. 



On FRIDAY, JULY 26. 




HIGHLY IMPORTANT 



of Orchids 




T J 1 E 



BY ORDER 01 



Messrs. F. SANDER and CO., 

St. Albans, 

WITHOUT THE LEAST RESERVE. 



barters' df ftw n i dr , 

SATURDAY, JULY SO, 189ft. 



CATTLEYA 



GI6A8 



I 



SANDER* 



1 



A PRIMITIVE TOBACCO 

FACTORY . 

/^HINA is nothing unless she is primitive, 
^ and although the factory which forms the 
subject of these remarks is not exactly situated 
in Chinese territory, as it is in the Portuguese 
settlement of Macao, it is, to all intents and 
purposes, a Chinese factory, for it is owned and 
orked by Chinese. The premises comprise 
several large sheds with earthen floors, and one 
or two better built rooms, used as storehouses. 




AND 



The factory gives 
hundred Chinese 



employment to several 
men and women. I was 



SANDERIANUM. 



A FINE IMPORTATION OF PLANTS, IN 

PERFECT CONDITION. 

We are pleased to be able to offer such 
grand plants. It is absolutely impossible to 
have a finer Cattleya than the one now offered. 
Although the major portion will probably turn 
out Sanderae and Sanderianum, yet our Collector 
assures us that Hardy anas and aureas are among 
them. The aureas our man collected in flower 
are all offered in this Sale. (See Catalogue). 

We fully expect plants will flower from 
amongst them similar to Countess of Derby, 
Hardyana, Franconvillensis, l^ochellensig, Hamar 
Bass's, Clarke's variety, &c , &c. 

Also a consignment of 

ODONTOGLOSSUM CRISPUM 

(SANDER'S TRUE PACHO TYPE). 

Simply unapproachable for beauty. 

These were collected from Mountains we have , ., , ,. i,^/. „_ ■— *i i , 1 
rented for the past eleven years, and from which * he i d l ell , ght / f °™ ^"i 0n !° 1 oker8 ' as e™ denced 



accompanied on my visit by Mr. A. A. Petti- 
grew, a son of Mr. Pettigrew, of Cardiff ( astle, 
who is at present (May) on a tour in the East. 
The tobacco is not grown at Macao, but at a 
pla.se called Hokshan, about forty or fifty miles 
to the north-west of th<' former to*rn, on one <>f 
the numerous mouths of the Sikiang, or Canton 
River. When the plants are properly dry, they 
are done up into bales a l >out 2^ feet long, 2 feet 
wide, and 1 foot deep, and sent down to Macao 
in junks. On arrival at Macao, these bales are 
stored in the premises of the factory until sucb 
time as they are required for the manufacture 
of tobacco. 

The first room we entered was devoted to 
stripping the leaves from the stalks, these being 
discarded in the manufacture. Women, sitting 
on the floor on their haunches, were busily 
engaged in this operation when we entered. The 
sight of us did not distract the women's attention, 
but several young children who were present 
on our arrival, scampered away to distant 
corners like mice into a hole. The dust from 
the tobacco leaves got into our noses and throats, 
and caused us to sneeze and cough, much to 



all the very best varieties have been imported. 



ALSO 



DENI ROBIUM STATTERIANUM, 

D, PHALiENOPSIS of FITZGERALD, 

D. SUMNERIX, and D. MOOREANA. 

A new introduction will be included, besides 

DENDROBIUM NOBILE, 
Our FINEST LA.NG TANG variety. 






CATTLEYA CITBINA, 

LYCASTE SKINNERL &c. &c 



MESSRS. 



PROTHEROE 




MORRIS 



Have been instructed to Sell the above, 

Entirely Without Kesebve, 

In their CENTRAL AUCTION ROOMS, 
67 & 68, CHEAPSIDE, LONDON, E.G. 



by the loud outburst of laughter whi h followed 
our discomfiture. Strange to say, we did not 
hear a sneeze or a cough from any of the Chinese 
whilst we were in the factory. After the leaves 
have been stripped from the stalks, they are 
carried into one of the sheds in large bamboo 
baskets by men, then spread on a wooden floor 
and damped with wate-. When sufficiently 
damp, they are made^ 
about 2£ feet long, 
inohes thick, and 

next 



up into layers 
2 feet wide, and 



placed on 
is to make each 



boards. 



2^ 
The 



layer into a 



process 

solid cake. This is done in the following way : 
About a dozen layers, with a board 1^ inch 
thick between each layer, are placed on the top of 
one another, and then pressure is brought to 
bear upon the whole lot by means of a lever of 
the second order, in the shape of a thick pole. 
One end of the lever is fixed firmly with strong 
ropes,and this constitutes the fulcrum ; the weight 
or the resisting substance is the tobacco, and the 



•i* 



wer is applied at the other end of the lever by 




means of stout ropes, which pass round a wooden 
axle that is securely fastened to the ground. 



62 



THE 



GARDENERS' 



CHRONICLE. 



[July 20, 1895. 



When 



pressed, the cakes are taken out and out cross- 
wise into strips 4 inches wide, and the two ends 
cut off, as they are not sufficiently pressed. The 



alio, and, as we think, more correctly, be considered 
at a form of C. macroearpa. The latter, known aa 
the Monterey Cypress, has a very limited range of 
distribution on the Californian coast, and, to our 



as Mr. Fawcett, after careful examination of the 
specimens of E. Campbelli at Kew, wrif es me that he 
regards it, because of the characters just mentioned, 
as a distinct species. The Guiana plant has an 



thinking, the present is but an insular variety of the elongated root-stock, which, though morphologically 

nextjtep^s to tie half-a-dozen of these scrips ipeciei * differing from the type mor e especially in of similar character, is several times larger, quite gla- 

rru _*. ~ .- its glaucous colour. It is true there is a considerable brous, glossy, and bright coloured; more or leas 

distance between Monterey in lat. 36° 4', and Guade- freely sinuated, occasionally forked at the top, and 



together by means of ropes. The next opera- 
tion is to make the tobacco ready for use. This 
is done by means of a plane, very similar in 
shape to an English carpenter's plane. The strips 
of tobacco are stood up on end on the ground, 
and kept in position by boards made for the 
purpose. As the strips are only about 1£ foot 
high, the men have to work the plane in 
a half-stooping position, a most uncomfort- 
able way of working from an English- 
mans point of view. However, the Chinese 
do not appear to mind it, as they work away 

The 



contentedly from 



night. 



morning to 
shavings of the tobacco leaves are the tobacco 
ready for smoking. Every man puts his 
shavings, as he takes them from the plane, into 
small heaps, weighing about a pound each, 
enclosing at the same time a ticket with the 
name of the firm on it in the centre of each 
heap. These small heaps are then put into 
papers, the two ends of the papers being left 
open. The packets are then weighed, and 
a little more tobacco is added or taken 



away according to whether the packet is too 
light or too heavy. When the packets are of 
the proper weight they are put into another 
paper, both ends closed up, and then packed in 
boxes ready to be sent away. There is a good 
deal of order in the way in which the factory is 
worked. Women are only employed in stripping 
off the leaves from the stalks, men do all the 
rest of the work. There is one lot for damping 
and pressing the leaves, and another batch for 
cutting the pressed cakes into strips and tying 
them up ready for planing. The planers only make 
the tobacco and put it into heaps, a separate 
lot of men put it into the first papers ready for 
weighing. The men who weigh the tobaoco 
pass it on to others, who put it into the second 
paper, and these finally hand it to the packers. 
The tobacco is of a dark brown colour, and is 
only used, so far as I know, by the Chinese. It 
has the reputation amongst them of being a par- 
ticularly good brand, and the factory is said to 
be one of the largest in South China. It was very 
amusing to see the workers at 12 o'clock, as this 
is the time they take their mid-day meal. 
As soon as the clock struck twelve, everything 
stopped as if by machinery. In less than five 
minutes tables were produced from unlooked-for 
corners, basins of rice and other foods were 
placed upon them, and the men were busily 
engaged in emptying th em by the aid of chop- 
sticks. All the workmen took this meal in the 
same place as they had previously been working 

in, W* J. Tutcher. Rntnnrn ClnrJnv* TTr,**. TT~~~ 



New oh No tewort hy Plants. 

THE GUADELOUPE CYPRESS * 



loupe, an iiland in 29° N.L., 200 milei from the 
mainland, with deep sea all around, but it is pos- 
sible that intermediate localities may be found. At 
any rate, the presence of distinct characters is a 
common feature of plants growing on isolated 
islands. Our illustration (fig. 9) is from a specimen 
sent us by Dr. Franceichi, of Los Angeles, who can 
also furnish seeds. The illustration shows a por- 
tion of a spray with male flowers of the natural size, 
foliage and male flowers magnified. The cones 
are generally larger than here represented. For the 
sake of companion we append a figure of Cupressus 
arizonica (figf. 11 and 12), with a transverse section 
of the leaves of that species, and also those of 
C. macrccarpa (fig. 10). M. T. Masters. 





X A 



X 4- 




sometimes with a furcation, or jib- like extrusion on 
one or other side. The species now known are •— E. 
Campbelli, Baker, slopes of Roraima, British Guiana ; 
and E. Fawcetti, Jenm., Eose Hill, Jamaica. It ii 
remarkable that this genus should have been dis- 
covered so late in the day in two well- explored 
countries, whose flora, fauna, and geology are so 
different, and which are so wide apart, much about 
the same time. Both species resemble in form 
closely Polypodium trifurcatum, L., which alio 
grows in both countries, for which, without cloie 
examination, they would at once be mistaken. <?, 8. 
Jen?nan 9 Demerara. 

Hemerocallis aubantiaca var, major, Baker* 

This botanically comes close to the plant which I 
described in the Gardeners' Chronicle, 1890, vol. viii., 
p. 94, from the Koyal Gardens, Kew, under the name 
of Hemerocallis aurantiaca, but it is larger in all its 
parts, and is the finest Hemerocallis I have seen. It 
has the firm, bright orange perianth-segments of the 
type, and like it, flowers later than flava, Middendorfii, 
and Dumortieri. The leaves are an inch or an inch- 
and-a-half broad, firm, and strongly ribbed. The peri- 
anth-tube is three-quarters of an inch, and the limb 
4 inches long. The inner segments are 18 to 20 linei 
broad, and the expanded flower is 5 to 6 inches in 
diameter. It was imported from Japan by Messrs. 
Wallace & Son of Colchester, and was exhibited at 
the Drill Hall on the 9th inst, where it obtained a 
Certificate. J. G. Baker. (See fig. 14, p. 71.) 



Orchid Notes and Gleanings, 




FKt 9. 



THE GUADELOUPE CYPRESS (C MACROCARPA 
VAR. GITAPELOUPENSIS). 



ORCHIDS AT ROUNDHAY MOUNT, LEEDS. 

The Orchid- houses in Dr. Jessop's pretty garden 
near the fine Roundhay Park, are well situated, and 
their occupants have in Mr. Tyson, the gardener at 
Roundhay Mount, a careful and diligent cultivator. 
Seeing therefore, that Dr. Jessop himself takes a 
personal interest in his Orchids, it is not surprising 
that the collection affords a good example of suc- 
cessful cultivation. Odontoglossums, Cattleyas, 
Laeliat, and Dendrobiums, are the species chiefly 
found, and in each department, uniform vigour, 
health, and freedom to flower are remarked. 
In the Dendrobium-house, the base of which is in part 
planted with foliage plants, Palms, Begonias, &c., the 
specimens of Dendrobium Dalhousieanumhavemadea 
grand show, one plant having nearly one hundred 
flowers. In addition, there were some beautiful 
plants of D. transparens, covered with their pretty 
blush-white and purple flowers; D. Parishii, and 
several of the 150 or so plants of D. Phalamopin 
Schroderianum which are here grown, were in flower. 
Some fine specimens of D. thyrsiflorum and others o 



The late Prof. Sareao Wauou described this fine 
Cypress as a distinct species, under the name of 
C. guadeloupensii, and perhaps rightly. 



Entehosora Fawcetti, Jenm. n. $p* 

The only plant of this discovered was sent to me 
several years ago by Mr. Fawcett to determine. I 

saw at once that it was a true Enterosora, but it dif- ^ * 

fered from the Guiana species in its much smaller that clati ! together with a few Phalaenopsis added 

size,,hairiuess and very slight sinuation of the margins, to the display. 

a «**•_ ....... Iq the block of span-roofed houses we found 

fine Cattlejas and Laelias, among the former beio* 
large number of fl >wers on excellent varieties ot 



Having so little material (a single but fully mature 
plant), after noting the distinctions mentioned I 



(Omacbocabpa vab guavblovpessis, Mast.) thought it be.t to leave it with E. Campbelli, think 



It 



ing io would soon be found again. It ha« not, however, Cattleya Mossiae; among these C. M. marmorata i« 
been re-discovered. I therefore publish if, particularly a noble form of flower, with very large lip, that H 



may 



A 



quadeh 



A*-* t I tT- L' *«'•"'/. «* """^j-ppreaaing tree, becoming 

*» f set Wh or more, and 2 to 5 feet in diameter, ^th era3 
brown hwk cleaving off in thin plates and leaving JK th in 
inner bark with a smooth, claret-red surface; branches , droo£ 
ing .and branchlets very slender; folisge glaueo?™ en r( ?£ 
acute or acut.sh leave* very obscurely iriand lar ™' It 

v£v ; £"v * l0 »rV n inchor mor " >" "iialne^ofTtoS 8 

very thick, an«l strongly- bowed «ral*»«. «^h ° °» 

mental purposes." v 7 vaiuaole tor orna~ 



* &ntero f or* FawcetHi, Jenm., n. sp. _ Rootstock nea- 
•bip*i. about , Jp e-eighth of an inch thick, not, or very little 
elongated, upright, densely coated with minute scales : 

surface elighUy hairy. mK To^°i ^"^SLS^ 
vein, obscure partly free, partly areolated ; l,,fS"« 

nau ot the frond, immersed in oblique sliUike cavities l— •* 

:=«:. tsss? *r; °sr„r "-is- 



marbled with rose and purple ; C. Schroderse is one 
of the most delicately- tinted and fragrant of Cat- 
tlejas; C. intermedia and other species wt re noted. 
Among the Laelias, L. cinnabarina was in flower, 
a 1 so a dark scarlet- coloured form of L. flava— a dis- 
tinct and pretty variety. In the same bouse a fie* 
plant of Miltonia spectabilis radians, and other MU- 
tonias were remarked, a small stage being raised near 
the glass for M. Koezlii and M. Phalienopsis, both 
of which are in fine condition. 

Passing to the group of Laelia purpurata, we found 
a good show of fine and dissimilar flowers— ou* 



July 20, 1895.] 



THE 



GARDENERS' CHRONICLE. 



63 



having enormous blooms. So beautiful are these 



Light, again, is a most important factor, and 



forms of L. purpurata that they cause one to ask, all important so far as setting the fruits is con- 
when we shall get a new Orchid, either species or cerned. For some eight or nine years past I have 
hybrid, which will be their equal? Another house had 
specimens in flower of Cattleya Skinneri, another old 
favourite difficult to excel ; Sobralia macrantha, and 
the fine yellow S. xantholeuca ; Cattleya Aclandise, 
and a healthy collection of Cypripediums, among 
which C. Rothschildianum, C. hirsutissimum, some 
splendid C. bellatulum, C. Godefroyae, C. niveum, C. 
caudatum, C. Chamberlainum, C. Curtisii, &c, were 
in flower. 



planted a row on each side of a wide house to go up 
the roof, trained near the glass. I have prepared 
the plants in various ways, sometimes planting from 
4- inch and sometimes from [8-inch pots, with the 
first bunch already set, and some swelling the fruit. 
But at the side of the house there are 18 inches of 
brickwork before the wall- plate is reached, so that 
the first-set bunch will be about 9 inches below the 



7 inches of stem. The variety was Chemin Rouge, 
a splendid variety, that sets freely, and has fine 
bunches of fruit of a useful and uniform size. 
* Nurseryman's " plants, judging by their height at 
this early date, could scarcely have carried a good 
crop. But it will certainly not assist matters to stop 
the plants at 4 feet high, although such a proceeding 
would be quite right with a late batch, which may 
only have time to finish fruit at 4 feet high ; bat 
with a full season in view it is another matter. 
The extreme point of the growth is full of embryo 



wall-plate, and therefore in obscured light. Whether bunches of flower-buds, and to remove the point at 
The next house was occupied chiefly with Cattleya planted with plants out of large or small pots, this 4 feet high would only result in axillary growth, and 






Triansei and other of the C. labiata class, some good 
C. Mendelii and C. Schroderae being in bloom. An 
Anguloa Clowesii was carrying twelve flowers, a 
plant of A. Kuckerii sanguinea was very handsome, 
and specimens of Dendrobium infundibulum formed 
pretty objects. Overhead were sprays of Odonto- 
glossum citrosmum, and some good plants of Den- 
drobium Hildebrandi, whose soft primrose-yellow 
flowers are always pleasing; Saccolabium curvi- 
folium, a pair of Rodriguesia venusta, and some 
vigorous examples of Vanda coerulea. 

In the cool house a few fine spikes of Odontoglos- 
sum crispum and other Odontoglossums were noted, 
also some Masdevallia Harryana and M. ignea, 
M. Simula, M. bella, M. X Heathii, and 
Ada aurantiaca; and in a slightly warmer 
house a fine display of orange-scarlet flowers 
on several strong specimens of Epidendrum vitelli- 
num majus; Oncidium concolor superbum, with 
flowers as large as O. splendidum ; a densely- 
flowered O. cornigerum, with six spikes; Odonto- 
gloasum hastilabium, and other Odontoglossums, and 
Oncidiums, and a healthy batch of Miltonia vexil- 
laria. The conservatory was gay with Lilies, 
Calceolarias, Pelargoniums, &c. ; and in the open 
garden, herbaceous and alpine plants fill the borders, 
and furnish the rockeries outdoors. 

LtTDDEMANNIA PeSCATOBEI. 

We understand that the plant exhibited by Sir 
Trevor Lawrence under this name has since been 
determined to be a new species, and has been named 
by Mr. Rolfe— Luddemannia triloba. 



M 



ATO FRUITS NOT 

SWELLING. 

In reply to the inquiry of n Nurseryman "regarding 
the above subject, vide p. 51 of the last issue of the 
Gardeners' Chronicle, I may say that continued obser- 
vation in the cultivation of Tomatos has led me to 
the belief that no one cause in particular may be 
given for the non-swelling of the earlier fruits ; but 
on the other hand that a variety of causes and cir- 
cumstances combined, conduce to the same end. 
I believe one of the most prolific causes to be in- 
•nflScient strength in the plants themselves, a cir- 
cumstance in all probability due to the warm tem- 
perature necessary early in the year for the growth of 
these plants. Very frequently in the early stages 
the plants are allowed to become crowded, or a 
warmer closer temperature than is really needful or 
beneficial is afforded, and in either case the early 
trusses are generally of little use. But because the 
tnmes are really put forth and the flowers expand, 
it does not follow that the wood is sufficiently mature 
to bring about the best results. In i Nurseryman's " 
case it is also in the "three earliest houses M that the 
non-swelling is most noticeable, a fact which appears 
™ give weight to my view ; while in the " later 
houses the bottom trusses are swelling off all 
Nghfc." Thus it would appear that the later- 
raised plants, with presumably less fire- heat 
and more sunlight and sunheat, have produced firmer, 
&*d therefore more fruitful, wood. Any foreign 
patter in the manure which would cause the plants 
torn black " in a few days after being planted would 
undoubtedly prove highly detrimental to the plants ; 
tit apart from this it is by no means uncommon for 
jjhe two earliest produced trusses, when very low 
sown, to be puny and small, while the third may 
Prove of prodigious weight. 



bottom truss is invariably a failure, but the first truss 
which receives full light is generally a large one. I 
have this season many notable instances of this. In 
the first 2-feet run of stem three trusses of flowers 
have appeared, the two first by reason of their 
position being always shaded, producing only puny 
worthless fruits ; the third in full light, bearing from a 







Fig. IO.^leaf section of c. macrocakpa. 

(SEE P. 62.) 



X 20. 




such growths would attain a considerable length 
before they become fruitful again. 

For some years past I hare planted my earliest 
Tomato plants in January, the first batch rarely 
doing much good ; they appear to set well, but seldom 
swell of a useful size, owing to lack of sunlight at this 
early date. I am satisfied if I get a good bunch on 
the stem at 18 inches from the ground, for if a 
bunch of rapidly- swelling fruit is got at that 
height, it tends to check growth usefully later on. 
Some growers bury a part of a rather tall stem by 
laying it on its side in planting, which I think is a 
mistake, since the Tomato, being a rampant grower 
naturally, is rendered more so by furnishing it with 
a greater number of roots in its early stages. A 
shallow narrow bed of rather poor and firm soil con- 
duces greatly to a good early set ; but the plants 
must not be neglected in any way, and once a good 
set is obtained, the plants benefit by liberal waterings, 
liquid manure, and a surfacing of fairly rich soil. 
Tomatos for planting in January should be sown at 
the end of September, and grown steadily on in as 
cool a temperature as is consistent with healthy 
growth, a long season of steady growth being an 
important factor in very early fruiting. J. 



Fig, 11.— c. arizonica: showing foliage and cones 



HOUND GHENT. 

In the houses of M. L. De Smet-Dnvivier we 
noted recently Anthurium M. Georges Montefiore, 
raised from A. Rothschildianum X sanguineum. The 
spathe is rounded, the form charming, with blood- 
red spots beautifully shaded. The upper surface in 
covered with a cloud of dots, mixed here and there 
with spots. The lower surface is much more beautiful 
and distinct than the other, and bears large spots 
i which almost entirely cover the whole surface. This 
is a very distinct Anthurium. 

A fine specimen of Araiia monstrosa, which is 
becoming very rare, grows in the same house with 
hundred pretty plants of Livistonarotundifolia, whose 
valuable decorative properties are well displayed. 
Few things are more charming than are these 
miniature Palms used for table decorations, baskets, 
&c. A very fine seedling Croton from C. Disraeli X 
Hanburyanus surprised me agreeably ; the young 
leaves are very bright yellow in colour, exceedingly 
delicate, the end of the leaves and half the length of 
the borders of them are a pretty tone of green ; the 
adult leaves are dark green, verging upon black, 
with the midrib and other veinings yellow, the 
petioles a fine shade of red. I noted a flowering 
specimen of Tapeinotes Carolina, a fine old plant 
which deserves to be more widely grown. 

M. L. Dd Smet-Bavivier's garden suggested Italy, 
owing to the large numbers of Bitnbusa aurea there 
growing; these Bamboos should certainly take a 
more important place as plants for parks and 
gardens ; they are also suited for indoor decoration. 

At M. Jos. Boelen's establishment I admired a 
the rule, involving loss of weight, and its consequent fine specimen of Mitraria coccinea, unfortunately 




Fig. 12.— leaf-section of c. arizonica, x 30 



dozen to eighteen fine fruits, weighing between three 
and four to the pound. This is not an isolated 
instance, but the invariable result noticed for some 
years past, and with different varieties. It demon- 
strates the great value of full light in obtaining a 
good set to begin with, and the fullest development 
afterwards. Wide houses, again, with several rows 
of plants across, are not conducive to a good set 
early in the season, unless abundance of space be 
given each plant ; and a stinting of space is, I fear, 



excess of growth of shoots. 

Too much and too rich a soil, and too much 
moisture, are common causes of failure with 
Tomatos. One of the heaviest crops I have grown 



much neglected now-a-days, and a good example of 
a variegated Rhododendron, the green centre of the 
foliage being sarrounded by a yellow edge. 
M. Gh. Vujlsteke has now some fine Orchids in 



was planted in a cube of 6 inches of soil, on a bloom. I would mention Miltonia vexUlaria Empress 



greenhouse stage, with a thin layer of cow-manure 
on the bottom, the soil being beaten down firmly 
ater the plants were put in. The s*age was of corru- 
gated-iron, and 3 feet 6 inches from the ground. 
The resultant growth was very firm, and short- 



Augusta Victoria, of fine colouring ; Odoatoglossum 
Harryanuru, with large flowers, the lips of which are 
of considerable size. The upper half is wide, and of 
an unusually pure white colour, the purple part of it 
veined with white, the yellow of the lower section of 



jointed, and fine bunches occurred in about every remarkable brightness 



\ 



I 



V 



64 



THE 



GARDENERS' CHRONICLE. 



[July 20, 1895. 




The seedling Odontoglossums mentioned by me 
continue to grow well ; they require special care, 
and dislike drought as much as they do excessive 
dampneis. After seeing a fine Cattieya gigas I was 
•hown a C. Gaskelliana nobilis with several flowers 

of a very delicate tint. 

A plant of Cjpripedium Chamberlainianum, which 
I have mentioned as floweringin the beginningof May, 
1894, still bears two fine blooms on the same raceme, 
and there are buds promising future flowers. A 
specimen of Odontoglossum Lindleyanum deserves 
notice. It has twenty flower-stems with about six 
blooms on each; theie liO flowers are very bright 
in colour. Three fine samples of O. mulus covered 



Avalanche and Sunflower are classed together by 
some growers for stopping. I never find them show 
too early ; my best flower of Avalanche in 1894 was 
taken July 29 with five others, and all of them 
did well ; those taken later were much smaller. 

Bouquet de Dame, taken on July 20, also August 9, 
were first-rate ; Crystal Qaeen, taken on August 9 and 
August 22, were poor ; Etoile de Lyon, taken on 



— -B— "* — "# www**/ r*** 9 mm^mm J 7 — - - 

July 29, were almost white, but of good form ; those were abundantly flowered 
taken August 22 and 31 were also good flowers, and ; 

perfect as regards colour — liberal feeding has much 
to do with the latter point in this variety. 

E. Molyneux has almost failed this season. The 
plants were rery healthy, and buds were taken on 



Papa Gontier is a vivid pink flower, centre buff, 
reverse of the petals reddish-purple. Raised by 

Nabonnand in 1882. 

Oleanders. 

These rarely cultivated plants, which are such 
excellent subjects for the decoration of apart men ti, 
were well shown in flower at Darmstadt by F, 
Classmann, Mayence. The vigorous healthy plants 



with flowers; O. mulus Holfordianum leriopteron, July29,Aogust 9,22,31; those on August 22 were the 

an excellent' variety with flowers of a very clear best, but were not full in the centre ; in 1891, those 

ground colour ; O. ornatum, 0. elegantius, with a ta 

fine branching spike bearing flowers whose ground 

colour is greenish yellow, with a large spot on the I/Enfant des deux Mondes and its parent Louis 

sepals, and on each of the petals two small spots ; Bcehmer, should not be taken too early. Those 

and O.' macranthum with very large flowers, complete taken on August 22 were the best here this season. 



4 were 

taken 



MARKET GROWERS AND 

SALESMEN. 

The memorable saying, " Something is rotten in 
the State of Denmark," has a manifest application to 
the fruit-growing community in Worcestershire. I 
have for some days been making an excursion 
through the rural districts of Worcestershire, 
and naturally I came in extensive contact with 
that industrious class known as the market gar- 
deners. It is impossible to view without 



my list of the Orchids now in bloom. Ch. De B. 

FL0RI8T8' FL0WER8. 

SOME NOTES ON TAKING THE BUDS OF 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 

Doubtless locality makes a great difference as 
to the best date for this operation, and the seasons 
make a great difference in remits, so that the best 
calculations are liable to be upset in some particular. . 
I like to get a good free growth for exhibition 
flowers, and allow the plants, with very few excep- 
tions, to break naturally. As a rule, I have no 
trouble with the plants showing their crown- buds 
too soon ; in fact, many of the incurved varieties 
are often too late, and this in a season like that of 

this vear. 

The best flowers of Queen of England I ever had 

were taken on August 4, 1891 ; the plants had grown 



Mr. A. H. Neve, taken on July 20, was of no use admiration the well-conditioned allotments which 

whatever ; others, taken on August 7, 15, 24, and 31, they hold, nor can you contemplate their energy 

were all good, the latter having the most colour. without admitting that they are justly entitled to 

Viviand Morel had to be cut back early in May, the practical sympathy and support of the British 



owing to premature flowering ; buds taken on July 20 
and 28, gave fine large flowers, but without colour ; 



public. Strange to say, this, the season of " hope 
realised," is invariably acclaimed a season of dismay, 



others, taken on August 15, were perfect, but not so They have watched the maturing process of their 



large as usual, owing to having been cut down. 



crops with glowing pride. Heaven for its bounty has 



proved the best date for this variety in 1893. W, 27. 

Diver 8. 



W. H. Lincoln, taken on July 20 and 28, gave good been praised ; but, alas ! there remains a sting which 
large flowers, but pale in colour ; and on August 15 warps and blunts their sense and enjoyment of human 

ecstasy. During the season these men despatch pro- 
digious quantities of their produce to Manchester and 
other important northern markets. Here they 
come into the hands of commission agents, whose 
duty it is to sell to the general purchasing public. 
A few days later a return is forwarded to the sender, 



GEEMANY. 



And they were not Missed ! — We read in 

Deutsche 



.tadt nurserymen and florist, declined, to the number and * h thi ' . docQment ' *&*« with « h ° *™*' 
of thirty-eight out of forty firm, there established, to P any ; ng P ?™ , J u oon * wl ^ that Z*"? ** g l°!" 



take any part in a recent exhibition held by the 



the depression and heart-sickness to which I have re- 
ferred. In almost countless instances the " proceed! ' 



No one knew the rauon for this wholeuU non-par- ft™ " bllll, °? re °" fa, ^tl" th i e '°"": '1 



than uiual during the very cold and late spring, but 
were not stopped in any way. In 1893 several of 
this class were cut back in May because they per- 
listed in flowering instead of growing; they grew 
much weaker afterwards, as might have been expected. 
I never find Lord Wolseley and Prince Arthur 
show too soon ; in fact, the difficulty with these 
two varieties is to get them to show early 
enough. The best flower of Lord Wolseley I have 

had was from a bud taken August 23, 1892, and 
I find from my note- book three more buds were 
taken on August 30, and five on September 12 
in that year; the latter, of course, were quite 
useless for exhibition. Last year five were taken on 

August 31, and did well ; in 1890 the first three 
were taken Auguit 26, and were good flowers. 

The Princess of Wales family, in which I include 
Mrs. Heale, Violet Tomlin, Mrs. Coleman, and Miss 
Haggaf , is very similar to the above in the matter of 

showing buds, &c, ; many of the shoots during 1893 
were not showing on August 31, and the flowers that 
set 



ticipation on the part of the trade. Perhaps it was 
to show the Society that they were indispensable, 
and that without their assistance the show would be 
a failure. However, one good result of their refusal 
to show was a very lively participation of the nur- 
serymen from a distance, and the show was ren- 
dered a much more interesting one than would 

otherwise have been the caie. 

A red ! Marshal Niel Eose was shown. It is one 
of numerous seedlings raised by Dr. M tiller, and is 
the result of a cross between Marshal Niel and 
General Jacqueminot, a fact that is readily discover- 
able in the foliage and in the bloom, which is exactly 
similar to that of Marshal Niel, excepting in colour 

•a beautiful deep red. Of all the seedlings from the 
selfsame seed-capmle, only this one possesied these 
striking attributes, the rest having a more or less 
resemblance to General Jacqueminot. This red 
Marshal is not yet named ; and may never receive a 
name from the raiser, who is no business man, but an 



ll 1893. 1-topped Hero orsto^rand 7ch vane. ^TZ^° "^J* ^ ^"J? ^ ?** ° f 

tie. early in May, and got a few verV fine flower, in 1% f I!"T '' £ STf " "T ** * time » 

3 and then discarding them for a new favourite. He 

has the advantage over all others, in being in the 
sole possession of certain crosses of Bases which he 
can employ in obtaining still more remarkable 

results. 



good time. I had not tried stopping before, and never 
got this family up to time previously, so that I am 
quite favourable to stopping these in any season ; the 
beit flowers I had were taken on August 31, some 
taken much earlier were quite useless, and I find them 
quite large enough for the centre row on the stands 
occasionally. 

Lady Harding* ?rew Stagger and did better m 

1893 than ever before, and the same may be said of 
Alf Lyne (buds taken August 7). 

Madame Carriere ihowed bloom at every point in 
May, and had to be cut back like many of the Qaeen 
family. I afterwards got some fair blooms, but they 
were much inferior to those of the previous year 
when they were not cut down or stopped in any way. 

The Japanese varieties in some instances show too 



A Yellow- coloubed Kaisbbin Augusts Victoria 

Eose. 

We read that Mr. Peter Lambert, of Trives, 
asserts that he has the above variety, but as yet it 
has not been exhibited. 

t 

A Whitb Spobt of Papa Gomtieb Rosa. 

Papa Gontier ia essentially a variety for cutting 
for market, an almost perpetaal flowerer, and very 
early in seaaon. The sport possesses aU the good 
properties of the type, and is likely therefore to be 



soon, but a. a rale they may be left to make a natural of great ralne to trade growe , It w ZZ ?! 
break. This section is not easily divided into families, the garden of a FnutkCT^^S^ 
and I wdl ment.on a few of the pnncpal varieties. and shown by Mr. C. P. Siraasheim, of ISO*. 



he is expected to remit. These disappointment! 
together with sundry others of a like kind, are re- 
sponsible for numerous and serious embarraM- 
ments which the market- gardening fraternity w 
perforce made to endure. Grievances of this char- 
acter have so multiplied of late years that a 
serious problem confronts us. We must either kill 
the patient, long-suffering gardener, which would 
mean a huge national calamity, or we must cure the 
disease. It is deep-seated, some say, and on the 
surface ineradicable ; but despite this the obstacles 
are not altogether insuperable. Let growers take 
heart of grace, show true manly confidence, and here, 
to a great extent, a solution of these disappointing 
experiences will be found. It has been suggested to 
me that the Government should be invited to appoint 
salesmen, who should be guaranteed a yearly stipend 
according and in proportion to their capacities. This 
stipend should be paid by the grant of a reasonable 
commission, together with payment of reasonable 
incidentals. I confess I do not like the principle. State 
interference would be cumbersome, and before itb*d 
been in operation long, it would be discarded as too 
costly and impracticable. Others suggest that the 
produce should be sold in the immediate home 
counties, but this contention is too absurd to be for 
one moment entertained. Large fruit-growing counties 
invariably have a yield tremendously in excess of 
local requirements ; hence, it is apparent that * 
hard-and-fast rule of this nature would soon be 
regarded as infinitely worse than the preset 
disease. The custom would be more honoured m 
the breach than the observance, and in *jjj 
end, general demoralisation of the system wonW 
follow. The only effectual solution that the writ** 
can discover in this : Let market-gardeners org*** 1 * 
and form a sound association. Select from its mem- 
bership honourable and capable men, and to tb«* 
entrust your future success as growers. The diffi- 
culties that would at the outset bestrew their pa^ 
as salesmen would vanish entirely as time went o&i 
mutual confidence, forbearance, and collective &' 













July 20, 1895.J 



1'JE 



GARDENER S 1 CHRONICL E. 



65 



terest woald impire them to succeed, and, that 
object attained, past miseries and disaffection would 
become tffkced. — Yours, &c , Investigator. 

Powick, Worcestershire, June 29, 1895. Man- 
chester Guardian, July 14 1895. 



AZALEAS AT WALTON LEA, 

WARRINGTON. 

Octr illustration (fig. 13) represents a profuse 
floral display in the conservatory at Walton Lea, 
and was taken from a photograph obligingly 



There are some thirty varieties, among which were 
fine pyramidal plants of Due de Nassau, 7£ feet 
high and 3.f feet in diameter, in perfect condition ; 
Souvenir du Prince Albert, Stella, Due de Brabant, 
Model, Flag of Truce, and Baronne de Vriere. The 
smaller plants consisted of Boi d'Hollande, Mdlle. 
Marie Planchon, Balsaminiflora, Illuminator, and 
others, all densely covered with bloom. The effect 
of such a display of plants, arranged as they were 
with good taste, was one calculated to leave a 
lasting impression on all who saw it. The 
conservatory was not the only house avail- 
able to the public. They were allowed to walk 



SPYE PARK. 

While on a visit last week to Mr. Perry, the 
gardener at this place, I was struck by the [beauty 
of an extensive herbaceous border he had made and 
planted in the centre of the kitchen garden. This 
border rnns east and west, and is about 130 yards 
long, and 8 feet wide. Choice Apples and Pears 
line both sides. This border forms a useful reserve 
of plants for cutting from, and there is nearly always 
something to be found in it of interest to the lover 
of plants. I noticed flowering profusely the lovely 
Funkia grandiflora, the odcur of whose flower is very 
refreshing; Achillea Pfcarmica, fl.-pl., so useful for 




< 









! 



•• 



I 



t 



Fig. 13.— azalea- house at wauton lea, Washington. 



furnished by Mr. P. WilUoaon, Ciiff View, 
Walton, Warrington. The following letter accom- 
panied the photograph : — M For a number of years 
John Crossfield, Esq, of Walton Lea, has, at 
different seasons of the year, generously opened his 
gardens to the Warrington public, for the inspection 
of his varied collections of plants. On May 5 and 6 
of the present year the public were so admitted to 
view the Azaleas, and some 5000 persons availed 
themselves of the privilege, myself amongst the 
number. The plants were arranged in the con- 
servatory, a splendid span- roofed house 40 feet in 
length, 25 feet in width, and 20 feet in height, a 



through the long range of plant and fruit- 
houses, one of them the famous Camellia- house 
100 feet in length, and 15 feet 6 inches in breadth, 
containing splendid specimen plants of choice varie- 
ties A good display of Orchids was likewise in 
bloom at the same time, and an admirable batch of 
herbaceous Calceolarias. Great credit is due to 
Mr. W. Kipps, the head-gardener at Walton Lea, 
who has for many years conducted the work in these 
gardens. It is impossible to visit these beautiful 
gardens without a feeling of indebtedness to Mr. 
Crossfield for his consideration of the War- 



cutting; Chrysanthemum maximum, growing wonder- 
fully strong, with numerous flowers, which were of 
nnusual siz? ; Heuchera sanguinea, Bocconia cordata, 
a tall Cepbalaria, with straw-coloured flowers; Epi- 
lobiums, flowering profusely ; Campanulas, of various 
species; Carnations, Mignonette, Dahlias, Ac. All 
the plantf were growing with amazing vigour, and 
flowering profusely. 

Choice Lilies, Gladiolus, which were showing 
flower very strongly, fill the spaces between the 
herbaceous plants. 

Mr. Perry finds Cole's Blood-manure very beneficial 



rington townspeople, and I think in admitting them to these subjects, and he uses it as a top- dressing for 
temporary entrance being arranged to meet the to his place be sets an example which many other beds of Lily of the Valley, D^utzlas, and Spiraeas, 
necessities of the occasion. The plants were arranged possessors of fine gardens in the neighbourhood of There is a good show of fruit generally; and the 

■ _ ■ _ •M-a^&_-K >K«t_ fin <m «■ 



m one large group in the centre and on borders about 
4 feet wide, which run along each side of the house. 



large towns might follow with advantage to all 
engaged in horticultural pursuits. 



houses afforded a rare show of Grapes, Peaches, and 



Bastctt 



# 



66 



THE 



GARDENERS' 



CHRONICLE. 



[July 20, 1895. 



Book Notice. 



Pflanzen Krankheiten durch Kryptcqam- 

I6CHE PARA8ITEN VERUR8ACHT. By Dr. Carl 

Frtiherr von Tubeurf, (Berlin, 1895.) 
A work of nearly GOO pages of closely-printed 
matter on the subject of plant- diaeaiet canted by 
parasitic fungi, may appear to many as, of necessity, 
either encyclopaedic and too fall of details, or super- 
ficial, and abounding in wordy treatment ; as a matter 
of fact, whatever the faults of Von Tubeuf a book, it 
avoids both the extremes mentioned. It is a very 
aoberly written and fair digeat of the voluminous 
literature which has appeared in Germany since De 
Bar j a fine treatiae on fungi atarted the aeriea of 
worka, of which Brefeld, Zopf, Hartig, Frank, and 
Sorauer are the moat important, in a domain in 
which 



with predisposition to infection, methods of com- 
bating the diaeaaes, and the practical significance 
of fungoid diaeaaes. The author inaiata on the hope- 
leaaneas of individual efforts to combat diaeaaes 
which are widespread over areas where apathy or 
ignorance prevent co-operation ; and urges, with 
conaiderable force, the necesaity for experimental 
stations, museums, and means for educating the 
public in the technical matters here co cerned. 
He then enters into the prophylactic and thera- 
peutic aapecta of remedies and measures; and, 
among other illuatrations of the efficacy of treat- 
ment thoroughly carried out, quotes the followia?, 
without, however, discussing the secondary effects. 



rapt, 



follow, including interesting but short parage 
on Epichlce and Claviceps. Under the DiicomycetT 
a considerable share of attention is given ^ 
Woronin's Sclerotinia ; and Hartig's account of the 
Larch disease is accepted in its entirety, The aaV 
given is, Larches in the low lands (i.e., as contrasted 
with its native alpine heights) ahould be planted 
only in airy situations, not in close plantationi 
and never in the neighbourhood of already-diseas^ 
trees. 

The Ustilaginese receive a very full treatment, 
baaed on Brefeld's work, and the section on Ure- 
dine* ia very intereating, owing to the large amonnt 
of att ention this group haa attracted lately at tie 



at one of the hardeat workera and cleareat thinkers. habits of the fungus. 

Berkeley s chief work in vegetable pathology ap- trees, based chiefly on Hartig s results, alao comes 

peared in these columns. 

It is a very common plan in German text-books 
to deal with subjects of thia kind in two parts 
"General " and u Special," and auch ia the caae here. 



'emtitur 



Of two' parka in' Munich, there is one where the banda of Erikson, Klebahn, Plowright, Tubeuf him- 

leaves are always removed, whereas they are left on *elf» and others. 

~- ■" The different varieties of Puccinia graminii are 

fully give n according to Erikson & Henning's recent 
work (1894), which affords a new glimpse of the 
compl exity of the problems of hetercecism among 
these fun gi. Similarly with the Gymnosporangim 
forms, to which also a good deal of attention hat 
been directed of late. Tubeuf has himself worked 
specially at these forms, and he here gives a very 
full account of the group, with lists of the varied 
results whic h different authors have obtained by 



the ground in the other : as a consequence, Ehytisma 
acerinum never appears in the former, but is spread 
all over in the latter, a fact easily explained. by the 

The treatment of wounds in 



been made to re-cait the usually-accepted classi- 
fications of the mode of life of fuDgi under the head- 
ings Parasitism, Mutualism, and Natricism (for 
only by this barbarous equivalent can we conaiatently 



render the word chosen), and, we thiiik, with but about the resulta. Rumm'a experiments 



in for lengthy discuaaion. 

The agriculturist and horticulturist will probably 
be disappointed to find so little said about spraying 
of foliage with powdera and liquids, but the three 
pages or so devoted to the subject abound in good 
sense. Possibly, over-caution is noticeable about 
details, or it may be, the author has not fully con- 
sidered the voluminous literature from America and 
elsewhere, or has not been able to make up his mind 

with 



scanty success, for the efforts to draw sharp lines 
between the various atagea of parasitism displayed 

species 



Bordeaux Mixture, and his idea that the action 
is due to the copper and is electric in nature [so 
says the author ; but Rumm concluded the action 



under different conditiona, can rarely be maintained. ia probably chemotactic] are mentioned, and further 



For instance, Von Tubeuf subatitutea for De Bary'a 
classification of parasites and saprophytes into 
(1) Obligate Saprophytes; (2), facultative para- 
sites; (3), obligate paraaitea; and (4), facul- 
tative saprophytes, the following (1), Pure Sapro- 
phytes; (2), Hemi-aaprophytea ; (3), pure paraiitfs, 
and (4), s*mi-parasites, without in any aubstantial 
degree improving the ciassificatory value of the sub- 
stituted terms. 



on in the book, reference is also made to Frank 
and Kruger's recent attempts to show that some 
mysterious chemotactic action occurs to account for 
the decidedly beneficial action on Potatos. 



sowing th em on the various Pomact se on which they 
are heterceiio us. This section is both intereitfflf 
and impor tant, and again serves to open up wide 
vistas in this difficult domain of mycology. Of 
course, the Witches' Broom on Silver Firs, &c, due 
to the well-known iEcidium elatinum receive 
attention ; as do all the principal fungi which 
attack Coni ers and other trees. Many of these 
latter, especially those which destroy timber, ire 
Bisid iomycetes, and Tubeuf has introduced photo- 
graphic reproductions here — as elsewhere in the 
book — with marked success. 

The systematic or "special" part ends with a 



Our own opinion is, that much remains to be ihort categorical treatment of the * fungi imperfects; 



done along this line of investigation, but one piece 
of advice is perfectly sound, namely, that spraying 
must be done with the fullest knowledge possible of 



Indeed, his own account sbowa that the habita of the fnngua to be fought, and no mere 



the new terma bn-ak down as hopeleasly as the old 
ones before cases like Mucor and Penicillium, which 
behave aa if they were paraaitea on ripened fruits/or 



dates or general directions for the application of 
these mixtures will suffice. 

We may interpolate here what is not sufficiently 



Botrytis forms which can penetrate young tissues dwelt upon in the book, namely, that what Rumm and 
when the mycelium has attained a certain degree of Frank and Kruger find is that the copper-salts affect 



vigour, and accumulated sufficient poison or enzymes 
to start an entrance by nestling in the first few cells 
it is enabled to kill. 



the host plant, apart from any action on the fungi, 
by incrsasitig the chlorophyll and the manufacture 



w A *i.i M ;. • a u u ,i- ,_ , * ,„ of itarch - b ? accelerating the maturity and weight of 

Nothing is gained here by calling the fungus a half- the f ruit ( Vine) and tubers ( PotatoV id h„ diJLh. 



parasite instead of a facultative parasite ; and indeed 
the latter term is the better, for it expresaea more 
nearly the real atate of the caae. The furth 



the fruit (Vine) and tubera (Potato), and by diminish- 
ing the rate of transpiration. On the other hand, 
experience alone can decide as to the effect of 



and phytopathogenic schizomycetes and Algse 

On the whole, the author ia to be congratulated on 
having produced a book which is decidedly in 
advance of any of its predecessors, and which moit | 
be regarded as the most complete compilation we 
possess on the subject. The style is clear, and the 
print e xcellent. Fault may perhaps be found with 
the inequality of the discussions; for instance, the 
Potato d isease ia diapoaed of in two pagei, while 
more than twenty are devoted to G)mnosporanginm; 
but such a matter depends on the point of view, and 
it is not difficult to conclude that the author is espe- 
cially interested in m orphological question!. Be 
thia as it may, however, there can be no doubt 
that the work ia a useful and valuable contribution 
to science, and will be welcome in all botanical 



— ;/ -.« .u^oi ma caae . ine mrtner ois- accumulating copper in the soil and there ia nro- 

ZZ °L th i m0d t ° f u Ufe w° f Para§itiC faDgi ta babl * ™ q-itioSof greater im^c. £ a^ul lib ' ari "' « "™™ W <«*> 
h ^!L aQd tbe a ? th0r ha8 *™<*t ***** •* tural and horticultural ^n^2^u^± =========== 



facta, r 

treatment of these phenomena along similar lines bv 
Zopf. 

In the aection on mutualism, again, we are driven 
to the conclusion that Tubeuf is atriving after a 
rennement of terminology, which obscures rather 
than illuminates hia subject. He regarda the 
claasical case of the symbiosis of Lichens as met by 
the term individualism, because the result is a living 
being "which in its form, life-requirements, and 
mode of living i. completely new, and differs entirely 
from the two components." But this aavours of a 
mere plajiog with words, and, we think, mih words 
singularly ill-cboaen to play with. 

That the author ia right in distinguishing soch 
cases of symbiosis as those of the Lichens, Witches' 
Brooms, and ao forth, from the cases of Mycorhiz* 
and the leguminous tube, etas, may be at one Zt 

that mthe Utter on. of ^symbiotic orga J£ 



serve, .specially for the nutrition of it. host- 

the fungus of Mycorhiza is regarded a tin \ m " 

ua, and the organum of the lez 
digested by t he ho.t plant. 
The section, most interring.. to the •' 



tural and horticultural committees who have ex- 
perimental ground* and expert advice at their dia- 
poaal, to investigate further. 

In the apecial part, which comprUei all but 
110 pp. of the whole, the plan followed it the .imple 
and effective one of taking the principal group, of 
fungi, and treating of their parasitic representatives 
In the main, Brefeld'a classification is followed An 
interesting section on the Chytridiac**, ia which 
fully acknowledged advantage ha. been taken of 
Fischer, and Sch. over's recent monographs, open, 
the work and then follow the Oomycetes, in which 
the far too short paragraph on the Potato disease 
will prove the most intereating. The fungus has no 
oospores, but the mycelium passe, the winter in the 

ubers, a view combated by E6hm, who maintained 
that we are completely ignorant of the way it win ers 
This fungus haa been found on SolMum^ric" 1 ^ 
in Ecuador, and has been infected i„r„ « i 
caribense and Petunia hybrida it !« ^^ 
the Tomato. The use of Bordeaux MixtlT"" ° B 
mended and defended. * tBre M recom - 



d wells on or 
aminous nodules 



receive attention, and a very conml^T , * timp - M J own experience goe. to prore 

Ern a ,c**, «nrf nru.wJ J com P Iete account of the i. „„,.,;„„ ♦„ u. JI^a k„ ti.ntin* larg« 



« Exoasceae and Witches 



practical 



""• - ^ *• * ***.;. zcsi ■ 



PassiDg to the higher funoi th» a 

C eiv« ^-«*.«- „f, ._ DRl ' the Ascomycetes first 

^xoasce* and Witches' Brooms n^wTT "' " he 



The Herbaceous Boroeb. 

_p_ ii ■ ^^ ^ 

SINGLE AND DOUBLE-FLOWERED PYSE' 

THRUMS. 
A useful bint in regard to the above popular 
and fiee- flowering group of plants is that ^ im 
the Messrs. Kelway— now is the time to P« ' 
Indeed, it is more than nsefol. it is ™ h * h f® n 
especially so to those vbo would have 6uen ° ^ 
for the year that follows. But the planting of ^ 
things in Midsummer, with the soil dust-dry M* 
districts, 2 or 3 inches deep, involves a ^ 
amount of ritk.and probable losses. The ^^ 
ever, may be reduced to a minimum by on,y ^[, ftT t 
well-established pot- plants, not starvelings, tba^ 
no vigour remaining, but such as have been ap 
prepared during the past spriog for planting ^ 
the present season. There are many, I *^. f j^ 
who adopt the rough-and-ready pract.c* o ^ 
these Pyrethrums with a spade at ^J**^^ 

-of 



is nothing to be gained by planting lfttf e * 

old 



these plants, or even by cutting tb*m m 



i 



blossoms inferior in size, and these by 
represent the flowera in their best iot^ 



1&»* 



July 20 1895] 



TEE 



GARDENERS' CHJRONICLE. 



G7 



tried several ways and different seasons, but fiod of a dwarf habit, none so tall ai the familiar Batter- flowers frequently covering the ground to the excla- 



none to fqaal that of dividing the plants into small cnp of the meadows of the Old Cjuntry. Then 



pieces of, fay, three or four crowns each, and potting 
them into pots of large 60 -tfzs; then place them in a 
cold, close, well- shaded frame for a short season till 
new roots and fresh growth are both apparent. 



appears, mostly on high ground, in compact clumps, 
a very low-growing plant, which beam a profusion of 
pure white, almost tquare- shaped Sowers, which are 
evanescent, however, for they la*t bat a week or so. 



In a month, all being well, they will be ready for At the same time maybe found, growing in more 



planting out again. This operation is best performed 
in the early spring, when about 4 inches of new 
foliage has been made, and when the dividing has 
been carefully done, the losses are very few indeed. 
Following this practice, I have propagated many 
thousands of these plants. In precisely the same 
manner these plants may be increased in summer- 
time after flowering is completed. At the latter 
date the plants should be cut down to within 
6 inches of the ground, and when new leaves spring 
from the tnfts, lift and divide them in the way 



humid soil, the yellow Lupin, its bright flowers being 
conspicuous from quite a distance. Where the land 
has been " broken " (ploughed), this plant is almoit 
sure to appear, and continues flowering for several 
weeks; it produces seed freely. Never shall I forget 
the delight and surprise I experienced when I first 
came during a botanical ramble upon a fine clump 
of Cypripediom, bearing ten fully - developed 
flowers, and as I looked with admiration upon this 
lovely wildling, with its Orchid-like beauty, it 
seemed to me to be hardly possible, knowing that 



sion of all other plants. Auriculas, also, where the 
ground is humid, but exposed to the full tun, are 
to be seen by hundreds in one place ; the foliage and 
flowers, the latter of a light pu-ple with yellow 
centre, are smaller than the varieties in cuUivtton, 
but they have the charac'er stic of their pette«l 
sisters of bting powdered. Th*re are t> be seen 
wide patches, extending several yards serosa, of a 
beautiful miniature white Ev«* la tin*. I >wer. which 
when gathered when just in full hlcora, will remain 
fresh and firm for }ears. I have S3me suc'i which I 
gathered four years agn, and they are ai white and 

perfect at when first taken from the prairie. T. 8, J. 



Plant Notes. 



recommended above. The plants resulting will be but a few weeks before the ground under its roots 



ready by the middle or end of August, and should 
be planted out without delay. Such plants, 
of course, will not be capable of producing 
results in the ensuing year equal to those 
earlier planted, and for this reason, and the saving 
of a season's bloom, the spring-propagated plants are 
much the best all round. If poisible, get these into 
their permanent positions by the end of May or 
early in June. Autumn-planting for these Pyre- 
thrums cannot be generally recommended, and on 
cold or clayey soils they frequently dwindle and die ; 
and, singularly enough, on heavy soils, the plants 
frequently become a prey to a small black slug, that 
demolishes every leaf as soon as it appears. In this 
manner I have known whole beds to be wrecked 



was frozen solid for several feet down, that it could 
retain its vitality in such trying circumstances — of 
such are truly the wonders of Nature. 

Just now (June 25) the Roses and Lilifs — of which 
latter, however, I have only met with one variety 
are the most conspicuously beautiful ; of the former, 
there are some so dwarf that tbey almost rest upon 
the ground, while others are several feet high, their 
natural growth having almost the appearance of 
trained standards. The colours of these Hoses vary 
from the purest white to a dark rich red ; some are 



HEUCHERA SANGUINEA. 

In this very droughty season, the above pretty 
herbaceous perennial is exceptionally free in 
flowering, I recently observed a nice healthy 
batch of it growing with great freedom amongst 
the many useful things to be found at St. Clere 
Gardens, Kemsing, the seat of Sir Mark Collet 
which gave me a more favourable impression of 
the plant than heretofore. Its deep red flowers 
on stems I J to 1£ feet high had a quite charming 
effect in the mass. The gardener at Sd. Clere's 



variegated, like the old York and Lancaster, but all f poke hjghly of it al ft pot plant for the contervatar y 
have about them a most delicious perfume. The fruit, 
which is produced in abundance, and of several 
shapes, from perfectly round to very long oval, while 



^to^TJt*'' th f^" lDg8 T rkiDg U ° 0b,erT6d iQ « ome of th < m are ronnd - with th * """ption of the _ iuuu . .„ uuue( . mmui ^ w 

the tufts, m defiance of the usual preventive measures ton whirh is narfpntlv flat somewhat like a Medlar u ^ .. j i_ *. If ^ 

t»k»« to v^n .in.. ^ ™„i ;„„^v t, ;. „ _,, l ??: ... 1- P^^ctly flat somewha. nice a Medlar. by 8eve ring the young rooted shoots and planting 



and greenhouse, and of his intention to grow a good 
number in pots another season. The plant is readily 
increased by taking the side-shoots and dibbling 
them into a sandy compost under a handlight, or 



taken to keep slugs in general in check. It is a good 
practice to surround the plants with coal-ashe*, as a 
preventive of the ravages of slugs. When planting at 
whatever season, the soil must be deeply worked and 
heavily manured ; and to secure the best results and 



All of them become the food of the prairie chick, 
and the bluff partridge. The large oval fruit, when 
fully ripe, can be made into a very nice preserve ; 
this I know from practical experience. The flowers 
are from 1 to 2 inches in diameter, the petals lying 



them on a north border at about; 1 \ feet apart, to 
be lifted and potted at a later date. A native of 
northern Mexico, introduced in 1882. H. Markham 



finest flowers, divide and replant every two years. J. wide apart| 80 fchat when fBUy expanded they are 

• _ quite flat. At I have said, I have met with but one 

variety of Lily, which in shape, size, and colour, 
though somewhat brighter and lighter, with brown 
spots at the base of the petal', much resembles the 
Vallota purpurea, but unlike that handsome plant, 






Nursery Notes. 



The Rosary. 



THE COUBERT DOUBLE WHITE ROSE. 

We had occasion recently to mention this Rose as 
growing at Kew. It is a form of Rosa rugosa, o f 
relatively dwarf stature, and large double flowers of 
great substance and snow-white lustre. From an 
article in the Journal des Safes by M. Grosdemange 
(November, 1894). it appears that this Rose was 
raised by M. Cochet-Cocbet at Coubert, hence the 
Rose has been called "Blanc double de Coubert," 



ALLINGTON NURSERIES, MAIDSTONE. 
Fob many years, with unwavering determination-, 



the leaves are all produced on the flower-stem, like Messrs. G. Buoyard & Co. have been adding to their 

already extensive fruit nurseries, till at the present 



most other Lilies. 

Of Vetches, there are several varieties to be met 
with on the prairie, all bearing purple flowers, with 
one exception, which is white, and mnch larger; 
they grow from 1J to 2 feet high. Then there is 
the " Fairy Flax," which, however, does not f ope' 
V the month of May," for it does not come to us till 
June is half over, when its delicate, fragile flowers 



time it may be safely said to contain one of the 
finest collections of fruit trees in the world. The 
thousands of young trees, clean, healthy, and free of 
growth, found in the Allington Nurseries of the firm 
must be seen for their general excellence to be 
comprehended. The area under fruit trees is 
upwards of 100 acres, and the 20 acres recently 



It is a most desirable introduction, well suited for expand in great profusion. Of Violets, we have two * dde< * ha J e be * n trpnched . **° »P*« <*«ep, * ad ar « 

beds, shrubberies, or corners. varieties, the white and the purple, the flowers and wel1 fiI,ed at the P™"* tlme w,fch hea,th y P lantin K 

foliage being much larger than those of the Old itDff The f amed Peach aod Nectarine trees are 

Country ; but, alas ! they have no fragrance to waste «amp!e. of good management, and being worked 

on the desert air, or awaken fond recollections in the on a ^e growing variety of stock, any of them 



VARIORUM. 



FLOWER8 OF THE NORTH-WEST PflAIRIE. 

On this vast, this seemingly interminable prairie of 
the Great North-west Territory of Canada, the 
flowers are truly beautiful and various, and to the 
true lover of Nature are things of beauty and joys for 
five months of the year, from the time (May) when 
that sweet harbinger of spring, Anemone patens. 
puts forth its light blue cups, not sparingly but by 
thousands, till September, when the lovely Gentiana 



heart of the lonely settler, for they have not even a 
suspicion of perfume. Then come the bold-looking, 
erect, handsome Harpaliums, their rich yellow and 
brown flowers forming a strong contrast to the 



would, with due attention, quickly cover a large 
space on high walls or trellises. There are 50,000 
trained trees in the nurseries, exclusive of cordons. 
Almost every known variety is kept in stock, but 



elegant, lightly-poised flowers of the ethereal Hare- <w*7 the moit approved varieties are extensively 



bell, which may generally be seen growing in close 
proximity to its more robust sisters. Two varieties 
of Aquilegia are to be met with here, a dwarf and a 



giant; the foliage of the former is simply exquisite, 
being quite as beautiful as Maidenhair Fern ; but the 
flowers are insignificant. The tall giant variety is 



cultivated. 

Apples were remarked as planted in "drifts," 
ranging from 30,000 to 70 000 in a drift, and the 
wood is vigorous, the foliage ample and o( good 
colour, and in many instances well studded with 
flower- buds. In one square I obseived 3S,00O 



acaulis [?] and stately Sunflower are in full glory ; the to be met with only in the •• bluffs " (woods or bush), dwarfs worked three years ago, which were in most 
colour of the former being blue as the heavens above where it grows to the height of 4 and 5 feet; the cases carrying a capital lot of fruit that promises to 



it, and the latter brilliant as the yellow sky round 
the setting sun. The season of these Anemones — 
here erroneously called Crocuses— is somewhat short, 
a* the flowering is over, and the fluffy heads of seed 
npen by the beginning of June. Bat this rapid 
maturity is not peculiar only to the Anemone, for 
all vegetation in this land of extreme heat and cold 
*■ the same ; its appearance is sudden, and the 
growth to the ripening stage simply prodigiout. As 
the Anemones fade away they are followed in rapid 
■accession by several kinds of Ranunculus, all being 



foliage, though like that of its little sister just grow to a fair s:ze. It is a matter of surprise how 
mentioned, is very much larger, and of greater sub- well these miniature trees fruit, and how bright the 
stance, and although handsome, is comparatively colour of the fruits, more so indeed than from some 



trees that are cultivated in pots. Plums and Pears 
are extensively grown, but the latter not in such 



coarse ; its flowers, also, are no great attraction. 

The Daisy we have — not the *• wee crimson-tipped 

flower," but a pure white, with several flowers on k'ge numbers as Apples and Plums. 

each stem, which is sometimes 4 or 5 inches long One might reasonably have imagined that the 

Of elegant Meadow-sweet there is an abundance, drought would have crippled the growth of many of 

scenting the air with its fragrance. Pyrolas the young trees, but this is not so, the numerous 

abound in moist shady places, their round, broad, fibrous roots penetrating the soil in every direction, 

Srm leaves, and charming Lily-of-the-Yalley-like enabling the plants to grow unchecked. Otfiog to 



68 



TEE 



GARDENERS' 



CHRONICLE. 



[July 20, 1895, 




the regularity of the plar. «»?, a hone-hoe can be 
tiled between the line* feet, and, ai a fact, it is 
constantly at work, kee a crumbly surface and 



th preserves the moisture 



killing weeds. Tbi* 6 n« 
in the toft. 

A fine plantation of Rami, consisting of some 
10000, was nt whic 1 m regards the Hybrid Per- 
petuals, pasted thr igh the winter without a plant 
being any the worse for 'he hard and long frost. 
The Teas Iftfl red sever , especially those budded 
as standards, Iwnrfs esca ng largely where covered 
with snow. Many iew varieties of fruits from all 
parts are beio.< grown for lal. //. M. 



Trees ano Shrubs. 



11EOV A 



' M 



MULTIJUGUM. 



This plant as naturallv a loosa straggling habit. 
The leaves sea ly 4 r > inches in length. The 

rsc€rnes are erect, 1< is*, with fifteen to seventeen 
Bower*, generally fewer ; each flower is about 
§ ineh long, v let or ■ Mac, becoming blneish as it 

withers. The pod divides into three or four, flattened, 

orbicular disc like iegm» ■ thickened at the margins, 

aad with tootr: like -none from the sutures, and 

from the cer e of the valve of the, carpel. We 

have now Hen spe mens from Messrs. Barbier, of 

< Orleans, the Roys! m Kew, and the Botanic 

Garden, GMubrids i r-ubstantially alike, and in 
accordance with l's rimire. 



Colonial Notes. 



IE GOLD COAST. 

Wa learn In I the K*w Bulletin that Mr. C. H. 
Humphries has h 'cited to succeed the late 

Mr. W row or of the Botanic Garden 

at Abari. Mr. Humph <-* has had three years 
experience in the trof if department at Kew, and 
had previously been with Messrs. Kelway & Sons for 
nine years, 

v«nt Lucia. 

Mr. J. C. Moore has received the appointment of 
Curator of the Botanic Station, St. Lucia, West 
ladies. Mr. H 



o o ■ \ 



employed before entering at 
Kew at the gardens, Broadlands, 



Thb Week's Work. 



THE HABDY FBUIT GrASDEW. 

By W. Pope, Gardner Highclere Cattle, Newbury. 
FIO TREES: • HJNN.NQ THE FRUIT8.— It will be 

necessary wher> , e I uas are numerous to thin 
them, so as to obtain good s^z^and fine quality. First 
those waich are mis -shape* from any cause should be 
removed, then al» j.* r,iz d and late ones. Continue 
to remove superfluou* ahoots, so as to admit sunshine 
to the fruits, and to the shoots reserved for fruiting 
next year. At forengtit .hoots should also be cut 
away, and short-jointed, tturdy growth laid-io in 
•u&cient number to duly cover the wall-space 

without crowding. r 

THE BUDDING OF 8TOCK8.-At this season 

budding may be performed if a number of suitable 
•tocks have been prepared. The best buds will be 
found on half rn»-n«d ihoot* of middle size, wood- 
bud*, that is, sucn as will produce a shoot only 
being taken. Sucn buds are readily distinguished 
from bloom-buds by their more elongated and 
pointed in shape. B^ careful to choose healthy, free- 
growing shoots, and not to take them sooner' than 
they are wanted for inserting in the stocks. Of 
course, if they hav*> to be sent to a distance, the 
thoot* should be bundled up in damp mots or the 
Uke, and when unpacked, they should be immersed 

!?•. W f*L for a Uw hottrt bflfore makin * at * of them, 
lhe budder must be provided with a pail or watering- 

can in which to pUcv th« shoots, standing the butt- 
ends in the water, havir g first cut off the blade of 
every leaf, but retaining toe stalk. This latter will 
serve to protect the bad a little, and is useful as a 
handle wherewith the bud-shield may be pushed 



into place. Having cotton, soft rafla, or Russian bast, 
cut into suitable-say, of 1} feet— lengths, one or 
two knives, and a hone, in readinesf, select a suitable 
bud, and, commencing at its lower end, cut a slice of 
bark and wood about 1£ inch, or slightly less, in 
length, with the bud occupying the middle point ; 
then carefully remove the small portion of wood left 
in the bark by inserting the end of the knife-handle 
at the proper upper end of the bark, bend back the 
slip of wood, which, if the shoot be in a suitable 
condition, will readily separate, leaving *o depression 
or pit beneath the bud. If a pit be left, the bud is 
useless. Having made the bud, cut a slit lengthwise 
in the bark of the stock about 1 inch in length, and 
at any desired height from the ground ; make a cross- 
cut at the top of the slit, raise the bark a little on 
both sides with the knife-handle, insert the bud at 
the point where the cross-cut is made, and push it 
gently but firmly to the bottom of the slit, cutting 
off any of the shield which may overlap the cross- 
cut, and bind-in the bud firmly with bast or budding- 
cotton. The ligature will require to be lootened in 
about one month afterwards. The stock should not 
be cut back till the autumn or winter, when it may 
be removed all but about 6 inches above the bud ; 
and in the following summer, when 10 or 12 inches 
of growth have been made, this snag may be cut off 
close to the young shoot. 



PLAJST8 UUDER GU.AS8. 

Bv W. H, Smith, Gardener ; West Dean Park, Chichester. 

FERN8. — These plants should now be afforded 
water in abundance, it being almost impossible to 
afford too much if the pots are filled with roots, and 
the plants growing strongly. Weak manure-water, 
applied twice a week, will do them good ; and some 
much diluted soot-water, now and again, will be 
found to keep the fronds of a good green colour, 
especially if applied to such as have not been 
repotted this year. When there is a large call for 
the fronds of Adiantum cuneatum, a good number 
of the plants should be placed in a frame facing the 
north, choosing those which have nearly finished 
their growth. This cooler treatment will tend to 
harden the fronds, and they will last much longer 
when cut than those not so manipulated. Tree 
Ferns should be examined occasionally for thrip s, or 
the fronds will soon be spoiled. Sponging them 
with weak tobacco- water is one of the best and most 
effectual means of ridding the plants of this pest. 
[Vaporising with XL All is likewise safe, and a 
great saving of labour. Ed.] 

ORANGE TREE8.— Those trees which have set 
their crop of fruits may be freely syringed overhead, 
afforded liquid-manure occasionally, and ventilated 
freely. All rank shoots, and such as if left would 
tend to spoil the symmetry of the crown, may be cut- 
in. Any trees infested with aphis should be well 
fumigated, and the leaves cleaned by sponging with 
soapy-water; afterwards, occasional syringings will 
keep them clean. Scale is sometimes very disfiguring 
to the trees, and must be got rid of by washes. 
Trees that were not repotted or retubbed should be 
examined as regards the drainage, and top-dressed 
with rich sandy loam after removing the old soil. 
It will do the trees no harm, but rather good, if 
they are stood out-of-doors till the end of August. 
If they have been growing in shaded houses, it wiii 
be advisable not to put them at first in full sunshine, 
although they will be able to bear it after a week or 
two of exposure. 

BAMBOOS.— If these are grown in pots, they may, 
if space be required in the conservatory for other 
things, be put out-of-doors, as for instance, in the 
sub-tropical garden, plunging the pots in the beds or 
in the turf, but finer growths will be made if they 
are left indoors. Bamboos require plenty of water 
at the root and a top-dressing afforded every fort- 
night of Clay . Fertiliser and soot. Bamboos make 
good-sized bushes when grown in comparatively 
small pots; but if large plants are wanted, they 
must have good-sized pots and the present is a good 
time for repotting. A suitable compost is made of 
fibrous loam peat fcaf-ioil. Hwh bones, and 
charcoal A few suitable soecies for pot culture are 
B. arundmacea B. mitis, B. striata, B. violate*™ 
B. Simonis, and B. nana. ' 

SCENTED - LEAVED PELARGONIUMS. - The.e 

plant, are general favourite., and very n.efal for 
conservatory and other niei. Small yonn* nlant. 
may be potted into 48'. and 32'. and /t3 ouS 
and when the pota get filled with mot , ,.«J X ' 

£££ ° lppi ° g tff * ^ EWE 



FANCY, 8HOW PELARGONIUMS, AC— Pat in cut- 
tings of these, choosing for the purpose shoots that are 
half-ripened. In the cutting-pots use sandy loam and 
leaf-soil, and place them in a cold frame close to the 
glass, keeping the frame close until roots are made. 
The old plants, after the cuttings haye been taken, 
should be stood in a sunny place out-of-doors, and 
kept somewhat dry at the root for a time, pruning 
them hard back towards the end of next month. A 
number of Ivy-leaved Pelargoniums may now be 
potted, and have three or four stakes put to each, 
around which the shoots may be trained. Keep the 
flowers pinched off till within a few weeks of the 
time that they are required to flower. 



thb oacaiD HOUSES. 

By W. a. Whctb, Orchid Grower, Burford, Dorking. 

CATTLEYAS AND L/ELIA3 — In a representative 
collection of CattUjas and Laelias, there is scarcely 
a week in the whol** year in which there is not some 
species or hybrid in flower. At the present time 
the C Eldorado in variety is attractive. The flower- 
sheat ha come up together with the new growth, and 
by the time the pseudo- bulbs are quite formed, the 
flowers bave pushed up out of the sheath. The 
blooms, when open, have a delicious fragrance, and 
in a dry ish atmosphere they will last in beauty for 
several weeks. While the plant is flowering it needi 
careful watering, as too much moisture afforded at 
this time causes the fleshy, half- matured growth to 
decay ; and this not seldom ends in the loss of the 
plant. On the other band, the plant should not be 
kept dry at the root, but should receive just as much 
water as will keep the compost slightly moiit, 
and much less moist when the blooms are cut, and 
the new pseudo-bulbs fully made up, C. Eldorado 
and its varieties, splendens, crocata, and Wallisii 
have often been imported, but artificial cultivation 
does not agree with them for many years together. 
For several years past our plants have been grown 
with the Mexican Laeliaf, but their pro- 
gress has not been quite satisfactory. When 
they began to grow last April they were experi- 
mentally placed in a warmer- house, where an even 
atmosphere is maintained, and kept more closely 
shaded than before. The result was that every plant, 
even those that were fast deteriorating, greatly 
improved, and scarcely a growth failed to produce 
flowers, the majority of which carried from two to four 
good sized ones. On the completion of growth 
they will be placed at the least warm part of the 
Cattleya-house. New roots will push out from the 
base of the flowering- bulb in a few weeks time, and 
the old roots subsequently throw out a quantity of 
short rootlets. It is at this time that repotting 
should be performed if any of the plants stand in 
need of it. Cattleya gigas, C. Dowiana, C. D. aurea 
and C. rex may also be repotted soon after the 
flowers fade. After repotting any of these plants, 
water should be very sparingly applied, just enough 
to encourage the roots to grow and to preserve the 
old ones in health. When re-established gradual 
exposure to the sun's rays is necessary to mature the 
growth, and prepare the plants for their long rest, 
and unless they are properly ripened prematare 
growth may result. 

ARPOPHYLLUM QIQANTEUM AND 8P1CATUM.--- 

Among Orchids that are not generally cultivated 
are these two species, which are attractive enough 
when seen with a dozen or more strong bloom-ip^ 8 * 
Both succeed in well-drained pots in a mixture ot 
peat and sphagnum- moss, if accommodated in a 
light part of the intermediate- house and plentifully 
supplied with water. 

MISCELLANEOUS — A charming miniature bota- 
nical species now flowering is Polycycnis Len- 
manni. Its flowers have some resemblance to tn« 
Swan-neck Orchid (Cycnoches), and id H? * 
prettily spotted. At the present time it U ke P* 
in the intermediate-house, growing in a hang- 
ing shallow pan with the ordinary Orchid com- 
post to root in. In the cool-house, planti i j> 
Epidendrum vitellinum are starting into F ***' 
and will be afforded fresh materials to root lnw 
without delay. They grow the best in small po»> 
in a mixture of peat and sphagnum-moss, the cro«^ 
of the root being kept above the rim of the pot, *n 
new growths turning black if they are in contact 
with the soil. Laelia harpophylla may a** 
repotted, keeping it with the Odontoglossunu for** 
present. This and the preceding species grow pes 
standing down upon the stage amongst other plan 5 > 
when hung up, the dry currents of air which reac 
them through the top ventilators seem to * 
injuriously on them. An extremely beautu* 



be 







July 20, 1595.] 



THE 



GARDENERS 



CHRONICLE. 



69 



Orchid now in flower, U Paaius Humblotii. 
Although coming from Madagascar, it does 
not always grow as satisfactorily under the 
treatment given to plants from that country, 
most of which like stove treatment. This species, 
on the contrary, succeeds in a shady part of the 
Cattleya-house. When in full growth, much 
water should be afforded, but no overhead 
syringing, or the young breaks become spotted, soon 
decaying. Yellow-coloured thrips infest the growths, 
doing much injury, and being minute, are not readily 

seen. ItisgoodpracMcetodust tobacco- powderinto the 
growths occasionally, or place the plants in a hous8 
which is being vaporised. Some growers prefer to 
use tobacco- paper for the destruction of thrips, but 
the tender leaves of the plant in question are some- 
times iDJired by strong fumigation. Others occa- 
sionally dip the plants into some safe insecticide, 
taking care to shade them from the sun's rays for 
a few days afterwards. 



THE FXiOWSR OARDEISf. 



Gardener 



The time 



BULB3 FOR THE 8PRINQ GARDEN. 

for ordering bulbs of the florist is now at hand. 
Single-flowered varieties of Hyacinth are the best 
for bedding purposes. Good reds and crimsons of 
these are— Amy, La Heine des Jacinthes, Lord 
Macaulay, Veronica, and Egbert Steiger. White: 
Grand Vainqneur, La Grandesse, Voltaire, and 
Grand Vedette. Bue: Baron Van Tuyll, Bleu 
Mourant, Charles Dickens, Marie, King of the 
Blues, and Uncle Tom. Yellows: Fieur d'Or, 
Heroine, and Ida. Porcelain- blue : Czar Peter, 
Grand Liias, Li Peyrouse, and Regulus. Double- 
flowered varieties for bedding are — Whites: 
Anna Maria, Jenny Lind, La Daesse, and La 
Souvenir d'Auvergne. Red. rose, or crimson : Alida 
Catharina, Boaquet Royal, Charles Prince of Sweden, 
Groot Vorst, Princess Louise, and R°gina Victoria. 
Biae : Garrick, General Antic, and Othello. Yel- 
low : Gcefte. Double and single-flowered Tulips for 
a bright display of colour are more satisfactory in 
the spring-garden than any other kinds of bulbs for 
beds, or for planting in patches of six or eight 
together m the herbaceous or shrubbery borders. A 
few good early single varieties are Dae Van Thoi 
various, and Artus scarlet; Brutus, orange-crimson ; 
yellows, Canary-bird and Chrysochlora ; reds, 
«c, Onmson King, Cramoisie superbe and Duchesse 
de rarme, red and gold ; yellow and orange, Golden 
p° c f ; , L La Grandeur vermilion-coloured. 0: 
rottebakker there are several beautiful varieties, 
^roierpme is beautiful dark rose; Qieen of the 
Netherlands, rose; Qaeen Victoria, white and 
cnmion. Royal Standard, white and cerise; La 

K' * lfce; , Thomas Moore, orange. Early 
oouWe-flovrered varieties are A^nes, scarlet; Ara- 

23* * ar »"w; C^ke of York, dark rose with 

V*iw a* t A Gloria Soli8 > red<*wh-brown with 
yeuow edge; Grenadier, scarlet and gold; Imperator 

I ft rf? ^ n m, / carlet - crimson ; La Candeur, white ; 
U J S^won, vermilion ; Premier Gladstone, 

rS , .n? Ppl !- Crown ' Wo°d-red; Qieen Victoria, 
Ban!? "M lt *i R^x rubrorum, scarlet; Rose 
vaS? f W Tr tG ; Tournesol, scarlet and yellow 
CT l; u elvet Gem ' crimson and yellow. Good 
M7rri2 a varieties are a ^a maxima, white; 
E? 8e d £ ma FlUe » whit * flak «d with 
£p 7, ?f ld - 8trf Ped; R°sa mundi, rose; 
•honld k! i ' , iwee t-scented. Tulip Gasneriana 
would be largely planted for mixed borders. 

week R ?° U8E8, ~ In con «naation of my list of last 
fioweri^n 8 ' Ve a 1Ut of a «tumn, winter, andspring- 
• Wtnn « Cfocn "*' The flowers are attractive 



red ; 

Yellow 



alwav« o«j # xne flowers are attractive 

which ap^r Z*?}* 1 ' * hoM *' ** *«lj «pring, 
are few £ *, ! , * lme wben flowers of other genera 
or in th« *? m the border8 of herba ceous plants, 

in clumJ °7? r °? nd of "hrubberies, they may stand 



Ar *bis a'nino t « J UUIUU Wlba ea g lD g* or 
a PPearance V ?>&->. they always give a lively 
ar «. whit P « n ,7 aneties of Crocus versicolor 

Qfcholn %* ^ Y lctori *< Moat Bianc * Caroline 
ai »* PwdU w B Bla "che, Grand Conqueror; blue 

B ^oq yon R rg0t V Pf ince Albert > D ™* R™o f 
8ir John P T' Lord Darb y^ L ° rd Palmerston, 

S^'oSdenSi.^ 0dheIl0; y ellow ' 

£° ld . Albion Kn\ 0ld Gi>lden Y * lloW > Cloth Of 

Pat K Pre.iHl . r, e *-'■«**». Lady Stanhope. Miss 

***- She .n ***' N " PlQ » U ^a,and Sir Walter 
nri atus i„ fl l'r lei of Crocus are aureus, vernus, 
■owirin- ft t7k eQ !' I^P^rati. odorus, albiflorus, 

ae ead of winter, and onwards to March 



and April. The autumn-flowering species are 
sativus, serotinus, Paliasii, nudiflorus, and speciosus. 

QALANTHUS NIVALI8 AND NIVALIS FL -PL., the 

double and single varieties of the common Snow- 
drop, should be largely planted in clumps by wood- 
land paths, or under the shade of trees near drives. 
Choice varieties for planting in borders in the 
garden proper are G. caucasicut, G. Elwesii, G. 
Imperati, G. latifolius Redoutei, G. robustus, and 
G. plicatus. 

ERANTHIS HYEMALI8.— The winter Aconite, the 
hardiest and earliest spring flower, is a useful plant 
for covering the soil under the shade of trees, and it 
is effective as an edging to flower beds. Ic is a 
plant of lowly growth that looks b?st when planted 
in masses together. Ic will grow in any kind of 
■oil. 

DAFFODIL8— No bulbous plants better repay the 

care and attention bestowed on it than Daffodils and 

Narcissus. The plants look well either as masses in 

beds, clumps in the borders, or in other ways, and 

they never fail to give satisfaction. The soil for 

Narcissus may be the ordinary soil of the garden, or 

it may be made up of loam and leaf-mould with quite 

rotten manure. The drainage should be thorough, 

or they will do no good. The land should be deeply 

stirred, and in manuring it, the manure should be 

put deep enough, not to be brought into contact with 

the bulbs; and before the latter are planted, it 

should be made quite firm. Planting may be done 

at depths varying from 4 to 6 inches, according to 

size of bulbs. A few good trumpet Daffodils are 

bicolor, Horsfieldi, Empress, Grandis, Dean Herbert, 

cambricus, Colleen Bawn, Fred Moore, Johnstoni, 

Madame de Graaf, princeps, Pseudo- Narcissus (the 

Lent Lily), Shirley Hibberd, Incomparabilis in 

numerous varieties, both single and double-flowered. 

Many other species and varieties are to be found in 

the bulb dealer's lists. 

JONQUILS — If these sweet-scented flowers are 
planted, it should be only in sheltered parts of the 
garden in beds of good rich soil. The best are the 
double and single - flowered Oiorus, Campernelli 
major and O. C. minor. 



FJEtUITS CTITDBR GLASS. 

By Richard Parkeb, Gardener, Goodwood. Chichester. 

M U8C AT VI NE8. — Vineries in which are ripe Grapes, 
will require to be verv carefully ventilated, otherwise 
the berries may be affected by rust, and this is likely 
to occur if they are cooled by air being allowed to 
circulate rapidly through the houses. If the borders 
where the berries commenced to colour were efficiently 
watered, and covered afterwards with straw, the Vines 
will require no more water till the crop is cut, but as 
the present season is a particularly hot and dry one, it 
would be well to examine the border occasionally, to 
ascertain if the soil is approaching dryness, a dry 
soil soon causing shrivelling of the fruit, and hin- 
dering the development of the young wood. As a 
shade to the Vines, a Strawberry-net may be fixed 
on to the roof to mitigate the fierceness of the sun's 
rays. If but a few bunches remain on the Vines, it 
will be advisable to cut these with several inches of 
wood, and bottle them ; then the vinery may be 
thrown open, and the foliage syringed daily. Later 
crops of Muscats should be assisted with abundant 
supplies of water at the roots. The borders should 
be mulched with cowshed manure, and afterwards 
afforded tepid water in quantity. Wnere the roots 
are in both outside and inside borders, the former 
should be lightly forked over, and manure and water 
applied as advised for the latter. Afford supports 
to the shoulders of bunches when necessary, using 
broad strips of matting for the purpose, and where 
necessary remove a berry or two to prevent a too 
great degree of compactness. 

OTHER VINES.— The Madresfield Court Vines 
have, so far, given no trouble this season, the fine 
weather enabling us to afford ample ventilation. 
Continue to keep a gentle warmth in the pipes during 
the night, with a little ventilation on the top-lights. 

LATE VINERIE8.— The fruit of Lady Downes and 
Gros Colmar which has to be kept throughout the 
winter should be freely thinned. In many gardens 
the first-named variety will be at that stage when 
scalding is apt to take place. So far, I have not seen 
a trace of it yet; but the vinery is freely ventilated 
during the day, and no water is made use of in the 
vinery after 3 p.m,, at which time the borders and 
walls are copiously syringed. A slight circulation is 
kept up in the pipes during the night, while at the 
same time a fair amount of top- ventilation is 



afforded, which prevents moistare from settling on 
the berries. Keep all lateral growths pinched back 
and treat the borders as advised for Muscats. 

GENERAL WORK -AU fruit-houses from which 

the crops have been gathered should be thrown open, 
and the roof-lights removed where portable. Syringe 
the foliage copiously morning and evening, and see 
that the roots are well supplied with moisture. 



THB KITCHEN QARDEW\ 

By John Lambert, Gardener. PowU Cattle, Welthpool. 
GHERKINS, VEGETABLE MARR0W3, AND GOURD8. 

— Tne soil between the plants should be forked up 
as the bine grows, and the latter should be thinned 
out whenever it becomes crowded. Ornamental 
Gourds and Pumpkins should have a piece of slate 
placed under the fruits, so that they may be kept 
clean. Remove the leaves shading the fruits of 
Pumpkins and Gourds, so as to afford them the full 
benefit of sunlight to give colour to the skin and 
ripen them perfectly. Afford heavy applications of 
manure- water occaiionally when the fruit is swelling. 

CARD00N8 should not be planted in exposed 
situations, or the wind will break and injure the 
tall leaf-stalks. The plant will now require abund- 
ance of water at the roots, and syringings in the 
evening. 

8ALAD8 — The seeds of Lettuces must be sown 
at intervals of a week or ten days, and batches of 
plants pricked out weekly. The land selected for the 
crops at this season should be such as does not get the 
whole day's sun, and which is in good heart. 
Ridishes, Endive, and Mustard and Cress should be 
sown at short intervals. Radishes do very well on 
east or west borders, and in very light soils on 
situations facing north. Endive will grow almost 
anywhere, if care be taken not to spoil it by crowding 
the young plants together. 

PARSLEY. — Continue to transplant Parsley when- 
ever the weather is favourable for the pb, remem- 
bering that one can hardly have too much of it. 
Transplanted in the present month, Parsley makes 
strong growth before the winter ; and trans- 
planted Parsley is, I think, better for withstanding 
frost than untransplanted. Piant 6 to 8 inches 
apart, and in some convenient place, where it may 
be readily covered in case of need. 

CABBAGES — If a bed of strong stocky plants be 
planted at about this date, they will afford heads for 
lat i autumn cutting. Tbe planting should consist 
of early- hearting, compact-growing varieties, and it 
should be frequently hoed to keep a loose surface, 
and afforded copious watering i in dry weather. 
Towards the end of the present month the first 
sowing of seeds of red Cabbage may be made 
broadcast in beds thinly, or in lines 1 foot apart, 
thinning the seedlings betimes, so as to obtain 
stocky short-stemmed plants. 

SEAKALE. — The beds may be occasionally dressed 
with agricultural salt, applying it lightly just before 
rain. Do not let flower-heads develop, but cut them 
off at the ground-level when observed. 

MISCELLANEOUS.— Clear off the remains of ex- 
hausted crops of all kinds, thus preserving a tidy 

appearance in the garden, and the land from 

unnecessary impoverishment. Woerevertime admits 

of it being done, such land should be manured and 

dug in readiness for cropping. 



GROWING Aquatics.— Once upon a time the 

writer of this paragraph was invited to a nursery 
celebrated for its large business in connection with 
the growing of water-plants, or, as th#»y are commonly 
called, aquatics. As the locality was far away from 
lakes or pondf, much curiosity was felt as to how 
the large quantity of plants was cared for. It was 
found that nearly everything was being raised in old 
kegs or barrels, sunk deep into the earth, and where 
water could be led into them by a hose or other 
methods. The hint may be taken advantage 
of by those who read of the beauty of 
aquatics, but do not have lakes or ponds of 
their own to grow them in. Old paint -kegs, 
or any vessels that will hold water, can be 
buried partly in the earth, filled with water, and 
seeds sown ; or young plants planted in mud placed 
at the bottom of the water. Many of the smaller 
kinds of water-plants can be trrown in this way with- 
out any serious difficulty. Th#» vessels need not be 
water-tight. " Meeharis Monthly "for July. 



70 



THE 



GARDENERS' 



CHRONICLE. 



[July 20, 1895. 



* « 



EDITORIAL NOTICES. 



Advertisements Should be Mnt to the PUBLISHER 

Newspaper* — Correspondents sending newspapers thovXd U 
careful to mark th* paragraphs they wish the Editor to see. 



APPOINTMENTS FOR THE ENSUING WEEK. 



TVKsU.it $ 



MEETING. 

( Royal Horticultural Soc 
JVLT ttl initt*e#, at the Drill 1 

I minuter. 



factory. The effect of continuoui systematic training 
is well exemplified in the class lists. On the other 
hand, many yonng gardeners and mechanics, who 
cultivate small gardens and allotments, bat who have 
not had the opportunity of regular tuition and 
systematic study, have taken a lower place than they 
otherwise would have done, because they have failed 
to grasp the significance of the questions. 
We have the honour to be, gentlemen, your 

Maxwell T\ Mastebs, 



obedient servants, 

June 15. 1895. 



Jas. Douglas." 



requirements of such plants, and the best way to 
propagate them. 

12.— What is the original parentage of Cauliflower 
and Broccoli ? Givd the method of culture, and the 
best varieties to obtain a succession all the year 

round. 

13.— Give some details of the culture of Grape- 
vines under glass. Describe the diseases to which 
they are subject, and the insect pests which attack 
them, and their cure. 

14.— What kinds of fruit trees and bushes are beit 
adapted for culture in small gardens? Briefly 



sattkdav. Jul. 



SHOWS. 

Rom Show at the Mao cheater Royal 
Botanic Gardens. 




ti:r3Ua\. 






WKUNK^DVY. July 



THURSDAY. 

FRIDAY, 



JULY 23-Tibshelf Horticultural 

Hational Carnation and Picotee 
Society, at the Crystal Palace. 
Ihwtorneld Rose. 

Newcastle - on - Tyne Horticultural 
24 -< (three day »). 

Caterham Horticultural. 
Heckenham Horticultural. 

Surrey Horticultural, at Brockwell 
V Park (two days). 

!„*• «r jTrentham and Hanford Horticul- 
JULV.5^ turaUnd Kofe. 



We can only find room for the names of those degcribe the begt method of culture, and arrange 

candidates who were placed in the first class, but meQt of ^ tree§ ftnd buiheB- 

we may add that the full list will be published 15 _i Q a wa u e d garden, what kind of fruit few 
in the Journal of the Society. 

Maximum number of Marks obtainable, 300. No - o£ 



Fir&t Class. 



Marks 
sained. 



JuLf 36 



TURSDAY, 



JULV XI 



FRIDAY. 



Jul* 26 



Wellingborough Floral and Hoiti 
cultural. 

8ALEB. 

Three direct Importations of 
Orchids, for Unreserved Sale. 
Also a grand Importation of 
Cattleya aurea, from Me-srs. H. 
Low & Co.; and a fine lot of 
Orchids, from Messrs. F. Hors- 
mau & Co.. at half- past 12 o'clock. 
Also, at 4 o'clock precisely, a 
splendid lot of Palm Seeds. 
Cannas, Freeeias. 8tc— at Pro- 
v theroe 8t Morris* Rooms. 

A grand Selection of Orchids, from 
Messrs. F. Sander & Co. ; to- 
gether with Orchids in flower 
and bud, at Protheroe k Morris' 



1. Miss A. U. Gulvin, Horticultural College, 

Swanley ... ... ... 260 

2. Mr. Geo. Butcher, gardener, 188, Wellfield 

Road, Streatham 240 

3. Miis F. M. G. Muklethwait, Horticultural 

College, Swanley 220 

4. Mr. Brown, Horticultural College, Swanley, 

tVGDt ... ... ... ... ... —lo 



wonld you recommend to be planted on the four 
aspects— south, north, east, and west? What dis- 
tance apart should the trees be ? Suggest the beit 
width of the borders and height of the walls. 



16. 



class 



I Miss Alice Hatchings, Horticultural Col- 
lege, Swanley 215 

4. Mr. J. Warner, School House, West Street, 

... 215 



Dorking ... 



■ . . 



• ft 



4. Miss Madeline Agar, Horticultural College, 

... 215 



Mr 



S *anley . . . 



• • • 



• • • 



Surrey 



• • ■ 



• • * 



8. Mr. W. Bell, Kaighton Road. Leicester ... 210 
10. Mr. Edward Dumper, The Gardens, High 



soil for fruit trees, and how ought it to be prepared 

for them ? 

(6). Is there any method of culture likely to pre- 
vent canker in Apple trees or gumming in Apricoti, 
Cherries, and Plums ? 

A glance at the above extract from the class 
list is sufficient to show the great advantage 
afforded by training and systematic study. Even 
when candidates are approximately equal in their 
natural abilities, and knowledge of the sub- 
ject, those that have been specially trained, 
as at Swanley, have the great advantage 
of being able to utilise their knowledge. We 
... 210 believe that many candidates fail, not so much 



Ashurst, Dorking 



• • § 



... 205 




CORRECTED AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOB THE ENSU- 
ING WEEK, DEDUCED FROM THE OBSERVATIONS 
OF FORTY-THREE YEAJL9. AT OHBWICK.- 63°.4. 



11. Mr. J. K F. Jack, Horticultural College, 

Swanley , 200 

11. Mr. H. W. Ganston, Fressingfield, near 

Harleston, Norfolk 



from actual lack of knowledge as from want of 
care in reading the questions set. For the last 
two or three years candidates have, we learn, 
been asked to describe in their own way any 
plant they pleased, or sometimes a particular 



The questions put were as follows : 



m 



The class lists of the last exami- 
E „"^ t r e ; a nation by the Eoyal Horticultural 

Society have been issued, and 
from them and the examiners' report- we cull 

the following particulars. It may be mentioned mtroui WI , ueir roota 
that the candidates oame from widely different absorption by the root. 



200 pl ant h as been specified, such as a Potato or 

an Onion, the plant selected being always 
one with which candidates might fairly be 

familiar from constant 



Eight questions only had to be answered: four 
from Division A, including No. 5, which had to be or observation. Now this question is in many 
answered by every candidate, and four from division B. cases either shirked entirely, or the candidate 



Division A.— Elementary Principles. 



1. 



(a). What substances do plants absorb by 
means of their roots? Explain the process of 



gives the details of cultivation concerning 
which nothing is asked. This seems to show 
that candidates trust too much to knowledge 
derived from books or lectures, and that they do 



parts of England and Scotland, a centre being ( j) What elements do plants obtain from the air not use their own e y es or trust to their 0WU 

established wherever a magistrate, or clergy- ' -..-.. 



man, or schoolmaster, or other responsible 
person accustomed to examinations, would con- 
sent to superintend one on the Society's behalf, 
and in accordance with the rules laid down for 
its conduct. No limits as to the age, or position, 
or previous training of the candidates were 



sexes, 



tie examination 
Examined' Ref 



To the Council of the Royal Horticultural Society. 

Gentlemen,— We beg leave to report that we have 
examined the papers of the candidates who offered 
themielves for examination in Horticulture in May 
1895. There were 169 candidates in all, varying 
greatly, as usual, in age, occupation, and in the 
means of instruction at their disposal. 

Three hundred marks were allotted as a maxi- 
mum, and all candidates who obtained 200 marks 
and upwards were placed in the first class. Those 
who received between 150 and 200 marks were 
placed in the second class ; and those to whom 
100 maiks and upwards were adjudged were ranked 
in ^e thirdclass The remainder, who obtained 
lew*? than 100 marks, were not classed 

In this way 12 candidate, were adjudged worthy 

£ SrS ? ?• *% dlii ' W in th * •*"<■ and 
73 in the third class. The highest number of marks 

obtained was 260, by Bite A. U. Gulvin, of the 
Horticultural College, Stanley. 

Considering the opportunities at the disposal of 
ibe candidates, the result* mav h* «**... j m .j _.. 



and by what agency do they obtain them ? 

2.— Explain the effect on flowering plants of an 
adequate, a deficient, or of an excessive, amount of 
heat. 

3.— How are ° cuttings " made? Describe the 
changes that occur during the process of M striking." 

4.— What are the objects sought to be obtained in 
digging the soil ? 

5.— Write as full and orderly a description as you 
can of any plant in common cultivation, through all 
stages of its growth, from the germination of the 
embryo to the formation of the seed. 

6.— What organs of the plant are represented re- 
spectively by an Onion, a Cabbage, a Potato, Beet, 
Turnip, and a Pea-pod ? 

7.— Describe the mode of growth of the common 
Mushroom. 

8.— What is meant by " greenfly " ? What ii the 
best application to rid plant* growing ont- of- doors 
of this peat ? 

Division B.— HosTJcuxTUfiAi Pbactice. 
9.— Name six of the beit species of hothouse 
flowering plants, and give some of the general details 
of culture. Name some of the insect pests that 
infest such plants, and state the best method to be 
adopted for their destruction. 

♦u 10 ' - ?? P ne , raI detaiU for P<% Peas, and 
the method of culture, time of sowing, &c, to give a 

supply for as long a period as possible. What is the 
use of the nodules on the roots ? 

ll.-What is an alpine plant, as the name is gene- 
rally understood m garden. ? De.cribe the caltural 



powers of observation and inference. 



> 









OUR Fruit REPORT.— Our tabular report on the 
condition of the fruit crop in Great Britain and 
Ireland, will appear in onr issue for August 9. Tllfl 
remarks on the crops kindly furnished by our corres- 
pondents, will appear in subsequent numbers* 

Hand list of Herbaceous Plants Culti- 
vated in the Royal Gardens, Kew (iold at 

the Royal Gardens, Kew).— A nsefui list of alpine 
and herbaceous plants cultivated at Kew, and num- 
bering about 6000 species. For the convenience of 
cultivators the list is printed on one side of the pag* 
only, leaving the other free for the addition ° f 
further entries or remarks. We notice nearly ninety 
entries of Lily names— itself a refutation of & a 
once- held opinion that Lilies could not be grows 
at Kew. Now, even other bulbous plants ttf* 4 
for decorative purposes are grown at Kew by 
following the same plan that is adopted in Hoi- 
land. The value of these hand-lists as furni*' 
ing a common nomenclature is very great. More- 
over, the Hit necessarily includes the best &*&* 
np to date, and thus supersedes the bulky catalog^* 1 I 
which include all sorts, good, bad, or indifferent, 1* 
or often out of cultivation. 

" The Kew Bulletin " for June and Jofr 

contains a variety of interesting matter. In ftddl * 
tion to notes on more or less well known subject*, 
there are technical descriptions of newly***** 
plants in the Solomon Islands, the Transvaal, »»** 



Jcit 20, 1895.] 



THE 



GABDENEBS' CHRONICLE 



71 



Somaliland 



In an 



article on the Sugar Maple and its product*, we are 
glad to iee the editor retains the beit known name, 
A. saccharinum. The " saccharinum " of LinmttJi 
it appears, the species now better known ai 
A. dasycarpum, Sir Charles Wager's Maple. Gos- 
svDium Stockiii, Matters, comidered to be the origin 




Street, Victoria Street, London. At 3 o'clock a pap ?r 
by Mr. P. Bbothebston on " The Carnation in 
Scotland/' will be read. 

CANNA8— We recommend all interested in these 
gorgeous plaatt to visit the collection now in blcom at 



ground—very fine. Some of the neirer kinds tent 
out by Messrs. Paul & Son are eqial to those 
distributed by Crozy. 

Eppinq FOREST.— The Report from the Epping 
Forest Committee to the Court of Common Council 



the Rjyal Horticultural Society's garden at Chitw-ck; has been published. It deals with th* alleged undue 







FlO. 14. — HBMEBOCALL1S AUBA.NTIAC0S VAB. MAJOB. (SEE P 62.) 



of the cultivated forms of G. herbaceum, and pre- they will be well repaid for their trouble. Among the and unnecessary cutting of timber in the forest. 



▼lously only known from Sindb, has been discovered 
by Mr. Bent in southern Arabia. Sararanga 
■inuosa, Eemsley, is the name of a very extraordinary 
Pandanus from the Solomon Islands. 



The Royal Horticultural Soc 

meeting 



The 



best varieties now in bloom are Secateur Montefiore, * We fail to find," say the Committee, "just fi cation 



orange- bronze, edged with yellow; 
rich crimson, thin 



orange- pink self; 



yellow edge ; 
Guillaume 



Paul Siegrist, for the attack that has been made : on the contrary, 
P. Marquart, we discovered many instances of gross exaggeration." 



II., crimson self; Attached to the report are reproductions of drawings 
Phoebus, orange-pink self; Comte Horace de Choi- 
seul, glowing crimson self; Alphonse Bouvier, 
scarlet- crimson self, very fine ; Star of 1891, orange- 



which appeared in one of the daily papers on May 4, 
purporting to represent the state of certain spots in 
the forest on that day, together with photographs of 



be held on Tuesday, July 23, in the Drill Hall, James red; Antoine Barton, with red spots on a yellow the same spots two days later, May 6. Judging 



• 



72 



THE 



GARDENERS' 



C HE OX I CLE. 



[July 20, 1895. 



distinct— amateurs only. Aaother special prizs 
(not in the schedule of prizes) will be given by Mr. 
Ernst Benaby, Erfurt, Germany, "The Ernst 
Benary Memorial Prize." & large Silver-gilt Medal 
is given by the firm in memory of the late much- 
regretted founder of the firm, Mr. Ebnst Benaby, 
for the most meritorious exhibit, either of plants or 



from these photographs, " gross exaggeration" is much 
too mild an expression. Another report from the 
Committee of Experts is expected shortly, so that it 
will be well to withhold further expressions of opinion. 

The Black Raspberry.— Specimens of this 

were shown by Mr. Farini at the last meeting 
of the Royal Horticultural Society, and seme 
were kindly supplied to us, and enabled us 
to identify the plant as Rubus occidentalis, 
Linn.* The species is very common in Canada 
and the northern 1 iit*d Ssates, and has bean in 
cultivation here since 1 >. Mr. Farini's specimens 
are the result of selection and " interbreeding" [with 
which species is not mentioned, but probably cross- 
fertilisation, not true hybridisation, is intended]. 
Owing to the drought, the fruits which are now 
•bout the size of marrow- fat peas, are much smaller 
than usual. Tae canes are scandent, rooting freely 
at the tips, when in the early autumn, they bend 
over and touch the soil. The plants yield a prolific, 
but not a continuous crop. Fruiting laterals are 
formed at short intervals all along the stem. Cooked 

or raw, the fruit is said to be good eating, but it MENT SOCIETY.— A party to the number of thirty- 
will have to be improved still more before it is fix proce eded on Tuesday, the 9;h inst., to Bicton, 
likely to find favour with epicures uninterested in the aeat f the Hon. Mask Eollb, thence to Ex- 



which, after the suppression of the principal stem 
will give birth to two, three, or even four new 
shoots, weaker than the first one, but which will, 
nevertheless, furnish bulbs to flower the following 
year. As to the detached shoot, it roots perfectly on 
a hot- bed, and by autumn forms a nice bulb of 
medium size. M. Crozy has, he says, practised this 
method of multiplication for many years, and has 
never had a mishap. Journal de la Societl Nationak 
d J Horticulture de France, May, 1895. 



cut flowers, by an amateur. 

HORTICULTURAL ClUB— The annual excur- 
sion of the members and their friends, to which 
ladies are specially invited, will take place on Tues- 
day, July 30. The members will meet at King's 
Cross, Great Northern Railway (Suburban), at 9 30, 
and proceed by 9.45 train to Finchley, to view Mr. 
Peter Kay's graperies. Brakes will be ready to 
convey the party, at 1 15, through Barnet to Hat- 
field, where the gardens, &s., will be open to the 
inspection of the members, under the guidance of 
Mr. Nobman, the Marquis of Salisbury's nead- 
gardener. Members wilt return by 8 45 p.m. train w hj c h are the obvious result of defective nutrition 



HOOKER'6 "ICQNE8 PlANTARUM'— This pub- 
lication, consisting of lithographic illustrations of 
plants, is mainly intended for systematic botanists, 
but frequently contains matter of interest to horti- 
culturists also. In the June number we find figures 
of Argostemma concinnum noticeable, because it fur- 
nishes an instance of an annual plant terminating 
in a solitary flower— an occurrence so rare that but 
few instances are known, of course excepting those 



from Hatfield to Kings Cross. 



EhododendronHancockii, Hemsley, t. 2381, is anative 



the history and evolution of fruits. 

Tottenham Chrysanthemum Society. 



TEIQNMOUTH Gardeners' MUTUAL IMPROVE- of Yunnan, and has large white funnel-shaped flowers, 

of such beauty that it is to be hoped it will soon be 
introduced to our gardens. Brandisia racemosa, 
Hemsley, a Scrophularineous shrub, also from Tan- 
nan, with rich red flowers, is also said to be a very 
desirable plant for introduction. The same remark 
applies to Jasminum primulinum, Hemsley, which 
looks like an enlarged variety of J nudicaule. Like 



mouth, visiting Bystock on the return journey. 
Arrangements had been made for viewing the groves 
and glasshouses of Bicton, but owing to some un- 



By the kind permi.sion of Biron Schroder, the foregeea ob8tacle(J , he after goi ou6 of thejr 

member, of the above Society, to the number of wfly flboat & mUe and waiting aboQ( . j ^^ h&d tQ the preceding, it is a native of Yannan. 



fifty, paid a visit of inspection to the beautiful 
residence and gardens ofTne Dill, Eaglefield Green, 
on July 9. Many thanks are due to Mr. H. Ballan- 
tine and members of the staff for kindness and 



go away without having seen the object of their 
visit. Dinner was partaken of at Exmouth, Mr. F. 



"The Natural History of Plants."— This 



Hannaford taking the chair, being faced by Mr. comprehensive work of Kbbneh, published ^m an 

-^ ,. . ,. . A Swan, the gardener at Bystock. After a considerable English translation under the editorship of ftot. JJ. 

courtesy m conducting the party through the ex- amount q{ 8peechmakil ^ the party re . aMembled , Oliver, by Messrs. Blackie & Son, has now reached 



tensive range of houses and grounds, and in doing all 
they possibly could to make the visit an enjoyable one. 
An excellent dinner and tea were provided at the 
"Sun Inn," Engtefield Green. The first meal was 
presided over by II Henderson, Eiq., who proved a 
genial chairman. Drives were afterwards taken into 
the surrounding country. 

Academy of Sciences.— Baron Sir Ferdi- 
nand von Mueller has been elected a correspondent 
ia the botanical section. 

NEWCA8TLE AND DISTRICT HORTICULTURAL 



and drove to Bystock, the residence of J. P. Bryce, 
Eiq., which lies 2 miles from Exmouth. Here they 
were kindly entertained by Mr. Bryce, after having 
inspected the various sights of the place. 

CARNATION DI8EA8E8.— Professor Byron Hal- 
step, at the annual meeting of the American Car- 
nation Society, indicated five diseases of the 
Carnation :— 1, Rust; 2, Leaf-spot; 3, Biack-spot; 
4, Ring-mould ; 5, Bacteriosus. Number 1 is pro- 
duced by a fungus, Uromyces caryophyllinus ; 2, by 
Septoria dianthi • 3 is not named ; 4 is the Heteros- 



MuTUAL Improvement SOCIETY.— The monthly porium echinulatum ; 5 is caused by a bacterium. 



meeting of this society was held at 25, Westgate 
Road, on Tuesday, July 9, Mr. Murray, gardener at 
Oakwoed, Wylam-on-Tyne, presiding at an excellent 
attendance of the members. Most of the even- 
ing was spent in naming species and varieties, and 



We are familar here with all these troubles, and 
also, quite as frequently, with eel- worms disease, 
cauBed by nematode worms, which is not mentioned 
in Professor Halsted's enumeration. 

The Late M. Duchartre.— Professor Clos 



discussing the various merits of hardy herbaceous - ' Zlv^Z 4 „ ^ * / / TV* T . , 

plants, several collections of which were brought in iTJ^ff' ,- i ™ ° f '** ^* W 

by the members. Towards the close of the meeting, %?*£ f^fV " TTZ *«?**** ifc 

the member, had an opportunity of viewing a fac " d WOrki ° f thl - dlitin « Bwh * d ** d * miabl « botanirt. 



simile of the "Magna Cbarta," provided by W. 
Brandfobd, from which the secretary read extracts ; 
also the warrant for the execution of Mary, Queen 
of Scots, and several other items of historic interest, 
which proved highly instructive. 



The extent and diversity of his work as here indi- 
cated are very remarkable. His career was one of 
great difficulty at first; but he was never dis- 
couraged, and always seemed to place the interests 
of science before personal considerations. His work 
at the National Horticultural Society of France is 



NATIONAL Carnation AND PicOTEE SO- known t0 l( >me of our readers, and he discharged the 



ciety (Southern Section).-! beg leave to 

remind yoar readers, writes Mr. Jas. Douglas, Hon. 
Secretary, that the annual show of the above Society 
will be held at the Crystal Palace on Wednesday, the 
24 ;h inst. Upwards of £150 are offered in prizes. 
Amongst special prizes may be mentioned the Martin 
Smith prizes for Border Carnations ; the flowers "to 
be cut from plants which have been wintered with- 
out protection in the open border, and staged exactly 
at they are cut without dressing." The Turner 
Memorial Trustees give a handsome Silver Cup, 
value £5, for the best stand of twelve Carnations, 
bizarre., and flake,, distinct, and twelve Picotees 



duties of his secretarial and editorial office up to the 
day of his death. It is characteristic of the man, 
that when Paris was invested by the German army, 
Dcjchirtrk was in the country. His course of 
lectures at the Sorbonne was announced to open on 
March 17. Entry into Paris was, as we know, 
almost impossible; nevertheless, Duchartre suc- 
ceeded in gaining entrance, and delivered his lecture 
as usual ! The next day the Commune was pro- 
claimed, but even this did not check the Professor's 
sense of duty. H* continued till his work was 
•topped by ministerial decree. 

Gladiolus from Off3et8.-m. Crozy, .en., 

mentions, in the Moniteur de V Horticulture for 



its fourteenth part. Nothing so comprehensive has 
been published since Lindley's Vegetable Kingdom, 
Bat while classification was the leading, though by 
no means the exclusive feature of Lindley's work, 
Kerner's biology and physiology take a prominent 
but not an exclusive position. The book is beau- 
tifully illustrated, and as a cyclopaedic book of 
reference is excellent. Perhaps it may be found 
convenient to give not only an index and an 
analytical table of contents, but also a reference to 
the principal authorities on the subjects on which 
the book treats. At present these references are 
wanting, and the student is not informed what or 
where is the authority for particular statements. A» 
the work is so much more than a mere popular 
exposition, such an addition would ba acceptable. 

The Weather and the Crop3 of 1894 —Mr. 

Edward Mawleys report on the "phenology" of 
1894 has been reprinted from the Journal of the 
Hoyal Meteorological Society. It will be remembered 
the winter of 1893-4 was not uniformly severe ; the 
spring of 1894 was mild till the occurrence of ****** 
frosts on May 21, 22. These ruined the fruit cropt 
excepting Pears. The summer was generally cold, 
but the hay crop was good and well harvested. The 
autumn, as a whole, wa« mild and wet ; corn ripened 
slowly, but the yield of both grain and straw witf 
large. Oats furnished a larger crop than any on 
record. Potato, were below average; fruit crop»> 
as before said, deficient, except in the case of Pears. 
The returns upon which Mr. Mawley bases hii con- 
clusions number 113, from all part, of the country. 
New observers are wanted in south Ireland, and to 
north and east Scotland. 



to 



» Kubutoxidemt '*. Linn., BUck Raspberry. ThimWebwrr 
S^ U,al l? Ver; rV emM "«"**. "Md H^the s J k8 w7h 

S5SSLB5ffi.!ff»" <"%2?2££& <« to m«*«\ iLutw L 1 .! ll™™ Um6t !? b . ook ' w . h, l h » ***** *>j Mem., .b^ 



May 10, and on p. 112, a method of multiplying 
Gladioli which ia little kuowa. It consists in raising 
nnder glass, Gladiolus bulb., and. when the .tern. 



Dr. Schlich'8 " Manual of Forestry 

The fourth volume of this excellent treatise «» 
written by Prof. Fishes, and is devoted to the pr?" 
tection of forests against the incursions of man or hi» 
mismanagement. A second portion is devoted W 
the protection of forests against animals, bird*, 
insects, weeds, frosts, winds, floods, ■hifaing ■»«»«•. 
acid fumes, and the like. The work is stated to W 
an adaptation of Dr. Hess's work, Der Forstihiitz, " 



(51 to 73 in<»h«i\ in /.n^;«„ *u «. — -«»"- «<««, wmcu is puousnea by Messrs. bu±»»"-- 












Jult £0, 1895.1 



THE 



GARDENERS* CHRONICLE, 



73 



The Summer School (^Horticulture in 

E68EX. — The School of Horticulture, the particulars 
of which were given in some recent numbers of the 
Gardeners' Chronicle, is now in full swing, fifteen 
scholarships having been given by the County Council 
of Eisex. Among the various places of interest 
visited by the students last week was Mr. Sea- 
brookr's seed-farm at Chelmsford, The effect 
of the present drought on the size of many 
plants was most marked, and Mr. Seabbooke 
mentioned that his William Hurst Peas which 
sire uiually some 2 feet high, were so short this 
year that the pods in ripening uprooted the plants 
which bore them. The Godetias were also stunted, 
and they were interesting from the manner in which 



subtended by a much smaller concave "spathella" 
(see fig. J5) These are the varieties now called 
" pomponate." We do not find this word in the 
Latin dictionary, but it is doubtless derived from the 
French "pomponner" pompon being an ornament 
worn on a soldier's cap. LiTTBi tells us of a French 
saying u Avrir le pompon" which he interprets as 
"being in the first rank." The term pompon is 
applied to miniature Dahlias, Chrysanthemums, &c, 
but the application of the adjectival form pomponate 
is new to us. 

A. 8. pomponatum rub mm has a reddish- crimson 
spathe, 7x4 cent., and very numerous spathellie of 
the same colour. 

A. 8. pomponatum album has a primary spathe, 



variations and the difficulties of keeping varieties 8 X 5cent., cream- coloured, with numerous spathellse 



true were exemplified — matters previously noted in 
the case of Peas at Mr. Cullen's trial plots at 
Wittam. With reference to the trouble experienced 
in separating flower* seeds from the plants which 
bore them, it was learned that when threshing 
sweet-scented Stocks, veils of many thicknesses 
of material had to be used, as the dust given 
off had such a choking tffect that the men 
feeding the machine were incapacitated in a few 
minutes, if unprotected. This effect is probably 
due to the short T-shaped hairs, with pointed ends, 
that cover the surface of these stocks. The party 
examined a plot of Spinach-beet in fruit which had 
been self-sown for six years ; and also an empty 
space which had been planted thrice with Cabbages, 
only for them to fall a prey each time to the Turnip- 
flea beetle, though generally speaking the county 
seems to be fairly free from injurious insects just now. 
Mr. Seabrooer then kindly showed his collection of 
fruit trees, and gave a good deal of valuable in- 
formation to the students concerning some of the 
varieties, also dwarfing stocks. Perhaps the most 
interesting point brought forward was Mr. Sea- 
bbooke's method, which he had picked up in America, 
of taking young stocks into the house in winter- 
time, and, after grafting them in comfort by the 
fireside, of putting them carefully away until they 
could be planted out in the spring. 

Another Horticulturist as Justice of 

THE Peace. — After conferring with the Lord- 
Lieutenant of the County, Lord Chancellor Hbb- 
schell, before giving up his seals of office, appointed 
Mr. John Watkins on the Commission of the Peace 
for the County of Hereford. Mr. John Watkins is the 
proprietor of Pomona Farm Nurseries, Withington, 
near Hereford. 



of the same colour; spatiix yellow. 



ANTHURIUM.— We have received from M. L. Be 
Smet-Duvivieb, of Ghent, a series of interesting 
specimens of seedling variations of A. Scherzerianum. 
Taking them in the order in which they come, we 
find: — 

A. 8. Rosa Booses. — A form with a cream-coloured 
spathe 8x4 cent., rosy- crimson at the base, and 
with a small central stripe of the same colour. 

A. 8. Madame Be Smet-Duvivier, — Spathe about 
12 X 9 cent., deep orange-crimson; spadix robust £__ 
orange ; a very handsome variety. 

A. S 9 var. JDuvivierana. — Spathe 10x6 cent., 
cream-coloured ; spadix pale yellow. 

A. S. var. Gandavensu. — Spathe 8x5 cent., orange- 
crimson ; spadix slender. 

A. S. var. amarantina. — Spathe 8x6 cent. ; red- 
dish-crimson; spadix slender. 

A. 8. var, atrosanguinea. — Spathe 7x4 cent., deep 
blood-red ; spadix coral-red. 

A. 8. citron. — Spathe 7x5 cent. 4 light orange- 
crimson ; spadix citron- yellow. 

Series with Double Spathes. 

A. S. var. bispatha.Spa.the 7x3 cent , rich red 
crimson; the second spathe somewhat smaller. 

A. 8. Prince Albert.— Spathe 6x3 cent, secondary 
•pathe somewhat smaller, both dull crimson. 

Sebies with Multiple Spathes. 

These are forms wherein, in addition to the primary 
spathe, each flower, or a large proportion of them, is 




FIG. 15.- BRACTEA.TE FORM OF ANTHURIUM 

SCHERZERIANUM. 



We are glad to see M. De Smet acting on a recom- 
mendation often made in these columns when we 



Fruit Growers, by F. M, Bailey, F.L.S.— From the 
Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Horticultural Division, Bulletin 84 (January), on 
The Recent Apple Failures of WeUern Sew York, by 
L. H. Bailey.— Bulletin 86 (March), on The Spray- 
ing of Orchards, by E. G. Lodkman.— Bulletin 87 
(April), The Dwarf Lima Beans, by L. H. Bailhv.- 
And from the Entomological Division, Bulletin 93 
(May), on The Cigar-case Bearer , by M. V. Slinger- 
u&T>.— Frutta Minora, del Prof. A. Prjcci, Milano 
Ulrico HoepH. — H. Correvon, Les Plant es Alpines 
et des Rocailles (Paris, Octave Doin). — Handbuch Jar 
Botanische Bestimmungsuhungen y von Dr. Franz 
Niedbnzu (L»ipiig, Engelmann, Plant Diagnoses). 
Traits de Culture Potaghe, par J. Dybowski (Paris. 
Masson). — Petit Atlas de Poche des Champignons 
Comestibles et Veneneux, par Paul Di mbr (Paris, 
Paul Klinsieck). — Experimental Plant Physiology, 
by Dr. Walter Oes, translated by I). T. M 



(Morris & Wiison, Minneapolis — The New Eng- 
land Blossoms and their Insect Visitors, by Clarence 
Moore Weed (Boston and New York: Houghton, 
Mifflin & Co.). To some of these we must refer 
on another occasion. 



MARKET GARDEN NOTES. 

Mr Sharp's Strawberry Gardens at Knowle, 
near Virginia Water. — Tnese gardens are famous 
for their Strawberries, and well known from the fact 
that they are open to the public, and anyone on. pay- 
ment of one shilling may eat as many as he 
chooses. A good many varieties are cultivated, 
including British Qaeen and Marguerite — the latter 
standing high in the estimation of visitors, although 
less firm in the flesh than other varieties. It is also 
Mr. Sharp's favourite variety, on account of the 
pickings lasting longer than others. Eugene and 
Oxonian were in splendid condition on the occasion 
of my visit; but for excellent cropping nothing could 
excel Comte de Paris, the crop of which was 
enormous. 

There are one or two points connected with the 
cultivation of the Strawberry at Knowle I would 
like to mention, namely, no manure has been used 
for twenty years, although Strawberries have been 
grown on the same ground all that time. The soil 
is light and sandy, which soon falls to dust in dry 
weather, yet at 3 inches deep it retains a good deal 
of moisture, even in this dry season. The plants 
stand 2 feet from row to row, and 18 inches apart in 
the row, and they are allowed to stand from five to 
seven years before being renewed, and the plants 
notwithstanding looked healthy. Yet one could not 
help noticing the vigour of some Strawberry plants 
which had been planted on ground on which 
some weeds and litter had been burned, and the 
ashes strewed around. These patches were so 
conspicuous, that Mr. Sharp, jun., remarked on the 
way the Strawberry seems to revel in ashes and 
burnt refuse ; and said that manure would be of 
some advantage for a change, and so for the first 
time for twenty years they have planted a portion 
of the young plants on manured ground. There is 
one advantage which plants grown without manure 
have — they do not throw many runners, and the land 
is not much infested with weeds. The perfume from 
these Strawberry gardens was so powerful, you could 
distinguish it some hundred yards before arriving at 



Home Correspondence. 



have received these and other monstrous varia- them. F. Bennett, Tyne, Chertsey. 
tions. Of Anthurium Scherzerianum we have now 
1, simple-spathed forms (normal) ; 2, dnplex-spathed 
forms with two or three spathes; 3, multiple-spathed 
or "pomponate" forms, with numerous secondary 
small spathes. As to colour, there are " self- 
coloured/' " albino," " spotted," and " striped " forms. 

Publications Received.— Contributions to the 

Queensland Flora, by F. M. Bailey, F.L.S., forming 
Botany Bulletin, No. 10, from the Department of 
Agriculture, Brisbane, Queensland, May, 1895, con- 
tains numerous descriptions of plants lately added to 
the flora of the colony; also, from the same depart- 
ment, Bulletin No. 5 (second series), devoted to A 

JInlf C.0*ktn<rii nf Xnf/>x fnr the Guidance of Amateur 



ANTHRACITE COAL V. 800T A8 A MANURE. 

— I have been waiting to see whether any of 
your readers would reply to the question under 
this heading, which appeared on p. 747 of the 
last volume, bat I must have overlooked any 
reply, if such has appeared. I do not quite see 
how carbon qua carbon in the form of coal-dust 
can be of so much use as soot, which I take it 
is used not because it is mainly carbon, but on 
account of its manurial value (ammonia) for on* 
thing, and chiefly because of its odour, which tends 



74 



THE 



GARDENERS' 



CHRONICLE. 



[July 20, 1895. 






to disgust many of the insect petti, e.g., the Onion- 
fly. It would be interesting to learn whether carbon 
ii a manure for plants. In the form of charcoal it 
it, no doubt, yery niefal, but then that ii not became 
it it carbon, but on account of its power of attract- 
ing oxygen, and to helping to sweeten the soil. It 
ii worth while mentioning, however, that a patented 
manure, many years old, was stated to be made of 
•tone-coal (anthracite) and sulphate of iron, and it 
was said in testimonials to be useful. Personally, I 
do not think "G. S. H." will find anthracite "duff" 
a substitute for soot, which is valuable in more ways 
than one. 8a ml. Bay. 

In reply to the above (vol. xvii., p. 747). I do 

not think "G. S. II." would find "duff" of any 



value as a manure, unless his land be of a stiff 
clayey, or light calcareous nature. In these 
cases the application would have a mechanical 
effect, opening and lightening the clayey soils so 
that air could pass into them more freely; and 
darkening the colour of calcareous soils, which 
would make them warmer. Oq sandy soils it would 
be harmful if used. The value of "duff" as a 

manurp -apart from its mechanical improvement— hi 

not worth mention, there being only about '50 per 
cent, of nitrogen in an average sample, which is the 
only plant food it contains. The carbon is present 
in a mineral form and will resist decomposition; 
consequently, it would be years before the nitrogen 
became available for the use of plants Soot is a 
good manure, for besides supplying plant food, it will 
improve the mechanical condition of all — except 
peaty — soils. The carbon in soot is present as 
organic matter, and can therefore readily undergo 
decomposition. An average sample of soot contains 
4 per cent, of nitrogen, chiefly present as sulphate of 
ammonia, from 10 to 14 per cent, of sulphate, car- 
bonate, and phosphate of lime, about 7 per cent, of 
chloride of sodium and potassium, and 2 5 per cent. 
of silicates of lime and magnesia, all of these being 
substances required by plants in their nutrition. 
W. Dyke, Tumford, Herts. 

CARNATION DUKE OF YORK AND OTHER8. 

When Mr. H. B. May sent out from Dyson's Lane 
Nursery this fine variety, he earned the thanks 
of all admirers of Carnations. When at its best 
the colour maybe described as a brilliant shaded 
crimson, largo, full, and finely formed ; a good 
grower, which does not split its calyx. It wants 
but one more qualitv, that of fragrance, and then it 
would be perfect. In respect of the possession of 
this quality, the maroon- coloured Uriah Pike has a 
great advantage over it, and probably the latter is 
rather more free in blooming. But both are in- 
valuable to any one who grows for cutting purposes. 
When are we to have a fragrant yellow self? I 
have never yet met with one that possessed fragrance. 
It may be coming, bat it does not appear to have 
made itself known as yet. Germania would be 
perfect as a yellow self had it the clove scent of Uriah 
Pike. It is sometimes said that German ia is not a 
good grower, but I recently saw at the Royal 
Nursery, Slough, a number of two-year- old plants in 
pots, large in size, vigorous and free branching 
in growth, and remarkably free. Mr. Harry Turner 
said much finer flowers could be cut from such two- 
year-old plants than from yearling ones. R. D. 

CHOICE HARDY RHODOOENQRON8 — It is a pity 

that Messrs, Anthony Waterer & Son of the Woking 

Nurseries did not name some at least of the newer 

varieties they exhibited at the Drill Hall on June 11. 

Some of them, and especially the delicately-tinted pink 

and pale rose varieties, have yellow and orange blotches 

and spottings on the upper segments, which of late 

years have become considerably deepened in colour 

One of the most striking of this type is Mrs. Pryce 

Lade, blush or delicate pink, with a central bunch 

of rosy stamens, and orange blotch and markings on 

the upper segments. Lady Grimston is also very 

fine, and a good grower ; it is flaked with carmine on 

a pale ground, and has striking top petals. A. B. 

Mitford is a large and finely-formed deep bright 

rosy-crimson variety, with dark ipots on the upper 

segments Oue of the most striking is picturatum. 

pink shaded with rose, the upper segments marked 

with large dark blotches, giving it the appearance 

of a Pelargonium. Some of the unnamed seediincs 

are also of fine character. R„ Ealing. * 

EARLY PEA8.-I have read with interest the 

ldth mst. To gardeners, the new first early wrinkled 
varieties of Peas are of great value, being of superior 
flavour to those Peas which have round seeds I 
have grown most of the wrinkled Peas, and find that 



Harbinger, a variety sent out by DicKsons, Chester, 
last vear, to be superior to any other that I know or, 
it being quite as early as Exonian ; and although 
the pods are not of such a deep green colour as that 
variety, they are larger, which is a valuable point in 
an early Pea, and the Peas are of excellent flavour. 
The variety Gradus is a valuable second early 
wrinkled Pea, and when growers can depend upon 
getting it true to name, it will become a general 
favourite. The introduction of these fine Peas should 
lead to the extinction of inferior varieties, M. G . 

PYRAMIDAL SWEET CHERRY TREES.— It is 

seldom that sweet Cherries are grown as pyramids in 
private gardens, a fact probably due to the nnsatia- 
factory way in which they fruit, and to their liability 
to suffer from gumming. In gardens where wall 
space is abundant, and a western aspect can be 
devoted to these fruits, truly fine crops are obtained 
annually, and pyramids are not needed ; but where 
wall space is not at hand, other methods have to be 
adopted for the production of sweet Cherries, and to 
my thinking, the pyramid seems the right sort of 
tree. It is, however, evident that the let-alone 
method will not do, and something more is needed 
than simply pruning and dressing to bring the trees 
into good fruiting. There exists in a garden not far 
from Maidstone a very fine lot of well-grown trees, 
which for the past four or more years have produced 
exceptionally heavy crops of large luscious fruit. 
The trees in question are planted moderately 
close together, so tbat in the fruiting season 
a wooden framework is easily placed over them, 
and over these some fish netting. This keeps 
the birds from the fruit. These trees are grow- 
ing on the Mahaleb and Cherry- stock, and they 
are moderately pruned annually, so as to pre- 
vent a too free growth of the shoots. At these 
prunings some of the stronger roots are severed at a 
distance of 3 feet, measured from the stem, and as a 
consequence there is a mass of healthy fleshy roots 
at a short distance around the stems. Daring the 
growing season the young shoots are constantly 
pinched to assist in the formation of fruit-buds, &c, 
so that both at top and bottom the trees are much 
restricted — a practice some gardeners might regard 
as too severe. However that may be, a better and 
more fruitful lot of trees could not be wished for than 
these; and the pinching and root-pruning will be 
persisted in so long as the trees bear as freely as at 
present. Of the early varieties I may mention Frog- 
more Bigarreau, Early Rivers, Black Eagle, Kentish 
Bigarreau, Napoleon Bigarreau, and Elton; later 
ripening ones are Florence, Bedford Prolific, Black, 
and Tartarian. All of the Dake Cherries are well 
deserving attention of the gardener. H. Markham. 

TOMAT08 NOT 8WELL1NG OFF.— The cause of 

11 Nurseryman's " Tomato fruits not swelling, is 
either owing to imperfect fertilisation of the blooms, 
or to the plants, at an earlier stage, having received 
a check. As the fruit is swelling well further up 
the stem, and if there is plenty of light between the 
plants, and these are vigorous, I would advise the 
removal of all, or a large proportion, of the lower 
leaves of the plants, encouraging a shoot to grow 
from the base. This would soon clothe the bare 
stem, and if the variety ii a free-setting one, fruit 
would in due course put in an appearance. This 
shoot could be stopped after showing three or four 
trusses. A similar case came under my notice a 
few days since, when visiting a friend's Tomato- 
houses ; and, in this case, the plants were planted 
prior to the continued frost in February. The site 
is very low, and the soil, being cold, checked the 
proper extension of the roots ; while the tops, being 
in a well-heated house, had, at the time, apparently 
not suffered. ^ At present, the roots must be active 
indeed, as evinced by the vigorous shoots above, and 
a good crop will doubtless ensue. P. F. Le Sueur, 
Grand Vale, Jersey, July 13. 

ARAUCARIA IMBRICATA.— On the terrace-garden 
opposite the south front of Alderbury Vicarage, 
Salisbury, is growing a remarkably good specimen of 
the Chili Pine (Araucaria imbricata). It was only 
9 inches high when planted by the Rev, Canon 
Hatchings' gardener in 1851, now it is about 40 feet 
high, straight, and of handsome outline, and having 
a stem 3£ feet in circumference a few inches from 
the green sward, which is brushed by its branches. 
And when I say that the tree is bearing about thirty- 
five large flowers near the top, readers of the 
Gardeners Chronicle will understand that it is in 
robust health, though one or two of the branches 
close to the ground show slight signs of distress- 
probably caused by the combined influence of the 



unusually dry summer of 1893, and the equally ex- 
ceptionally severe frosts experienced in January and 
February last, followed by the prevailing tropical 
weather of the lait eight or ten weeks. Canon 
Hutchings, however, is of opinion that the distreu 
referred to is owing to the fact of the roots having 
penetrated the sandy sub-soil— the natural surface 
soil being light, inclining to peat. This circum- 
stance reminds me of an avenue of fairly good 
examples of Araucaria imbricata which I saw seven 
or eight years ago at Branksome Dean Park, Lord 
Wimborne's place at Bournemouth, which were then 
exhibiting proofs of declining vigour, and the natural 
soil and sub-soil at Alderbury Vicarage and Brank- 
some Dean Park are, judging by appearances, very 
much alike. This being so, what practical inference 
are we to arrive at other than that the Chili Pine 
delights in a soil inclining to be peaty rather than 
otherwise, and which is well drained, and that so 
long as the roots are retained in this, and the tree 
being protected from the effects of north and east 
winds, so long will it make satisfactory growth. 
H. W. Ward. 

VINE PERON08PORA. — I send you a few mildewed 
Vine leaves and immature Grapes of the kind known 
as San Gioveto (the best quality used in making 
Chianti), as it may interest you to see the progress 
of the disease, and the effect of the Bordeaux Mix- 
ture upon it. They came from the podere attached 
to this villa, in which the Vines have been carefully 
medicated every year with the above mixture, since 
its introduction as a remedy. Nevertheless, this year 
the mildew made its appearance with the opening of 
the leaves quite early in May, and although the 
remedy has been applied three times already, and in 
doses of more than double the usual strength 
(that if, 2 kilogrammes instead of 1 of sulphate 
of copper to a quintal of water), the disease is by no 
means subdued. Of the four leaves sent, the top- 
most is one which opened early in the season, 
received its dose, and is cured. In the second one, 
the disease has been permanently arrested, but has 
not disappeared. The third leaf has been twice 
medicated, but the disease is still spreading. The 
fourth is a leaf of recent growth which has not 
yet been treated, which the fungus has attacked with 
extreme severity, and which would certainly wither. 
The effect on the fruit is such as I had not hitherto 
seen. As a rule the disease has appeared with us 
much later in the season, and its effect has been to 
prevent the Grapes maturing, leaving them light m 
colour and acid to the taste. Owing, I suppose, to 
the extreme humidity of the year, up to the end of 
June, the disease began early, with the result on the 
Grapes that you see. The Vines presented a great 
promise of fruit, but at least half of it dj 
not flower, rotted at the stem, and withered. 
Thousands of fine bunches have gone that 
way even in this well-tended vineyard. My 
neighbours who have been less careful in this and 
previous years, have no fruit left at ail. The Bor- 
deaux Mixture proves itself to be a palliative of this, 
the most formidable enemy of the Vines which w 
ever yet appeared, I think, but far from being the 
complete cure too often claimed for it. That has 
yet to be discovered, and if it be not, the art w 
Vine-growing as a profitable industry may some day 
be as extinct as the Dodo. Thomas C. ffayuar, 
Florence. 

MONA'8 PRIDE POTATO.— My experience with 
Mona's Pride has not been a very favourable one, 
and I have grown it three ve \r$ in all sorts of waft- 
Better ones are as follows :— Star of Rsading, whicfi 
was sent to me for trial two years since, it a nice- 
lookinor tuber, e&rlv. a ont\A nnnbr and an abundafl* 

>ne root, 



looking tuber, early, a good cooker, and an 



the average number being thirty, an extraoramarj 
number for such a small plant ; the height of tne 
haulm is about 1 foot. Myatt's Ashleaf i§ very go° a 
on our land. Daniels' Table King ii a good variety, 
and I always cultivate a good lot of it, as it comes 
in so well after the above, and before white Beauty £ 
Hebron, It is a good tuber, and much to be V T ' 
ferred to the pink variety, with the exception o 
white Beauty of Hebron. The others are all dug *?' 
and done early. They were planted on March i-» 
and we began to dig them on May 26. I have aho 
twenty more varieties, most of them new for tn» » 
which I hope to report upon in a few moncn • 
G. Howes, Merton Hall Gardens , Thetford. 

THE ROUND LEAFED 8UNDEW.— It may not , lj 

generally known that the round-leafed b^ 
(Drosera rotundifolia) occurs in the greatest ; p* 
fnsion near the source of Brony Burn, Callen, # an 









Jolt 20, 1895.] 



THE 



S 'A RDENEk S> CHE ONICL E. 



75 



shire. The exaet locality is 300 feet above sea level, 
on a strip of bog-land, alongside of the plantation 
between Burnsford, and the line of the march that 
divides the parishes of Deskford and Kathven. At 
the present time, the bright-red leaves of this in- 
teresting carnivorous plant appear in their greatest 
beauty. W. Kelly, Aberdeen. 

PAULOWNIA IMPERIALI8.— This noble tree, like 
many other natives of warmer countries than our 
own, has felt the severity of the paBt winter. I 
examined the other day a fine tree fifty years old, 
which is in full leaf, but bearing no flowers. In 
other years it has flowered profusely on the naked 
wood before the leaves appeared. The flowers are 
of a dark violet hue, borne freely, and about the size 
and shape of a Foxglove, and a well-flowered 
example makes a striking object ; the leaves being 
of large size and spread out horizontally, make it a 
fine shade tree. Paulownias are often recommended 
for town planting, but one seldom meets with them 
in England ; on the continent, however — in Paris, 
for instance — they are plentifully planted. A. Hope. 



A PROLIFEROUS POLYPODIUM. 

Mb. G. B. Wollaston, of Chielehurst, has very kindly 
sent me a frond of Poly podium vulgare var. elegantis- 
sima (fig. 16), upon which the developments of the 

of soral bulbils 



Herewith I 



appears 
send 



re- 



an 



rare phenomenon 

markably profusely. nerewitn 1 send you 
enlarged sketch of a pinna ( X about 3£), ahowing 
how the clusters of bulbils are developed in lieu of spo- 
rangia, which, except in an aborted state I have been 
unable to trace. At first tight, and before the little 
fronds appear, the abnormal aori appear exactly like 
the aposporous growths which have been recorded on 
A. f.-f. Ciarissima, but in this case the next step is 
the direct formation of fronds instead of prothalli, 
and from the ready growth of these when laid down 
in congenial soil, I have no doubt whatever that 
proper axis of growth will follow, and independent 
plant! result. The Polypody family, due, probably, 
to the provision for easy extension of habitat through 
the creeping rhizonje to which it owes its generic 
name, is very re rely bulbiferous, and thia instance 
merits record on that ground alone, apart from the 
interesting transformation of reproductive energy 
which it represents. It appears to be identical in 
character with the soral bulbils noted in Adiantum 
capillus-veneria vars. daphnites and imbricata, 
already recorded in ycur columns, while the soral 
bulbils noted in the species Atbyrium differ in being 
usually solitary and accompanied by numbers of per- 
fect sporangia to which they seem to bear no analogy, 
i.e., they make their appearance as bulbili proper 
and quite distinct in character from the associated 
growth. Chas, T.Druery, F.L.S., 25, Windsor Road, 
Forest Gate. 



SOCIETIES. 






1HE LONDON PAN6Y AND VIOLA. 

July 6. — There was a great demand npon the 
available space of the Crystal Palace on the above 
date, and the London Pansy Society's show had to be 
content with a site immediately in front of the orchestra, 
but in a position favourable to showing off the flowers 
to the best advantage. As at Birmingham, the fancy 
Pansies in the open class and the leading flowers in 
the amateurs' division came mainly from the North, 
and they were, on the whole, remarkably good 
despite the prevailing drought. Show Pansies came 
entirely from the North, and were as usual some- 
what limited. Violas in pretty sprays were vrry 
numerous, and in these classes the Southern growers 
held their own with considerable credit to themselves. 

Collections. 

Opmcluses.— There was but one collection of Panties and 
Violas, Mr. S. Pye, Gaterall, Gaistacg, winning the Gold 
Medal of the Society with a &upetb exhibit, having twelve 
hoards of fancy Pansies, twenty-four blooms in each, and four 
panels, each containing forty sprays of Violas, all prettily and 
effectively arraDged. Among the fancy Pansies were fine 
examples of Mrs. J. Travis, W. H. Clarke, Lord Hamilton, 
M*s. R. q # Moi]Pt Miwj stirlingf ;vxrs. d. Johnstone, Miss 

Abercrombie, J. Crawford, W. Stewart, M. Bain. J. Samuel, 
*• ^cFarlane, G. H. Clarke, Mrs. R. Fleming. Mrs. Mackie, 
Tamworth Yellow, Mrs. D. McNeill, Mary Kay, Mrs. G. 



Paddie, T. Gardener, John McLellen, T. C. Hedderwick, Miss 
Patterson, Tom Graham, John Myles, Jessie Travis, Maggie 
Burn, J. Robertson, and Dr. Bostock— a very fine selection for 
anyone needing one. The sprays of Violas were representative 
of the best varieties in cultivation, such as White Flag, 
Grandee. King of Whites, Christiana, Mrs. D. Ferguson, 
Lemon Queen, Geo. Lord. Gold Crest, Lord Elcho, Yellow 
King, Wonder, Ardwell Gem. Blue Gown, Waterloo, Sweet 
Lavender, Crimson King, Commodore, Iona, Charmer, Mrs. 
Wood, Countess of Kintore, Maggie Todd, Mrs. Crane, 
Duchess of Rothesay, &c. 

Fancy Pansies.— There were five stands of forty-eight fancy 
Pansies, Mr. J. Sutherland, Lenzie, N.B., being placed 
1st, with clean, fresh, bright blooms of Col. J* S. Stirling, 
Mrs. W. Watson, Miss Stirling, Maggie McPhail, Jas. Irvine, 
Miss Patterson, Tamworth Yellow, Mrs. Fleming, Mrs. Sher- 
rard, Marmion, George Stuart, W. H. Clark, Bernard Doulton, 
Mrs, M. Cuthbertson, Dr. G. McKay, Jessie Russell, Celtic 
Gem, Mahogany, Jenny Lawson, and Princess May, as the 
very finest; 2nd, Mr. M. Campbell, Blantyre, N.B. 

There were five collections of twenty- four varieties, Mr. A. 
Lister, Rothesay, N.B.. being placed 1st. 

With twelve blooms, Mr. J. Smellie was 1st, having the 
following in fine condition:— Mahogany, W. H. Clark, Mrs. 
W. Steel. Ella Murray, Marmion (a beautiful soft flower), and 
Maggie Watson ; Mr. J. Lister was 2nd. 

The best twelve of any one variety were those of Marmion, 
from Mr. J. Smellie ; Mr. A. Lister coming 2nd, with Col. 
R. G. Buchanan. 

The best twelve unnamed seedlings came from Mr. A. 
LitTER; and Mr. J. Smellie being 2nd. 




Fig. 16.— a proliferous poly 



JM 



Show Pansies,— Mr. J. Smellie bad the best twelve varie- 
ties, viz. :— Dark selfs : J. T. Howard, and a seedling ; yellow 
aelfs : Maggie Benson and Mrs. John HunteT; white selfs: 
Bobbie Harper and a t-eediing ; yellow grounds : R. M. 
Wembey, Busby Gem, and John Brand; white grounds: Mrs. 
Wilson, Mrs. Brown, and Jessie Thompson. Mr. J. Lister 

was 2nd ; his leading flowers were— dark selfs: Harry Paul 
and R. McAllister ; yellow self : Willie Irvine ; white ground : 
Mrs. John Stewart; white self: Bobbie Harper; yellow 
ground : Mrs. John Hunter. 

Amateurs' Division. 

Fancy Pansies. — With twelve varieties. Mr. J. McFarlane, 
Glasgow, was 2nd, having Maggie McPhail, Annie Knowlep, 
Mrs. D. Johnstone, and Mrs. W. Watson, very fine. Mr. 
Thos. Nades, Alveston, was 2nd. With six varieties the 
same exhibitors were severally 1st and 2nd. 

The best twelve Fancy Pansies of one variety were those of 
Tamworth Yellow, from Mr. Naden ; Mr. McFaRLA^e was 

2nd with Maggie McPhail. 

* 

Open Classes. 

I 

Violas. — Various stands were employed for exhibiting 
sprays of Violas, but all were nicely and effectively displayed, 
though we thought some of the flowers over-large. The best 
twenty four spray?, six blcoms in a spray, came from Mr. J. 
Smellie. With twelve sprays, Mestrs. Paul 9l Co. were 1st. 
With six varieties of raylets Violas, Mr. A. J. Rowuerry, 
South Woodford, was 1st, with chaiming sprays of A. J. Bow- 
berry, deep yellow, Blush Queen, Christiana, Border Witch, 
Vestal, and Blue Gem ; 2nd, Mr. W. BaxtaR, Woking, with 
some capital sprays. 

With six sprays of the miniature type, Mr. A. J. RoWBERRr 
was again 1st, having Marginata, Violetta, 01 ivexta, Emily, 
and two seedlings ; Mr. J. NicHOLSOlC was 2nd. 




I tolis. Amateur Classes.— with twelve sprays, six blooms in 
a spray, Mr. H. A. Needs, Woking, was placed 1st, having 
charming illustrations of Lemon Queen, Ducheas of Fife, Iona, 
Ardwell Gem, Admiration, Ac.; Mr. A. J. Roww rry was 
2nd. With six sprays, Mr. E. C. Smith, Muswell Hill, took 
the 1st prize; and Mr. W. Bucking, Chingforl, the 2nd. 
a few other small classes the exhibitors already named were 
principal prize-takers. 

The best fancy Pansy in the open e lasses was George 
Stewart, sho\> n by Mr. J. Suthkkland, Lenzie; that iq ihe 
amateurs' cla- ■* Mr. David Johnstone, from Mr. J. 

McFarl * sk. The bast spray of Viola in the open claaaes was 
Florizel, deep lilac, shown by Mr. S. Pye; the best in the 
amateurs' classes, Christiana, pure white, with yellow eye, 
from Mr. H. A. Needs. 

A large collection of Violas, not for competition, was staged 
by Messrs DOBBDB A Co. It consisted of some 200 sprays 
comprising 190 varieties, mid thoroughly representative of the 
beet, new and old, Sweet Peas were also included, and a 
good strain of Auricula-eyed Sweet William. 



IPSWICH HORTICULTURAL. 

July 9. — Thii Society got back to \U old home in 
ChriitchuTch Faik, on the occation of the last ihow. 
The Park with all its fine Spanish Cheatnuta and 
other treea has now become the property of the town, 
and is open to the pnblic fre*, with the right to close 
it for twelve days in the course of the year for pur- 
poses approved of by the Corporation. It is so 
popular, and has been used to such purpose that the 
grass is literally trodden off by thousands of busy feet 
over most of its area. It was suggested to some of 
the authorities that bavinp, we understood, liberally 
and well-spent some £60,000 on this open space for 
Ipswich, they might connect it with the town mains, 
and keep the turf alive and green during periods of 
drought, by frequent overhead wateriDgs. Even the 
fine trees looked less green and shady than usual. 

The show this year in the old home, however, had very 
substantial merit, though neither to large nor so good as we 
have often seen linger the fostering au-j ices of this Society. 
The most notable reductions were among Roses, which was 
doubtless largely attributed to the great Bose thow of the 
Royal Horticultural Society at the Drill Hall, London, on the 
tame day, and Rose shows in other places, as well as to the 
drought. But in the main the show of Roses resolved itself 
into a contest between two amateurs and two nurserymen — 
the Rev. Hugh Berners and the Rev. A. Foster-Melliar, and 
Mr. Frank Cant and Messrs. Prior & Sons, of Colchester. The 
Silver Medal of the National Rose Society for the best Rose in 
the show was won by the latter with a line bloom of Francois 
Michelon, though it was run pretty close by a very fresh 
though rather small A. K. Williams, and the be*t of this 
charming half dozen, Gabrielle Luizet, staged by Mr. Berse&s, 

In the cla^s for thirty-six Roses, Messrs. Frask Ca:xt was 
1st, and Messrs. Prior 8l So>s 2nd. For twelve Roses, three 
trusses of eacb, Messrs. Prior were 1st, and Mr. F. Cant 2nd. 
These were among the lichest features of the show. For 
twelve Teas and Noisettes, Mr. Frask Caxt was 1st, and 
Messrs. Prior 2nd. For twenty-four Roses, distinct (Amateurs), 
1st, Rev. A. Fostbr-Melliar, Sproughton ; 2nd, Richard 
Berners, Harkstead. For six Roses, three trusses of each 
(Amateurs), 1st, Mr. Fo.ster-Mkeliar ; 2nd, Mr. Berners. 

Twelve Roses distinct, single U usees, 1st, M. D. Warner, 
Esq. Twelve Tea and Noisette Roses, 1st, Rev. Hugh Berners. 
Six Roses of one variety (Amateurs*), 1st, Mr. Bernj rs, with 
a chaiming six o! Madame Gabrielle Luizet. Four Roses, 
single trussep, giowu by residents in the borough (Amateurs), 
1st, Mr.Cf rder. Six Tea and Nci ette Roses (Amateurs), 1st, 
Mr. W. Parsons. A charming box of l'ldeale from Mr. 
Jacobi, were brilliant, b*autifu% but indescribable— in its 
blending of metallic red and gold— added greatly to the effect. 
We noticed the following of the beat blooms among the Roses, 
Ernest Metz, Madame Hoste. The Bride, Niphetos. Souvenir 
de Paul Ne)ron, Francisca Kruger, Anna Olivier, Innocente 
Pirola, Comtesse de Nadaillac, Edith Giffard, Souvenir d'un 
Ami.Marechal Niel, Jean Ducher, Ethel Brownlow, Catherine 
Mermet, Alba rosea, Madame Cusin, H>brid Perpetuals, Rey- 
nolds Hole, Mrp. John Laing, Charles Lefebvre, Viscountess 
Folkestone, Madame Victor Verdier, Charles Darwin, John 
Stuart Mill, Horace Vernet, Duchetse de Moray, Marie 
Baumann, Dr. Powell, Duke of Fife, Madame Charles Crapilet, 
Harrison Weir, Suzaone-Marie Rodocanathi, A. K. Williams, 
Alfred Colomb, Jean Soupert, Camille Bernardin, Heinrich 
Schultbeiss, Duke of Wellington, Her Majesty, Eclair, Madame 
Verdier, Marie Rady, Lady May Fitzwilliam, Xavier Olibo, La 
France, Star of Walth<im, Ulrich Brunner, Jeannie Dickson, 
Duchess of Bedford, Du hess of Edinburgh, Duke of Edinburgh, 
Marchioness o* Londonderry, Duke of Teck, Guttave Piganneau, 
Exhibition de Brie, La Havre, Ac, 

7 he Table Decorations, and Bridal and Ball-room Deco- 
rations deseive to rank next to the Roses ; there were three of 
the former 8 feet by 5, having this peculiarity, that they were 
all furnished and judged by ladies. Two of them, that of Miss 
Gilbert and thatcf Miss C. G. Orpen, were harmonies of 
Sweet Peas of utique lightness, chasteness, and beauty; and 
they were so nearly alike in merit, that they were rightly 
bracketed equal 1st. The Teas were lightly veneered with 
Asparagus, Maidenhair Fern, and a delicate spray or two of 
white Jasmine, and Ficus repens. Mr. Steward, who was 3rd, 
showed what may be called a harmony of Shirley Poppies 
and Nasturtium*, on a yellow centre, also very lightly touched 
with graceful foliage. 



76 



THE 



GARDENERS' CHRONICLE. 



[July 20, 1896, 



Herbaceous Perennial i.— As usual, there was a grand muster 
of cut herbaceous flowers for collection?, most tastefully 
arranged on a table-space of 8 feet by 3, and also for the best 
twenty-four, twelve, and six herbaceous plants, these made a 
rich display. The chief prizes being taken by Mr. Jacobi of 
Henley Road, the Earl of Dysart, Mr. George Gilbert, 
Messrs. Warmer and Notcutt, Rer. W. Beiners, Rev, E. 
Farrfw, Captain Price, the Hon. L. Lowther. 

Miscellaneous Exhibits. 

A few good stands of Pelargoniums were also shown, but 
like the Fuchsias, all far below the standard of former years. 
Groups of plants arranged for tffeot were very creditably 
shown, three exhibitors showing in each of the two sections of 
13 feet by 5 feet for amataurs, and 9 feet by 4 feet for ditto, 
employing not more than one gardener. 

Vegetables. 

The Ipswich Horticultural Society still holds a high place as 
a vegetable show of the first rank, and the liberal special 
prizes offered by Messrs. Sutton A Sons, Wills 9l Sons, 
Daniels Brothers, Mr. W. Addison, and the special collections 
from seedsmen, as well aa the liberal prizes offered by the 
Society, brought a splendid master of vegetables in most of the 
classes. The green Peas were green indeed. Potatos, espe- 
cially the Duke of York and Sutton's Seedling, looked perfect ; 
Duke, however, teems to sport in many gradations, from 
veritable Ashleaf to the furthest remove from those 

eculiar marks and swellings on its surface that distinguish 
all true Ashlesf Potatos. All the Dukes present, however, 
were linked together through those peculiar unique spots 
that distinguish that fine Potato. Carrots and Cauliflowers 
were alio fine. Broad Beans seem getting bigger, longer, 
broader. Turnips were the only vegetables present that 
teemed as if they might have felt the pinch of the drought. 
Cucumbers and Tomatos fine, also Lettuces Cos and especially 
Cabbage Lettuces, the latter especially wonderfully good ; 
while Cabbages were conspicuous by their absence—no, there 
was one lot of three. 

Fruit. 

Fruit, especially Grapes, Nectarines, Melons, Peaches, 
Cherries, black and white Strawberries, were fine; and there 
were eight dishes of Raspberries, seven of ripe Gooseberries, 
nine of other sorts, seven of black Currants, twelve of 
white Currants, thirteen of red Currants, nearly the whole 
\ eing of high quality. There was a fine lot of Strawberries 
in all shown, in collections and in single dishes, and for 
weight, Laxton's Latest of All taking 1st and 2nd prizes for 
weight, the third was unnamed, 1st. thirty fruits, weighed 2 lb. 
H oz. ; 2nd, thirty fruits, weighed 2 lb. \ oz. ; 3rd, thirty fruits, 
weighed 1 lb. 7 oz. A very fine dish of the striking black Straw- 
berry Waterloo was shown, though by no means up to the Queen 
standard in tlivour, this Strawberry is better in quality than 
not a few, and its colour will afford a new variety in desserts 
that have to be large and showy as well as good. Of black 
Grapes there were seven lots of good quality, and only three 
lots of white, not specially good. Then also there were collec- 
tions of fruits of six dishes each— Mr. Messenger, gr. to C. H. 
Berxers. Esq., of Woolverston Manor, taking the 1st prize 
with Black Hamburgh, Buckland Sweetwater, Bellagarde 
Peaches, Pineapple Nectarines, Best of All Melons, Waterloo 
Strawberry, the Strawberries nicely managed in a series of 
several tints, easily accessible and well arranged under the 
personal superintendence of the Rev. H. Berners, the able 
secretary, assisted by Messrs. Mahon, Smith and Hooper. 
D. T. F. 

THE WOLVERHAMP1 ON FLORAL 

PErE. 

Jcxy 9, 10, and 11.— Thii waa one of the best 
horticultural exhibition! yet witnessed at Wolver- 
hampton. Favoured by beautiful weather, the 
•how wai greatly patronised on the first day. 
The prizes offered were sufficiently tempting to 
fetch exhibitors from all parts of the kingdom, 
and the ihow of plants has never been excelled at 
Wolverhampton. Some of the chief features of the 
•how were the Roses, which were remarkable for so 
dry a season, more than 3000 blooms being staged, 
and the groups arranged for effect. 

Cut Flowers. 

Herbaceous Plints.-Oi these there wag a large display. A 
novel claw, and one which was much commended by the 
judges and public, was that for the National Challenge Prize— 
the most tastefully arranged Violas and Fansies in glasses, 
with Viola or other suitable foliage as a setting. A Gold 
Medal and substantial money prizes were also offered by 

Esq., to encourage an improvement in the staging 
oc ine*e turners, and altogether there were eight competitors. 
It was a class that was the most admired of any, and served 
to show the decorative value of Violas and Pansies in skilful 
hands. It was remarked that the usual mode of setting up 
these (lowers as sprays was not adhered to. 

Stove a*td Greejthoitse Plants. 

For the best $ixte*n Flowering or fine Fo'iage Flints no 
fewer than tight to be m bloom, Orchids excluded 1st Mr T 
Cypher, Cheltenham, *ith a collection that contained weli- 

Allamaeda grandihora and A. Hendersoni, fine spe- 
^.-.™„ v f Anthurium Scherzerianum, BougainviUea glabra 
Taora Williamsi, and I. regina, Erica Kingstoniana Co^ 
dueum aogustifolium, a very fine C. Mortefontainense, Cycas 
ci/cmalis, Latania bortonica. and Kentia australis. J Mar. 




• •:• 



\. % Coventry, was 2nd (gr., Mr 
ell flowered ; also Ixoras. flou 
Cod ise urns. 



some g 

For the beit six Exotic Ferns, H. LOVATT, Esq., Bushbury 
(gr., Mr. Sharp), was 1st with a very fine Todea superba, 
a Dicksonia antarctica, Gleichenia Mendeii, Ac. 2nd, J. A. 
Kehdrick, Esq., of Edgbaston. 

For six Bxotic Orchids, 1st, Mr. J. Cypher with Cattleya 
Sanderiana, C. Mendeii, and Odontoglossum Alexandra; 
2nd, Mr. Charlesworth. 

F#r Six Palms, Dissimilir .—1st, Mr. J. Cypher, who staged 
a good Latania borbonica, Kentia Fosteriana, and Phoenix 
reclinata ; 2nd. Mr. Vause, Leamington, with Areca lutescens, 
Kentia australis. and Phoenix dactylifera. 

Group of Plants.— 1st, Mr. J. Cypher, with a group con- 
sisting of flumea elegans, Palms, Orchids interspersed with 
well-coloured Codieeums and Ferns ; 2nd, J. Marriott, Esq , 
of Coventry, with a group containing plants of Gyptophila, 
Orchids, Carnations, Ferns, Palms, Codieeums, all very nicely 
arranged ; 3rd, Messrs. Tom B. Dobbs & Co.. of Wolverhamp- 
ton, whose group was effectively arranged with Lilies, Bou- 
vardias. Orchids, and Palms, the plants clean, well grown. 

The Open Classes. 

Roses. — For 9eventy-two distinct varieties.— 1st, Mr. B. R. 
Cant, Colchester, who staged superb blooms of Her Majesty, 
Alfred Colomb, Innocente Pirola, Marchioness of Londonderry, 
and Maurice Bernardin ; 2nd, Messrs. Harkness & Son, 
Bedale, with excellent specimens of Horace Vernet, Maurice 
Bernardin, Merveiile de Lyon, Marie Rady, Sir Rowland Hill, 
very fine ; Charles Lefebvre, Lady Londonderry, and The Bride. 

For Jo ty- eight distinct varieties.— 1st, Messrs. Harkness & 
Sons, with good Etienne Levet, Merrie England, Dupuy 
Jamain, Horace Vernet, Comtesse de Serenye, and Pride of 
Waltham ; 2nd, Messrs. Perkins & Sons, Coventry. 

For twelve blooms of one dark variety,— 1st, Messrs. TOWN- 
SEND&Sons, who staged very fine A. K.Williams; 2nd, Messrs. 
Perkins & Sons, with the same variety. 

Twelve blooms, one light variety.— 1st, Messrs. Perkins & 
Sons, with a good stand of Her Majesty; and 2nd, Messrs. 
Townsend & Sons, with Mrs. J. Laing. 

Amateurs' and Gentlemen's Gardeners' Classes. 

For tMrty-six distinct varieties.— 1st, the Rev. J. H. Pem- 
berton, of Havering, Essex. 2nd, Mr. W. Drew, Ledbury. 

F*r twenty four diitinct varieties. — 1st, Mr. W. Drew; 
2nd, Rev. J. H. Pemberton. 

For twtlve Tea Roses. — 1st, Mr. W. Drew. 

Miscelxaneous. 

The bouquets were much admired, Messrs. Perkins & Son 
taking three 1st prizes ; while Messrs. Pope & Son of Birming- 
ham, and Mr. G. H. Kendrick, Edgbaston, were 2nd. 

In Hardy Cut Flowers.— 1st, Mr. Johw Mecklein, Bridge 
of Weir, with a fine collection ; 2nd, Mr. J. Salmon, Trysail, 
Wolveihampton ; 3rd, P. Stanhope, E q , Wombourne. 
This class brought sixteen competitors. 

For the Natioml Challenge Prize.— The Gold Medal, Messrs. 
Dobbie & Co., Rothesay, N.B , for an arrangement of Violas 
and Pansies ; 2nd, Mr. G. Smellie, Bushby, N.B. ; 3rd, Mr. 
M. Campbell, Blantyre, N B. Tnis class brought out eight 
competitors. 

Fruit. 

The show of fruit was excellent, especially the Graphs. 
Mr, Bannerman, gr. to Lord BAGOT, of Blithfield, was 1st for 
lour banches of Grapes, distinct varieties. Other noted ex- 
hibitors in the Grape classes ^ere Mr. Goodacre, gr, to the 
Earl of Harrington, Elvaston Castle ; Mr. Read, gr. to the 
Earl of Carnarvon, Bretby Hall ; Mr. Gilman, gr. to the 
Earl of Shrewsbury, Ingestre. 

For the bsst collection, of nine dishes rf Fruit, Mr. Gleeson, 
gr. toC. E. Keyser, Ej-q., Stanmore, was 1st, with a very 
tine Pine, Muscat of Alexandria and Black Hamburgh Grapes, 
Hero of Lockinge Melon, Lord Napier Nectarine, Dr. Hogg 
and Eiriy Grosse Mignonne Peaches, and Brown Turkey Figs. 
Mr. Bannerman, gr. to Lord Bagot, was 2nd with very good 
Black Hamburgh and Duke of Buccleuch Grapes, Violette 
Hative and Royal George Peaches, Downton and Violet Hative 
Nectarines, Golden Perfection Melon, and Brown Turkey Figs. 

For six Peaches. — 1st, Sir G. Merrick, Bart, (gr., Mr. 
Gray), with Crimson Galande; 2nd, R. Sneyd, Esq. (gr., Mr. 
Wallis). with A_bec; 3rd, Sir C. H. Broughton, Bart., with 
Hale's Early . 

for six Nectarines. -1st, Hon. P. Stanhope. Wombourne, 
with River's Early Orange; 2nd, R. Sneyd, E<q., with Lord 
Napier; 3rd, C. E. Keyser, Esq. 



Vegetables. 



There was a very good display, it being much better than 
might have been expected this dry season. In the larger 
collection, 1st, Earl of Carnarvon; 2nd, the Rev. W. D. 
Thatcher, Stourbridge. 

The non-competitive exhibitors were Mr. W. D Bason of 
Fmchfield, Wolverhampton, who received Bronze Medal and 
Certificate of Merit for Mushroom Spawn and display of plant* 
Messrs. Thompson, Sparkhill, Birmingham; Messrs. Hewett 
&SON, Solihull, Birmingham; Messrs. Dicksons, Chester 
who sent Roses, and recced an award of a Silver Medal and 
a Certificate of Merit ; Messrs. Eckford * Son, Wem, who 
steged fifty varieties of Sweet Peas ; Messrs. Jarman & Son, 
Chard; Messrs Birkenhead & Son; Messrs. Jones & Son 
Shrewsbury; Mr. K. Lowe, of Wolverhampton; Mr. J 

KNIOUT. Wolverhamoton ' anHMr T u xrr n w 



TUNBRIDGE WELLS HORTICUL- 
TURAL. 

Jtjly 10.— The thirty-teventh annual exhibition 
was held on the above date, and in reipect to quality 
and quantity waa well up to the average. Groups 
are always a strong feature, and on thii occasion 
competition was very close. Eventually, Mr. J, 
Howes, gr. to W. Cobb, Esq., Tunbridge Wells, was 
placed before Mr. L. Dupond, gr. to C. B. Powell, 
Esq. ; Mr. S. Pope, gr. to J. J. Barrow, Eiq. f follow- 
ing. There was little to choose between theie 
groups, all three being especially neat and pretty 
in arrangemeLt 

For four stove and greenhouse plants, Mr. T. Portnell, gr. 
to Sir A. Lamb, Battle, was 1st, Statice prof usa, Clerodendron 
Baifourians , Dipladenia amahilis, and D. boli viensis being very 
well flowered. Mr. S. Pope, gr. to J. J. Barrow, Esq., won for 
four ornamental-foliaged plants ; and waa also 1st for four 

exotic Ferns. 

In a class for nine Orchids, Mr. J. Howes was a good 1st, 
his pieces of Epidendrum vitellinum majus and Oncidiom 
macranthum being excellent. 

Begonias were excellent, Mr. W. H. WlCKENa being 1st for 
singles, and Mr, T. Furze for doubles. Mr. W. H. Wickeits 
also won the Silver Medal for tuberous Begonias, with a 
grand lot. 

As usual, both zonal Pelargoniums and Fuchsias were good,, 
while the Gloxinias were difficult to beat. Mr. Wickens, 
Mr. Wakeford, and Mr. Furze took 1st honours in the 

order giveo, for these three species of plants. \ 

Cut Flowers.— For blooms of herbaceous plants, Mr. J. 
Charlton, Tunbridge Wells, was well in front, and put up a 
grand lot. Mr. Dupont, gr. to C. B. Powell, Esq., South- 
borough, was 2nd. Mr. T. Portnell was 1st for eighteen 
varieties of stove and greenhouse flowers. Table decorations, 
if not very numerous, were of the usual high quality, Mrs. 
Hat-tow, Sevenoaks, being 1st for three stands ; and Mr. R. 
Edwards, Sevenoaks, 1st for one stand, the latter decorated 
entirely with Roses. In both classes, Mr. A. Hatton, gr. to 
Mrs. Swaxzy, Sevenoaks, was a close 2nd. Mr. J. CHARLTON 
won for a wreath, hand- bouquet, and also a wedding-bouquet, 
all being good. 

Roses.— Mr. G. Mount, Canterbury, was well in front for 
forty-eight varieties, and had some good examples. The best 
were Duke of Teck, Duke of Wellington, A. K. Williams, 
Charles Lefebvre, Marie Baumann, Xavier Olibo, and Dupuy 
Jamain. The last bloom secured the National Rose Society's 
Bronze Medal for the best Rose in open classes, and was a mag- 
nificent flower. A similar Medal in the amateur classes was 
awarded to Mr. Elxes for Mrs. John Laing. Mr. J. Den- 
wett, Maresfield, won for twelve Teas or Noisettes. Mr. 
Harris, gr. to E. M Bethune, Esq., Denne Park, Horsham, 
staged a good stand of twenty-four single blooms, Niphetos, 
Alfred Colomb, A. K. Williams, and Fisher Holmes, being 
particularly good; Mr. C. Salter, gr. to T. B. Haywood, 
Esq., Reigate, was a close 2nd here, and first for fix varieties, 
three of each ; while Mr. Harris was again well in front for 
twelve Teas in the amateur division with a perfect stand. 

i Fruit.— This was excellent in quality. Mr. J. Friend, gr. 
to the Hon. P. C. Glyn, Grodstone, beat Mr. Palmer for 
Black Hamburgh ; Mr. Earl was in front of Mr. J. Snow for 
Black Grapes other than Hamburgh ; while Mr. SNOW was 
well in front for White Grapes. Mr. T. C. Moorhouse, gr. to 
J. W. Temple, Esq., Groombridge, took 1st, both for Peaches- 
and Nectarines; Mr. Earl doing the same for Pine-apples and 
Cherries, and Mr. Friend for Melons and Strawberries. 

The collections of fruit (nine varieties) were good, and 
resulted in Mr, Fenneil, gr. to W. M. Cazalet, Esq.. Ton- 
bridge, being awarded an equal 1st with Mr. Earl, Mr. J. 
Saow following. 

Vegetables.— Mr. J. Friexd was 1st for nine kinds, and 
also for six kinds, to be grown by single-handed gardeners 
only. The 1st prize in Messrs. Suttos & Son's class went to 
Mr. G. Denton, gr. to A. G. Earle, Esq , Tonbridge ; and that 
by Mr. J. Charlton to Mr. C. F. Dunk, gr. to H. TAYLOR, 
Esq., Rust ball. 

The chief winners in the local classes were Mr. J. StfOWt 
for six stove and greenhouse plants in bloom, also for four 
ditto for ornamental foliaged plants and for exotic Ferns. 

Miscellaneous.— Cottagers productions were particular!? 
good, especially the vegetables. A few good cat Roses came 
from Mr. G. W. Piper, of the Uckfield Nursery; and also* 
pretty group of Begonias and Ferns from Mr. S. S. Ctn£, Sk 
John's Nurseries. Other exhibits, not for competition, were 
herbaceous flowers, and the usual stands of horticultural 
implements. 



EDINBURGH BOTANICAL. 

July 11.— Thia aociety held iti last meeting of 
the aeition on the abrve datp, in the Lecture fl ftU 
of the R»yal Botanic Garden, Mr. Symington Grie* e 
taking the chair. 

There was a rather thin attendance of members, thisbe !?g 
due to the heavy rainfall during the afternoon. After 
reading of The council proceedings, and election of D ® 
members, Mr. Andrew Taylor read obituary notices of _ 
H. C. F. Cleghorn and Dr. T. A. G. Balfour, both of * b ° 
were distinguished members of this society, and contriDU 
to the Transactions of the society. Mr. R. Lindsay, CuI *Jv 
in his repoit on Vegetation in the Royal Botanic Oa rfl' 
Btated that a much larger number of plants had flowered tip» 
the rock garden than for «ereral years in the correspond * 















J0I.Y 20, 1895.] 



THE 



GARDENERS 



CHRONICLE 



77 



month. The foliage of trees were tolerably free from insect 
pests, notwithstanding the drought during the month. The 
following items are taken from the report of meteorological 
observations for June, in the garden. The highest reading of 
the barometer was on the 24th =30° '397 ; lowest, 29° # 445; 
moan for month, 29° 965. Protected self- registering thermo- 
meter* : highest reading, 77°"7, on the 26th ; lowest, 37°1, on 
the 13th; mean for month, 56°*3; or O 0, 7 above average for 
June of last four years. Hygrometer : mean cf dry bulb, 57° 8 ; 
mean of wet bulb, 52°'5. Radiation thermometer : highest, in 
sun, 131°'0, on the 10th ; lowest, on grass, 28° 8, on the 15th. 
Frost occurred on grass on six days. Total sunshine, 187 hours 
93 minutes; the sunniest day was on the 6th, when 13 hours 
25 minutes was recorded; Rainfall : rain fell on 15 days, the 
total fall being 2*560 inch, this being 0611 inch above the 
average for June of last four years. Mr. R. L. Harrow read 
the u*ual notes on Plants in the Plant Houses, and exhibited 
Combretum purpureum, Crinum augustum, Cypripedium 
Parishii, Lambertia formosa, Tussaccia pulchella, and others 
from the houses. At the close of the meeting, the chairman 
announced the next meeting to take place in November. 



BATH HOSE AND BEGONIA SHOW. 

July 11.— The Bath Rose ahow, as usual, was held 
in the Sydney Gardens on the above-named date. 
The competition in some of the open classes was 
not quite so good as it generally is at Bath, the long 
■pell of dry weather being responsible for this cir- 
cumstance ; the blooms, however, were of a high 
order, and the show was a success. 

ROSES. 

Nurserymen. 

In the class for seventy-two distinct varieties, three very 
good lots of blooms were staged by Messrs. Harkness & 
Sons. Bedale, Yorkshire ; Messrs. Perkins & Sons, Coventry ; 
and Messrs. George Cooling & Sons, Bath, who took the 
prizes in the above order. The contest for 1st place between 
the Yorkshire and Warwickshire firms was very close. The 
best bLoms in the premier stand were Captain Haward, Her 
Majesty, Duke of Teck, Francises Kruger, Gustave Piganneau, 
Mrs. John Lai D g, Prince Arthur. Alfred Colomb, A. K. 
Williams, Comte Raimbaud, Auguste Rigotard, Victor Hugo, 
Karl of Dufferin, Marie Rady, Charles Darwin, Exposition de 
Une and La France. The blooms in the 2nd prize stand were 
slightly smaller, but they were even, fresh, and of fine sub- 
stance, as also were the blooms in Messrs. Coolings' stand. 

Thirty-six varieties, three trusses of each.— 1st, Messrs. 
cooling & Sons, with good all-round blooms of Comtesse de 
v»! a ^! ride ° f Waltham ' Etienne Levet, Alfred Co!omb. 
I*f an k o?' Mra * John LaiD «» La France, Abel Carriere, 
no^i ,, d ' Gu8fcAve Piganneau, Duke of Wellington, 
Caroline Kuster, Horace Vernet, Harrison Weir, large solid 
glooms of rich velvety crimson, &c. ; Messrs. Perkins taking 
2nd honours with a good stand. 

Ei ? htee * distinct varieties, three trusses of each.- Mr. George 
mount, Canterbury, was a good 1st among four competitors 

was 2nd ***** ^ ° f bl00m * '' **' J ° HN Mattock . °* ford > 

• Thirty-six distinct varieties, single trusses.— Ken Mr. Mount 
was to the front again with a fine lot of blooms, including 
grand specimens of A. K. Williams, Mrs. John Laing, Duke of 
Edinburgh, Madame Eugene Verdier. Xavier Olibo, Ulrich 
Brunner, John MiUs. and Alfred Colomb; Messrs. Curtis, 
Fanpford & Co. were 2nd. 

Eighteen Teas or Noisettes, distinct varieties, single trusses - 
*irst, Mr. Mattock, with a stand of even, fresh, solid blooms 
of Ernest Metz, Souvenir de S. A. Prince, Caroline Kuster, 
Uitnerine Mermet, Madame Cusln. The Bride, Comtesse de 
wadaiilac, Innocente Pirola. Marie Van Houtte, Marechal Niel, 
Souvenir d'Elise Vardon, Ethel Brownlow, and Souvenir de 
inereie Levet; Messrs. Curtis, Sandford A Co. were 2nd. 

Amateurs. 

In the classes for thirty-six and eighteen varieties in single 
trusses, the Rev. J. H. Pemberton, Havering, Essex, secured 
premier position, Duke of Teck, Her Majesty, Charles 
i^febvre, A. K. Williams, John Stuart Mill, Dupuy Jamain, 
^therme Mermet, Duke of Wellington, and Comte Raim- 
"aua, being the most prominent blooms in his stand ; Dr. Budd 
mtn, was a good 2nd in each class. 

EoZT* f<nir , varieties > ■*** trusses.-lst, Mr. Thomas 
*obb9, Bristol; 2nd, Mr. Parker, Old Headington, both 
staging good blooms. ' 

Twelve varieties, one bloom of each. —Mr. HOBB3 was again 
1st. and Mr. Conway Jones, Gloucester, was 2nd. 

Local Classes.— In the two classes reserved for Roses grown 
witnin six miles of the Guildhall, Bath, Mr. A. Hill Gray, 
^as 1st id both, securing the Gold Medal for twelve varieties, 
one bloom of each, and premier place for a like number of 
varieties in trebles. Messrs. E. G. Garaway, Hobbs, and 
"all (Bath), were the other prize-winners in the above-men- 
tioned classes. Mr. Hill Gray also secured the premier award 
iQ two out of the three classes for Teas and Noisettes ; Mr. 
James Parker taking 2nd place in the other class. 

Open Classes. 

Twelve singU trusses of any Rose.-lst, Messrs. Harkness k. 
bons, with good examples of Gustave Piganneau ; 2nd, Messrs. 
^tTRTis, Sandford & Co , with good blooms of Marie Bau- 

^ann. Six stands were staged in this class. 

Twelve blooms of any Yel owRose.—Ut, Mr. John Mattock, 



with faultless blooms of Comtesse de Nadaillac ; Mr. Hill 
Gray being 2nd with Marechal Niel. 

Twelve single trusses of any crimson Rose.—Ut, Messrs. 
Perkins & Sons, with grand blooms of A. K. Williams ; Mr, 
Mount taking 2nd place with good solid flowers of Fisher 
Holmes. 

Tw Ive distinct garden decor at ve Roses to be shown in 
bunches.— Here Messrs. George Cooling & Sons were easily 
1st with grand exhibits of Ophirie, Madame Falcot, Jaune 
Desprey, Celine Forestier, Marquis of Salisbury, Beaute 
Inconstante, W. A. Richardson, Bardon Job. Homer, Triomphe 
des Rennes, and LTdeale ; Mr. Mattock was 2nd. 

Premier blooms.— Mr. Hill Gray had the best Tea or 
Noisettd (Comtesse de Nadaillac) Rose in the show; and 
Messrs. Harkness & Sons had the best hybrid perpetual in 
Gustave Piganneau. 

Messrs. Keynes Williams 9l Co , Salisbury, had a stand 
of hybrid Sweet Briars, which were greatly admired ; Jeannie 
Deans, Brenda, and Lucy Bertram being the most conspicuous. 

Groups. 

For a group of miscellaneous plants, on a space not exceed- 
ing 250 square feet, Mr. James Cypher was 1st, with an 
artistic arrangement, consisting of a series of mounds having 
central plants of Palms, Bamboos, Tuberoses, Dracamas 
Goldieana and Lindeni, Crotons, and Humea elegans in fine 
flower, backed up by grandly-flowered Orchids ; also Cala- 
diums. Maidenhair Fern, Crotons, &c. Mr. B. R. Cater 
(Chairman of the Bath Floral Fete and Band Committee, and 
a keen horticulturist) was a capital 2nd. being very strong in 
Orchids ; and Eldorado cork was introduced into this arrange- 
ment with good effect, representing the front elevation of a 
castle. 

BEGONIAS. 

Four classes were set apart for plants of the tuberous- rooted 
Begonias, and the plants put up in competition for these prizes 
made a good show, and were, on the whole, highly creditable 
to the growers. The plants were confined to pots not exceeding 
10 inches in diameter. 

Mr. Richard Curry, Bath, was 1st for six distinct varieties, 
with well-grown plants, the foliage being good, and the flowers 
large and fresh ; Mr. T. W. Dunn, Bath, was 2nd. 

For six plants, double, Mr. J. B. Blackmoor was 1st, with 
large, grandly-flowered plants of Lady Gertrude, Duchess of 
Fife, Rev. E. Lascelles, Princess May (a fine white), Mrs. 
French, and Exquisite ; 2nd, Mr. D. L. Carr. 

Mr. Dunn had the best specimen, single-flowered ; and Mr. 
Blackmore the best plant of a double variety. 

Mr. B. R. Davis, Yeovil, had a magnificent display of cut 
blooms of great size, and various and pleasing shades of colour. 

Strawberries, 

In the three classes provided for Strawberries, Mr. F. 
Bicketts, Batheaston, took 1st prize in each class, showing 
nice fruits of Sir Joseph Paxton in each case. 

Vegetables. 

Two good collections of vegetables were staged by Mr. 
George Garaway and Mr. William Evby, who secured 
the prizes in the above order. 

A portion of the side staging on entering the large marquee 
had been devoted to the sale of spare flowers in aid of the 
Gardeners' Royal Benevolent Institution, £13 being realised in 
this way last year. This pnetice is worthy of adoption by 
the committees of other shows held in various parts of the 
country. 

THE NATIONAL ROSE SHOW AT 

DERBY. 

July 17. — We share the opinion of both secre- 
taries, that this ahow was the beit of the aeaton, so 
far at quality it concerned, while it certainly fell 
very little ihort in numbers. Not many expected to 
find so grand a collection of Roses after the pro- 
longed drought, but there they were, and from almost 
all parts, bat Scotland, Ireland, and the north and 
north • east of England sent the best flowers. 
The Hjbrid Perpetuals were very good, clean, and 
bright, except in a few cases; but the Teas were 
scarcely so good as at the Crystal Palace or Glou- 
cester. Their uniform good quality was remark- 
able, more especially in the Hybrid Perpetual 
classes. u 

NURSERYMEN. 

In the Jubilee Trophy class for thirty-six singles, to which a 
Gold Medal is also awarded, there were eleven competitors, 
Messrs. R. Harkness Bl Sons, Bedale. Yorks, won with a good 
stand, consisting of Charles Lefebvre, Madame Eugdne Verdier, 
Horace Vernet, S.-M. Bodocanachi, Dr. Andry, Duchesse de 
Morny, Dupuy Jamain, Queen of Queens, Comte Raimbaud, 
Her Majesty. Duke of Edinburgh, Gustave Piganneau, Lady 
Mary Fitzwilliam, Fisher Holmes, A. K. Williams (medal 
bloom), Ac. There was scarcely a faulty bloom in the collec- 
tion. Mr. B. B. Cant, Colchester, with a good lot, was 2nd, 
his best blooms being Lady H. Stewart, A. K, Williams, 
Victor Hugo, Horace Vernet, and Duke of Wellington. 
Messrs. A. Dickson & Sons, Newtownards, Ireland, had two 
promising seedlings in their 3rd prize stand. 

Fnr seventy two distinct, single trusses.— Messrs. HARKNESS 
& Sons, B. B. Cant, and Messrs. Dickson & Son occupied the 
same positions as in the former class. The best flowers in the 
winning stand were Etienne Levet, Marie Baumann, Horace 
Vernet, Duke of Connaught, Prince Arthur, A. K. Williams, 
and Victor Hugo. 



J-or thirty-six varitties, three blooms of each, there was 
very keen competition, but eventually Messrs. Harkness. 
B. R. Cant, and Messrs. Dickson once more followed each 
other as named. A set of their new H.P. Merrie England, 
was peculiarly striking in the winning stand. 

Thirty-six sing'es, distinct.— There were nine collections, 
and the prizes were taken by Messrs. Cocker 8c Sons, Aber- 
deen ; Messrs. D. Prior & Sox, Colchester, and Messrs. 
Townshexd & Son, Worcester, in the order of their names. 
Very shortly after judging, both of the Utter were decidedly 
in front of Messrs. Cocker's stand. 

For eighteen vitieties, three blooms of each, Messrs. D. Prior 
& Son, Colchester, were well ahead, Messrs. Townshend and 
Mr. G. Mount following. 

Silver Medal Roses. 

Nurserymen. — Messrs. Harkness * Son. with A. K. 
Williams (H. P.); Messrs. W. A D. CROLL, with Marie van 
Houtte (Tea). 

Amateurs. * 

The Jubilee Trophy and Gold Medal was won by Mr. E. B. 
LlNDSELL, Hitchin, who also secured the Silver Medals for 
both the best H. P. and Tea Rose shown by amateurs. This was 
a grand stand, the Medal blooms being Xavier Olibo and 
Comtesse de Nadaillac; Madame Hoste was the only weak 
flower. H. V. Machin, Etq., Gateford Hill, Worksop, had 
Horace Vernet and Her Majesty particularly good in his 2nd 
prize stand. 

A £10 Cup, presented by the Right Hon. Sir W. V. Har- 
COURT, was easily secured by Mr. E. B. Lindseli , with a good 
collection of thirty-six blooms; Mr. W. Drew, Ledbury, was 
2nd. Mr. E. B. Lindsell was also 1st for eight distinct 
varieties, three blooms of each ; Mr. H. V. Machin dividing 
him from the Rev, J. H. Pemberton in this class. 

The Crown Derby Vase, for growers of fewer than 20C0 
plants, was secured by Mr. J. Parker, Oldfield, Hitchin; 
E. Mawley, Esq., Berkhamsted, 2nd ; and R. E. West, Esq., 
Reigate, following. 

For growers of fewer than 1000 plants. Mr. Whittle, 56, 
Belgrave Terrace, Leicester, was in front. 

A piect of Plate given by the Mayor of Derby was won by Mr. 
A. Willi ton, Bedale, Yorks, for twenty- four distinct singles. 

Nine single b.ooms, T. Tatham, Esq., Wilmslow, was a g 
1st among seven competitors; Mr. J. T. Marsdkn, Silverdale, 
Carnforth, winning for six Teas. These three last classes were 
for growers north of the Trent only. 

For 7iine blooms of any one variety, except Teas or Noisettes, 
Mr. Machin was successful with Prince Arthur ; Mr. Drew, 
with Mrs. J. Laing ; and Rev. J. H. Pemberton, with A. K. 
Williams. 



S.l.l 



The class for six new Roses was poor ; Mr. Machin and the 
Rev. J. H. Pemberton being respectively 1st and 2nd. 

Teas and Noisettes. 



Eight competed in an open class for twelve trebles, M< 
D. Prior t\ Son, Colchester; Mr. J. MATrocK, Oxford ; snd 
Messrs. Cocker c\ Sons, Aberdeen, winning in the order aa 
named. 

Nurserymen. 

Messrs. Prior b\ Son were 1st for eighteen distinct, singles; 
Messrs. A. Dickson 8l Son, Newtownards, Ireland, 2nd ; and 
Messrs. J. Cocker & Sons, Aberdeen, 3rd. This was a strong 
class, and the winners came from a wide aiea. In this class 
was the Silver Medal Tea, Van Houtte, from Messrs. W. & D. 

Croll, Dundee. 

For twelve Teas, Mr. J. Mattock, Oxford, was 1st ; Messrs. 
J. BURRELL & Co., Cambridge, being 2nd. 

Amateurs. 

Twelve booms, distinct, open to all amatturs.— Mr. O. G. 
Orpen, Colchester, was well in front of A. Hill Gray, Esq., 

Bath. 

Nine blooms of any Tea or Noisette.— Mr. Machin, Worksop, 
won in this class, staging some good blooms of Edith Gifford. 

Nine single blooms by growers of fewer than 500 plants.— Mr. 
W. Drew, Uplands, Ledbury, was 1st ; A. H. Gray, Esq., 
Bath, being 1st for an extra class of six varieties, thr*e of each. 
The Rev. F. R. Burnslde, Sutton-on-the-Hiil, was 1st, with 
Marie Van Houtte for six blooms of any Tea. 

Open Classes. 

Twelve new and distinct Roses.— Messrs. A. Dickson &Sons, 
Newtownards, Ireland, won with a good lot, but a Jittle 
weaker than at the Crystal Palace; Mr. B. B. Cant, Col- 
chester, and Messrs. Paul & Son, Cheshunt, takiDg 2nd 

and 3rd. 
A Gold Medal was this time awarded to Messrs. A. DICKSON 

& Sons, for HP. Helen Keller, and Commendation was given 
for Lady Moyra Beaucleic. Messrs. Townshend & Son, Wor- 
cester, won with The Bride, for twelve blooms of any whit* 
Rose. Messrs. A. Dickson 8l Sons, with Her Majesty for 
twelve blooms of any light Rose (a grand box) ; and Meters. 
Harkness 8l Sons, with A. K. Williams, for twelve blooms 
of any crimson Rose, 

Garden Roses. 

These were very good, and superior to those shown either at 
the Crystal Palace or Gloucester. In the amateurs' class for 
twelve bunches, Mr. H. V, Machin was 1st 

Messrs. Paul & Son, Cheshunt, staged a grand lot in the 
open class for 1st honours ; being followed by Messrs. W, &. D. 

Croil, and Messrs. J. Cocker 9l Son. 
In the display of Bosee, Mr. H. V. Mi chin beat Mr. J. 

Mattock. 



-4 



78 



THE 



GARDENEBS' 



CHE ONI CLE. 



[July 20, 1895. 



©t>ttttari> 



found 



♦ 



one of hit 
partner, and 



JOHN WILLS.— On Saturday, the 13th init., on a 
perfect incomer day, with the brilliant aumhine 
playing about the grave in Brompton cemetery, and 
amid a large circle of friendt from ail parti of the 
country, John Willi, whoie death wai announced 
in our lait iitae, wai laid to rest. Many who 
would otherwise have been preaent were kept away 
by butineaa engagement! peculiar to the day ; but it 
waa a representative gathering which atood around 
hit laat reiting-place. He had diaplayed undoubted 
geniua, and marked originality in hia particular 
line; he had conceived and carried into effect 
achievement! which amounted almost to audacity, 
but alwaya executed with remarkable taste, akill, 

No man 



and conacientioua 



attention to detaiia. 

elaborate 



and 



in hia day hat done ao much to 
elevate the art of the floral decorator, and the 
immenae impetua given to the development of that 
art in later yeara ia largely due to the happy 
inapirationa of him who aleepa hia laat aleep in 
Brompton Cemetery, near others of hia brethren who 
in their day had made horticulture famoaa. 



here he died. 

When the Royal Aquarium, at Weatminater, waa 

firat eatabliahed aome yeara ago, Mr. Willa planted 
the aummer and winter gardena, and had the main- 
tenance of them for a time; and he alao carried out 
a aeriea of horticultural exhibitiona in the building, 
at one of which, held in May, the aum of £100 waa 
offered in three prizea for twenty-five Orchids. He 
alao carried out a large exhibition at Sandown 
Park, which attracted a very faahionable company. 
Hia groupa of plants at the leading London exhibi- 
tiona were alwaya remarkable for the taste and skill 
which characteriaed hia work* 

About 1878 he waa auperintending extenaive 
alterationa at Laeken Palace for the King of the 
Belgiana ; and during hia career he undertook 
extenaive floral decorations at Buckingham Palace, 
Marlborough Houae (where he had charge of the 
gardena), at the Foreign and other Government 
offices on the occaaion of receptions, at banquets, 
at the Manaion Houae and other city halls, at many 
aristocratic mansions, &c. One of hia greatest 



John Willa waa born in 1832, at Chard, Someraet, undertakinga waa the decoration of the Midland 



where hia early life waa apent. He received hia educa- 
tion in the village achool, having aa a schoolmate Mr. 
Superintendent £. Denning, ao long the Chief of the 
Police at Buckingham Palace and the Houaea of 
Parliament, and who waa preaent at his funeral. 
On leaving achool, he was taken into the gardens of 
Cricket St. Thomaa, the aeat of Viscount Bridport, 



Railway Station, and the Queen's Hotel, at Sheffield, 
on the occaaion of the visit of their E.H. the Prince 
and Princeaa of Walea, who were preaent at the 
opening of one of the public parks, when he electrified 
the Sheffield folk with the boldness and originality 
of hia work. Hia proposal to cover the Albert 
Memorial in Kensington Gardena with a gigantic 



near Chard ; and from thence he went to London glaaa erection, and make it illustrative of the flora 



about 1850, aa gardener near the Swiaa Cottage, St. 
John's Wood, to a Mr. Woodcock, who waa father to 
the vicar of Chard. Later on he waa employed under 
Sir J. Paxton in laying-out the grounda of the 
Crystal Palace at Sydenham; and from thence he 



of the four quartera of the globe, will be remem- 
bered ; aa also hia energetic efforts for a number of 
yeara to originate another International Horticultural 
Exhibition in London. 

Many gardening Institutions and Societies found 



went to the Pine-apple Nurseries of Messrs. A. Hen- in him a generous supporter. At the time of his 
derson & Co., Maida Vale, and on leaving there to the death he waa a member of the committee of the 

Royal Gardeners' Orphan Fund, and as long as he 
was able to do so, he made a point of attending the 
meetings of that body. He leaves a widow, who will 
continue to carry on the business in Onslow Crescent, 



gardens of the Royal Horticultural Society at South 
Kensington, under Mr. George Eyles. He next be- 
came engaged as gardener to Sir Philip Grey de 
Egerton, Bart., at Oalton Park, Tarporley, where his 



enterprising apirit found congenial work. It is * n conjunction with Mr. S. M. Segar. R. D r 

to him we owe to aome extent the popularity of the 

Viola aa a bedding plant in the preaent day, by hia 

bringing V. cornuta to the fore and getting it a place 

in almoat every flower garden. Thia led to othera, 

especially in Scotland, turning their attention to the 

Viola, V. lutea and other apeciea being employed for 

the purpose of obtaining newracea for garden decora- 
tion. Willa 



alao m w _ . w _ 

bena, and raiaed some double varieties now probably 
lost. He alao originated some very fine and 
distinct bicolor Pelargoniuma, including Beauty of 
Calderdale, Beauty of Ribblesdale, Beauty of Oulton, 
Her Majesty, Golden Qaeen, Gaiety, &c, and of 
tricolor*, Florence, Lizzie, and Unique, which were 
sent out by Mr. William Ball ; the former of these, 
Beauty of Calderdale, ia still grown for bedding 
purpoaea. In 1865. he waa gardener to Capt. Le 
G. N. Starkie at Huntroyde Park, Burnley, where 
he still continued hia experiments in raising new 
varieties of bronze zonals and other bedding Pelar- 
goniums ; and from whence originated the new ai d 
distinct Ivy-leaved varieties Wiilaii and Wiliaii 
roaea. To the Botanical Congreaa held in con- 
nection with the Great International Exhibition of 
London in 1866, he contributed a paper on the 
sporting of "Pelargoniums and other Plants," which 
w published ia the Report of Proceedings; and later 
he contributed to the gardening press papers on the 
origin of variegated Pelargoniums and allied subjects. 
Coming to London at the end of the aixtiea he 
eventually e.tabli.hed himself in business at Sassex 
Place, Brompton, removing a few years afterwards 
to Onslow Crescent, where he built up a large basi- 
nets, having establishments at Anerley, Falham 
and elsewhere; and taking a foremost pla4 
as a floral decorator, E*rly in 1880.j6oding his 
large business beyond hi. control, he formed it 
into a Limited Liability Co., with commodious pre- 
mises in Regent Street ; but it did not prove ao 
aucceaaful aa he had hoped, and the business again 



MR. J. STRATFORD. — We regret to announce 
the death of Mr. J. Stratford on June 29, 
aged sixty-one years. He was head gardener at 
WormleyBury, Broxbourne, Hertfordshire, for thirty- 
five years, under the late Mrs. Grant and H. G. 
Bashby, Esq ; having come from The Knole, Glamor- 
ganshire, with Mrs. Grant in the year 1860. The 
funeral took place at Wormley Church, on July 3, a 
large number of his old friends attending ; and he leaves 
a widow, three daughters and one son, to mourn his 
loss. Mr. D. R. Stratford, son of the deceased, takes 
hia father's place aa head gardener, he having been 
foreman under him for the past five yeara. 



Markets. 



CO VENT GARDEN, July 18. 

I cannot accept any responsibility for the subjoined 
reports. They are furnished to us regularly every 
Thursday, by the kindness of several of the principal 
salesmen, who revise the list, and who are responsible 
for the quotations. It must be remembered that these 
quotations do not represent the prices on any particular 
day, but only the general averages for the week preceding 
the date of our report. The prices depend upon the 
Quality of the samples, the supply in the market, and the 
demand ; and they may fluctuate, not only from day to 
dav. but often several times in one dav. Ed.1 

Out Flowers.— Average; Wholesale Prices. 



f. d. t.d. 



4 0-60 

10-16 
6-10 

3 8 



Arums, per dozen 

blooms 

Asters, per bunch... 
Rouvardias, p. bun. 
Carnations, 12 bun. 
Eucharis, per dozen 4 0-60 

Gardenias, per doz, 3 0-40 
Lapageria, 12 blow. 
Lilic (French), per 

bunch 

Lilium Harrisii, per 

dozen ... ... 

Lilium Lancif olium, 

per dozen 

Maidenhair Fern, 

per 12 bunches ... 

Marguerites, 12 ban. 
Mignonette, 12 bun. 



10-20 
4 6-50 

2 U- 4 

■ 

3 0-40 

■ 

4 0-60 

lf-30 



4-06 
9 0-15 



*. d. s. d. 

Pelargoniums, scar- 
let, per 12 bunches 4 0-60 

— 12 sprays ... 
Orchids : — 

Oattleya, 12blms. 

Odo n toglossum 
crispum,12blm, 3 0-60 
Pyrethrums, 12 bun. 
Bases, Tea, per doz. 

— coloured, p. dz. 

— yellow (Mare- 
chals), per dozen 4 0-60 

— red, per dozen 

— red. per dozen 
bunches 

Stephanotis, dozen 
sprays 



2 0-40 
10-20 
2 0-40 



10-16 
4 0-90 



• #• 



Orchid-bloom 



Tuberoses, 12 blms 



16-20 
4-06 



Plants w pots.— Average Wholesale Prices. 



Adiantum, per doz. 
Aspidistra, per doz. 

— specimen, each 
Calceolaria, per doz. 
Coleus, per dozen..* 
Cyperus, per dozen 
Dracaena, each ... 

— various, doz. 
Evergreen Shrubs, 

in variety, per 
dozen ... ... 

Ferns, small, doz.... 

Ferns, various, doz. 



t. 
4 

12 
5 

4 
3 
4 
1 
12 



d. t. d. 

0-12 
0-30 
0-15 
0-6 

0-6 
0-10 

0-* 7 6 
24 



6 

1 
5 



0-24 
6-3 
0-12 



Ficus elastica, each 
Foliage plants, doz. 
Fuchsias, per doz. .. 
Heliotrope, per doz. 
Hydrangeas, p. doz. 
Ivy Geraniums, doz. 
Lobelia, per doz ... 
Marguerites, p. doz. 
Mignonette, p. doz. 
Palms, various, ea. 

— specimens, ea. 10 6-84 
Pelargoniums, doz. 8 12 
Rhodanthe, per doz. 



«. d. t.d. 
10-76 

9 0-24 

6 0-86 
4 0-60 
9 0-24 
4 0-60 

3 0-4 

6 0-90 

4 0-60 
2 O-10 



4 0-60 



Fruit.— Average Wholesale Prices. 



• • • 



Apples, per sieve 
Cherries, Black, per 

half- sieve ... 

— White, do. ... 
Figs, per dozen ... 
Grapes, 1st quality, 

black, English, lb. 

— 2nd quality... 

— Muscats 

— Guernsey 
Melons, each... 



... 



... 



... 



t. d. t. d. 

3 0-50 

4 0-80 
4 0-70 
10-20 

16-20 
9-10 
2 0-30 
10-16 
16-20 



Pine- apples, St. Mi- 
chael, each ... 
Peaches, 1st size, doz 

— 2nd size 

— 3rd size 
Raspberries, per lb, 
Red Currants, per 

half-sieve ... 

— black, per 

half-sieve 



•t 



»t 



... 



t.d.t,d. 

2 0- ft 
6 0-10 
2 0-40 
10-16 

3 3} 

2 6-30 
4 0-46 



Vegetables.— Average Wholesale Prices. 



t.d. t.d. 



*•• 



10-1 
5 



Beans, Broad, per 

sieve 
Beans, p. sieve ... 
Cauliflowers, p. doz. 2 6-3 
Cucumbers, per doz. 2 0-3 
Marrows, veg., doz. 
Mushrosms, per lb. 



6 




1 0- 

6-09 



Peas, blue, per bag 

— — per bush. 
Tomatos, Home- 
grown, per doz. lb. 

— Smooth 

— ordinary 

— Guernsey ,, 



I. d. t. d. 

4 0-6 
2 6-36 



M 



>» 



4 
4 0- 
3 0- 
3 



36 



New Potatos. 

Market rather firmer for best English samples, 
foreign supplies, prices are lower. J. B. Thomas, 



but for 



SEEDS. 

London : Ju'y 17.— Messrs. John Shaw & Sons, Seed 
Merchants, of Great Maze Pond, Borough, London, S.E., 
write that owing to the Parliamentary elections, and more 
particularly to the practically unbroken drought, to-day'a 
seed market was bare alike of buyers and of business. New 
Trifoiium, both English and French, being in early and abun- 
dant supply, and well in advance of consumptive want, 
naturally comes to hand very cheap. There is no change in 
either Mustard or Rape-seed, Canary exhibits marked signs 
of increasing strength, the bear sales which caused the recent 
depression are apparently still uncovered. Peas and Haricots 
keep steady. 

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES. 

Borough; July 16. — Quotations ;— Carrots, 2i. to 2s. Gd. 
per bag ; Peas, 2s. Gd. to 3s. Qd. per bushel ; Horseradish. Is. to 
1*. 3d. per bundle; Apples, Tasmanian, 6s. to St. per case; 
Cherries, Is. U. to 2s. ; Currants, 1j. 9d. to 45. per half-sieve. 

Spitalfields : July 16.- Quotations:— Cabbages. 5*. to 7«. 
per tally ; Carrots, 2s. to 2s. 6rf. per dozen bunches ; Turnips, 
do.; Peas, 2s. 6d, to 3s. per bushel, and 5*. to 65. per big; 
Broad Beans, 25. 6d. to 35. per bag ; Scarlet Runners, 35. w 
35. 6d. per half-bushel ; French Beans, do. 

Stbatford : July 16.— The supply at this market during 
the past week has been excellent, and, with plenty of buyers, 
a brisk trade was done at the following quotations :— Cabbages, 
25. Kd. to 55. per tally ; Peas, 55. to 65. per bag ; Beans, 
25. 9d. to 35. per bag ; Black Currants, 35. 6d. to 45. per hfli - 
sieve ; red do., 35. to St. 64. do, ; Cheuries, 45. to 4s. W- d0 / ' 
do., eating, 45. to 5s. to.; Apples, 2s. %d. to 2s. 9d. do. ; do , w. 
to 55. Qd. per sieve; Oranges, 4s. to 5s. per 100 ; Tomatos, e ■ 
to 10s. per case; BeanF, Scarlet, 7s. 6d. to 8s. per bus w^ 
Cucumbers, 2s. to 2s. 6rf. per dozen ; Turnips, 2s. to 2s. 6 • P* 
dozen bunches; Carrots, household, Is. to 2s. per <)<*«, 
Mangels, 12s. to 20s. per ton ; Onionp, Egyptian, 5s. 6d. to 
per cwt. 

Farringdon : Ju'y 18.- Quotations :— Raspberries, 3d- 
Ad. per lb. ; Gooseberries, 25. fd. to 3s. per half-sieve; hia* 
Currants, 5s. %d. per half-bushel ; red do , 5s. per bubhe , 
Green Gage?, 5s. 6d. per basket (12 lb.); Cherries. *>*- J* 
halt-bushel ; do., white, 5s. 6<*. do. ; Melons, 12s. per caae^ 
24; Pineapples, 2s. 6o\ each; Apples, Tasmanian, 6*. P 
case ; Tomatos, English, 6d. per lb. ; do., foreign, 1 \d. per 1 • t 
Cucumbers, 2d. each ; Cabbage. If. 3d. per dozen ; Pa™ ^ 
Qd. per bunch ; Turnips, 2d. do ; Carrots, 3d. do. ; Bro 
Beans, 2s. to 2s. 6d. per bushel ; French do., 6f. 6^. P er fiai 
bushel ; Scarlet Beans, 6s. 64. do. 




Averages.— The following tat the averages of the P nC< ? 

e principal metropolitan markets during the past wee 
Clover, prime, 90s. to 115*. ; do., inferior, 50s. to 80s.; £ 
best, 60s. to 95s. ; do., inferior. 30f. to 60s. ; mixture. 7i*. 



92s. : and straw 



CORN, 



of 



Averages. — Official statement of the average P n ^- I1J? 
British Corn, imperial measure (qr.), for the week ena * 
July 13, and for the corresponding period in ibe pre 
year:— 1895: Wheat, 25s. ; Barley, 20s. 84. ; Oats, 15*. 
1894 : Wheat, 24s. 54. ; Barley, 21s. ; Oats, 19s. 74. 









July 20, 1895.] 



THE GARDENERS 



CHRONICLE, 



79 



POTATOS. 

BOROUGH: July 16. — Quotations : Old, 40*. to 60*. pep 
ton ; New, 80*. to 120*. per ton. 

Spitaxfields : July 16. — Quotations :— Hebrons, 80*. to 
lOOi. ; Puritans, 90*. to 100*. ; Snowdrops, 80*. to 100*. ; 
Kidneys, 100*. to 120*. per ton. 

Stratford : July 16.— Quotations : — Old : 25?. to 40*. per 
ton. New : Beauty of Hebron, 80*. to 90*. ; Kidneys, 90*. to 
100*. ; White Hebron, 8-5*. to 90*. per ton. 

Farringdon : Ju } y 18. — Quotations : — New : White 
Hebrons, 5*. to 5*. 6rf. per cwt. ; Red do., 4*. 6rf. to 5* do. ; 
Early Monarch, 5*. to 6*. ; Puritans, do. : Jersey, 4*. to 
per cwt. 

London Averages : July 17.— New : Hebrons, 80*. to 100*. ; 
Snowdrops, 80*. to 100*. ; Early Regents, 80*. to 90*. ; Early 
Rose, 75*. to 85*. ; Jersey, 70*. to 90*. ; Cherbourg, 65*. to 
75*. per ton Old : Magnums, 30*. to 40*. per ton. 




» term "accumulated temperature" indicates the aegre- 
gate amount, as well as the duration, of degrees of 
temperature above or below 42° Fahr. for the period 
named: and this combined result is expressed in Day- 
degrees -a ••Day-degree'' signifying 1° continued for 
twenty-four hours, or any other number of degrees for 
an inversely proportional number of hours. 1 



'ERA 



Rainfall 



Bright 

Sun. 




aver 
10 aver 



a l 



3 
4 

6 
6 

7 

8 

9 

10 



1 



aver 

i + 



i + 

aver 
aver 

1 + 



Day- 

deg. 

87 
1C0 

123 

132 

127 
137 

99 
113 
125 
104 



117 
139 




Day- 

deg. 

+ 262 



lOths 
Inch. 

8 + 








+ 70 
•f 20 



415 2 



+ 277 2 



Ins. 

117 J21-1J 12 

93 127 36 



+ 283 

|+ 48|+ 372 



3 






96 
81 






















— 15 
+ 50 
+ 48 
+ 22 

+ 11 

— 37 



+ 333 4 



+ 364 
+ 303 

+ 337 
+ 275 
+ 195 

+ 248 



126 
9'4 



50 
59 



30 

37 
34 
41 
38 



2 + 

aver 

5 — 

3 + 
2 — 



75 . 10 4 61 

72 8*4 62 j 40 

96 1 13 30 35 

83 1 12*5j 46 37 

77 113 5 50 46 






107 14 1 20 

88 15'7 29 






91 



11 5 46 



35 

37 

50 



♦k * ,. nct8 lndl <»ted by number in the first column are 
toe tollowing :— 

0, Scotland, N. Principal Wheat-producing Districts— 
1, Scotland, E. ; 2, England, N.E. ; 3, England, E.; 
4, Midland Counties; 5, England, including London, S. 

Principal Grazing, $c. t Districts— G, Scotland, W. : 7, 

England N.W.; 8, England, S.W.j 9. Ireland. N.; 
10, Ireland. S.: "Channel f«landn. 



THE PAST WEEK. 

The following summary record of the weather throughout 
the British Islands for the week ending July 13, is furnished 
from the Meteorological Office :— 

"The weather was unsettled and rainy in the extreme 
western and northern parts of the kingdom, but generally fair 
in ail other localities, although some rain was experienced in 
nearly all places on Thursday or Friday. 

n/tK The tem P erature TO** rather high during the earlier days 
oi the period, but fell considerably towards its close, and the 
average for the week did not differ materially from the normal 
rhiTY hi g h «st of the maxima were recorded either on 

ZJ 7™* ® th ' and ran « ed from 80 ° to 82° over the greater 
wJL+ , * gland ' to 72 ° in Irel *nd, and to 71° in the north and 
west of. Scotland. The lowest of the minima were recorded, 

4io • « ™ " rin * the latter P arfc of the w **. and ranged from 
in >i f^j*^ N ' and E.\ 42° in • England, S. W.\ and 43° 

4° gland * E - to 5l ° *a the • Channel Islands.' 
and i rainfali ©needed the mean in -Scotland, N. and W.\ 
N W' w . ,IreUnd ' N/ - * nd i^t equalled it in * England, 

••Tfcl k ? ° ther di8tricte th «*e was again a deficiency. 
Enirl^ ^ , sunshine was in excess over the whole of 
wit 1a M T 11 M in ' Scot,and . E.'; but in Ireland and the 
the m T Scotland, the amount recorded was less than 

dur^r* the time o! yeap - The P«roenU ge of the possible 
land r" ***** tt0m 62 in ' Bn S^. $.', and 61 in the • Mid- 
Snirli^ f?' and from ^tween 46 and 59 in the other 



To a Minor Bard. 

Poat, who long hast timed thy song 
la praise of Kdscs and of Lilies, 

And wreathed each line with Eglantine 
To please the lovely Amaryllis, 

The taste in flowers those lines embody 

Is j ait a little bit dtmodt. 

If thou wouldst write for oar delight 
(And that of her whom thou adorest), 

No longer wait, but celebrate 

The latest triumphs of the florist ! 

Why obstinately shut thine eyes 

To horticultural novelties ? 

They flaunt themselves on hot-house shelves, 
With petals spangled, twisted, forked ;— 

Sorely the Muse will not refuse 
To recognise the modern Orchid ! 

Should gazing on their glories tire thee, 

Their names alone mast needs inspire thee. 

How sweet, my friend, to seize and spend 
The wealth these noble names supply us ; 

To sing of Masdevattias 

Of Zygopetalum, and Phaius, 

And, seeking for a rhyme to " blossom," 

To find it in * Odontoglossum " ! 

Then there's Cymbidium and Otcidium, 

Lycaste with the purple lip, 
Calanthe, too, of gorgeous hue. « . . 

Then haste !— The vacant laureateship 
(IVe shown the way)— 'tis thine to win it, 
So set to work this very minute ! 

— Pall Mall Gazette . 



Enquiry 



M He that questioneth much shall learn much."—BjLQOV. 

British Wines. — "C. H. I." wishes for some 
receipts for making wine from Currants, Raspberries, 
Gooseberries, and Plums. *a^ 




Wns\fm 



\pondent 




• * 



Owing to the large increase in our circulation, we are 

TwuAJiMntly under the necessity of going to press some hours 

earlier. Our contributors t who well know what this implies, wiU 

kindly aid us by sending their communications as early in the 

week as possible. Communications should reach us not later than 
Wednesday. 

•** Plants, Fruits, etc., to se Named.— Correspondents 
sending plants or fruits to be named, or asking questions 
demanding time and research for their solution, must not expect 
to obtain an answer to their enquiries in the current week. 
Specimens should be good ones, carefully packed and numbered, 
and not more than six should be sent at one time. Leaves only, or 
Florists varieties cannot, as a rule, be named. 

Annuals for Standing the Winter : 
Agrostemma cce'i-rosea fimbriata, J foot; Alys- 
sum maritimum, | foot ; Bartonia aurea, 1 J foot ; 
Cacalia coccinea, 1 foot ; Calliopsis Drummondi, 
2 feet; C. coronate, 1 foot; Candytuft, whit3, 
lilac, and crimson, 1 foot ; Chrysanthemum Bur- 
ridgeanum, 1£ foot; Clarkia elegans, in varie y, 
1£ foot ; Collinsia, in variety, 1 foot ; Erysimum 
Peroffskianum, 1£ foot ; Eacbscholtzia californica, 
1 foot ; Gilia, in variety, 1£ foot ; Leptosiphon 
densiflorus, 1 foot; L. aureus, £ foot; Lupinus 
nanus and others, f to 2£ feet ; Nemophila varie- 
ties, J foot; Shirley, Oriental, and Iceland Pop- 
pies ; Sanvitaiia procambens, £ foot; SileRe 
pendala, £ foot; Sweet Peas, 5 feet; Venus' 
Looking-glass, | foot; Virginian Stock, in variety, 
J foot. The above is an ample list for any but 
jarge gardens, and contains many very pretty 
plants. To make quite sure of having a display, 
it is prudent to make sowings in September in 
small 60-pots, and thin the seedlings to five 
or six in a pot. They should be wintered in cold 
pits or bank<»d-up frames close to the glass, and 
protected from hard frosts, and well aired at other 
times. These may be planted out in March. 

Books : C. M. T. The Landscape Gardtner, by Jos, 
Newton, published by EU'dwick & B>£ue, 1U2, 
Piccadilly. Milner's Latidscape Gardening, pab- 



lished by Simpkin, Marshall, Kent & Co., Stationed 
Hall Court London, E.C. - F. C. Hcinemann, 
Arfurt. The American Florist Company's Directory, 
Price, 2 dollars. Chicago: Published by the 
American Florists' Co. It contains a list of 
florists, Nurserymen, and Seedsmen in theUoited 
btates of America, besides other useful matter. 

Carnation Failing to Bloom : J. H. Caused by 

over-watering, probably. There is no disease 
visible. 

Carnations: J. A. The appearances are probably 
due to the presence of eel -worms. They are 
derived from the soil, so that they are difficult to 
get rid of. 

Chrysanthemum Buds : X. The crown-bud is the ter- 
minal bud of the main stem, and therefore is really 
the terminal bud proper. The terminal bud of the 
Chrysanthemum fanciers is the terminal bud of 
the side- shoots. It might be called secondary 
terminal bud to avoid confusion, the proper ter- 
minal bud being called the primary terminal. 

Eucharis: W. J. They are affected by the bulb- 
mite, and there being no cure for the malady, you 
had better burn all the affected bulbs and make 
a new start with clean plants. 

Grapes : i?. D. L, The spots are due to a fuDgas 
figured in the Gardeners' Chronicle, July 21, 1894. 
Spraying with Bordeaux Mixture in the very 
young state would be serviceable. 

Names of Plants : Correspondents not answered in 
this issue are requested to conudt the next number. 
8. 1, Leptospermum ericoides; 2, Spiraoa torbifolia; 
3, Erjngium alpinum ; 4, Hierochloe redolens ; 
5, Lilium monadelphum; 6, Centaurea scabiosa. 
— C. H. I. 1, Ljchnis cbalcedonica ; 2, Galepa 
officinalis; 3, Justicia carnea; 4, Altb®a offi- 
cinalis; 5, Clarkia elegans; 6, Stenactis spe- 
ciosa.— W. Over. Cattleya granulosa, var. Du- 
busysonii. — X. 1, Pyrus Sorbus, the true 
Service; 2, Spinea callosa— E. J. N. A very 
I good variety of Stanhopea oculata— W. M. Den- 
drobium superbiens.— M. 1, Myrsiphyllum aspa- 
ragoides, often called Smilax; 2, Phjllanthus 
nivosus ; 3, Cyrtomium (Aspidium) falcatum, 
a cold greenhouse or conservatory Fern ; 4, 
Lastrea aristata variegata — G. M., France. The 
flowers of Epidendrum were quite dried up 
on arrival, but they appear to be of the variable 
E. fragrant. The abnormal flower is very sin- 
gular. — W. V. T. Guevinia avellana, Proteaceae, 
figured in the Gardeners' Chronicle, July 12, 1884, 
P« 41. — H. Henkel. Dendrobium gratiotissimuro, 
the other probably Phlox maculata var. Candida. 
— Amateur, Lavatera trimestris. 

Peaches : R. <?. H. Without seeing the trees we are 
uoable to do more than make a guess at the cause 
of the evils complained of. We know how severely 
the sulphurous fumes of coke-ovens and burning 
pit- heaps affect the fruit trees at Lambton 
Castle ; and it does not seem improbable that the 
proximity of the smoky district of Bjker and the 
surrounding factories and collieries may have 
exercised a baneful influence on the trees. 



w - Ko8es : J. C. 8. We do not undertake to name Roses. 

Sulphide of Potassium: E, H. Kept by most 
chemists. 

Tomatos : W. J. The fruits have the " black spot," 
a d lipase caused by a fungus, Peronospora lyco- 
persici. Cut off forthwith, and burn all affected 
fruits, and dress the plants with the Bordeaux 
Mixture. 

Vegetable Marbows Diseased: J. L. We cannot 
tf»!l from jour description of the c\%% what it is 
that causes the loss of the plants. Kindly send 
an entire plant, or, at least, leaves, shoota, and 
roots, for our inspection. In the meanwhile, 
employ the Bordeaux Mixture against it; of 
course taking care to waih all fruits before 
cooking them. 

Co -fMUSiCATioifs Receivkd. W. K. Gk-T. H. O.-R. D.- 

j. B w, V R-G. W.-E.L. J.-N. S. 8., Dresdeii.-M. 

Phot graphs. Sfecimk.vs, &c. Received with Thinks.- 

bander & Co. - K. Ks der. Tonuto* <u*xi week). - k\ W. O. 
(next w«ek). -- G. Mabtiu. Fans - G. W. (uext week), we 
cannot reply by W*.-Q.W.W.--U.Q.X. (next week). 
G W W T W.-G. H.-J. W.O.- 






• ' • 



80 



THE 



GARDENERS' 



CHRONICLE 



[July 20, 1895. 



THE GARDENERS' GHRONIGLE 



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3 



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II 
II 



• t 

• t 
t • 





















4 
5 
6 
6 
6 

7 
7 
8 





6 


6 

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6 

6 




» 



15 Lines 
16 

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95 



..£0 




n 
•» 

M 

»» 



it 



ti 



• • 



• • 



• • 



« • 



• • 



• • 



t • 



• • 



• • 



• • 



8 
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9 
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6 



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A!f D 8IXPMTCK FOB EVERY ADDITIONAL LINK. 



If set across two Columns, the lowest charge will be 30*. 
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Page. MS; Half Page, Mi 10*.; Column. £3. 
G ARDENER8 AND OTHERS WANTING SITUATIONS. 

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by post, the cover should be forwarded with 
complaint). 




GARDEN REQUISITES. RICHARDSON 



j 




COCOA-NUT FIBRE REFUSE, 



li: 



50i 



64. per buahel ; 100 for 30f . ; truck, 

Bags, id. each. 

SPECIALLY SELECTED ORCHID PEAT. 

LIGHT BROWN FIBROUS PEAT, to. %d. per sac* ; 5 sacks, 

25*. ; sacks, id. each. 
BLACK FIBROUS PEAT, fit. per sack ; 5 sacks, 22m . ; sacks, 

id. each. ..... v i« 

COARSE SILVER SAND. If. 9d. per bushel; 15f. per half 

ton : 26*. per ton, in 2-buahel bags, id. each. __._ 

YELLOW FIBROUS LOAM, PEAT-MOULD, and LEAF 

MOULD, 1*. per bushel. 
8PHAONUM MOSS, 8s. 6d. per sack. 
MANURES, GARDEN STICKS, VIRGIN CORK, TOBACCO 

CLOTH. RUSSIA MATS, &o. Write for Price LIST.— 

H. O. SMYTH, 21. Goldsmith Street. Drury Lane. W.C. 



WARE & S O N S ' wJSgGBi*. 



FLOW ER 

SUSSEX POTTERY 
WORKS, 

UCKFIELD. 



POTS 




■stab. 1770 



For Private 
Gardens. 

Hundreds of 

Testimonials, 

Lists on application. 



ROOFING PELT. 




THE " POTTER" ROOFING FELT. 



Specially prepared. In Rolls, 25 yaw's by 3 .' i". 

No. 1, 5s. per Roll ; No. 2, 6s. 6d per Roll ; 

No. 3, 88. per Roll. 

Special Nails for Fixing, Is. per 1000. 
Carriage Paid.] [5000 Rolls in Stock. 

ANDREW POTTER, 

WOLVERHAMPTON. 



CHAS. 




KINNELL 




GO. 



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BOILERS, PIPES, VALVES, and HORTI- 
CULTURAL SUNDRIES in the United 
Kingdom. HEATING APPARATUS erected 
by specially- trained staff of skilled Engineers. 
Estimates free. New Illustrated Catalogue 



sent on receipt of post-card. 
H.M. Government, &c, &c. 



Contractors to 



SOUTH WAEK ST., LONDON, S.E. 



WOOD-WOOL. - WOOD- WOOL. 

The Rest Material for Packing every description of Goods. 

CHAPMAN A CO., Ltd., 

CROWN WHARF, DEPTFORD, LONDON, 

The Largest Manufacturers in the Kingdom. 
Large Stock of Standard Qualities. Prompt Deliver; 

8amples and Prices unon aDDlication. 



S.E. 



STAND WIDE* 

Don't a; w yourself to be led into the notion that 

auy amount of beer you may swallow will restore 

your jaded energy bo quickly and completely as 

the invigorating beveraere made from 



^m~ 






W 



■ 



FOR MAKING 

NON-INTOXICATING 



And if J <>n Wish to be a friend to yourself and 
anyone should ask you to doubt the accuracy and 
expediency of this advice, you will be consulting 
your own interest by telling them to Stand WM, 

For every 
RAILWAY MAN 

and all workers 

everywhere. 
It is the finest beverage 

obtainable. 
One 6d. bottle makes 
8 gallons. Of all 
Chemists and Stores. 

SAMPLE BOT. FREE 
9 STAMPS. 

NEWBALU MASON 

Nottingham. 



am — 1 



IT* 



■*% 



s * 




Many 

Prize Mkdjjls. 



HORTICULTURAL 

BUILDINGS, 

Conservatories, Greeiiliuibj*, 
Vineries, Peach Housa, 




Awarded the only 

Gold Medal for 

Horticultural Buildings at the 

International Horticultural 
Exhibition, London. 



Stove and Orchid 

Houses, &c. Alao 

boilers, Pipa, 

and all 



W. RICHARDSON & CO., 

DARLINGTON. 



BOULTON 




PAUL 



f 



Manufacturers, 
NORWICH 



GARDEN REQUISITES in Great Variety. 



No. 6. — Wro ght • Iron 
Ashes or Offal Barrow, 

Garden Barrow and Cinder 
Sifter combined. 
The top can be taken off, 
making an excellent Leaf 
and Garden Barrow. 

Cash Price, 

Painted ... ... ... 30/- 

Body galvanized, extra 6/- 

If fitted with Registered Cinder Sifter, 4/6 extra 





No. 7- Wrought-Iron 

Barrow. 

For ASHES, 0.0 kl* 

STABLE, &c 



> *«: • 



Cash Price 



.«- 



No. 87. The Hamburg Prize 
Watering Machine, 

With Poweiful Garden Engine. 

Cash Price, Carr. Paid. 

To hold 36 gallons £5 

If without pump £i 

Suction pipe at 1/3 per ft. 
If fitted with extra powerful 
pump, two delivery hose jets 
and sprayers, for spraying fruit 
trees, &c. ; also dashers, for 
keeping the solution mixed 
whilst in use, £8. 

Send for ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE free. 

Carriage Paid on all Orders ahove 405. value to the pnn 

Railway Stations in England and Wales. 

BOULTON & PA 




- 



NORWICH 







12X10 1 14X12 
14X10 16X12 



18X12 

20X12 



SIZES-in ii 

16X14 I 20X14 



20X16 
22X16 



24 X 16 
20X18 



1.8* 



i 



21-OZ. Foreign, of above sizes. 100 and 200 t"*™l 9 
and 4thg qualities, always in stock. 15-0Z- *°™ l » 
current sizes In 200 feet boxes. . ^{0 

English Glass, cut to buyer's sizes at lowest prices, 
free and tnund in the country in quantity. ftCf 

PROPAGATING and CUCUMBER CLASSES. * 

PUTTY, WHITE LEAD, PAINTS. OILS, BRUS^tf 
PIT LIGHTS, cheap line of 21-0*. 200 feet, a 
7 inches, and 10 inches by 8 inches. ^ j 

GEORGE FARMILOE & JO ' 
34, St. John Street, West Smithfleld. W^S 1 qx* 

Stock Lists and Prices on annlication. Please quote Cr» 



Jult 20, 1895.] 



THE 



GA RDENEB S' CHE ON I CLE. 



81 




JADOO FIBRE is a COMPLETE PUNT FOOD 

ANY KIND OF PLANT GROWS IN IT. 



SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR FORCING STRAWBERRIES AND EARLY POTATOS 

CLEAN TO HANDLE, LIGHT, FREE OF INSECTS, SLUGS, &c. 

3s. 6d. per Bushel ; 8s. per Sack of 3 Bushels. 
Can be had of all Nurserymen and Seedsmen. For further particulars apply to 

SECRETARY, JADOO, LIMITED, 54, HIGH STREET, EXETER. 





HALLIDAY & 



CO 



BUILDERS and HOT-WATER 



1 



ROYAL HORTICULTURAL WORKS, MIDDLETON, MANCHESTER. 

Vineries, Stoves, Greenhouses, Peach Houses, Forcing Houses, &c, construct*! on our improved plan, are the 

perfection of growing houses, and for practical utility, economy, and durability cannot be equalled. We only do one class 
of work, and that the vehy best. 

Conservatories and Winter Gardens designed architecturally correct without the assistance of anyone out of our 

firm, from the smallest to the largest. Hot -water Heating Apparatus, with really reliable Boilers, erected, and success 
guaranteed in all cases. Melon Frames, Bashes, Hot Bed Boxes, &C, always in Stock. 

Plant, Estimates, and Catalogue* Free. Customers waited on in any part of the Kingdom, 

Our Maxim is and always has been — 

MODERATE CHARGES. FIRST-CLASS WORK THE BEST MATERIALS. 



o 



.vAH 



* 



tf 



-nLONDONjv 

TRADE MARK. l VINE 

Thev are used by 
Leading Growers, 
Royal Botanic So- 
ciety. Royal Horti- 
cultural Society, 
Royal Parks, Lon- 
don County Coun- 
cil, throughout the 
United Kingdom, 
and in every quar- 
ter of the globe. 

* 



PA 



FOB 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS 



ROSES 



AND 



All HORTICULTURAL 
PURPOSES. 








-M 




*&KJ 



& <^^ in 6d. and Is. 

Packets, and 

SEALED BAGS :— 

71b. 2s. 64. 141b. 4 j. 64. 

28 lb. 7f. 6d. 56 lb. 12.. 64. 

112 lb. 20*. Or direct from the Works, 

Carriage paid in the United Kingdom 

for Cash with order (except 64*. Packets). 



rf$ 



^5. < 



*&* 



* Sv* 



Crushed Bones, Peruvian Guano, 
Sulphate of Ammonia, Nitrate of Soda, 
and other Manures. Tobacco Cloth and 
Paper. Best Qualities only. Prices on Application, 




& 



SON, 




Manure Manufacturers, Bone Crushers, &c 
Temple Mill Lane, STRATFORD, LONDON, £ 




•U| III* 

TRXDE MAffK, 




THE GARDENERS' CHRONICLE FORM 




SUBSCRIPTION 



From 



To 






THE PUBLISHER, 






41, Wellington Street, Strand, 

LONDON, w.c. 



Please send me « The Gaudeners' Chronicle n for 



1895. 
Months 



Commencing 



} for which I enclose P. O.O. 






&P Please Note that all Copies sent Direct from this Office must he paid for in advance. 

THE UNITED KINGDOM :— 12 Months, 15*. ; 6 Months, Is. 6d, ; 3 Months, 3s. 9d. ; Post-free. 

ALL FOREIGN SUBSCRIPTIONS, Including Postage, 17*. 6d. for 12 Months. 
Receipts for less than six months' subscription will not be sent unless specially asked for. 



JO 



_ P.O. O. to be made payable at the Post Office, 

GREAT QUEEN STREET, London, W.O., to A. G. MARTIN. 

Cheque* should be orossed « DRUMMOND." 



O. C. 
July 20, 1S95, 



THE 



SYDNEY 



MAIL 



AJTD 



5 



NEW SOUTH WALES ADVERTISER 



CONTENTS : 

«™5KX£ 0NUL and GENERAL NEWS. 

Lx^T^SYD^EY 1 ^ 0, * "^ U inoor *>orated BELL'S 

S^^J^vJSS^ on the TUBF ' 

THK al!y L ?o^s J23J" 4 - (D " WD "* **«"« "»+ 

AGRICULTURE. PASTORAL. HORTICULTURE 
GOLD FIELDS and MINING generally 
STOCK and SHARE REPORTS. 
2?!^?^ and ScrE *TIFIC ARTICLES. 

fuTHORS P ° PULAH KNQLI8H *» d UmUIMI 

?£^i SH * 01 * 8 - DOMESTIC ECONOMY. 
INDOOR AMUSEMENTS. 

THE CHESS PLAYER. THE HOME CIRCLE. 
COMMERCIAL NEWS . list. 

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE. 

The SYDNEY MAIL has a wide circulation throughout the 
Australian Colonies, New Zealand, Polynesia, Ac. It contains 
a large amount of information on a great variety of subieeti. 



Subscription in Advance, £1 6s. per Annum 

Single Copies, &d.; Stamped, Id. 
shing Office— Hunter Street. Svdnev. New flAnfh 1 



ENGLAND. 

The undermentioned Newspaper and Advertising Agents are 
authorised to receive ADVERTISEMENTS for the 
SYDNEY MORNING HERALD and SYDNEY MAIL:- 



IiONDON 



Bristol 



mafche8ter.. 

Edinburgh ♦. 
Glasgow^... 



Messrs. Geo. Street & Co., 30, Oornhill, E.G. 
Mr. F. Algar, 8, Clement's Lane, Lombard 
Street, E.C. 

Messrs. Gordon & Gotch, St. Bride Street, 

Fleet Street, E.C. 
Messrs. W. H. Smith & Son, 186, Strand. 
James and Henry Grace, Royal Insurance 

Buildings. 

James and Henry Grace, 73, Market Street. 

Robertson & Scott, 13, Hanover Street. 

W. Porteous & Co., 15, Royal Exchange 
Place. 




Copies of each Journal are filed 
Offices for the use of Advertisers. 



TECHNICAL HORTICULTURE. 



COUNTY COUNCIL LECTURES. 



THE COTTACER'S CALENDAR 

OF GARDEN OPERATIONS. 

Will be useful to Lecturers and Students in the 

above subject. 

Price 3d.; post-free, 8|rf. 
41, WELLINGTON STREET, STRAND, W.C. 



FARMS, ESTATES, RESIDENCES. 



**■ 



Any one desirous of 

Renting a Farm or Residence, or Purchasing an 

Estate, can have copies of the 

MIDLAND COUNTIES HERALD 

SUPPLIED FREE FOR SIX WEEKS, 

on stating the purpose for which the paper is 
required, forwarding Name and Address, and six 
halfpenny stamps for postage, addressed, " Mid- 
land Counties Herald Office, Birmingham." The 
Midland Counties Herald always oontains large 
numbers of advertisements relating to Farms, 
Estates, and Residences for Sale and to be Let. 



p 



82 



THE 



GARDENERS 



I 



CHRONICLE, 



[July 20, 1895, 





EESON'S MANURE, 

Crushed Bonet and all Hi*h-claas Fertilisers, 

Genuine only from— 
W. H. BEESON. Carbrook Bone Mills. Sheffield. 



LEAF MOULD! LEAF MOULD! 
Good Oak f well matured, two to seven years old, clean, 
all leaves, no rubbish. On rail. 8*. 6d. per yard. Samples sent. 
J. C. CAMPBELL, The Park, Feltha m. Middlesex. 

NETS— NETS.— Tanned, Oiled, Waterproof, 
for protecting Strawberry Beds, Fruit Trees. &c, from 
Birds. Makes excellent Tennis boundaries. 

300 yards, 8*. : second quality, fti. 
SPASHETT AND CO.. Net Manufacturers. Lowestoft. 



OttCIIID PEAT; Best Quality; BROWN 
FIBROUS PEAT for Store and Greenhouse use. RHO- 
DODENDRON and AZALEA PEAT. Samples and Prices of— 

WALKKR and CO., Farnborough. Hants, 



RICHARDS' NOTED PEAT. 

(Trade supplied on beat terma). 

A large stock of the finest quality ORCHID PEAT. Also for 
Store and Greenhouse Plants. Ferns, Rhododendrons. Ac. By 
the sack, cubic yard, ton, or truck-load. Can be seen in bulk 
at London Wharf. Immediate despatch by any Rail or Steamer, 
Prompt and Special Quotations for delivery to any Station. 

O. H. RICHARDS, Old Shot Tower Wharf, Lambeth. 
London, S.E.; Peat Grounds and Depots, Bingwood and 
Wareham. Address all letters to London Wharf. 



GLASS I 



CHEAP GLASS I 

In Stock Sizes. 



15 ox., per 100 ft., Is, 8d, 
21 -or., „ 10*. (K 



12 X 10, 18 X 13, 18 X 14, 24 X 14 
14X12, 20X12, 18X16. 24X16 
16 X 13, 16 X 14, 20 X 16, 24 X 18, *c, 
3} X 3 Prepared Sash Bar at 5s. per 100 feet. 
Flooring, 5/9 per square; Matching, 4/9; 2X4, at Jd. per 
foot run. Garden Utensils, Trellis, Ironmongery, Paints, &o. 

Catalogues free. 

THE CHEAP WOOD COMPANY, 
72. BiflHOPSOATB Street Within, London, K.O. 




FLOWER POTS 

and HORTICULTURAL POTTERY. 

CONWAY Q. WABNE (Ltd.), 

Royal Potteries, 

WESTON-SUPER-MARE. 

The Largest Manufacturers of Garde* 

Pottery in the world. 

Millions in Stocx. Contractors to 

H.M. Government. 

SO Gold and SUrer Medals Awarded. 

lYice Lists free on Application. 




w 

W 

a 

S 





POTTER'S WIRE-ARMOURED HOSE. 

Quality Guaranteed. 

Prices of 60-feet lengths (including Fittings). 




ARMOURED. 

Prices. 



LUI 

t 



PLAIN. 



Diam. 

Ji-in. heat quality 



•♦• 



1 



»» 

9* 
»» 

•» 



ti 



extra stout 
beat quality 
extra stout 
best quality 
extra stout 



«. d. 
36 3 

43 7 
45 
62 
... 62 
... 60 7 





Diam 
^-in. 



■ se 





»» 






74 tt 



H 



• •• 



« * 



cheap 

best quality 
extra stout 
best quality ... 
extra stout ... 
best quality 
extra stout 



PRICES. 

f, d. 

... 19 3 
21 5 

27 6 

28 
33 
33 



• •• 



40 10 




Carriage paid, and dispatched on receipt of order. Awarded 
12 Gold and Silver Medals. Also maker of Hose for Delivery, 
Steam, Fire, Suction, and Liquid Manures, Ac. Supplied to 
all the principal Corporations, Parks, Estates, &c, at home and 
abroad. Over 3,000.000 feet in use. Rot-proof Green Shading, 
10c*. per square yard. Catalogues post-free.— Melbourne Works 
Wolverhampton ; and London Works. Reading. Maker to Her 
Majesty the Queen, and H.R.H. The Prince of Wales. 






GARDENING 



APPOINTMENTS. 



Mr J. Toogood, for the past sight en years Head Gardener 
to theUte Htm. Chart.es W. W. ?itzwilliim, Alwalton 
Hall, Peterborough, as Gardener to the Hon. Thomas W. 
Fitzwilliam, and remains at the above place. 

Mr 



* ^ ? fc f BU «• for the **•* 9eTea ***** Head Gardener 
at The Lod«e, Hunstanton. Norfolk, as Head Gardener to 
A. FRA9ER, Esq., Weaterfield House, Ipswich. 

T. H. Crisp, as Head Gardener to F. Fouambe Eho 
Overton Hall, Worksop, in place of Mr. ^.Twoo^ 

Hi/& C # h U n, Gard60 \ Kel-Q - ** Head Gardenerto 
pSiWH B ° F EoXBraaiac * Broxmouth Park* 



THE PROPRIETOR of an old established and 
well-stocked Nursery in the Midland Counties is open 
to treat, with a view to a PARTNERSHIP, with either a 
practical Nurseryman, or a Gentleman who would attend to 
the Office Department and Travelling. Capital required about 
£500. — NURSERYMAN, Gardeners 9 Chronicle Office, 41, 
Wellingt on Street. Strand. W.C. 

. Middlesex County Council. ^-^^ 

HORTICULTURAL LECTURER WANTED 
for Two Courses, ten lectures each, commencing in 
October. Syllabuses for (1) Cottagers ; (2), Junior Gardeners ; 
terms, &C.-E. H. PRITCHARD, 6, Belle Vue Road, Fnein 
Ba rnet, N. 

WANTED, a HEAD WORKING GAR- 
DENER and GENERAL MANAGER, experienced in 
Orchard-house of Cordon Trees, also of Wall-fruits, Grapes, 
Melons, Ferns, Cucumbers, Chrysanthemum* and Flowers. 
No children. Wife to attend to Dairy and Poultry. Eleven 
miles from London. — Apply by letter, stating full 
particulars and length of personal character, to A. D., 
5, Walbrook. London. 

ANTED, as UNDER GARDENER, a 

Married Man (without family). Must be experienced 
in Indoor and Outdoor Gardening. Will be required to milk 
and take charge of cows, &c. Wife must be a good laundress. 
Wages. 27*. per week, with lodgings on the premises, milk, 
vegetables, and gas. Good references required.— Apply by 
letter to W. F., The M anor House, Richmond, Surrey. 

ANTED, an UNDER-GARDENER, a 

strong, young Man. Pleasure-grounds and Kitchen 
Garden. Wages, to begin with, 16s. per week, with bothy and 
usual advantages. Copies only of testimonials. State age 
and experience. Gentleman's place near London. — Address, 
T. J. EDWARDS, Esq., Toksowa House, Dulwich Common, 
Lond on, S.B. 

WANTED, MARRIED COUPLE, Wife to 
do Laundry. For a place in Sussex at Michaelmas 
next; a thoroughly reliable couple, married, without family. 
Man must understand Plant culture, Vines, and usual routine 
of Gardening. Wages, £80, with House, Ac. Wife must 
be a thoroughly efficient Laundress, who would herself do the 
finer work. Additional remuneration offered for this. — Address 
SUSSEX, Messrs. James Veitch & Sons, Royal Exotic Nursery, 
Chelsea. 

ANTED, a good PROPAGATOR and 

GROWER of Soft-wooded Plants for the Market. 

Age 30 to 35. None need apply whose character will not be 
excellent for sobriety and practical experience. — Apply, with 
full particulars, to THOMAS PERKINS and SONS, 34, 
Drapery, Northampton. 

AOTED,"immediately7~PROPAGATOR 

and GROWER.— Clematis, Ivies, Tea Roses, Hardy 
Climbers, Conifers, Soft- wooded Plants, &c, in quantity. 
Ferns for Market Nursery. Active, sober, competent man. 
Abstainer preferred.— State age, wages, and references, to 
CONIFER. 41, Wellington Street. Strand. 

WANTED, a good GROWER of Pot Vines, 
&c. Character and ability must be excellent. — 
WILL TAYLER, Osborn Nursery. Hampton, Middlesex. 

WANTED, thoroughly good FRUIT- 
GROWER, experienced in Grapes, Tomatos, Cucum- 
bers. Must be sober and trustworthy. Good place for a good 
man.— WILKINSON. Lambley, Nottingham. 

WANTED, a MAN, thoroughly understand- 
ing Outside MARKET GROWING. Strawberries, 
Potatos, Cabbages, &c. Also Management; of Horses and 
Ploughing. Abie to do a round. Permanent situation. 
£l a week. Those only with first-class references.— Apply 
personally to WILLIAM UFF, Nurseiyman, Ivy Nursery, 
West Molesey, Surrey. 

ANTED, a Smart, Active MAN as 

KITCHEN GARDEN FOREMAN, not under 25. 
Must be competent to grow Fruit and Vegetables to the 
highest standard. Wages, £1 per week. References and capa- 
biltties to— W. J. EMPSON, The Ga rdens. Ampthill. 

ANTED, as FOREMAN, an experienced 

steady MAN, to take charge of Fruit and Plant-houses. 
Two others kept. Wages, 195., bothy, &c— Apply to Mr. 
SOWBAY. T he Gardens, Highnam Court, Gloucester. 

WANTED, a strong active young _ 
(single), for Pleasure Grounds and Kitchen Garden, 
One used to Scythe Work preferred. Wages 14j.— Applv* 

stating age, &c„ to W. MASTERS, Shuckburgh Gardens. 
Daventry. 

V\T ANTED, a single, steady, stout, active 

W young MAN, accustomed to Nursery Work, Indoors 

55 ju^ii y ag ?. 18 *' per week .-J.HUGGINS, The Nurseries, 
WoodballSoa. Lincoln. ' 



MAN 



VI7ANTED, a Young MAN, quick at Water- 

▼ T ing, Potting, and Tying ; one with some experience of 
Ferns, Carnations, and Primulas, preferred. Apply, stating 
wages, and full particulars to-FOREMAN, Hampton Road 
Nursery, Teddmgton. 

Y*7 ANTED, a yonng MAN.— Must be well 

\ " P *! 9 UC T^ ers ' J om *tos. and Chrysanthemums ; 
one who is not afraid of work and it eapable of taking charge 

i ? ft?m * «*Pl°yer.-State age, w age9 , and references, to 
J. TtTLLEY. Nursertman. Enfield u;„h„ ' 



WANTED, a SALESMAN, 
..u M** 1 ^ 8 - t 0n e used to making ui 
with a fair knowledge of Seed and Bulb 
stating wages, *c , to WALTER LITTLE 
Stafford. 



to attend 

Wreath*, &c, 
Trade.— Apply, 
The Nurseries, 



Wholesale Seed Trad* 

WANTED a SECOND SHOPMAN, by . 

T 1 London House - Reply by letter, stating a R e ex- 






WANT PLACES. 

TO GARDENERS AND 0THEB8 

SEEKING SITUATIONS. 

Advertisers are cautioned against having kttm 
addressed to initials at Post-offices, as all 

addressed 



Letters so addressed are opened by 
authorities and returned to the sender. 



tk 






ICHARD 



SMITH 



RICHARD SJKLJLTH AND CO, 

beg to announce that they are constantly receiving 
applications from Gardeners seeking situations, and that 
they will be able to supply any Lady or Gentleman with 
particulars, ke.— St. John's Nurseries, Worcester. 

F SANDER and CO. can reoommend 
• several highly qualified and energetic HEAD and 
UNDER GARDENERS, of excellent character and proved 
ability ; men thoroughly fitted for all the various duties of 
their profession. For all particulars, please apply to— 

F. SANDER and CO., St. Albans. 



Gardeners, Farm-Bailiffs, Foresters, &c. 

DICKSONS, Royal Nurseries, Chester, are 
always in a position to RECOMMEND MEN of the 
highest respectability, and thoroughly practical at their busi- 
ness. All particulars on application. 
Telegraphic and Postal Address— 4 ' DICKSONS, Chesteb." 



GARDENER (Head).- 
and experienced in all branches. 
WOOD and SON. Wood Green, N. 



Thoroughly practical 

We recotnmend.- 



G ARDENER (Head).— Age 45, married, no 
incumbrance ; thoroughly experienced, all-round. 
Understands Marketing Produce. Good characters and testi- 
monials.— J. HAYNES, 8, Dale Park Road, Upper Norwood, 

Surrey. 

O ARDENER (Head).— A Gentleman 



WILLIAM 



can 

V_3T strongly recommend his Head Gardener ; fourteen yean 
in his service; leaving by his own desire,- wttt.tiii 
SHARP, Achnacarry Gardens, Fortwilli am. 

ARDENER (Head), where two or more are 

kept.— Fourteen and a half years' experience. Good 
testimonials.— H. D„ Park Hill House, Stapenhiil, Burton- 
on-Trent. . 

GARDENER (Head).— Age 34; married, 
2 children ; thoroughly experienced. Excellent cer- 
tificates. Two and a half jears Head last situation. For 
three years Foreman at Keir. Perthshire, and in other large 
establishments.— OLIVER. W. Drummond & Sons, Stirling^ 

GARDENER (Head), age 47.— H. Poetbh, 
twenty years Head Gardener at Studley Castle, Red- 
ditch, is open to take a similar appointment. Practical in au 
Departments, and with the requirements of a large estab- 
lishment. 

GARDENER (Head, of two or three).- 
Age 29, single; life experience, Inside and Out. Tj#' 
monials.— H. BROADBENT, Helme's Lane, Meitham, HW 
dersfield. 



GARDENER (Head), where tiro or more are 
kept.— Age 25, single ; good character. Eleven yea" 
experience in good Gardens — F. R., The Hazels^j andy^^ 

GARDENER (Head Working); age 30.-- 
H. S. Bower, Esq , wiehea to recommend F. J. Du«ij 
leaving through reduction. Practical experience w 
branches. — Gardens, Fontmell Parva, Blandford.^ 

GARDENER (Head Working); age 32.- 
Sir Thomas Bazley wishes to recommend W. # ur 



who has been with him live year* ; thoroughly experien 
all branches. —BUR LEY, Hatherop, Fairford. 



cedm 



GARDENER 
Single-handed). 

practical experience. Excellent 
Jarvis Road, South Croydon. 




(Head Wobking, or 

Age 27, married ; fourteen .yea* 
llent character.-F. WELLS, 




GARNENER (Head Working). 
no family ; thoroughly experienced in all brancn 
E. MORGAN, The Gardens, FairhiU . Coventry, 

ARDENER (Head Working).^^; 

no family; successful with Vines, Tomatos, Cue* hfl 
Melons, Stove and Greenhouse Plants, Flower ana a 
Garden. Good character.— T. R., 20, Chestnut Road, nu 
Surrey. 



GARDENER (Head Working). 
married ; no encumbrance. A 
in all branches. Seven years last place 
Cottage, High Beech, Loughton. 




Age ' 



SlNGtf' 




Kirkby Mailory, Hincklev, Leicestershire. 



Age 



o 



GARDENER (Head Working). . r 
married, no family ; life experience in the ro . ^ 
work. Connected with well-kept establishment*.-^ 
references. Leaving through place being sold.— "A 
77, Hig h Street, High Barnet, Herfr. 

GARDENER (Head Working) ; *e*Jt+ 
Mr. W. H. Protheroe can highly ^ c0 ^ a ^ 
Saunders after five years' service, as a good all; J " *er.- 
steady and industrious, and a successful Orcnw 
W. H. PROTHEROE, Leytonstone, London, E. 









July 20, 1895.] 



THE 



GARDENERS 1 CHRONICLE. 



83 



GARDENER (Head Working).— Captain 
Philip Green will be pleased to recommend his late 
Gardener, who is a thorough good practical and hon€st man. 

Fruits, Flowers, and Vegetables. 
-V7. JOHNSTONE. 2. Acacia 



up 



Married, one child, age 13. 
Villas, Pembury, Kent 



^ ^^— ~ ' ■ .^ — m 

GARDENER (Single-handed or otherwise). 
—Situation wanted, by a married man. No family. 
Disengaged.— C. B., 4, Scott's Cottages, Chigwell Row, Essex. 

^ — ^_ 



Single - handed). 

-F. R., 19, Garden Cottages, 



GARDENER (good 
Age 39, married, one child. 
East Street, Epsom, Surrey. 

GARDENER (Single-handed, or with help). 
—Age 32, married, one child; experienced in Vines, 
Fruit, Flowers, and Vegetables. Good character.— R., The 
Laurels Lodge, Withdean, Brighton. 

GARDENER (Single-handed, or Second 
of three).— Situation required as above by young Man, 
age 23. Four years in present place.— W. S. H„ 41, Welling- 
ton Street, Strand, W.O. 

/Jl AKDENER, good plain.— Age 28, married; 

J seeks situation as above. Two years' good character — 
WAREHAM, Cuthbury Cottage, Wimborn e, Dorset. 

GARDENER.— A Lady wishes to reoom- 
mend her Gardener, who thoroughly understands Early 
and Late Forcing. Trustworthy. Married. Six years' 
c haracter.— Address, M. C., 17. Woodvil le Road, Ealing. 

GARDENER, thorough practical, where Under 
is kept.— Age 30, married, one child; Orchids, Vines, 
&c. Five years good character; also good reference — 
T. FRANCI S, 3 , Edgell Road, S taines, Middlesex. reierenCe ' 

GARDENER.— Age~307married, one child ; 

VJ disengaged and seeks situation. Good experience in 
?J5$&££Z2S£<-T**- te We " —ended.- 



•II 



JOHN STANDISH & CO., Royal Nurseries, 

rj Ascot, can recommend a steady, competent, dependable 
Man. age 28, as GARDENER in small establishment, or 
Single-handed,— Apply to The MANAGER. 

ARDENER (Good Second, or Single- 

handed, or where help is given).— Age 25. single: nine 
years experience. Good references. — W. HOWSON The 
Gardens, Pepper Arden, Northallerton, Yorks. 



GARDENER 
—Age 27; < 
excellent character. 



(Second, or Single-handed), 

perienced Inside and Out; two years' 
H. S., 5, Bexley Lane, Cray ford. Kent. 



£% ARDENER (Second), or JOURNEYMAN 

V^ (First), Inside, or Inside and Out.— Age 26; eleven 

WOOTtXaTh 06 ^^ Place3 "« E * ce ^t references.- 
WOOLLEY, Aldgate, Ketton, near Stamford. 

GARDENER (SECOND).-Age 28, single^ 
in ARDENER (Second), age 

VJ penence Inside and Out.— J. P., 
Road, Esher. ' 



20.— Good ex- 

Holewood, Wolsey 



GARDENER (Undeb, or Single-handed). 

Onf anr£ e Jt' 9,n « le ; T 8i * years' experience. Inside and 



C\ ARDENER (good Under) ; age 25, single. 

Bath ^i* 1^' He ? d . Gardenep . Manor House, Bathford , 

blen w7f h v J? P,eaS6d *° ' eeomniend H. Slocombe, who has 
<*en W!th him two years as above. Experience d Inside and Out. 

O ARDENER (Under), In or Out.— Young 

=^V Ma ?' age x ' has had experience in two good gardens. 
h™.. ^ -f we » r ecommended.-I. K., Mr. Mobeby, Gate 

JlOUSe GardAtlfl nhinninn- flnHKnm fl1~., «„„«.-.__ v • J 



GARDENER (Under).— Age 21 ; three and 

•r^i a hal L y ?? r9 ' experience, and character from present 
»mployer.-W. PIPER, West Ham, Basingstoke, Hants . 

(^ARDENER (Under).— Age 21; four and 

TTT t \r\ v a1 / yet £? «P«««nce. Excellent character.- (I. 
i ILLMAN, Jun. , The W oodlands, Rowhill, Dartford, Kent. 

QARDENER W*n>*£fc- Age 28, single; 

ho v e eaS n w ed •}* , aDd °^°° P - ExceIlen t references 
WILLUM* £ n 8ltu **°a- Three years previous one.- 
^LI AMS, 25, Great Earl Street. St. Martin's L ane, W.C. 

QARDENER (UNDER).-Age 16^7 four 

8TJOH^*V exp 7 ie 5 c ?r • aood c^racter. -REVI CANON 
ai. JOHN, Kempsford, Fairford. 

v - . ER (Under), Inside 

BorU.m 19; n S*? *? weU recommended.- 
tforeham, near Chelmsford, Essex. 



and Out. — 

J. PRESTNEY, 



^ARDENER (UNDKR).-Age 22, seeks Tsitua- 

fefci vlT™^?* ™* i* Toma tos, Cucumbers, Melons, 
Rood ThwJi?. # Fl0W 7 and Kitehen Garden. Three years' 
^^ALTnnn if H «»Ployer. Bothy preferred.- 
_^^^3j^ ^ Badly Wood, near Worcester. 

G A s£S E t R ( U ™ E *)--Age 21 ; young man 

Kpp^ng t6r and refe '«nce-A. NASH, North Weald, 






ARDENER, or GROOM GARDENER 

■ UainU w*?." ^ aundrew - Tw ° y«ara' good character. 

• RAINES, HiUincdon Heath rr*hwHcr* 






rs ROOM or GROOM and GARDENER, wants 

V>A situation.— Age 27 ; married. Three years' good cha- 
racter.-q. ELLIS, Poulshot, Devizes, W ilts. 

JOHN SMITH.— Many years Foreman to Mr. 

*J John Fraser, The Nurseries, Leyton and South Wood ford , 
Itssex, and six years with Messrs. W. Barron & Son, Elvaston 
Nurseries. Borrowash. Now offers his services, having a 
thorough practical knowledge of Nursery Work in all its re- 
quirements as GENERAL MANAGER,tincluding Valuer or Tra- 
veller. Well known to the Trade. Could undertake Laying- 
out or Furnishing to any extent. —Address, 2, Belle Vue Cot- 
tages, Borrowash, near Derby. 

" ^ - ILi 

To Nurserymen. 

\f ANAGER, FOREMAN, or TRAVELLER. 

L -\ —Seventeen years' experience with good Firms ; tho- 
rough knowledge of the trade; good grower.— J. WINSEB, 
5. St. John's Road, Clifton, Bristol. 

(l/TANAGER, FOREMAN^or SALESMAN, 

mu l ^ Sma11 M * rk et Nursery, or otherwise, under Glass.— 
Thoroughly practical all round, with a view to Partnership.— 
Please state full particulars to M. J., 41, Wellington Street, 
Strand, London, W.C. 

To Seedsmen and others. 
lVT ANAGER or otherwise.— Thorough know- 

U-L ledge of Horticulture, Agriculture, and Wholesale and 
Retail Seed Trade. Good descriptive writer, &c— KO, 33, 
Cross Cheaping, Coventry. 

ROWER.— Situation wanted as Grower of 

Tomatos, Grapes, Cucumbers, and general Pot Stuff. 
Age 26. Good references.— T. EDWARD3, 27, Garden Road, 
Tonbridge, Kent. 

PRACTICAL FLORIST and GROWER, 

of English and American experience, desires a situation. 
Hard and Soft-wooded Plants. Orchids and Ferns, Floral Deco- 
rations and Bouquet*, thoroughly understood.— W. E. HEARN, 

Mr. J. N. Smith. Pnar. OARaa \Tnt f in»Kam ir^f 




ROSE GROWER, &o.— Age 30 ; eight years 
Inside and Out. Experienced in budding and grafting 
Fruit Trees, Clematis, Ac— F. W ., 14, Bsrend, Winchester. 

ROPAGATOR and GROWER.— SofTand 

Hard-wooded Flowering Stuff, Palms, Ferns, Carna- 
tions, &c. Age 26; ten years' experience in Germany and 
England. Well recommended.— E. H., 3, Ashby Terrace. 
Garden Road, Enfield, Middlesex. 

HTO MARKET GROWERS— GROWER, nine 

-t- years' experience in Grapes, Cucumbers, Tomatos. and 
General Pot Stuff. Age 21.— B. MAILER. Blackwa ter, Hants. 

TO NURSERYMEN. — A young Man seeks 
situation as ROSE and FRUIT BUDDER and GRAFTER 
with a good knowledge of General Nursery Stock. Seven 
years' experience.— O. A., 41, Wellington Street. Strand. W r. 



FOREMAN, PROPAGATOR, and GROWER. 
—Age 31, married; life experience. Well up in Grow- 
ing Cucumbers, Tomatos, Carnations, Roses, and all Soft- 
wooded Stuff. Good character.— J., 5, Oxford Terrace, Cram- 
worth Road, Worthing. 



FOREMAN, Inside.— Age 26 ; Life experience 
with Plants, Fruit, and Decorations. WeU recommended. 
—WHEE LER, Biackmere End,Welwyo, Herts. 

FOREMAN, Inside.— G. C. Williams, The 
Gardens, Trewyn Pandy, near Abergavenny, will be 
pleased to recommend a young Man, age 21, as above. Two 
years in present place. Life experience. Orchids and 
Chrysanthemums a specialty. 

FOREMAN in a Market or good General Nur- 
sery.— Age 26 ; twelve years* experience in ail branches ; 
well acquainted with Fruit, Hardy Flowers, Stove and Green- 
house Plants. Good references.- H. PLUMMER, Curdridee 
Botley. s ' 

FOREMAN.— Age 28. single ; fourteen years' 
thorough practical experience in Plant and Fruit-houses. 
Will be highly recommendea for ability and trustworthiness." 
Three years' foreman in last situation. Abstainer. Disensraired* 
— R. LLOYD, Church Preen. Shrewsburv. 8 ' 



FOREMAN.— John Crook, Forde Abbey 
Chard, Cin with confidence recommend a mao, age 24^ 
who has lived with him two years, and given every satisfaction! 

XfOREMAN (General, or Inside), in alarge 

±- establishment.— Age 29 ; highest possible references from 
last two places as Foreman. House and Table Decorations — 
G. RAYMENT. Poles Park. Ware. Herts. 




II « 



i ait 



JOURNEYMAN (First, Inside, in good es 

fc. S^.-AtZ™^-- - IRVINE ' »«™ 

^ private. Six years' experience. Good reference from 
—l. KENNETT, Kelham Gardens, New ark, Notts. 

JOURNEYMAN, Inside, or inside and Out.- 

J DICKER \hT e £ ^ "P"*??"- <*°o* referenoea.- 
London 7 Botanic Gardens, Regent's Park, 




OREMAN (Inside).— Age 27 ; well up in 

— Stove and Greenhouse Plants, Orchids, Orchard- houses. 
Vines. Peaches, ftc, and Chrysanthemums for Exhibition 
ri — I references. Previously Foreman. — T. WALLER, 
irnham Cottage, Beehive, Ilford. Essex. 



JOURNEYMAN in the Houses.-Age 22; 

Battl'e I"' part,cular8 .'PP 1 y t« MR. ALLEN, KonSanhuret, 



JOURNEYMAN, or GARDENER (Srcond). 

«™ii.7^°i? r yea /u' ''Perience amongst AaparaRu*. Ferni, 
I™ 1 ' «• ' ChryMiDthemums. Aralea.. Tomatos, an<i general Pot 
St uff. Abstomer.-J . HAY. P ark View Nursery, Hanwell 

JOURNEYMAN, Inside, or Inside and Out" 

".-*& 24 L-^ U «tuation in Private Garden. Good 
references. Willing ; abetainer. - E. WICKENS. South- 
borough Lodge, Bickley, Kent. 

piPROVER.— Age 19; requires situation in 

A Gentleman's Establishment, Inside preferred, slight eane- 
Park e SurrT U8 learn -~ H ' D - Noithend Cottage, Worcester 

JMPROVER7^r~GARDENER (Undkr)."^ 

-B- Young man (age 21), seeks situation as above. Six yeara' 
experience. Ltfe abstainer.-W. P., 89, Oval Road, Croydon. 

JMPROVER. — Age 20; reqaires situation 

JL Inside or Out. Four years' experience ; good character • 
abstainer.-T. BALDWIN, A ewton Park, Burton-on-Trent 

'yO GARDENERS.— Situation wanted^bTT 

^. y f, UDg L Man ' age V- * IM PKOVERin the Houses. Bothy 
preferred. £ive years' experieno«.-W. LOVELL LEIGH. 
Wimborne, Dorset. ' 



TO HEAD GARDENERS. — Advertiser 

•jfrnnit^ 20 ^,"'' 8 ?* uat L ion whe '« he could learn Gardening. 
SSShaiTiKf Itf »»— «-<»•. * ^% ^rk Roao, 



r rO GARDENERS.-A Gardener wishes to 

in thJ m! hlS "IfiP 16 * y J* n >' ia a P ri,,at « eotablishment. 
in the Houses. Bothy preferred. Twelve months' good re- 

Srkr* ' ' J " PounBett - Nurseryman, WalllSord, 



r rO NURSERYMEN.-Advertiser, four^ears 

^a m „^ Pagator ' *°,- at Messre - LaiD K & Son «. desires re-en- 

fi ag .£ m ^ I 8 ' X ^ ara P' e T 10U9 character.-E. PEACOCK, 20. 
Fulbrook Koad, Upp er Holloway. 

O NURSERYMEN and OTHERS. — A 

nf . M^a g i^ an ^^n^^tnatioD. Well used to the routine 
m/ne ^ e i/ U J 8 " y ' 0r Fruit and Flower-growing Establish- 

naVta d Kent enCe9 - WELLAED ' H " er "^ *"»«><*' 




T^O NURSERYMEN and GARDENERS. 

i~ Advertiser, aged 20. just served three years' apprentice- 
ship, desires IMPROVERS HIP in Houses. Excellent references. 
— w. a. K , Manor Parm, Kingsbury, Ilminster. 

(COLOMBIAN ORCHIDS! Odontoglossum 

RlEVo7i)r m n'rffin B Pacho type ' a »P ecialt y' EXPE- 
RIENCED COLLECTOR is open to engage with a well -estab- 
lished firm and commence work without delay. Small salarv 

r^l'rrJ"^ (E w 8 1 % I ,o G * r,aan ' French « or Spanish) to 
££ffi. S^mS™' "—^ H ° NDA ' ***«™° 

(GARDEN LAROURER~in~ Gentleman's 

f«%„«v« I den -- Youn * tn , an 8eek9 •itnstion as above; willing 
R^aTBradfr/Yo^r" 7 ^^-^ °" " 4 « toh -^ 



£f) iLL ^ P aid b y Advertiser, aged 22, for 

<**y situation in a Florist's Establishment, where he can 

fn Plent 7l!, d8e °* th ^ *%**- Hm had flv * y eare ' experience 
Lane EC K Propagating.-HERBERT, 63, Moor 



pLERK, TRAVELLER, or SEEDSMAN.— 

«w« w K, man >. a K e u 23 (disengaged), seeks appointment as 

te^l"^^ 1D tb ! tn £ e ' ^d ^ferences -G. L.. 93, 
Hereford R oad, Bayswater, W. 

/^JARPENTER.— Young Man wants situation. 

feke. P ton n e! , ^nt GIaZing • ^"^ J " »- «• Ch " ch *»«> 



FOREMAN (Inside).— Age 28 ; twelve years' 
experience in Plant and Fruit Houses. &c Twice pre- 
viously as Foreman. Good references— G. WHITE, Gatehouse, 
Westwell, Ashford, Kent. 

FOREMAN, or JOURNEYMAN (First), 
Age 24 : ten years' experience in good establishments. 
Well up in Fruit*, Plants, Chrysanthemums. Ac. Good refer- 
ences.— O. WITT, 22, East Street. Salisburv. Wilt*. 



O FLORISTS. 



T° FL0KI STS.- Young Lady, age 28, seeks 

ttrvXf^Tort. We8t * €nd «P"i«c.-M.. 80, Clemen- 




JOURNEYMAN; age 24.— Manager 
Nightingale Nurseriet. Bath, can very highly recom 
mend the above. Pushing and energetic. Experience ic 
Chrysanthemums, Cucumbers, Tomatos, Grapes, Ferns, Ac- 
Address as above. 



'pre MOST IMPORTANT LESSON Escu- 

<£"«* trm,W.^ffl ? impre8 * Up ° n hit P U P U< "« ^at the 

trouble afflctmg humanity was due to impurities of the 
All disorders mav he tn»/>«i tn »h,-. r.„* t , ^ 



■.•.I 



S»Mi' M ho- disease genns, lt"c*nnot havTthat 
PILLS 'aw Mm^JJT!?^ 7 f ° r g00d health ' HOLLOWAY'S 
Saarns wh^M. V h fK m08t PL*' " 8 herb9 *»« ^thint? 
to»1K«™«i!f ^ Earth Can offerto "er children, there? 

is craved ?vth^.v 1 r d UP ?» t0 "^^ the nourishment that 
is craved by the system. It is no vain boast to say that this 

£i.„n!!^! WOn< ^ rful disMVW J a*** « the annaU of medical 
science ; they will cure or relieve all diseases. 



V 






84 



THE 



GARDENERS 



CHRONICLE, 



[July 20 1895, 




9. 2. GLAZED POBCH, I 
Price about £10. Carr 



Hij£= 



"V? 






i 



Range of Horticultural Buildings now 
in course of erection at Hestercombe. Taunton, for 

The Hon. E W Berkeley Portman. 



A 



III! 1114 

iik:;:; 



ill!* 



*"*■"* 



-f. ., 



.'••••«= 



sh^* 






.. j 



*"* 



" •'••;■;. 



f/ l mi 



«/" 



>v><. 






'ffc 






.».. 



No. 3, GLAZED PORCH, 6 ft. by 4 ft. 
Price about £13. Carriage paid. 



C 



*4* 



t 



te£&c 



^^.^B^^^ 






CONSERVATORIES. FERNERIES, VINERIES. 
PEACH, PLANT, ORCHID, TOMATO, & CUCUMBER 






i > 



.■ »i 



-* 



v 



^ 



1 



2T5SS 



..... 



I- 






*/* 



w 



*u... 



'j 1 



1IM 



l-< 



HOUSES, GARDEN FRAMES, &c. 



m& 



■ - 



CHEAP GREENHOUSES 1 

Wo 47a — LKaN-TO, 10 ft. t>y 7 It. £8 108. 
Ho 4»»' -SPAN, L> ft. by 8 ft. £10 108. 
OU^ Painted." Packed, and Ouri.fC -" 



BEST MATERIAL AND WORKMANSHIP. . rtw * i>* </«■" wr* c * • m« «** 7 */*Jr- 

p. A-rpn pnRPHFq AND VERANDAHS IN ALL STYLES. 

ESTIMATES^ A?pUca!ion A New ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE FREE. 

LOU k^ fy to t Goods Stations. 



fo 



U i 



> ■ 



No. 77.— LEAN-TO FRA.ME, 6 ft. by 4 ft 

With Two Lights, 30s. 

Pit Lights, Propagating Glasses. 

Frames in Every Variety. 







ORCHID PEAT 



D. 



THE FINEST OBTAINABLE. 

For particulars apply to— 
CAMERON, Forester's Lodge, Mount Mascal, Bexle 

Special Terms to thb Trade. 



J 



Thorpe's Patent 
Glazing Staple. 

Broken panes re- 
placed instantly, 
and without top 
putty. Will not 
rust. Practically 
everlasting. Sample 
gross assorted right 

and left hand, *ent 
•naiiMfm post-free, 1/9. 

The Marriott cycle Co.. Ltd., 71, Queen Street, B.C. 




Established 1851. 

BIRKBECK BANK 

Southampton Buildings, Chancery Lane, W.C. 

TWO-AND-A-HALF per Cent. INTEREST allowed on 
DEPOSITS, repayable on demand. L ^ rr J ama :* . . 

TWO per Cent, on CURRENT ACCOUNTS, on the mini- 
mum monthly balances, when not drawn below £100. 

STOCKS and SHARES purchased and sold. 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT. 

For the encouragement of Thrift the Bank receives small 
sums on deposit, and allows interest at the rate of TWO-AND- 
A-HALF PER CENT, per annum on each completed £1. 

BIRKBECK BUILDING SOCIETY. 

HOW TO PURCHASE A HOUSE FOR TWO GUINEAS 
PER MONTH. 

BIRKBECK FREEHOLD LAND SOCIETY. 

HOW TO PURCHASE A PLOT OF GROUND FOR FIVE 

SHILLINGS PER MONTH. 

The BIRKBECK ALMANACK, with full partimlars, post- 
free. FRANCIS RAVEN8CROFT. Manager. 



WALTERS 




CO.'S 



IMPROVED 



LATH ROLLER BLINDS 

The most Effective 

GREENHOUSE SHADING 

yet introduced, and the cheapest in the end. 

Price on application. 
Can be had in various widths up to 15 feet, 

Sample piece sent on receipt of Is. 6d. 



» 



! 






W 



& CO 



ORCHID BASKET MANUFACTURE BS, 

BOURN HOUSE, LEYTONSTONB, LONDON, E. 






MESSENGER 





Contracts undertaken and Estimates 

given for 



WINTER GARDENS 



1 



CONSERVATORIES 



VINERIES, 

PLAN T 



HOUSES 



) 



AND 






ALL KINDSof HORTICULTURAL BUILDINGS 






Gentlemen waited upon and Surve} 

. payment of out- of -p^ 61 



made 
expenses 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGU 

With numerous Designs, post-fr© 6 * 8 # 





London 







HORTICULTURAL BUILDERS and HOT 

ENGINEERS, 








GHBOROUGH 



f 



LEICESTERSHIRE 





ce :— 163, Palmerston 




Old Broad Street, E.G. 



Editorial 



*•!■ **• iltl'l 



itionj •boaM 




W»Ud to tha.ftopr..^ by H~n. m^um '£££ ^-^^^^S^l^^ ^^^*^ "ft ft ***** St**, Oor«.t **»tfSS& 



Amnri &bqmi Mjjffnr, at Um (Mm, 




No. 448.— Vol. XVIII. { S T E H B ™ } SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1895. 



CONTENTS. 



• f • 






• • • 



• »• 



• •• 



v • • 



* • • 



^Ecidium Nynii 

Alstreemerias 

Calcutta, Royal Botanic 

Garden ... 
Cineraria, the garden 
Corridor in Mr. W. Bi 

nursery 

Dendrobium omentum 

„ Hildebrandii 

Droseras in Scotland 

Fruit, preserving ... 

Gentiana phlogifolia 

Gooseberry, a spineless ... 

Hydrangea Hortensia var. 
Lindleyi 

Jersey Potato crop, the ... 

Kyoto Industrial Exhibi- 
tion of 1895 

Nursery Notes— 
Birkenhead, W. 8l J. 

Wallace's, Dr., Col- 
chester 
Obituary — 

Babmgton, Chas. Car- 
dale ... 

Rabone, T. H. 
Odontoglossums at I 

field, Bradford ... 
Orchid notes and g 

ings 

Phylloxera laws, the 

Plants new or note- 
worthy — 

Rosa Wichuraiana 



96 
91 

96 
89 

100 
91 
93 

101 
92 

101 



*»• 



• * • 



■ •• 



• t« 



• • • 



- • • 






• • • 



92 
99 

95 

94 

94 



• ft 



• t « 



• •• 



• « • 



99 
99 

90 

90 

99 



• t . 



90 



Potato Mona's Pride 

Raspberries in Dover 
House Gardens 

Rosa setigera 

Roses at the Di 

Roses, notes upc 

Seeds, the relation be- 
tween the weight and 
growth of 

Societies— 

Beckenham Horticul- 
tural ... ... ... 

National Carnation and 

National Horticultural 

of France 
Plants under glass 
Newmarket Hort. 
Rose show at Man- 
chester 

Royal Horticultural 
Scottish Pansy and 
Viola ... 

Syringa japonica 

Tomato, Duke of York 

Turnip-fly, the 

Vegetables- 
New Peas 

Week's work, the 
Flower garden, the 
Fruits under glass 
Hardy fruit garden 
Kitchen garden, the 
Orchid- houses, the 



101 

101 
92 
98 
91 



93 



• ** 



■ • • 



• • • 



• •• 



- • « 



• • i 



t • t 



• •• 

• it 



• •• 



• • • 






tit 



tM 



104 
104 

100 

97 
103 

103 
102 

103 
92 

99 

99 

36 

96 
97 
97 
96 

97 



ILLU8TRATION8. 



• • • 



• • • 



Dendrobium cruentum .. 
Dendrobium Hildebrandii 
Campanula Vidalii 

Gooseberry a spineless 

Corridor m Mr. Bull's Nursery (Supplement). 
Rabone, portrait of the late Mr. T. H. 



• •• 

1 1 1 



• • • 






- • • 



91 
93 
95 
100, 101 

... 105 



• • . 




In 



NOTICE TO ADVER TISERS. 

consequence of the alteration of the hour of 
going to Press , consequent on the large increase 
in the circulation, %t is imperative that all Copy 
for Advertisements should he received BY 
FIRST POST THURSDAY MORNINQ 

at the latest. 



New 



tagers 1 Calendar of Garden Operations," 



post-f 



Sid. 



London* W. 



4 1 , Wellingt 



THE GARDEN.— All who desire the greatest 

ha « * mou ? t of 8UCC€89 and pleasure, certainly should, during 
-•• Ji.** i II \ - e a d *y at OANNELL'd (confirmative of this, 
■W^ u, l £ ueof the G**kma*'» Journal). At no other 
S*^i« U i Establishment can the like number of Novelties, 

Eill^!* * 0r 5 lng ' and interesting objects be seen, and so 
JS ST 11 * 1 ' M afc J Stanley and Eynsford. We cordially 

uv »te ali to Come and See. 



Vt xt JE? BeBt Frea «nt for a Gardener. 
INEs AND VINE CULTURE. 

The most complete and exhaustive Treatise on 
ttrapes and their Culture ever published . 

Third Edition just out. 

- - Price **•; post free, 5*. M. 

BAKROy, Royal Horticultural Society, Chiawiok. 

•ALMS, COR YPH AS and L ATANIAS from 



»wr«j, 10*. pc F 

pnium Cuttino 



Cash or exchange for Carnations 
Bedding Geraniums. 
)0., Merstham. Surrey. 



SUTTON'S FLOWER OF SPRING 
CABBAGE.— The finest variety in cultivation for spring 
use. Of compact habit, having few outer leaves, firm heads of 
excellent quality. Mr. J. Hounslow, Gardener to the Most 
Hon. the Marquis of Headfort, says :— •• Your Flower of 
Spring is the best Cabbage I have seen. From seed sown 
last July I commenced cutting March 28. The quality is all 
that could be desired. Ifrice of seed. 1$. oer oz.. oost free. 




SUTTON'S SEEDS GENUINE ONLY DIRECT FROM 

UTTON and SONS, THE 

SEEDSMEN, READING. 



ROYAL 



TROUBLE WHITE PRIMULAS.— Strong 

±-J plants, in 60's, 20s. per 100. Strong-rooted Cuttings, 
1 05. per 100. Cash with order. 

P. AftDERSQN, Teddington Nursery, S.W . 

EGONIAS, Double and Single, for Bedding. 

Extra superb in quality. Selected large tubers. Also for 
Conservatory and Exhibition. Descriptive CATALOGUE free. 

B. B. DAVIS, Yeovil Nurseries. Somerset. 



DOUBLE WHITE PRIMULAS. — Strong 
plants, in 60's, 25s, per 100, free on rail for cash witn 
order.— G. BENNETT. Florist. Hanwell. 



NOW is the TIME to PLANT PYRETH- 
RUMS, Gaillaraias, Delphiniums, and Herbaceous Plants. 
Catalogue of KELWAY and SON, Langport, So merset. 

PRIMULAS! PRIMULAS! PRIMULAS! 
26th year of Distribution. 
Williams* Superb Strain, Is. 6d. per dozen ; 10s. per 100. 
CINERARIAS, same price ; also DOUBLE WHITE PRIM- 
ULAS, fld. each. Package and Carriage free for Cash with 
Order.— JOHN STEVEN*. The Nurseries. Coven tr v. 



SUPERB ORCHIDS, CHEAP.— Thousands 
to select from. Write for LIST, free. 
P. Mc ARTHUR, The London IS ursery, 4, Maida Vale, London, W. 

Peaches, Nectarines. Melona. Strawberries, &e. 

JOHN NATHAN, Jun , Long Market, Oovent 
Garden, W.C., is open to receive Consignments of above. 
Best price guaranteed ; 6 °/ m Commission. Bankers references. 

TAYLOR, Fruit Salesman, Stanwix 

and New Market, Carlisle. 
TOMATOS in demand. Cash prompt. 




O FRUIT and TOMATO GROWERS 

Sales on Commission. Prompt Settlements. 
JOHN POUPART, 30. James Street, Covent Garden. W.( 




POETICUS ORNATUS.— 20,000 first size for 
forcing, true to name, direct from the grower, at 17*. 
per 1,000.— THOMAS HODSON, Bulb Grower, Wainfleet S. 
Mary, Lincolnshire. 



X)R 



ORCHIDS of every description at 

Reasonable Prices, and efficient men to cultivate them, 




apply 



W. L. LEWIS and CO., Southgate, London, N. 

PRICE LIST free. 



LOVELS' YORKSHIRE STRAWBERRIES 
Runners, strong, healthy, and well-rooted. 
Sample pacaet, post-free, Is. Descriptive LIST. 
; W. LOVEL AND SON, Strawberry Growers, Driffield. 



H 



ENRY RIDES, Salesman, 

Avenue, Covent Garden, W.C. 
Highest Market Prices. PromDt cash 



Central 



ARTISTIC PORTRAITS of FLOWERS, 
FRUITS, &c., PAINTED in OIL by a Lady-Exhibitor, 
R.A. For terms, Ac, address — 

M. S. H., Messrs. Street & Co.. 30. Cornhill. E.C. 



WANTED, 60 good, clean CUCUMBER 
PLANTS, Lockies Perfection, or other good sorts. 
Send sample and price, to be paid for, to— 
ELLIOTT AND BATTEN, Terrace N u rseries. Lancing, Sussex. 

WANTED, 100 CUCUMBER PLANTS, at 
Once. Particulars to be sent to— 
J. A. BREEZE, South View, London Road. Peterborough. 



i Regt. as a Newspaper, f PRICE 3d* 

\WITH SUPPLEMENT.! POST-FREK, 3Jd. 



MILDEW.— Will anyone (within 20 miles of 
London), having a bad attack of Mildew on Vines or Roses 
under Glaes. kindly communicate with G. H. RICHARDS, 
Old Shot Tower Wharf, Lam beth, S.E. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS.— Now is the time to 
read DROVER'S BOOK. Winners of the Highest Prize 
ever offered (vide Gardeners' Chronicle). Pronounced by 
Professionals and Amateurs the most practical work ever 
published. Post-free, Is. 2d. —Nurs eries, Fareham. 

Cabbage. 

WHEELER'S IMPERIAL 
— Earliest and Hardiest Cabbage known, having 
stood the severe winter where all others have failed. Unless 
had direct from the raiser you do not know what this variety 
is like. In sealed packets only, 6rf., 1*., and 2*. each, post-free. 
Sole Proprietor, H. J. WHEELER, F.R.H.S., Seed Grower, 
Warminster, Wilts. 



Important to Mushroom Growers, 
(^UTHBERTS SPECIALITY MUSHROOM 

\J SPAWN. Always alike; most productive. Hundreds 
of testimonials. Per bushel, 6s. 

R. axd O. CUTHBERT, Seed, Rulb, and Plant Merchants, 
Southgate. N. Esta blished 1797. 

Hyacinths, Tulips, Crocus, Lilies, &c. 

CG. VAN TU BERGEN, Jun., Haarlem, 
• Holland. Wholesale CATALOGUE now ready, and 
may be had free on application to— 

Messrs. R. SrLBERRAD and SON, 25, Savage Gardens, 
Crutched Friars. E.C. 

N.R.— Many new, rare, and interesting plants and bulbs 
wiU be found in this Catalogue. 

ARR'S AUTUMN-FLOWERING BULBS. 

—Send for full Descriptive LIST of Beautiful Autumn- 
flowering Crocuses. Colchicums (Meadow Saffrons), 
Cyclamen, SciUas, Snowflakes, &c. 

BARB'S SEEDS for present sowing, Catalogue on application. 

BARB'S DAFFODILS and SPRING- FLOWERING BULBS, 
Catalogues ready in August. 
BARR ak i> SON, 12, King street. Covent Garden, London. 

FERNS AND DECORATIVE PLANTS 
(TRADE) :— Ferns, in 2J-inch pots. Stove and Green- 
house, 30 best selling sorts, 12*. 100 ; ditto large, in 48s, 10 best 
selling sorts, 6*. do*. ; strong seedlings, 6*. 100, 50«. 1000; Adi- 
antum cuneatum, in 48's, for cutting, 6*. and 8s. doz. ; ditto, 
for making large plants quickly, Its. and 20f , 100 ; Aralias. 10j. 
100 ; Cyperua, Aralias, Grevilleas, Geraniums, in 48*a, 6s. doz. ; 
Heliotrope, Fuchsias, Double Petunias, Marguerites, Double 
Tropssolums, in bloom, in 48*s, 8*. doz. ; Ficus, Palms, Dra- 
caenas, Crassulas, Hydrangeas, Pelargoniums, 12*. doz. Lists 
free* Packed free. Cash with order.— J. SMITH, London Fern 
Nurseries, Loughborough Junction, London, S.W. 

Budding SeaBon.-New Roses. 

WM. PAUL and SON beg to offer stroi 
plants in pots, with buds of their new Roses, 
follow :— 

SYLPH (Tea), and ZEPHYR (Tea), 7*. 6d. each. 
CLIO (H.P.), DUKE of YORK (China), and LORNA DOONK, 
(Bourbon), 3*. $d. each. 

The new American and Continental Roses of 1895, 3*. 6rf. eaeh, 
36*. per dozen. 

The new English, American, and Continental Roses of 1894, 

2s. to 3*. 6d. each, 21s. to 36*. per dozen. 
Lord Penzance's Hybrid Sweet Briars, 5*. each; the set of 

nine varieties, 42*. 
Crimson Rambler. 1*. 8d. to 3*. 64. each. 

PAUL'S NURSERIES, WALTHAM CROSS. HERTS. 



as 




EESON'S MANUR 

Crushed Bones and all High-class Fertilisers, 

Genuine only f rom— 
W. H. BERSON, Carbrook Bone Mills. Sheffield 



E, 



Petroleum! Petroleum!! Petroleum!!! 

ORILLIANT ILLUM1NANT. 

Ah DREW POTTER, Melbourne Workg. Wolverhampton. 
[_ Mater to the Queen and Prin ce of Wales. 

T WEEKS & CO., Horticultural Builder. 

tf • to Her Majeety, H.B.K. the Prince of Walee. H.M. 

R^v^f nt; A £i" a &\ I)ept " War Dept.. Royal Hort. Soo! 
Royal Botamc 8oc. Parks and Public Building, Patentee, of 
the Dapl« Upright Tubular Eoilera. King's Road, ChelaeaTw 



86 



THE 



GARDENERS' 



CHRONICLE. 



[Joly 27, 1895. 



L 



SALE S by AUC TION, 

Friday Next. 

SALE of IMPORTED ORCHIDS, by Older of Mr. A. Van 

den Kogaerde. 
10 ODONTOGLOSSUM GRANDE. 860 ODONTOGL088UM 
ALEXANDRA:, the well-known broad-petalled type, and 

• 360 CATTLEYA TRIAGE, all in i ^^^X'" 

lion ; also from various sources, 75 CATTLE\ A CITRINA, 

rPRlPEDWM CAUDATVM H^SRUM W ^Wished 

ORCHID8. 40 well-grown Plants of PHAUKNOPSIS in 

variety, ORCHIDS IN FLOWER. &c. 

MESSRS. PROTIIEROE and MORRIS will 
SELL the above by AUCTION at their tooms. 67 and 68, 
Phespside. London. K.C.. on FRIDAY NEXT. August 2. at 
Half-past Twelve o'clock. 

On view morning of Sale, and Catalogues b ad. 



w 



ilimlnary Notice. 

DA YS' SALE. 



H 



The UNSOLD PORTION of the WILSON COLLECTION 

of ORCHIDS. 

MESSRS, PROTIIEROE and MORRIS have 
receive i instructions to SELL by AUCTION, at their 
Central Sale Room*. 67 and 6R. Cheapside. London, E.C.. on 
Ti'KSDAY and WEDNESDAY, August 27 and 28. 1895, 
without Reserve, the Unsold Portion of the WILSON COL- 
LECTION of ORCHIDS. 

WITHOUT RESERVE. 
The Sale contains, among others .— 
Sobralia Kienastiana (several i Lsel 

plants) 
Cattleya Schroderse alba 

Reineckiana 

Wagneri 
Odontoglossum Vuylstekea- 

num 
Cattleya Gaskelliana alba 
L»lia elegans 

„ Scottiana 
Cypripedium Morganiee Bur- 

fordiense 
Lfielis elegans Blenheimensis 
,, liluntei 

„ prasiata 

Messrs. SANDER AND CO. will offer in this Sale, WITHOUT 

hk Least R bvk, a large number of grand plants of the 

very finest ORCHIDS, including the new white M Denatu^m," 

C. BELLATULUM ALBUM, new hybrid Lalio-Cattleyas, 

a white flowered Cattleya labiata with crimson labeilum. 

L-3ELIAS, CATTLEYAS. new HYBRID SOBRALIAS. 

NEW DENDKOBES. CATTLEYA GIGAS SANDERJE. Ac. 



M 



> t 



Lycaste Skinneri alba superb* 

,, „ armeniaca 
Ctelogyne cristata alba 
Lycaste Skinneri imperator 
Dendrobium nobile Sanderia- 

num 
Odontoglossum deltoglossum 

„ coronarium 

Anderson ianum vara. 

Ruckerianum vary. 
,, anpersum 
„ mulus 
Schomburgkialepidissima, Ac. 



M 
M 



HammerswlcH House, Hammers'wlch. near Lichfield, 

STAFFORDSHIRE. 

Large and Important UNRESERVED SALE of STOVE and 
GREENHOUSE PLANTS, ORCHIDS, CHRYSANTHE- 
MUMS, ace. 

MESSRS. POPE and SONS have received 
instructions from Job Evans, Esq. (who is removing to 
Torquay), to SELL by AUCTION, without the least reserve, 
on the Premises as above, on TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY, 
July 30 and 31, commencing each day at half-past 11 o'Clock 
prompt, the whole of the STOVE and GREENHOUSE 
PLANTS, including fine specimen Lapagerias, Stephanotis, 
Maidenhair Ferns, Hoyas, Begonias, Bougainvilleas, Crotoni, 
Asparagus, 100 Camellias, 80 fine Azaleas, specimen Alia- 
mandas, Dipladenias, Ac. ; sixteen very fine specimen Palms 
and Tree Ferns, also Gloxinias, Cyclamen, Euphorbias, Poin- 
■ettias. Geraniums, Fuchsias, Aloes, Ficua, Dracaenas, Yuccas, 
Ac. ; also a very fine Collection of Orchids, 20 very fine Ceelo- 
gynes, 100 Dendrobiums, 70 Odontoglossum Alexandra ; also 
Leelias, Cattleyas, Lycastes, Cypripediums, Oncidiums, 
Vandas, &c. ; a large quantity of Garden Sundries, including 
Pots and Pans, Tools, Lawn Mowers, Marble and Iron Vases, 

An. ; two Marble Figures, 8lc. 

On view day before and mornings of Sale. 
Hammers wich House is only five minutes' walk from Ham- 
merswich Station, L. & N. W. Ry., and about 3 miles from 
Lichfield. 

Catalogues now ready, and may be had free by post from 
the Auctioneers, at their Offices, 6,Phillips Street.Birmingham. 



WANTED, to Rent a small MARKE 
GARDEN, with some Glass. North of England pr 
ferred. Moderate Incoming. 

Address, ARMITSTEAD, Winmarleigh, Garstan*. 



Framfield, near Uckfleld, Sussex. 
IMPORTANT to market gardeners, fruit, cut 

FIA>WEK, TOMATO, EARLY VEGETABLE, SALAD 
and MUSHROOM GROWERS. 



It] ESSRS 



instructed to offer for SALE BY TENDER in TWO 
LOTS, the following FREEHOLD PROPERTY : - 

Lot l.-The FRAMFIELD NURSERY, rich Meadow &c 
14a. Ir. I3p. ; nine newly-built Greenhouses, about 74 000 
superficial feet, heated by about 10,000 feet of Piping and 
Boilers; fitted with Tanks, &c; with the valuable Vines 
two Cottag *s, and numerous oiher Outbuildings. 

Lot 2.-The FREEHOLD BUILDING ESTATE divided 

iT*^ \ bypU ?iL f ?° tpat , b L and «nbrwiDR an area of 
m. 2r. 3p . having 1500 feet of building frontage to existing 

a7d f SW fld Bt th a,° ffi '? ° f ***** PKOTHEROE 
A!iD MORRIS, Auctioneers, 67 and 68 Chea^i/i- t^^ 

E.C., at Noon, on Thursday, August 8? 1895 tts^f l™' 
tieular* and Forms of Tender mafbe had of Mes2? VINpISt 
and VINCENT. Solicitors, 10, Budge ^wCan^ons^Sf? 
London, B.C., and of the Au ctioneers abov? ° 8troet ' 

TO BELET or SOLD.-A capitalNURSERY 

A with small Cottage, near London. Low rent or «m.u 
seU cheap. First-rate position. -Apply toROOT McSrr 
46, Plumstead Road, Plumatead. "OT1TT, 



POULTRY AND BEE FARMS 

ORCHARDS and NURSERIES. 



» 



THE REMAINING TEN FREEHOLD LOIb 
of the HIGH STREET FARM are FOR SALE by Private 
Contract, viz. : — 
FIVE LOTS of about f acre each, from £40 to £50. 
THREE LOTS of about 2 J acres, at £120 to £125. 
Also a beautiful SITE for a HOUSE, 4a. Or. 30p. of OLD 
TURF LAND, with COTTAGE, BARN, TIMBER. TREES, 

ftc, £450. 

All the lots are within a mile of the Market Town and 
Midland Station of Hemel Hempstead, and tome within i mile. 
Situation about 400 feet above sea level, and a good service of 
Water will very shortly be laid in the adjoining roads. 

Apply to N. W. ROBINSO N, Land Agent. Hemel Hempstead. 

To Gardeners and Others. 

FOR SALE, a Six - roomed FREEHOLD 
DWELLING-HOUSE, and Six Span-roof GLASS- 
HOUSES. All been erected within five years; splendidly 
situated, 10 minutes' walk from the G. E. Railway Station ; 
45 from London. Used as a Florist's and Fruitr growing. A 
splendid chance for new beginner. 

Particulars apply by letter, J. O'CALLAGHAN, Saalfield, 
Alexandra Park Road, Wood Green, London, N. 



FOR SALE, a small NURSERY, FLORIST, 
and JOBBING GARDENER'S BUSINESS. Five Green- 
houses, heated by Hot-water, &c. Stock and Trade. A reason- 
able offer accepted.— W. H„ Park Row Nursery, Greenwich. 

REE HOLD LAND FOR SALE : Ashford, 

Middlesex, S.W.R. ; 15 miles from London, consisting of 
about 2 acres of Orchard Land, planted with Strawberries 
underneath, in full bearing, gave a good crop this year ; a good 
Packing-shed and Storehouse, Greenhouse Baskets, Strawberry 
Boxes. &c, suitable for Nursery.— Apply for full particulars 
to D. H. ROBERTSON, 33, Mount Ararat, Richmond. 

To Nurserymen and Florists commencing business. 

HAMPTON-ON-THAMES, on The Marling 
Park Estate, free from London fogs, a deep rch 
loam, the favourite neighbourhood for Growers, FREEHOLD 
LAND for SALE, on easy system of payment. Excellent sites 
for residences.— For full particulars apply to Mr. FREDK. G. 
HUGHES (Surveyor), the Estate Office, Hampton-on-Thames. 

FOR SALE, as a Going Concern, MARKET 
NURSERY and FLORIST'S BUSINESS, on Main Lines, 
within easy reach of several of the largest Cities in the King* 
dom, 25,000 feet of Modern Glass, efficiently heated, comprising 
Vineiies, Cucumber, Tomato, Plant, and Forcing Houses; 
nearly 10 acres rich land, planted with fruit trees and other 
crops. Good water supply and dwelling-house, with necessary 
out-houses, &c. Immediate possession can be arranged. 

Addresi, N. B., Gardeners' Chronicle Office, 41, Wellington 
Street, Strand, London, W.C. 

TO LET, near Railway Station, good rioh 
LAND, suitable for Nurserymen, Fruit Growers under 
Glass, and others.— Apply by letter, H. FOURTEEN, Hertford. 



To Market Gardeners, Florists, Greengrocers, and 

OTHERS, 

TO BE LET, with immediate possession, 
within a mile of Swansea, which is a capital Market 
Town, a KITCHEN GARDEN, in good order and condition, 
and well stocked with various kinds of Fruit Trees and Crops, 
with 4 Vineries, 3 Peach-houses. 3 Forcing-houses, and 
2 Fig-houses, 10 of which are heated with water-pipes, and 
all well stocked ; also Bothy, Packing and Potting Sheds, &c. ; 
the whole being surrounded by a high Fruit-wall, and con- 
taining together two acres or thereabouts. 

For particulars, apply, Mr. T. D. LEWIS, Auctioneer and 
Valuer, 13, Heathfield Street, Swansea. 



FOR ORCHIDS and GARDENERS 
to Grow them, apply to SANDER'S, St. Albans. The finest 
stock of Orchids in the World.— 30 minutes from St. Pannr.. 




ERN 





SPECIALITY. 



Our Collection is unrivalled. Over 1400 species 
of Stove, Greenhouse, Filmy, Hardy Exotic 
For prices of these and for speciaUy cheap 
tiful variety, see our Catalogue, free on api 

W- & J. BIRKENHEAD 

FERN NURSERIES. SALE m>n» nr 



JAPAN LILY 




BULBS 



1 



PLANTS, SEEDS, <&c. 

CATALOGUE on application. 

TOKIO NUBSERIES 

Komagomi, Tokio, Japan. 
Cable Address s •• Nursebies, Tokio." 

F. TAKAGHI. Proprietor. 

ORCHID PEAT; BesToualitv rpowbj 
FIBROUS PEAT for Stow and of I ' -BROWN 

DODENDRON and AZALEA PRAT fc^"^ KH0 " 

wat lrro Z-7JL ltAr " Samples and Price* of— 
WALKER and CO. , Parnborough, Hants, 



EXHIBITIONS. 



WOKING and DISTRICT HORTICULTU- 
RAL, COTTAGE GARDENERS' and FANCIER* 
ASSOCIATION. 
SHOW of PLANTS, FRUITS. FLOWERS, & VEGETABLES 
WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY, July 31 and Aug. 1, 1395 ' 

At the Horsell Cricket Ground, Woking Station. ' 
Numeroos MONEY PRIZES offered for Competition and 
SILVER CUP for Grand Aggregate. ' 

Entries close Saturday, July 27. 

Somerset Villa, Woking. H * W « ROBERTSON, Hon. Sec, 



CARDIFF HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 
(Affiliated to the Royal Horticultural Society). 
The SEVENTH ANNUAL SHOW will be held on August 1* 
and 15. £300 in Prizes, Specials, Cups, and Medals. 
Entries close August 7. H. GILLETT, Secretary. 

MAIDENHEAD HORTICULTURAL 
SOCIETY. 
The ANNUAL SHOW of FLOWERS, FRUIT, VEGE- 
TABLES, HONEY, and POULTRY, will be held in the 
Grounds of Ives Place, on THURSDAY, August 15. Entries 

close August 8. CH4S. A. VARDY, Hon. Sec. 

WARWICK and DISTRICT CHRYSAN- 
THEMUM SHOW, November 21 and 22. 
For Schedules and particulars, apply to— 

Mr. GEORGE BURRO WS, Hon. Sec. 
Warwick School, Warwick. 

WESTON-SUPER-MARE FLOWER SHOW. 

AUGUST 15th. 



£200 IN PRIZES. 



Sohedules from the HON. SECS., 

24, West Street, Weston-Super-Mare. 



SECOND INTERNATIONAL HORTICUL- 
TURAL EXHIBITION, DRESDEN. 
From May 2 to 10, 1896. 

Under the high protection of His Majesty the King of Saxonf. 
For particulars, Schedules, &c, write to the Secretariat der 
Zweiten Internationalen Gartenbau-Ausstellung zu Dresden. 

O. LAMMERHIRT, 7, Glacisstrasse. Dresden, N, 
Die Commission : G. Krause, I. Vors. ; T. J. Seidkl, II. Vob. 




NETS— NETS.— Tanned, Oiled, Waterproof, 
for protecting Strawberry Beds, Fruit Trees, &c fr» 
Birds. Makes excellent Tennis boundaries. 

200 yards. %s. ; second quality, 5s. 
SPASHETT and CO., Net Manufacturers, Lowestoft. 



PEAT. 



EPPS 



J 




PEAT. 



Specially selected lor Orchids, and all kinds of Plants, by 
sack, cask, cubic-yard, ton, or truck-load. Rich fibrous LOAM. 
Coarse and Fine SILVER SAND, superior LEAF-MOULD. 
C. N. FIBRE REFUSE, SPHAGNUM MOSS, CHARCOAL, «• 

Special through rates to all parti. 

Tne Original Peat Depot, BINGWOOD, HANTS 

RICHARDS' NOTeFpEAT 



(Trade supplied on best terms). 

A large stock of the fineet quality ORCHID PEAT, 



Also ^ 



Store and Greenhouse Plants, Ferns, Rhododendrons, Ac. W 
the sack, cubic yard, ton, or truck-load. Can be seen m wn» 
at London Wharf. Immediate despatch by anyRailorStsainw. 
Prompt and Special Quotations for delivery to any Station. 

G. H. RICHARDS, Old Shot Tower Wharf, ^^ 
London, S.E.; Peat Grounda and Depots, Rinfwood a» 
Waraham. Address all letters to London Wharf. 



ORCHID PEAT. 



D. 



THE FINEST OBTAINABLE. 

For particulars apply to— tf * 

CAMERON, Forester's Lod^e, Mount Mascal, Bexley, &•* 

Special Terms to the Trade. 



ii 



EUREKA 



if 



WEED 



KILLER 



Safe, Effective, and Cheap 

_ _ • 



Animals 



dirtft^J 

are followed when applying this preparation. Quaranw^^ 
clear all weeds ; mixes at once ; no sediment ; leaves tne y 
bright and clean, without stains. 

„ w f g*IU 1*. %d. ; 1 gall., 3f . (tins included). « 

2-fcall. drum«, 2s, »d. p*r gall. ; *-gall. drums, 2s. M- r**& 

10-gall. drums, 2s. 3d. per gull. ; 40 gallons at 2s. V** * 

Double Strength, Mixes 1 to 60. 9 gj t 

Sample Half Gallon Tin post free for stamp** "- 

ONLY ADDBES3 : — m A Q fl 

TOML1NSON & HAYWAg 1 * 

MINT STREET CHEMICAL WORKS, LINCOLN 

*% « «* - «. Wholesale London Ajrenta:— . „.,,«+ % 

OSMAN & 



CO., 132, Commercial 

Chemist or Seedsman for this 



Street 



July 27, 1895.] 



THE GARDENERS' CHRONICLE 



87 




ROSES ON THEIR OWN 



ROOTS 



9 



FOR PRESENT PLANTING 



LAXTON 



J 




STRAWBERRIES 

INCLUDING 

THE TWO GRAND NEW and INDISPENSABLE 

VARIETIES. 



> 



WM 



PAUL 



SON respectfully invite attention to their magnificent 



Stock of the above, established in 5-inch (48-sized) pots. The Collection comprises the leading 
varieties of the Hybrid Perpetual, Tea Scented, Noisette, Bourbon, China, and Polyantha classes, 
including Crimson Rambler. 

Price, 10s. 6d. to 18s. per dozen; 75s. to 120s. per 100. 

# # * The present is a most favourable time for planting, as it allows of the plants establishing 
themselves in the ground before winter. 



MONARCH 




LEADER 



All the Best Older Varieties In strong, open- 
ground Runners or Pot Plants. 



STRAWBERRIES IN 60-POTS ARE GOOD 

Send to Head-quarters for your Supplies. 
PLANTS GROWN SPECIALLY FOR RUNNERS. 



Also a large General Stock of Hoses in pots for Greenhouse Culture, Conservatory Climbing, fyc. 



PAUL'S NURSERIES, WALTHAM CROSS, HERTS 



THE BEST & CHEAPEST FUEL for GREENHOUSE BOILERS, STOVES, & HEATING APPARATUS. 




ANTHRACITE SMOKELESS COAL. 



ROYAL SOVEREIGN 

Should be procured direct from the raisers. Price, open ground : 



Runners ... 20s. per 100 
In Pots 27s. 6d. per 100 



• • • 



• • • 



4s. per dozen. 
6b. per dozen. 



FULL DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE, GRATIS. 



LAXTO N 



BROS. 



G 



R. CARTER & SON supply their LARGE, NUT, or 

COBBLE COALS (the Nuts being about the size of a Walnut, and 
the Cobbles about the size of a man's fist), delivered by van, at any address 
within the 4 mile radius of Charing Cross ; or in truckloads, at any Railway 
Station. This Coal is absolutely smokeless, and it requires much less 
attention than any other description of fuel, burning for twelve hours at least 
without any supervision, and giving from fi?e to ten degrees more heat than 
Coke. Quotations on application to— 



1 



BEDFORD. 





GARTER 




SON, 53, 54, & 55, COAL EXCHANGE, LONDON, E.C 



WINTER-FLOWERING ZONALS 

Good plants, ready for shifting into 5 and 

6-inch pots, 4s. per dozen, 

SEEDLING PRIMULAS. 

Extra quality. All colours, mixed. 
Is. 6d. per dozen. Free for cash with order. 

H. J. JONES, 

RYECROFT NURSERY, HITHER GREEN, LEWISHAM. 




essieurs 



LINDEN 



> 



L'HORTICULTURE INTERNATIONALE, 

PARC LEOPOLD, BRUSSELS, BELGIUM 




FIKST PRIZE (unanimously) for NEW PLANTS at the International Horticultural 
Exhibition of Paris, 1895, REVENGE, on the "Match" of the International Quinquennial 
Exhibition of Ghent in 1893, Messrs. LINDEN exhibiting, each time, only their own introductions. 




The GRANDEST DISPLAY of ORCHIDS and NEW PLANTS 



Cultivation 



COMPARED WITH THEM 



" The nursery has become a model of its kind, and one in which every plant taken in hand is cultivated to perfection, is the least that can be said of 
the Orchid and new plant nursery of Brussels' 1 J. O'B— Gardeners' Chronicle, April 28, 1894, p. 528. 

MESSRS. LINDEN will be happy to quote price and size on application of anything they have in cultivation. 

AMA.TEUItS and NURSERYMEN visiting the Continent are specially invited to favour Messrs. Lindens' establishment with a call, when a 
cordial reception will be given them. English visitors will find an English welcome. 

FOR COLONISTS. — Messrs. Linden beg to announce that, notwithstanding their numerous Collectors in Foreign Parts, they are always open to 
purchase Fine Obchids from all parts of the world, and residents abroad are earnestly invited to correspond with them on the subject. 

MESSRS. LINDEN, having a large staff of experienced Packers, the utmost reliance may be placed on their skill and care, and orders may be 
safely entrusted to them from any quarter of the globe. 





Ltd., 



HORTICULTURAL PROVIDERS, 



The Original Inventors of Cheap Greenhouses, ■ w wj 

The Largest Steam Horticultural Works in the World. 



755. OLD KENT ROAD. LONDON 



J 

Inspection Invited. 



» 



S.E. 



1000 Houses in stock to Select from. 

Works cover 5 acres. 
Nurseries-Hanworth & Feltham. 






IMPORTANT. 

J£« beg to inform all readers of 
J™ Pa P«r that the Fourth Edition 
ppt^° c °P le8 > «* our Revised 

rKXCE LIST, consisting of 400 pp. 

*a<* about 1200 Illustrations, 
bound in c i othf ^ Now Ready> 

f we shaI1 have much pleasure in 
forwarding to every person one 
Post-free on application. This 
u*z ia the moat complete in the 
Ajade, and has cost several thou- 
■•M Pounds to produce. 





CONTENTS OF SECTIONS. 



Amateur Span-roof Greenhouse. 
Complete, from £3 16s. 



Rustic Summer 
Houses from £i 



i 



Span-roof Conservatory 
See No. 19 in List. 




IRON 

BUILDINGS 

of every 
description. 

Estimates 
free. 



Cooper's M Beatall." 




*. . 



• • * 



t - i 






• ■ • 



• * • 



Boxes, 2/9 each 



SECTION. 

I. — Conservatories, Greenhouses, Vineries, 
Orchid Houses, Plant and Forcing 
Houses, Frames, Pi ts,Hand-Lights,&c. 

-Poultry, Kennel, Rabbit, and Pigeon 
Appliances, &c. 

Rustic Work 

-Iron Buildings and Boon 
Furniture, &c. ... 

-Heating Apparatus, Cooking Stoves, &c. 

-Horticultural Manures, Fertilisers, In- 
secticides, Worm and Weed Destroyers, 
Sunshades, Soil 

-Lawn Mowers and Edge Cutters, Tennis 
Markers, Garden Rollers, A